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SWS: Hunger among Filipino families at highest since 2012

The survey, conducted from September 17 to 20, showed that 30.7% experienced hunger due to lack of food to eat amid the ongoing health crisis, higher than the 20.9% recorded in July......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarSep 27th, 2020

7.6 million families hungry in past 3 months, highest hunger rate since 2014 — SWS

MANILA, Philippines — Some 7.6 million Filipino households experienced involuntary hunger in the past three months, the highest hunger incidence since 2014, results of a Social Weather Stations (SWS) survey showed Sunday. Of 1,249 adult Filipinos surveyed from September 17 to 20, 30.7 percent of them said they experienced “hunger due to lack of food […] The post 7.6 million families hungry in past 3 months, highest hunger rate since 2014 — SWS appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 27th, 2020

5.2 million Pinoys suffer hunger in lockdown

At least 5.2 million Filipino families---around 20.9 percent of the population---experienced hunger once in the past three months, the highest recorded since September 2014, according to a recent survey by Social Weather Stations......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJul 22nd, 2020

Hunger cases rise to 30.7%

Some 7.6 million Filipino households experienced hunger in the past three months – a new record-high of 30.7 percent from the previous record-high of 23.8 percent in March 2012 – an independent survey released Sunday by pollster Social Weather Stations showed......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 28th, 2020

More Filipino families experiencing hunger

More Filipino families experiencing hunger.....»»

Category: newsSource:  cnnphilippinesRelated NewsSep 27th, 2020

Involuntary hunger among Filipino families climbs to 20.9% in July — survey

An estimated 5.2 million Filipino families found themselves without food to eat at least once in the past three months, new survey data suggests. .....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 21st, 2020

SWS: Number of hungry Filipino families nearly doubles due to COVID-19 blow

The poll of 4,010 working-age Filipinos showed that 16.7%—which translates to around 4.2 million nationwide—experienced hunger due to lack of food to eat at least once in the past three months......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 22nd, 2020

2.1 million Pinoy families experience hunger — survey

Some 2.1 million Filipino families experienced involuntary hunger in the fourth quarter of 2019, the Social Weather Stations said in its latest survey......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 25th, 2020

SWS: Fewer hungry Filipino families in Q3 of 2019

The number of Filipino families experiencing involuntary hunger decreased in the third quarter of 2019, a Social Weather Stations survey suggests......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 24th, 2019

Involuntary hunger measure little changed in three months to June according to SWS

INVOLUNTARY HUNGER among Filipino families in June was little-changed at 10.0% from 9.5% in March to 10.0%, according to the Social Weather Stations (SWS), stalling a downtrend in recent quarters in a result that fell within the SWS study’s margin of error......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsJul 22nd, 2019

PSA to honor Diaz as 2016 Athlete of the Year

Behind her powerful arms and legs, a young petite lady gave Philippine sports a lift it badly needed in the year just passed. Weightlifter Hidilyn Diaz gave this country of 100 million people something to cheer about at the break of dawn one rainy day in August after copping an Olympic medal that was long overdue during the 2016 Rio De Janeiro Games. A combination of hard work, effort, heart, and sheer luck paved the way for the 25-year-old pride of Zamboanga City to run away with the silver in the women’s 53-kg weight division behind eventual winner Hsu Shu-Ching of Chinese Taipei. Diaz totaled a combined 200 kgs. in both the snatch and clean and jerk to the 212 of the Taiwanese bet. An Airwoman First Class at the Philippine Air Force, Diaz was only hoping for a bronze medal finish, but ended up a surprise runner up when fancied Li Yaiun of China – who earlier set an Olympic record in the snatch - failed to complete her final two attempts in the clean and jerk. “Sabi ko thank you Lord. Bronze lang ang hinihingi ko, pero silver ang ibinigay mo,” said Diaz moments after her triumph as the first-ever Filipina to win an Olympic medal. The Cinderella finish by Diaz was the first for the country in the last 20 years since boxer Mansueto ‘Onyok’ Velasco punched his way to a similar silver medal feat during the 1996 Atlanta Olympics. Hidilyn also became the first Filipino weightlifter to win an Olympic medal for the country and the only one to bag a silver outside of boxers Velasco and the late Anthony Villanueva (1964 Tokyo Games). In the light of her outstanding feats, the Philippine Sportswriters Association (PSA) was one and unanimous in naming Diaz its 2016 Athlete of the Year during its traditional Awards Night presented by MILO and San Miguel on Feb. 13 at the LE PAVILION in Pasay City. Diaz is the first lady to be feted by the country’s oldest media organization with its highest individual honor after boxer Josie Gabuco and the Team Manila women’s softball team in 2012. “This one is a no-brainer. Hidilyn Diaz is truly the hands-down choice as the 2016 PSA Athlete of the Year,” said PSA president Riera Mallari, sports editor of The Standard. Last year, pro boxers Nonito Donaire Jr. and Donnie Nietes, along with young golfer Miguel Tabuena were the recipient of the coveted award annually handed out by the PSA, comprised by editors and sportswriters from the different broadsheets, tabloids, and online portals in the country. Diaz, who came home empty handed during both the 2008 (Beijing) and 2012 (London) Olympics, respectively, leads a long list of personalities and entities to be recognized during the formal rite co-presented by CIGNAL/HYPHER TV. In the coming days and weeks, recipients of the President’s Award, Lifetime Achievement honor, Executive of the Year, National Sports Association of the Year, Mr. Basketball, Mr. Golf, Mr. Football, and Ms. Volleyball will also be named as part of the two-hour program backed by Smart, Foton, Mighty Sports, Philippine Basketball Association, ACCEL, Gold Toe, SM Prime Holdings Inc., Globalport, Rain or Shine, ICTSI, and MVPSF. There will also be major awardees in different sports and citations to various personalities and entities in the annual rite backed by the Philippine Sports Commission, Philippine Charity Sweepstakes Office, and Federal Land. Not to be missed out is the PSA’s recognition to young promising achievers such as the Tony Siddayao Awards and the Milo Male and Female Junior Athletes of the Year, as well as posthumous awards to those dearly departed friends of the local sportswriting community.   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 19th, 2017

Number of hungry Pinoys grew by 300,000 in Q2 – SWS

MANILA, Philippines - The number of Filipino families who experienced involuntary hunger grew by 300,000 in the second quarter of the year, according to the.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 12th, 2016

Coke PH expands Balik Pinas program for repatriated OFWs

Coca-Cola Beverages Philippines, Inc. (CCBPI)—the bottling arm of Coca-Cola in the country—has expanded its Balik Pinas program to national scale to reach more repatriated overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) and help them start their own business at home. Gareth McGeown, CCBPI President and CEO. “Coca-Cola’s commitment to Filipinos has only grown stronger, in weathering this crisis together,” said Gareth McGeown, CCBPI President and CEO. “We will help and support where we can. Through Balik Pinas, our goal is to help repatriated OFWs who have lost their livelihood abroad to start anew, via owning and operating their own business and be successful here, at home, with their families.” With the help of the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE), CCBPI aims to reach more OFWs who are interested to start their own business through Balik Pinas. Data from the Department of Foreign Affairs show that as of September 2020, over 190,000 overseas Filipino workers have been repatriated. Balik Pinas gives opportunities to OFWs to be part of the Coca-Cola family as a distributor, wholesaler, or a community reseller. Balik Pinas is a journey that the company and new entrepreneurs take together at every step—from setting up the business, to sustaining it, to ensuring growth. Coca-Cola assists former OFWs in choosing a suitable business model for their area, helps in managing their cash flow and inventory, and sees to it that they are given proper guidance and training until they are fully ready and equipped to operate on their own—all in all, a sustainable and profitable business founded on practical support from a global beverage brand. According to Carlos Rivera, CCBPI Territory Sales Team in Naga City, the Balik Pinas Program started as a small-scale initiative in Naga City to help former OFWs. Just a couple of months after returning home, Carlos Manzano and his family was able to set up their business as Coca-Cola distributor through the Balik Pinas Program, which Carlos said has reshaped his life and outlook forever. IN PHOTO: Carlos and their family’s multi-cab routing unit with the Coca-Cola Naga Sales team. When the program’s pilot rollout started, the Manzanos—brothers Carlos and Jazz, and their father Lito—were among the pioneer members. Carlos and Jazz had both been working for several years in Qatar until the COVID-19 pandemic shook the trajectory of their career and, consequently, the well-being of their families. Together with their father, Lito, who also used to be an overseas worker, they set up a beverage distribution business in their hometown Naga City. Their optimism, as with any new business venture, was tempered with anxiety over how it would all turn out—especially with the considerable challenge of launching during such tenuous times until Rivera offered them membership to the Balik Pinas Program of Coca-Cola. Now, the Manzanos are running a profitable business as Coca-Cola distributors. “Even when I had to leave Qatar suddenly because of the lay-offs, I always envisioned that I would head back to work there when things settle. But with Coca-Cola’s Balik Pinas, I have a livelihood that doesn’t take me away from my family as being an OFW had,” said Carlos.  Lito can still remember his first order of 60 cases of Coke products. Now, the Manzano  family business has grown to an average of 4,000 cases a month, just five months after they started—a feat magnified for it being in the middle of a pandemic and strict quarantine measures. The Manzanos have also since invested in routing units to augment their business’s capabilities—a multicab and a tricycle. Since starting his business in 2019, Billy Belleza (left), is now one of the prominent Coca-Cola distributors in his area and has added another mini truck to serve more routes and deliveries. Billy is one of the pioneers of Coca-Cola’s Balik Pinas program. Another Balik Pinas program pioneer member is Billy Belleza who decided to return to the country after working for 20 years in Brunei. “I am really thankful that Coca-Cola reached out to me to be a part of this. They have never failed to present opportunities for me and my business to grow since I decided to take part in the Balik Pinas Program. My sales actually soared this year,” said Belleza, who is also based in Naga City. According to Rivera, Balik Pinas Program was really designed for returning OFWs like Billy, Carlos, and Jazz and their families to set up and run a viable business at home. “With their success and in light of current events, this program was expanded to operate on a national scale, so the company can lend assistance to repatriated OFWs and their families as they weather through new challenges brought on by the pandemic,” Rivera said. Coca-Cola has consistently sought to create programs to support MSMEs, more so now with the COVID-19 pandemic having disrupted countless lives and livelihoods. With programs like Balik Pinas, Coca-Cola remains firm in their commitment to help local communities, contributing to the restart of the national economy—by way of reaching out to Filipinos.  To know more about the program, you may reach Coca-Cola’s contact center at (02)-8813-COKE (2653). For SMART/PLDT users: toll-free number: 1800-1888-COKE (2653); and for GLOBE users: toll-free number: 1800-8888-COKE (2653). You may also contact 0919-160-COKE (2653) via SMS......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated News7 hr. 24 min. ago

Belmonte backs renaming of Roosevelt Ave. after FPJ

Quezon City Mayor Joy Belmonte backed on Saturday Senate President Vicente Sotto III’s suggestion to rename Roosevelt Ave. after Fernando Poe Jr. (FPJ) Ave. in honor of his contributions to the Filipino movie industry. The local government said Belmonte asked the city council to pass a resolution urging Congress to pass a measure renaming Roosevelt Avenue. Senator Lito Lapid earlier suggested to rename Del Monte Ave. after the late actor, but Sotto suggested to change Roosevelt Ave. instead because “it’s where FPJ grew up because it was their ancestral home.” For Belmonte, “it is but right and proper to honor the late Fernando Poe Junior for his invaluable contribution to the city and our culture.” “At the same time, we also recognize the historical and religious significance of the area. We are hoping this issue will be resolved judiciously,” the local chief executive said.    “The Senate President’s suggestion to rename Roosevelt Avenue after the late action king more popularly known as FPJ is a welcome development and a win-win solution for everyone concerned,” she added. “We thank the Senate President for sharing his wisdom and for providing us with a situation that is acceptable to everybody,” she added. In his 46 years as an actor, FPJ starred in around 300 action films earning him the monicker “Da King” of Philippine movies. Almost two years after his death on December 14, 2004 at age 65, FPJ was declared National Artist for film by former President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo.  But Poe’s wife, actress Susan Roces refused to accept the posthumous award during a conferment ceremony at Malacañang in June 2006.   Poe and Arroyo contested the Presidency in 2004. In 2012, President Benigno S. Aquino III issued another presidential proclamation —Proclamation No. 435 affirming FPJ’s National Artist stature......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated News22 hr. 23 min. ago

Wright dedicates performance to baby boy, OFWs

Matthew Wright (PBA Images) ANGELES CITY–Phoenix guard Matthew Wright dedicated his fiery performance against Magnolia on Friday to his son Sonny who just celebrated his first birthday. Wright waxed hot with 23 points, pouring eight of those in the Fuel Masters’ blistering 22-0 run in the fourth quarter that kindled their 91-84 comeback win over the Hotshots at the Smart 5G-powered AUF Sports Arena. The Gilas Pilipinas stalwart also collected seven rebounds, four assists and two steals in almost 46 minutes of play without a single turnover as Phoenix arrested a two-game skid to improve to 3-2.  “The first birthday is always very special and I hate to see that I cried just thinking about it. The only way I can make this better was to dedicate my performance to him,” said Wright, whose family resides in the United States.  “I’m sure he’s watching but I don’t know if he understood what I was saying (in the TV interview). But when he gets older, hopefully he’ll look back and he’ll forgive me for not being in his pictures on his first birthday,” he added. The Fil-Canadian sniper said that missing special family occasions is part of the sacrifice that the 350-man delegation has to make in order to ensure the success of the Philippine Cup bubble. “Everybody’s going through it so you just have to suck it up.” The 6-foot-3 cager said he was even reminded of the bigger undertaking that the overseas Filipino workers have to do for their families. “It’s an amazing sacrifice and it’s so hard to be away from your family. And we’re only doing it for a couple of months so we got to man up.” “I was just thinking about them today.” .....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated News22 hr. 23 min. ago

Hunger, anxiety, confusion over new SSS pension rule

Mike, a Filipino friend in his mid-'70s, emailed Oct. 16 about being locked down in London by pandemic......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 19th, 2020

Rights groups slam MMDA spox for ‘drama serye’ remark on detained activist

Human rights groups slammed Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA) Spokesperson Celine Pialago following her “drama serye” remarks at detained activist Reina Mae Nasino who recently buried her three-month-old daughter River.  Kapatid, a support group for families and friends of political prisoners, said those who downgrade what happened to the political prisoner are only trying to “cover the government’s gross violation of human rights.”  “The story of Reina Mae Nasino and her 3-month-old child who died last week is not ‘drama-serye.’ It is a real story that exposed the countless injustices committed by the government,” it said in a statement released on Sunday.  “MMDA Chair Danny Lim, a former political prisoner himself, should have long shown the door to his spokesperson. It should be obvious by now that sensitivity cannot be taught nor proper manners and right conduct if one is empty-headed,” it added. Meanwhile, National Union of People’s Lawyers (NUPL) President Edre Olalia was more restrained, saying they would “do the same thing if she was in Ina’s position and circumstance. “To start with, we will never ever wish this horrible tragedy and injustice to visit the Asec, her mother, her daughters, her sisters and her aunts,” he said in a Facebook post. Despite having nothing to do with traffic, Pialago felt the need to “use her voice as a Filipino” to share her two cents on Nasino’s case. “Hindi lahat ng inang nakakulong ay nakapunta sa libing ng kanyang anak. Kaya yung mga sumisimpatya kay Reina Mae Nasino, pag aralan niyo mabuti ang dahilan bakit siya nakulong at kilalanin niyong mabuti kung sino siya sa lipunan (Not all jailed mothers get to visit their children’s funeral. So all of those who sympathize with Reina Mae Nasino, study well why she was imprisoned and know who she is and what her role is in society),” she said in a Facebook post on Sunday morning. “Masyado ninyong ginagawang pang drama serye sa hapon ang paghihinagpis niya. Tigilan niyo (You are trying to make her grief like an afternoon drama serye. Stop it)!” she added. Nasino was five months pregnant with River when she was arrested in November 2019 for allegedly being found with firearms and explosives at the Bagong Alyansang Makabayan Manila Office in Tondo, Manila. Her lawyers have insisted that the pieces of evidence were planted and that the charges filed against her are trumped-up. She gave birth to River on July 1 at the Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Medical Hospital on July 1. She and her baby were returned to the Manila City Jail 48 hours later. Before this, she filed a motion before the Manila Regional Trial Court (RTC) to allow her to breastfeed her daughter for a year at the hospital or a prison nursery.  But Manila RTC Branch 20 Judge Marivic Balisi-Umali denied this, saying that the jail has “very limited resources” for the care of her child.  Nasino was also among 22 elderly and medically-compromised detainees who filed a motion for their compassionate release amid the pandemic on April 8 before the Supreme Court. But months later, the High Court ruled that the trial courts will be the ones to decide on their temporary release. On August 13, the activist-mother was ordered to turn her child over to her relatives.  River was admitted at the Philippine General Hospital for fever and diarrhea on September 24. She was placed in the intensive care unit on October 9 where she died a few hours later.  A few hours before her daughter died, Nasino filed a very urgent motion for furlough so she can be with her child in her dying moments. On October 13, Manila RTC Branch 47 Judge Paulino Gallegos granted her three full days from October 14 to 16 to be by her daughter’s side during the wake and burial.  But the next day, he cut Nasino’ furlough down to only six hours from 1 to 4 p.m. on October 14 and 16 after receiving opposition from the Manila City Jail. The Manila City Jail cited lack of personnel, health concerns, and a guideline stating that detainees can only be at their loved ones’ burial and wake for a maximum of three hours. For both the wake and the funeral, Nasino was clad in a full set of personal protective equipment, handcuffed, and flanked by numerous uniformed personnel.  Tensions rose during the wake after her escorts tried to pull her away twice before her time was up, eventually escorting her out with 20 minutes to spare before 4 p.m. On October 16, Marites Asis, Nasino’s mother, had to kneel and beg in front of the police to allow them to hold funeral at 11:30 a.m. The cops wanted to delay it until 1 p.m. Police also sped off with River’s hearse to the Manila North Cemetery, leaving her family behind and thwarting activists’ plan to conduct a caravan around the Supreme Court and the Court of Appeals before burying her at the cemetery. Nasino’s counsels at NUPL earlier said that they will file charges against those involved in the activist’s treatment during her daughter’s wake and burial. .....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 18th, 2020

Literary Fiesta

Filipino dining in Philippine literature Pahiyas festival, illustration by Manuel Baldemor It’s not Pinoy dining if it’s not a feast. And our Philippine literature has told many stories that illustrate our healthy appetite, traditional palayok (clay pot) cooking, siesta, fiesta, flavors, and fusions.  Doña Victorina fans herself amid the smoke of a roasting pig. Her guests are coming, their noses up in the air sniffing the flavors. On the table, adorned with gilded copa de vino (wine glass) and plato, are sinigang na dalag with alibambang leaves, callos, adobo, tinola, and pochero. Everybody was in high spirits. Never mind if the doña is broke (to begin with). At least her guests are full. Jose Rizal drew a perfect picture of the Pinoy fiesta and salu-salo (gathering) culture. Our national hero himself loves to eat. He prefers a hefty serving of champorado and tuyo for breakfast. For dessert, he likes minatamis na santol (sweetened santol) made from boiled santol slices soaked for three days in hugas bigas (water used to wash rice). Before starving in Europe, where he published El Filibusterismo, Rizal would feast in carneng asada (beefsteak with sauce), made from lean meat marinated in olive oil, lime juice, and parsley and served with fried potatoes. Gabriela Silang loved pinakbet. Emilio Aguinaldo listed sardines with tomatoes among his favorites. Marcelo H. del Pilar would die (pun intended) for his apparent favorite, pochero, the local version of the Spanish cocido. Andres Bonifacio got his strength and protein source in nilitsong manok sa zaha (grilled chicken wrapped in sampaloc and banana leaves). The Filipino salu-salo Never mind if some of our celebrated dishes are not “purely” Pinoy. “What is Filipino food and how does food become Filipino?” asks the late food critic Doreen Fernandez. She argued that food only became Pinoy by process of indigenization, like patis (fish sauce) put in a foreign dish. And this is how Pinoy fusion came to life. What we have on our modern plates are many fusions, crazy or ingenious, like paella with lechon, sinigang na steak, adobong tapa, pancit with kangkong. Yes, you get the picture.  Could their favorite Filipino flavors be the reason behind the intelligence and nationalism of our heroes Rizal and Bonifacio? Too bad, many young Pinoys nowadays barely know what minatamis na santol is, or any Pinoy traditional merienda for that matter. What replaced maruya, nilagang kamote, turon, kutsinta, and ginataang mais are French fries, burger, pizza, and pasta. You know what they say: You are what you eat.   In another table setting, Padre Damaso looks across the dining table. Everybody’s enjoying tinola, a stew of chicken and green papaya, but not him. Who wants chicken neck for lunch? He didn’t finish his plate. And this, people, was how the concepts of degustation and small plates were born. They’re not, after all, a French discovery or New York’s. We can blame our mañaña habit. We’re too slow to grab the credit. And oh, we are pioneers of the culture of not finishing plates, too. Blame these all to Padre Damaso (or Jose Rizal?). The tinola brouhaha scene in Noli Me Tangere started it all.  Lechon haus mural by boonsai While it’s rude in other cultures not to devour all the food served on the plate, in the Philippines, it’s not. Pinoy eating tradition tells you it’s okay to have leftovers. Telenovela , movies, and literature are great examples. When a family fights over the dining table, the father (or any member) walks away with an unfinished plate. In Ibong Adarna, over a scrumptious dinner, the brothers were all too busy planning how to catch the elusive bird that they forgot to finish their plate.       Besides books, paintings also tell our delicious food experience. Fernando Amorsolo captured Pinoy eating habits in his painting Afternoon Meal of the Rice Workers. It shows Pinoy families cooking meals in a palayok and eating under the shade of a tree, seemingly ready to sleep after an afternoon feast. With all the food trends coming and going on our plates and literature pages flying off to oblivion, what remains steadfast in our eating habit is this: Siesta. –NICKKY FAUSTINE P. DE GUZMAN.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 18th, 2020

Memorial lot investments yield good ROI – Golden Haven

Investing in a memorial lot offers higher yield, according to the top executive of Golden Haven Memorial Park. Red Rosales, chief operating officer of the country’s first integrated memorial parks, reported of the huge price valuation of Golden Haven lot owners. Investing in Golden Haven lots now will grant you high returns in the future. When its Golden Haven Memorial Park, Las Pinas first opened in 1984, memorial lots cost only P5,000. “Today that value has gone up to P378,000, showing an impressive 2,240 percent increase or 67 percent increase per annum,” said Rosales. Golden Haven Memorial Park in Las Piñas, a 15-hectare property that features elements of Spanish architecture and a beautiful Butterfly Garden for people of all ages to enjoy. When the park first opened in 1984, memorial lots at this location cost P5,000. The Villar Group owned Golden Haven has also other memorial park investments in other locations. The Golden Haven Cebu, the most beautiful memorial park in the country inspired by Italian design, costs only P25,000 per plot in 2005. Today, a lot at Golden Haven Cebu costs P232,000, an increase of over 828 percent in value or a 46 percent increase per annum. This mountaintop sanctuary maximizes the enchanting surroundings with its various amenities such as the Pope John Paull II Memorial Hill, the Garden Plaze, the Imperial Gardens, among others. Still another choice place is the Golden Haven Memorial Park in Cagayan de Oro which is known for its majestic replica of the famed Christ the Redeemer statue at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In 2007, memorial plots at this beautiful location cost P33,000. Today, those plots now cost P89,000, boasting a 170 percent increase in value.  Under normal circumstances, Rosales said that investing in a memorial lot might be the last thing on many people’s minds. After all, the pursuit of leisure and other mundane affairs often take precedence over matters like a final resting place—for themselves or for those they love.          However, Rosales said that realizing how fragile and unpredictable life is may motivate people into making smart decisions now such as investing in a memorial lot at any of Golden Haven’s premier locations. Families go to Golden Haven Memorial Parks not just to visit those long gone but also to forge new happy memories together. “Because there is no telling what lies ahead for all of us, now is actually the best time to invest in a beautiful final resting place that befits the wonderful memories we shall leave behind. In this regard, there is no better choice than a prime lot at any of Golden Haven Memorial Park’s many locations across the country,” he said.  But people do not just buy a memorial lot, they now choose parks that are strategically located, beautifully designed, and high potential for growth.    According to Rosalies, families go to Golden Haven Memorial Parks not just to visit those long gone but also to forge new happy memories together. “Golden Haven inspires this through its elegant architecture that complement the park’s picturesque naturescapes,” said Rosales.  Golden Haven has more going for it than its beautiful parks and tranquil settings that honor the dearly departed. As with any piece of real estate, memorial lots at Golden Haven increase in value over time. “With an annual appreciation of 20 percent, investing in Golden Haven lots now will grant you high returns in the immediate future,” he said. The pandemic also presents opportunities for clever investors—both seasoned and beginners—to purchase properties while price increases have been temporarily halted. He said that many developers are now offering incredibly flexible terms and even substantial discounts to prospective property seekers. They can come in at a low cost—with no risks involved—but with a proven high return on their investments. “Nowhere is this more evident than at Golden Haven, one of the most trusted names in the deathcare industry,” he said. As it works towards having a memorial park in every Filipino’s hometown, Golden Haven now boasts of thirty beautiful and enticing sites across the country, offering memorial lots that make perfect low-risk and safe investments. For the numbers do not lie when it comes to Golden Haven. Rather, they tell a story of continuous growth. Golden Haven is a subsidiary of publicly listed Golden Bria Holdings Inc., currently positioned as the third largest real estate company in the country in terms of market capitalization valued at more than P200 billion......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 18th, 2020

Survey shows PH one of highest in SEA online piracy

A new study of the online content viewing behaviour of Filipino consumers, has found that 49% access streaming piracy websites or torrent sites......»»

Category: techSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 17th, 2020

Delos Santos hits summit

Filipino James delos Santos is now the highest ranked karateka in the male seniors division online rankings......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 16th, 2020