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Some SEA Games events postponed

Some SEA Games events postponed.....»»

Category: newsSource: cnnphilippines cnnphilippinesDec 3rd, 2019

Eduard Folayang, Geje Eustaquio, other ONE Championship athletes take part in action-packed ‘CUC challenge’

With the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic thats affecting the entire world, there isn’t a lot of action going on in terms of the sporting world. Games, matches, events, and bouts have either been postponed or cancelled, leaving athletes wondering when they’ll be able to do what they do best again. For now, many have kept themselves occupied with family time while also continuing to improve themselves by working out and training, even at home. Others have also managed to keep themselves entertained through various activities and social media challenges. Take these ONE Championship athletes, for example. While it may be a while before they can once again deliver their brand of action inside the circle, they brought the action to social media through their rendition of the #CUCchallenge. ONE stars like Eduard Folayang, Geje Eustaquio, Demetrious Johnson, Martin Nguyen, Aung La N Sang and many others showcased their hardest hits in an explosively entertaining video. The #CUCchallenge originated from students of the Campus Univers Cascades, a stunt school in France. The students basically made a supercut of themselves taking hits and giving hits, virtually of course, to fight COVID-19.  Here’s the original #CUCchallenge video:.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 1st, 2020

Olympics beckons for Pinay LPGA campaigner

The US-based shotmaker, a double gold medallist in last year’s SEA Games, was all set for her rookie stint in the LPGA Tour in the Lotte Championship in Hawaii this month but was postponed, along with a number of events, in the face of the continued impact of the global virus......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 30th, 2020

40 years later, vote to skip Moscow Games still horrible

By EDDIE PELLS AP National Writer DENVER (AP) — By the time the news filtered to him, Edwin Moses had already left a promising engineering job to focus on a full-time career on the track. He was lucky. He already had an Olympic gold medal hanging on his wall. Hundreds of other American athletes would never get their chance. They were part of the 1980 U.S. Olympic team — the team that never made it to the Moscow Games after President Jimmy Carter spearheaded a now-infamous first-of-its-kind decision to boycott the Olympics. The full board of the U.S. Olympic Committee rubber-stamped Carter's decision 40 years ago Sunday — April 12, 1980. “I'd walked away from my career to get ready for the 1980 Olympics, and all was moot,” Moses told The Associated Press by phone. “So, it was horrible. For me, and for everyone.” Moses said by the time the USOC's unwieldy delegation of nearly 2,400 people met at the Antlers Hotel in Colorado Springs, Colorado, on a Saturday morning in April, with Vice President Walter Mondale in attendance, it was all but a done deal that the U.S. team would not be traveling to Moscow. Carter had begun the push in late 1979, with the Soviet Union pressing a military campaign into Afghanistan. In his 2010 memoir, Carter called it “one of my most difficult decisions.” Maybe more telling, as former USOC spokesman Mike Moran wrote in a recap of the events leading to the boycott, was an exchange the late 1984 Olympic champion wrestler Jeff Blatnick had with Carter on a plane many years later. “I go, ‘President Carter, I have met you before, I am an Olympian,'” Moran said in his retelling of Blatnick's story. “He looks at me and says, ‘Were you on the 1980 hockey team?’ I say, ‘No sir, I’m a wrestler, on the summer team.’ He says, ‘Oh, that was a bad decision, I’m sorry.’” Forty years later, there is virtually no debate about that conclusion. And the lingering irony of this year's games postponed by a year because of the coronavirus pandemic isn't lost on Moses. “As an athlete, you lose one of your cat's nine lives,” he said. There will be a handful of could've-been 2020 Olympians who will not make it to 2021, because of age, injury or a changed qualifying procedure. Of the 466 U.S. athletes who had qualified for Moscow in 1980, 219 would never get to another Olympics, Moran wrote. Most of those who did would compete in 1984 against a less-than-full field. The Soviets and a number of Eastern Bloc countries boycotted the Los Angeles Games in a tit-for-tat retribution to the U.S. move four years earlier. Moses romped to a victory at the LA Coliseum in 1984, and he almost certainly would've won had the Soviets been there, too. He was the world-record holder and in the middle of a string of 107 straight victories in finals at 400 meters. If there was any silver lining to the 1980 boycott, Moses believes it was the recalibration of the Olympic model. During the years of the Moscow and Los Angeles boycotts and massive red ink from Montreal in 1976, the forces that had compelled Moses to quit his job — a profession unrelated to track and field — to retain his amateur status as an Olympian were exposed as unfair and unrealistic. The 1984 Games marked the beginning of the Olympics as a money-making venture and the beginning of the end of the strict rules regarding amateurism that put many Americans at a distinct disadvantage. All good for those who were able to take advantage of it. Many from that 1980 team, however, saw their Olympic careers shuttered without ever competing on the biggest stage. “Nothing was ever done to celebrate the team, and a lot of those members aren't around anymore,” Moses said. “We made the ultimate sacrifice in a sports world that no one was asked to do — and it was completely involuntary.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 12th, 2020

BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 1

Pingoy Rule: Never give up. --- Jerie Pingoy is not a disappointment. He is disappointed in himself, no doubt about that, but he is not a disappointment. Not just yet - so he says. "'Di ako susuko na makapag-PBA. I still want to prove to everyone na kaya ko pang makipagsabayan," he said, full of confidence, in a phone interview. "Kasi nakikita ko pa sa sarili kong kaya ko pa eh - as in, kaya ko pa. Sana, sana mabigyan ako ng chance to prove na I'm still worthy." Many dream of playing in the PBA, but only a few get to do so. Even fewer get to do so after going missing in action for more than a year. The last time we saw the 5-foot-9 point guard, he and Adamson University were at the wrong end of the University of the Philippines' breakthrough in 2018. No, that's not right. The last time we actually saw Pingoy was in the now-suspended 2020 PBA D-League Aspirants Cup where he played two games with Karate Kid-Centro Escolar University. "Sa ngayon, I'm trying to come back. Since bata ako, gusto ko mag-PBA, pero sa ngayon, sa nakikita ko sa sarili ko, kailangan ko magdoble-kayod para dun," he said. "Ang hirap pa ngayon, nawala ako ng (higit isang) taon kaya mas lalong dapat ipakita kong worthy akong mapunta dun." In between his last game as a Soaring Falcon and his first one with the Scorpions, indeed, it seemed as if the 25-year-old just went off the grid - something that would have been thought to be impossible years ago when he was still the toast of high school basketball and a hoped-for contributor in collegiate hoops. GOOD OLD DAYS "One of the best players I've ever seen. He was the complete package," Mike Oliver, Pingoy's head coach at Far Eastern University-Diliman, answered when asked to look back at his former ward. Oliver would be one of the few people who would have a good grasp of the top talents at the high school level as he was a champion coach there as well as mentor of Batang Gilas. "It was a transition from Coach Norman [Black] to Coach Bo [Perasol] and we were trying to rebuild the program. He was one of the first recruits talaga that Coach Bo wanted," Kiefer Ravena, Pingoy's teammate in Ateneo de Manila University, answered when asked to recall one of the prized prospects he helped recruit. Ravena would be one of the people who would know a thing or two about the Blue Eagles' recruitment plans in the early '10s as, of course, playing with him would have been one of the reasons why a player would want to wear blue and white. "We're just scratching the surface of what he can do right now. If he will just follow what we're trying to teach him, he will be a better all-around player," Franz Pumaren, shot-caller at Adamson University where Pingoy transferred to, said right after one of the better games he had in college. Pumaren would be one of the few people who would have the power to make somebody believe that his system leads to wins and championships - and the power to judge the potential of a player. NEW YEAR, NEW ME After two years in Adamson, though, Pingoy decided against playing his fifth and final playing year in the UAAP and decided to instead nurse his troublesome left foot back to full strength. Along with that, for the good of his mind, he decided to stay away from all the noise. And so, for more than a year, not much was heard from Pingoy nor did he hear anything from anyone. That was until Karate Kid-CEU came calling by getting him in the 2020 PBA D-League Draft. With his up-and-down collegiate career a thing of the past, Pingoy was nothing but grateful for yet another shot. "I'm so thakful sa CEU kasi sobrang inaalagaan nila ako. Sina Coach Jeff [Napa] pati mga boss dun, tinutulungan talaga nila akong mabalik yung career ko," he said. So much was he grateful that he wasted no time in returning their trust in him. In fact, in just a month, he was able to shed off excess fat - something he has been known to be unable to get away from in his last years in college - and shape up. "After practices, may workout pa ako and dahil dun, from 250 lbs., naging 211 lbs. na lang ako nung may D-League pa. Ngayon, tuloy-tuloy pa rin and 197 lbs. na lang ako," he was glad to report. He also added, "Kailangan nasa 170 lbs. Sana makuha." HERE WE GO AGAIN Just when it looked like all was finally coming together for Pingoy, however, COVID-19 turned into a pandemic and forced the D-League, as well as all other sporting events, to be postponed. And with the crisis continuing, it is yet to be determined when the developmental league would resume - or if it would even resume considering that all but one of its 11 participating teams are college-based. This is just the latest challenge in a young career that has already been through several starts and stops. Start with back-to-back UAAP Jrs. MVPs as well as a championship in FEU-Diliman. Stop with brand new residency rules from high school to college. Start with the starting point guard position in your first game in Ateneo. Stop with a logjam of point guards and then academic deficiencies. Start with a long-awaited breakout as a two-way player for Adamson. Stop with a foot injury that failed to fully heal. Start with Karate Kid-CEU taking a chance on you. Stop with COVID-19 shutting down anything and everything. Still, Pingoy chooses to see the silver linings. "I think it's God's plan. Hindi yung virus ha," he shared with a laugh. He then continued, "For me, sinasabing bago ka maglaro ulit, kailangang fit na fit ka. Dapat, 'di na ganun kataba. Dapat, ipakita sa CEU na kahit walang training, ready pa rin." For sure, his future is yet to be written - and only his hand is holding the pen. Still, it could not be argued that after all those starts and stops, the very first one remains to have left the biggest mark. NEXT ON BEST-OF-5 SERIES: THE PINGOY RULES: "Nasasayangan ako sa years na 'di ako nakapaglaro. Kung nakapaglaro ako nung mga yun, mag-iiba yung takbo ng panahon." --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 8th, 2020

Virtual sports rising

“Real” action in the National Basketball Association has been on a standstill since March 12 following the suspension of the games due to the global COVID-19 pandemic. So has the other sporting events around the globe been postponed or canceled. The Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA), the female counterpart of the NBA, recently announced the […] The post Virtual sports rising appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsApr 6th, 2020

Hidilyn Diaz vows to remain focused and determined on Olympic qualification

The current COVID-19 pandemic has no doubt left its mark on the globe, and one of the most affected by it is the sporting world.  The NBA, collegiate sporting tournaments, football tournaments, and major events across all sports have either been cancelled or postponed. The same fate could befall the upcoming 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, Japan, even though the quadrilennial multi-sport event won't begin until July. Obviously, the delays in preparation brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic will affect the Summer Games greatly.  So far, only four Filipinos have already qualified for the Summer Olympics: gymnast Carlos Yulo, pole-vaulter EJ Obiena, and boxers Eumir Marcial and Irish Magno.  One Filipina Olympic hopeful is none other than 2016 Rio silver medalist weightlifter Hidilyn Diaz, who is on track to qualify, but the current suspensions and postponements have delayed her quest for a ticket to Tokyo 2020.  Diaz took to Instagram to address the situation.          View this post on Instagram                   There are things we can’t control and we can’t do anything, the effects of N-Covid19 is something unimaginable. Most of my Olympic Qualification events are postponed or cancelled, travel ban, city lockdown and country lockdown. Panic, fears and frustration is controlling us right now. I was supposed to have my flight today going to Colombia to compete at the Ibero-America Open Championships 2020 for my final Olympic Qualifying competition but we didn’t push through because of travel ban in Colombia. As an athlete we don’t stop when we fail once, even twice, the most important thing is we do our best and at the end of the day we won’t regret anything. I will remain focus and determine to improve every single day together with #TeamHD who prepared me and sacrificed a lot to represent God and Philippines well in Olympics. So far the best snatch technique I have in competitions is captured by @one_kilo_ this was in Roma World Cup 2020 in Roma, Italy. Speaking of Italy, mio amico and mia amica take care always, be strong you are in my prayers, in my thoughts and worries. To my friends, family, supporters, fans, church mate, kabaro at buddy sa Airforce at co-athletes, please take care, wash your hands and social distancing. To frontliners Salamat po sa Serbisyong binigay niyo po. Kuidaw ustedes pirmi! #LabanPilipinas #LabanHidilyn #TeamHD #tokyo2020 #olympicweightlifting @phil.sportscommission @mvpsportsfoundation @phoenixfuels A post shared by Hidilyn Diaz OLY (@hidilyndiaz) on Mar 16, 2020 at 7:00pm PDT Diaz revealed that she was supposed to be flying out to Colombia for her final Olympic Qualifying competition, but a travel ban has forced her to not push through. She also shared a message to the people of Italy, one of countries hardest hit by the COVID-19 virus.  "Speaking of Italy, mio amico and mia amica take care always, be strong you are in my prayers, in my thoughts and worries," Diaz wrote.  She concluded by giving a message to her family, friends, and fans, and gave thanks to the workers in the frontlines.  "To my friends, family, supporters, fans, church mate, kabaro at buddy sa Airforce at co-athletes, please take care, wash your hands and social distancing. To frontliners Salamat po sa Serbisyong binigay niyo po. Kuidaw ustedes pirmi!".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 17th, 2020

No fans, no work: Arena workers caught in sports shutdown

By TIM REYNOLDS AP Basketball Writer MIAMI (AP) — David Edelman can usually be found at a Denver Nuggets basketball game or a Colorado Rapids soccer game. As an usher, he interacts with fans in a role he calls a staple of his life. But there are no Nuggets games for at least a month. No Rapids games, either. And Edelman has no idea what he’ll do now. “This is what I do for a living,” Edelman said earlier this week, as the realization hit that sports were going on hiatus because of the coronavirus. “This is my income.” Thousands of workers would have staffed the 450 NBA and NHL games that will not be played over the next month in response to the pandemic. And then there are the more than 300 spring training and regular-season baseball games, 130 NCAA Division I men’s and women’s tournament games, 50 or so Major League Soccer matches, all international golf and tennis tournaments, and who-knows-how-many high school, small college and other entertainment events canceled or postponed because of the global health crisis. The total economic impact of the loss of sports and other events because of the pandemic — assuming only a month shutdown — is impossible to calculate but will reach the billions, easily. Tickets aren’t being sold, so teams and leagues and organizing bodies lose money. Fans aren’t going to events that aren’t happening, so taxi drivers and ride-share operators have no one to ferry to and from those places. Hotel rooms will be empty. Beers and hot dogs aren’t being sold, so concessionaires and vendors lose money. Wait staff and bartenders aren’t getting tips. Without those tips, their babysitters aren’t getting paid. The trickle-down effect sprawls in countless directions. Some teams are trying to help. Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban, within minutes of the NBA shutdown announcement, said he wanted to find a way to help workers who will lose money because games won’t be played. By Friday, he had his plan: “We will pay them as if the games happened,” he told The Associated Press in an email. Other teams, including the Cleveland Cavaliers, have made similar commitments to workers at not just NBA events but also the building’s minor-league hockey games. The Miami Heat, Toronto Raptors, Washington Wizards, Golden State Warriors and Atlanta Hawks were among the earliest NBA franchises to reveal they’re working on how they’ll take care of arena staffs. So have the NHL’s Washington Capitals, among others, and the ownership group for Detroit's Pistons, Red Wings and Tigers on Friday said they were setting up a $1 million fund “to cover one month's wages for our part-time staff for games, concerts and events that they would have otherwise worked." “Our teams, our cities and the leagues in which we operate are a family, and we are committed to looking out for one another,” New Jersey Devils owner Josh Harris said. There were many more significant gifts revealed later Friday. Zion Williamson of the New Orleans Pelicans said he would “cover the salaries” for workers at the team’s arena for the next 30 days. Blake Griffin of the Detroit Pistons pledged $100,000 for workers there, the San Jose Sharks said part-time arena workers would get paid for all games not played and Florida Panthers goalie Sergei Bobrovsky said he was giving $100,000 to workers in that club’s arena -- a donation matched by his teammates and followed by another pledge from the team’s ownership group. “This is a small way for me to express my support and appreciation for these wonderful people who have been so great to me and my teammates and hopefully we can all join together to relieve some of the stress and hardship caused by this national health crisis,” Williamson wrote on Instagram. At Chicago Blackhawks hockey games alone, about 1,500 workers are in or outside the building on event nights: guest services, concessions, parking, security, box office and so on. “The per game payroll is more than $250,000,” said Courtney Greve Hack, a spokeswoman for the United Center. If that’s the NHL norm — no official numbers are available — then workers around the league would stand to lose more than $60 million if hockey does not return this season. “I get it,” said Chris Lee, who owns a coffee and smoothies franchise in Arizona that draws 70% of its annual revenue sales at spring training and Arizona Coyotes hockey games. “But this is going to be really tough.” Lee was packing up cups that won’t be used when baseball announced Thursday that spring training was ending about two weeks early. He and his staff — one full-timer, 14 part-time employees — aren’t sure what comes next. The enormity of the numbers stacks up quickly. The group that owns the Raptors and other pro sports clubs in Toronto, Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment, says it's trying to help 4,000 workers in that city. Extrapolate that across other Canadian and U.S. pro sports cities, and those teams could be looking at 100,000 workers feeling some sort of pinch — not counting the impact at college and other levels. Cavaliers star Kevin Love pledged $100,000 to help the workers in Cleveland address what he described as their “sudden life shift.” On Friday, reigning NBA MVP Giannis Antetokounmpo of the Milwaukee Bucks made a $100,000 pledge on behalf of his family “It’s bigger than basketball! And during this tough time I want to help the people that make my life, my family’s lives and my teammates lives easier," Antetokounmpo wrote on Twitter. The NCAA men’s Division I tournament generates about $900 million annually through television and marketing rights alone. In Albany, New York, which was scheduled to host men’s tournament games for the first time in 17 years, organizers estimated the economic loss from the three-day event to be about $3 million. Bars and restaurants bought tons of additional stock and perishables to prep for crowds that won't arrive. It’ll probably take a few years before the NCAA can bring the tournament back to many of the cities slated to host games next week. “It’s incredibly disheartening. There’s no question about that,” said Mark Bardack, president of public relations and management firm Ed Lewi and Associates, which had worked for more than a year on the planning of the tournament in Albany. “To have it all disappear, though obviously no one’s fault.” Some arena workers, many not wanting to be identified because of workplace policies about speaking to reporters, said they are living paycheck-to-paycheck. They’re not alone, of course: A study last fall by the American Payroll Association said 74% of workers in the U.S. would “experience financial difficulty” if their usual payday was delayed by as little as one week. In Philadelphia, Rodney Thompson works on commission selling popcorn and beer at 76ers basketball games, Flyers hockey games and Phillies baseball games. They’re all on hold. "The more I sell, the more I make,” the 56-year-old said. “The less I sell, the less I make. It would hurt me, financially. I would have no income coming in. ... I make pretty good money. But if there's no fans, there's no work.” ___ AP Hockey Writer Stephen Whyno in Washington, AP Sports Writers Tom Withers in Cleveland, David Brandt in Scottsdale, Arizona, Josh Dubow in San Francisco, Stephen Hawkins in Dallas and Dan Gelston in Philadelphia, and Associated Press Writers Matthew Carlson and Tim Cronin in Chicago contributed to this report. ___ The Associated Press receives support for health and science coverage from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 14th, 2020

Scrubbed: March Madness leads long list of canceled sports

By EDDIE PELLS AP National Writer The world's sports schedule cratered at warp speed Thursday, with one of the biggest events on the U.S. calendar, the fun-filled and colorful college basketball tournament known as March Madness, becoming the first mega-event to be scrubbed due to fear of the spread of the coronavirus. Leaders at all levels of sports, including the NCAA, NBA, NHL, Major League Baseball, tennis and soccer, decided the risk of playing games with the threat of the virus hanging over them was too great despite the billions of dollars — to say nothing of the trophies, pride and once-in-a-lifetime experiences — hanging in the balance. By late in the afternoon of an extraordinary, headline-a-minute day across a pandemic-rattled globe, the NCAA, which regulates March Madness and virtually all major U.S. college sports, basically had no choice. With conferences and individual teams calling off their basketball seasons at breakneck pace, the NCAA followed suit. They scrapped all college winter and spring championships, the highlight of which is the men's basketball tournament — a three-week extravaganza that stands as the biggest event this side of the Super Bowl on the U.S. sports calendar. The cancellation leaves a massive hole in American sports — from campuses across the country, to a growing passel of sports-betting businesses that rely on college hoops money, to say nothing of the hearts of players who were poised to get their first, or last, or only chance to shine on the big stage. All of it was to be covered by CBS and its partners; about 80 percent of the NCAA's $1.05 billion annual budget is bankrolled by the money the networks pay to present the 68-team tournament over the air, on cable and online. “This is bigger than a sport or championship,” said Kansas University coach Bill Self, whose team would've been the likely favorite to win it all. Hours earlier, Kansas and Duke had each taken matters into their own hands, announcing they wouldn't be sending any of their teams to games, no matter the stakes. It wasn't even the most jaw-dropping moment of the morning. That came, fittingly, at one of the world's most renowned sports venues — Madison Square Garden — where at halftime of a Big East Conference tournament game, the PA announcer came on and said the tournament had been called. By then, every major conference, and virtually all of the minor ones, had done the same thing. They were prompted in part by the NCAA's decision a day earlier to hold all its tournament games — which had been scheduled to start next week in nine cities and close April 6 at a 71,000-seat stadium in Atlanta — in front of friends and family and limited “essential” personnel. Only 24 hours later, with the stock market tanking, mixed messages coming out of Washington and no promise of quick relief being offered by world health experts, it became even more clear that gatherings involving thousands of people were hard to justify. Also clear: The NCAA would have trouble assembling an equitable bracket for its tournament, given that most games designed to suss out the most-deserving teams and automatic qualifiers had already been scrubbed. “I’m not a researcher in immunology or infectious disease, but those who are engaged at the NCAA level provided some stark information yesterday,” said Greg Sankey, the commissioner of the Southeastern Conference. The March Madness news meant it will be a world free of basketball for the foreseeable future. A day after the NBA put its season on temporary hiatus, a second member of the Utah Jazz — Donovan Mitchell — tested positive for the coronavirus. The league said its suspension would last for at least 30 days — possibly a conservative guess, as teams undertake the task of identifying any player or referee who has had recent contact with the Jazz, then putting them into isolation for the required two weeks. “What would kill the NBA season is if more players catch it,” Mavericks owner Mark Cuban said in an interview on CNBC. He called the hiatus a matter of “us being vigilant, as all businesses should be. Businesses are going to have to be incredibly vigilant, and that's hard.” The NHL also suspended its season, though it did not report any positives for COVID-19. Major League Baseball scrapped spring training and postponed the start of its season, currently scheduled for March 26, for at least two weeks. Before the start of one of the biggest golf tournaments on the calendar, the PGA Tour announced that the last three rounds of The Players Championship, best known for the rowdy gatherings around the island green on the 17th hole, would be played without fans. The same goes for the three events that follow, all of which lead into the Masters, which was, for the time being, slated to go on as scheduled the week of April 6. The LPGA postponed three tournaments, beginning next week, including its first major of the season. Tennis will also be canceling events. The ATP called off men's tournaments for the next six weeks; the WTA said its tournament in South Carolina, set for April 6-12, would not be held as scheduled, with decisions about the rest of the season to come in the next week. NASCAR announced it would race the next two weekends, in Atlanta and Miami, without fans, and IndyCar made the same decision for its race this weekend in St. Petersburg, Florida. Horse races were going on in several states, though without fans in the stands — leaving the parimutuel wagers to be made online; organizers of the Kentucky Derby were moving forward with plans for the May 2 race. The NFL, never off the radar even in the depths of the offseason, announced a number of changes and cancellations on its schedule of meetings, fan fest and scouting trips — all related to coronavirus. The U.S.-based Major League Soccer said it would shut down for a target period of 30 days. Earlier in the day, soccer leagues and teams scrambled to make changes: —Belgium's soccer league backpedaled on an earlier decision, and decided to close stadiums to fans. —A Champions League game involving Real Madrid was postponed after the Spanish team puts its players in quarantine. —Dutch soccer authorities canceled all matches through the end of the month, including friendlies against the United States and Spain. —Also, a second player from Italy's top soccer division tested positive. All sports in that hard-hit country have been suspended through April 3. For once, there were no major announcements coming out of Tokyo, where conflicting messages about the status of this summer's Olympics have come out of the country, and the IOC, for weeks. Instead, the IOC went ahead with its ceremonial lighting of the Olympic flame, an event held in front of the ruined Temple of Hera in Ancient Olympia. "We are strengthened ... by the many authorities and sports organizations around the world which are taking so many significant measures to contain the spread of the coronavirus,” IOC president Thomas Bach said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 13th, 2020

Tokyo Olympics still on, organizers insist

The Tokyo 2020 Olympics are going ahead, organizers said Wednesday, even as the government called for major events in the coming weeks to be postponed, canceled or scaled back over the new coronavirus. The fate of the Summer Games has been in the spotlight as the outbreak of COVID-19 forces the cancellation and delays in […] The post Tokyo Olympics still on, organizers insist appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsFeb 26th, 2020

Coronavirus Hits Sport Events in China

Many national and international sports tournaments in China were postponed, moved and even canceled amid the novel coronavirus outbreak that claimed the lives of over 1,000 people in the country where it emerged. Major events including the Chinese Formula 1 Grand Prix and Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games are also under threat as the virus continues […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsFeb 11th, 2020

Public safety first

he Philippine Sports Commission has postponed the ASEAN Para Games, the 2020 National Sports Summit, the Philippine National Games, and other agency-driven events on the order of President Rodrigo Duterte, due to possibie danger from the novel coronavirus......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 7th, 2020

Tokyo tries to quell fear of Olympic-Paralympic cancellation?

By STEPHEN WADE AP Sports Writer TOKYO (AP) — Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic organizers again tried on Thursday to allay fears that the 2020 Games could be postponed or canceled by the fast-spreading virus from China. Tokyo Olympic CEO Toshiro Muto, who on Wednesday said he was “seriously worried” the virus could disrupt the Olympic and Paralympics, backtracked a day later and was more cautious in a news conference with officials from the International Paralympic Committee. “In order to avoid any misunderstanding, I would like to say that the Olympic and Paralympic Games will be held as scheduled,” Muto said, adding people need to remain “cool headed.” Craig Spence, the spokesman for the IPC, was even more direct with the Olympics opening in just under six months — and the Paralympics in just under seven. “One thing I am noticing at the moment is fear is spreading quicker than the virus, and it is important that we quell that fear,” Spence said. On Thursday, Japan confirmed 45 cases of the virus but no deaths have been reported. Tokyo Olympic officials said they have established a task force to focus on the virus and have been repeating for a week that the games will go ahead as planned. Despite the assurances, questions keep coming with organizers saying they are deferring to the World Health Organization for advice. “We need to put things into perspective, and until the World Health Organization tells us otherwise, we will proceed with business as usual," Spence said. The Olympics open on July 24, and the Paralympics follow on Aug. 25. Both events are experiencing record ticket demand, which could begin to shift the longer the virus threat spawns uncertainty. It's a similar story with hotel demand. Toshiaki Endo, a vice president of the organizing committee, earlier in the week said organizers “are facing all sorts of problems including coronavirus infections, cyber security and transportation systems.” Some Olympic and Paralympic qualifying events around the globe have been canceled or postponed by the virus outbreak. Travel restrictions also complicate matters, particularly for China's large Olympic and Paralympic delegations. There is also the question of housing 11,000 Olympic athletes safely in the Athletes Village. The number is smaller for the Paralympics, but still in the thousands. The Olympics have been canceled during wartime, and faced boycotts in 1980 and 1984. The event has grown rapidly in the decades since, driven by multi-billion dollar television contracts and billions more from sponsors......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 7th, 2020

Some SEA Games events postponed

Some SEA Games events postponed.....»»

Category: newsSource:  cnnphilippinesRelated NewsDec 3rd, 2019

Some events in SEA Games suspended because of ‘Tisoy’

THE Philippine Southeast Asian Games Organizing Committee decided to postpone some scheduled events today, Tuesday, because of bad weather and to ensure the safety of all participating athletes and supporters. Postponed and rescheduled to a later date or time were Skateboard, Canoe, Kayak, Traditional Boat Race, Sailing, Windsurfing, and Surfing. The surfing competition in San Juan, […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsDec 3rd, 2019

NBA postpones media sessions in Shanghai amid China rift

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press NBA Commissioner Adam Silver told the Brooklyn Nets and Los Angeles Lakers on Wednesday that the league is still expecting them to play as scheduled this week, even while the rift between the league and Chinese officials continued in ways that clearly suggested the two planned games in Shanghai and Shenzhen were anything but guaranteed. The NBA called off scheduled media sessions Wednesday for both teams. At least two other NBA events to be held Wednesday before the start of the China games were canceled as part of the fallout that started after Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey posted a since-deleted tweet last week that showed support for anti-government protesters in Hong Kong. "Given the fluidity of the situation, today's media availability has been postponed," the league said. They were not rescheduled Wednesday, though having them on Thursday — game day in Shanghai — remains possible. Later Wednesday in Washington, a bipartisan group of lawmakers — including the rare alignment of Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas and Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York — sent a letter to Silver saying the NBA should show the "courage and integrity" to stand up to the Chinese government. They asked the NBA to, among other things, suspend activities in China until what they called the selective treatment against the Rockets ends. "You have more power to take a stand than most of the Chinese government's targets and should have the courage and integrity to use it," the lawmakers told Silver. The NBA did not have any immediate comment on the letter, and it was unclear if Silver had even seen the document. In Shanghai, the mood surrounding the game that — if played — will feature LeBron James, Kyrie Irving and other big NBA names was anything but festive. An NBA Cares event that was to benefit the Special Olympics was called off, as was a "fan night" celebration that was to be highlighted by the league announcing plans to refurbish some outdoor courts in that city. And workers in multiple spots around Shanghai were tearing down large outdoor promotional advertisements for Thursday's Lakers-Nets game. The teams are also supposed to play Saturday in Shenzhen. Chinese smartphone maker Vivo has joined the list of companies that have suspended ties with the NBA for now, only adding to the uncertainty surrounding the China games. Vivo was a presenting sponsor of the Lakers-Nets games, and on Wednesday there was no reference to the game in Shanghai on the list of upcoming events scheduled at Mercedes-Benz Arena. Other firms such as apparel company Li-Ning announced similar moves earlier this week, as the rift was just beginning. Silver said Tuesday in Tokyo that he supports Morey's right to free speech. Several Chinese companies have suspended their partnership with the NBA in recent days, and Chinese state broadcaster CCTV said it will not broadcast the Lakers-Nets games. "I'm sympathetic to our interests here and to our partners who are upset," Silver said. "I don't think it's inconsistent on one hand to be sympathetic to them and at the same time stand by our principles." All around China, stores that sell NBA merchandise were removing Rockets-related apparel from shelves and many murals featuring the Rockets — even ones with Yao Ming, the Chinese great who played for Houston during his NBA career — were being painted over. Effects were even felt in at least one NBA arena Tuesday night. In Philadelphia, where the 76ers were playing a Chinese team — the Guangzhou Loong Lions — two fans were removed by arena security for holding signs and chanting in support of Hong Kong. The signs read "Free Hong Kong" and "Free HK." The sentiment was not different from Morey's since-deleted tweet last week of an image that read, "Fight For Freedom. Stand With Hong Kong." The 76ers and Wells Fargo Center, the team's home arena, released statements Wednesday confirming that the fan removal took place and explaining why. "During the second quarter of last night's 76ers game, Wells Fargo Center security responded to a situation that was disrupting the live event experience for our guests," the arena's statement said. "After three separate warnings, the two individuals were escorted out of the arena without incident. The security team employed respectful and standard operating procedures." The NBA is not the first major corporation to deal with criticism from China over political differences. Mercedes-Benz, Delta Air Lines, hotel operator Marriott, fashion brand Zara and others also have found themselves in conflicts with China in recent years. After Morey's tweet was deleted, Rockets owner Tilman Fertitta said Morey does not speak for the organization. Joe Tsai, who recently completed his purchase of the Nets and is a co-founder of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba, has said the damage to the NBA's relationship with China "will take a long time to repair." ___ Reynolds reported from Miami. AP Sports Writer Dan Gelston in Philadelphia and Associated Press writer Yanan Wang in Beijing contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 9th, 2019

Bagunas begins building dream house for parents

Bryan Bagunas is planning something big for his hard-earned money. While his peers are occupied with their business ventures with the resumption of volleyball events still up in the air because of the health crisis, the national team stalwart is busy with his own project.       “As of now wala pa akong binabalak na negosyo kasi magpapatayo ako ng bahay ng parents ko,” Bagunas told ABS-CBN Sports. The former UAAP Most Valuable Player saved some of his earnings as an import for Oita Miyoshi Weiss Adler in the Japan V. Premier League to buy a lot and eventually build a house for his parents in Batangas. “Kakabili ko lang ng lot dun then papatatyuan ko naman sila ng bahay. Yun muna ang unahin ko as of now,” said the 2019 Southeast Asian Games silver medalist and two-time UAAP champion. The pride of Balayan, Batangas bought a 430 sq. meter property where he plans to construct his parents’ house. As of now his parents are still planning on the design and size of the house. “Depende pa sa kanila kung anong gusto nilang design. Sila na mamili para naman sa kanila ‘yun. Ireregalo ko sa kanila,” said Bagunas. He added that once the house design is settled, they can then proceed with the construction. “Hindi pa nasisimulan bale pinag-aaralan pa lang ng tatay ko. Kasi ang tatay ko marunong ding gumawa ng bahay,” said Bagunas. Bagunas is set to fly back to Japan in September to resume training with the Weiss Adler. On Wednesday, Bagunas signed with Spikers’ Turf club team Go for Gold. He cleared that the there’s no conflict of schedule with his league commitments here and in Japan.     .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 3rd, 2020

Lady Falcons help in relief efforts vs virus

Since their games in Season 82 of the University Athletic Association of the Philippines have been postponed, the Adamson Lady Falcons women’s softball team still stayed in shape over the last three months......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJul 1st, 2020

PBA return a difficult process says Chairman Vargas

It'll be a little over a month before the PBA Board's crucial August meeting to determine the fate of the league's 45th season amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Despite the rising numbers in positive cases in the country, Chairman Ricky Vargas remains hopeful that the PBA can finish out at least its 2020 Philippine Cup later this year. "We are still positive and our players are also very hopeful that we can start," Vargas said during the most recent forum by the Philippine Sportswriters Association. "Kasi alam din naman nila na we are protecting their health interest," Vargas added of the players. Early in June, the PBA started dialogue with the IATF as the league seeks clearance to have players already do some light workouts per small batches. It doesn't appear that the IATF has given the PBA a proper response, but according to government protocols, the lowest quarantine level allows for sporting events and the like to push through but only at 50 percent venue capacity. "Closest we can get is if we got to [MGCQ]. Kapag [MGCQ], sinasabi nila you may go back to practicing," Vargas said. "Also, the more positive note is yung statement ng GAB [Games and Amusements Board] is they're also working for professional sports to begin," he added. Nevertheless, the PBA returning this year will not be an easy process. The decision will involve many concerned parties, not just the league and the IATF. "Marami. GAB, IATF, DOH, LGU, at tsaka yung owner ng coliseum. Medyo mahirap din ang proseso. Plus, the protocol that we have to agree on," Vargas said.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 30th, 2020

No paychecks for 11 big leaguers: advance larger than salary

By RONALD BLUM AP Baseball Writer NEW YORK (AP) — Grant Dayton will notice one glaring absence this season after he reports to the Atlanta Braves: his twice-a-month salary. He is among 11 major leaguers whose prorated pay for the abbreviated 60-game season amounts to less than the $286,500 advance already received by the 32-year-old left-hander. “It’s going to be weird not getting a paycheck,” he said Friday, “but we already got paid.” Dayton gave up the 6,776th and final home run of of last season's record total, to the New York Mets' Dominic Smith. To resume preparation for the new season he will drive Monday from his home in Winter Haven, Florida, to Atlanta with wife Cori, 2 1/2-year-old son Decker and nearly 6-month-old Nolan for Braves' workouts at Truist Park. After opening day was postponed because of the coronavirus pandemic, Major League Baseball and the players’ association agreed March 26 to a deal that called for teams to advance $170 million in salaries over the first 60 days of the season. Others who won’t get paychecks because of lower prorated salaries are Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Jimmy Nelson and New York Yankees reliever Jonathan Holder ($277,778 each), Pittsburgh infielder Erik Gonzalez and Minnesota pitcher Matt Wisler ($268,519 apiece), Philadelphia catcher Andrew Knapp ($262,943), Chicago Cubs pitcher Jharel Cotton ($237,037), pitchers Collin McHugh of Boston, Ross Stripling of the Dodgers and Jesse Hahn of Kansas City ($222,222 each) and Milwaukee pitcher Freddy Peralta ($575,200). “My first reaction was, wow, if we don’t have any games this year, I’m going to get paid the same amount that Freddie Freeman’s getting paid, so that’s pretty cool,” Dayton said in a reference to his teammate, a four-time All-Star first baseman with a $22 million salary that was cut to about $8.15 million. “I knew that there was going to be a point that if we resume games, I wouldn't get paid. And I was OK with that because we still received significant amounts of money and we’re fine.” Each of the roughly 480 players with so-called “straight” contracts that call for a single salary received $286,500. The 769 players with “split” contracts that have a lower salary in the minor leagues — generally a younger group not yet eligible for arbitration — got either $16,500, $30,000 or $60,000, depending on their minor league pay level. Dayton, who has spent parts of three seasons in the majors, has a $655,000, one-year contract. His prorated salary for the short season will be $242,593, assuming the contagion does not cause more games to be canceled. The group won’t have to return any cash because the March deal states “in the event there is a 2020 championship season, any amounts advanced to individual players that cannot be recouped by clubs via payroll deduction during the 2020 season for any reason shall be reimbursed to clubs from the International Tax Fund at the conclusion of the 2020 season.” That tax fund is money collected from teams that exceeded their specified bonus pools to sign high-priced Latin American amateurs. “We’re blessed because we’re getting more money than the prorated amount,” Dayton said. Most of the group has relatively low salaries for arbitration-eligible players because of injuries that sidelined them and reduced their statistics. Nelson returned last June from shoulder surgery and was limited to three starts and seven relief appearances. McHugh missed September and the postseason with a sore right elbow and signed a deal with a $600,000 salary and $3.65 million in performance and roster bonuses. Cotton, Dayton, Hahn and Stripling all were interrupted by elbow surgery early in their careers, and Gonzalez missed more than half of last season after breaking his collarbone. Peralta has a low salary in 2020 as part of a $15.5 million, five-year contract he agreed to in March. Dayton was 0-1 with a 3.00 ERA in 14 relief appearances last year and is 1-3 with a 3.34 ERA in 68 big league games that included time with the Dodgers in 2016-17. He wonders how he will fare in arbitration next winter. “It's going to be a weird year and a short season, but I guess they’re going to have to treat it on paper like a real season, a championship season," he said. "And as far as contracts go in the future, they’re going to have to take the stats this year, which is kind of scary for a relief pitcher, to be honest because you have one bad game, it takes a whole year to get that back. The slow starters can't be slow starters anymore." Stripling, a financial adviser for B. Riley Wealth Management when he’s not playing baseball, negotiated a $2.1 million deal in January but was able to have $1.5 million designated as a signing bonus, which is protected and not reduced. Only the $600,000 specified as salary in the contract gets prorated. “It will be strange to receive no money or paychecks throughout the year,” he said. “I’m thankful for my background in finance, because I’m comfortable with my ability to budget. I do worry about the 10 other guys in my situation. Technically will be receiving zero income until next April. That’s a long time to budget ahead.” One option for players could be licensing money they are owed that had been retained for them by the union. “Our PA is offering a stipend of sorts for guys in similar situations,” Stripling said. “But I don’t know how much money or how often they can receive it. It also comes from our `war chest,′ which is money saved for salaries in case of a work stoppage in 2022. Most guys will try to avoid pulling money from that unless they are in dire situations.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 27th, 2020

Japan badminton star Momota fully recovered after crash

Japan's badminton king Kento Momota said Friday he had completely recovered from the eye injury caused by a car accident and vowed to bring home Gold at the postponed Tokyo Games......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJun 26th, 2020