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Simple life in Scotland

Why former Streetboys dancer Spencer Reyes chose to lead a quiet life with his family in the UK.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource: philstar philstarOct 17th, 2020

Just a simple life

I think the biggest lesson learned from the pandemic is the value of doing our own things but never losing touch with the rest of the family......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 27th, 2020

Duterte urged to give life to dying P75-billion gamefowl industry

The industry that has never bothered the government for any social amelioration or financial assistance since the start of the COVID-19 quarantines in February is now in urgent need of simple ‘life support’ from President Duterte, through the Inter-Agency Task Force for the Management of Emerging Infectious Diseases (IATF) – a permit to proceed with its safety-guaranteed new normal cockfights......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 14th, 2020

Simple ways to reduce stress

  BY MARILYN C. ARAYATA     STORIES about highly stressed personalities who developed serious stress related illnesses remind us to find ways to reduce our stress. How many of us get heavily stressed due to our own habits? The thing is, they are hard to break. If we really like to make life less […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsSep 13th, 2020

Simple Osmeña Day celebration in Cebu City on Sept. 9

CEBU CITY, Philippines — The Cebu City government will have a simple celebration to honor the life of former President Sergio Osmeña, Sr. on Wednesday, September 9, 2020. According to the Cultural and Historical Affairs Office (CHAO), the city government will pay tribute to the late Cebuano President via a small gathering at the historical […] The post Simple Osmeña Day celebration in Cebu City on Sept. 9 appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 8th, 2020

Relearning the simple life

  So much of our new normal is about rooting ourselves at home, adjusting to more domestic lifestyles and interests. The rise of plantitas and plantitos is just one ubiquitous proof. When outside trips are restricted, homey hobbies like gardening, cooking, baking, and crafting are the new cool. Of course, millennials and Gen Z have […] The post Relearning the simple life appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 4th, 2020

Globe 5G tests console-less gaming in PH

Over the years, the gaming industry has made substantial progress. What started as simple simulations evolved into arcade games and video consoles featuring sophisticated and life-like graphics......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 24th, 2020

Always About the People

“Solid!” That was the only reaction, or lack thereof, that I could muster after that first breakaway slam of Kiefer Ravena’s UAAP collegiate basketball career over the outstretched arms of UST’s foreign center, Karim Abdul. Moments before, you could see Kiefer was going to go hard, as it was a one-on-one breakaway and he had the speed advantage over Abdul, who was hot on his heels. Little did I know that he was going to go for that highlight that would announce his entry into college basketball. That reaction, that loss for words, can pretty much sum up my past 10 years of covering college basketball for ABS-CBN Sports.  They first asked me to write about my most memorable UAAP game coverage; but I must confess, I was never really good at remembering exact details of games, unlike some of my fellow sportscasters, or even coaches I know, who remember almost detail for detail, or play by play. My memories come in highlights, or sometimes even just flashes of good or memorable plays.  I remember a 6’8”, 18-year old Ben Mbala, whom we first saw a glimpse of while Anton Roxas and I were covering the CESAFI league in the hot and humid Cebu Coliseum, sometime around 2012. He was playing for the Southwestern University Cobras, wasn’t as built and polished as when he was with DLSU, but you could already see the raw talent and athleticism. Fast forward a few years, I remember well how he took the UAAP by storm, with his monster dunks, and how he piloted La Salle to a championship while winning league MVP in Season 79.  I remember the heralded rookie season of Kiefer Ravena in the men’s division, after a storied juniors career. Kiefer won Rookie of the Year honors and helped lead Ateneo to two more titles to round up their 5-peat, before it was Jeron Teng’s turn to lead the Green Archers to a championship over his elder brother Jeric and the UST Growling Tigers.  I remember Bobby Ray Parks Jr. and his back-to-back MVP seasons. He was arguably the most complete college player during that time. It was painful to see his team fall short especially during his second MVP year. The Bulldogs made history the year after though, with Alfred Aroga, Troy Rosario, and Gelo Alolino now at the helm, winning the school’s first ever championship after more than forty years. I would argue that the past decade saw some of the brightest UAAP college basketball stars, both local and foreign, take to the hard court. It would almost be unfair to start naming them because I’ll surely end up leaving some names worthy enough to be mentioned. But we all remember Greg Slaughter, Ryan Buenafe, RR Garcia, Terence Romeo, Mac Belo, RR Pogoy, Roi Sumang, Charles Mamie, Alex Nuyles, Jericho Cruz, Papi Sarr, Jeron Teng, Jason Perkins, Aljun Melecio, Kiefer and Thirdy, Bobby Ray, Alfred Aroga, Kevin Ferrer, Karim Abul, Jeric Teng, Ange Kuoame, Matt and Mike Nieto, Paul Desiderio, Juan GDL, and the list goes on and on… all of them making their mark in the UAAP the past ten years. Aside from the highlights, there were the more mundane, behind-the-scenes memories, especially covering out-of-town games when we used to do the CESAFI and the PCCL. That was basketball coverage at its purest. There was a time we traveled to Lanao Del Sur to cover the Mindanao regional selection of the PCCL. Lanao was about another two to three hour drive from Cagayan de Oro along a dark highway with trees and mountains all around; and where there was only one mall in the entire town. Or when we traveled by van to La Union to cover the north regional selection of the PCCL… or even staying a whole week at the Cebu Grand Hotel, for the VisMin regional selection. Coverages then were bare bones: no real-time stats or live graphics, and I would even sometimes have to tally the points and rebounds of each player in-game on my notebook just so that I’d have some semblance of stats to mention on the coverage. Still, those games were so much fun because the players, getting their first shot at national TV coverage, would leave everything out on the floor.  In a year or so, both the UAAP and the NCAA will announce their respective new homes, and new broadcast teams will have the privilege of covering the best collegiate basketball players in the country. That’s how the ball bounces. I’m a firm believer that in life there are seasons, and a perfect time for everything. I’m just thankful for the opportunities thrown my way. If you were to ask me why the coverage of the UAAP helped build the league into what it is today, my answer would be simple: it was always about the people. At the end of the day, what makes the UAAP and its coverage great are the stories of the people that play, coach, officiate, cover, and run the games. It’s not really about the championships or the awards, but rather the challenges, hardships, and journeys of each of the individuals that brought them there.  And it is also about the directors, producers, cameramen, reporters and make-up artists that make sure that the audience sees what is supposed to be seen – the winning basket, a fan’s priceless reaction, the agony in defeat, and the glory of victory. It’s what Boom Gonzalez or Mico Halili would always say, that our job as anchors and analysts is to tell the people watching at home the story of what is happening in the game in the best way possible.  I just want to tip my hat to all the people that allowed us to do our jobs the best way possible. From our directors, producers, cameramen, floor directors, fellow panelists, courtside reporters, league officials, statisticians, make-up artists, and all those people behind the scenes whom we worked with, know that we were able to give our best because of you; and the UAAP coverage will not be what it is if not for all of your hard work and dedication.  It was, is, and will always be about the people. Marco Benitez was the team captain for the Ateneo Blue Eagles when they won the UAAP Season 65 men's seniors basketball title in 2002. Marco eventually covered collegiate basketball as analyst for ABS-CBN Sports starting in 2010. He is presently the President of the Philippine Women's University (PWU)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2020

Manila’s iconic clock tower’s lights shut off as city mourns passing of former mayor Lim

The Manila City Hall complex went dark on Saturday night (Aug. 8) as the lights of the building’s iconic clock tower were switched off to mourn the passing of former Manila mayor Alfredo “Fred” Lim. (Isko Moreno FB page/ MANILA BULLETIN) It was a tribute of the Manila city government to the former mayor “in its own little way” while the country still battles the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, current Mayor Francisco “Isko Moreno” Domagoso said. Domagoso, who served as Lim’s vice mayor during the latter’s mayoral term from 2007 to 2013, announced the death of his former partner via Facebook Live. “Nais ko pong ipabatid sa inyo ang isang malungkot na balita sa atin bilang taga-lungsod, bilang batang Maynila. Si dating Mayor Alfredo Lim ay sumakabilang buhay na po, dala nang pagkaka-infection nya sa COVID-19 (I’d like to inform you of some sad news, as residents of Manila, that former mayor Alredo Lim has passed away due to COVID-19 infection),” he said. “Ilang araw na po ang nakakaraan ngunit di na po kinaya ng kanyang katawan (He had been ill for some days but could not longer continue fighting),” he added. Lim was 90. Moreno said there “are a lot of things” to give and words to say to Lim. But the city can only show its respect to him for now by turning the lights off of the clock tower as “the proper time is yet to come.” “Kanina po, bilang tanda ng ating pakikiramay sa maliit nating kaparaanan ay…pinapatay po natin ang ilaw ng clock tower, na sagisag ng pag-asa ng Maynila (Earlier, as a sign of our sympathies in our own little way, we turned off the lights of the clock tower, which symbolizes the hope of Manila),” Domagoso said. The iconic clock tower, which was completed in the 1930s, is the largest clock tower in the Philippines, reaching close to 100 feet in height. It is illuminated every evening. “Ngunit di naman ibig sabihin na wala na tayong pag-asa. Ito ay isa lamang tanda ng ating paggalang sa maliit nating kaparaanan, habang kinakaharap natin ang pandemyang ito, ang isang taong naglingkod, mabigyan man lang nating ng kaunting pagpapahalaga (But this doesn’t mean that we don’t have hope. This is just a sign, in our own little way while we face this pandemic, of our respect for a person who served, that we give him a simple acknowledgement),” he added. The current local chief executive cited Lim’s contributions in the city of Manila, including his hospital projects that still benefit residents. “Hindi natin makakalimutan ang paglilingkod niya sa ating lungsod, sapagkat hanggang sa ngayon ay patuloy na pinakikibangan ng mga batang Maynila ang mga programa at proyekto ng minamahal nating mayor. Ilan diyan ay patuloy na nakikita ninyo — Sta. Ana Hospital, Gat Andres Bonifacio, Sampaloc (We will not forget his service to our city, because up to now the people of Manila stil benefit from the programs and projects of our beloved mayor. Some of those you still see — Sta. Ana, Gat Andres Bonifacio, and Sampaloc [hospitals]),” Domagoso said. “Ang isa sa pinakamalaki na di makakalimutan na program ng ating dating mayor ay ang Unibersidad de Manila, na ito’y nagbibigay ng libreng tertiary education na hanggang ngayon ay nagagamit ng mahihirap nating kababayan na nagnanais na magkamit ng edukasyon (One of the biggest and most unforgettable programs of our former mayor was the Unibersidad de Manila, that gives free tertiary education that up to now may be availed of by our poor countrymen who wish to obtain an education),” he added.  Domagoso also said Lim “had been an effective” public servant as he gave the public safety and security whenever they went to Manila. Aside from being mayor from 1992 to 1998 and from 2007 to 2013, he said, Lim also became the city’s chief of police and the head of the National Bureau of Investigation, dedicating 50 years of his life to serving the public. “Noong ako po’y manalong mayor, siya po ay aking pinuntahan agad para po humingi ng mga payo kung paano susugpuin ang kriminalidad sa ating lipunan at paano patitinuin ang mga bahagi ng gobyerno sa ating pamahalaang lungsod (When I won as mayor, I immediately went to him to ask for advice on how to crack down on criminality in our society and how to reform some areas of our city government),” he said. Domagoso encouraged the public to emulate Lim, noting that like the latter, Filipinos can also serve the country well and with honesty. The current mayor called on his constituents to include Lim in their prayers......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 8th, 2020

ALBUM REVIEW: ‘Folklore’ is signature Swift but minimalist

Taylor Swift Taylor Swift dropped a bomb recently with the announcement and release of album “Folklore” on the same day. The set is a collection of 16 tracks penned by the 30-year old singer-songwriter and produced with long-time collaborator Jack Antonoff and Aaron Dessner (of The National) in the first few months of lockdown. Critics have hailed it one of her best albums. Well, Swift has always been about the lyrics, and here and there an interesting line pops up and conjures an image and corresponding emotion. “I’m doing good/I’m on some new s**t” she sings on opener “The 1.” A simple piano motif shape the first few stanzas and I could almost swear that first chord is same as Bruce Springsteen’s ‘Thunder Road.” Less is more as Swift conveys how life goes on after the one that got away, but there’s definitely a hint of regret there as she sings “But it would’ve been fun if it could’ve been me.” “Cardigan” is a sentimental, lo-fi sounding flashback about a loveable but two-timing rascal. “A friend to all is a friend to none /Chase two girls, lose the one,” she sings. ‘Folklore’ album art “The Last Great American Dynasty” is signature Swift. It’s a potent mix of country-tinged pop and drum machines as TS sings about 20th century American socialite Rebeka Harkness, and draws parallels to her own life put under a microscope. Easy fave “Exile” features Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon in a piano-decked ballad. Vernon sings in that low, Nick Cave-drone that is sweet contrast to Swift’s honeyed tones. Swift and Vernon sing from the perspective of two lovers who have realized that it won’t work. They take turns singing the regretful line, “I think I’ve seen this film before/And I didn’t like the ending.” “Mirrorball” glimmers with Swift’s radiant melodies as she intones “Hush, when no one is around my dear/You’ll find me on my tallest tiptoes/Spinning in my highest heels love/Shining just for you.” And there’s more: “August” (“Lost in the memory/August slipped away into a moment in time/‘Cause it was never mine”’), melancholy folk song “Seven” (“Your braid’s like a pattern/Love you to the Moon and to Saturn”), and a bit of hilarity in “Invisible String” (“Cold was the steel of my axe to grind for the boys who broke my heart/Now I send their babies presents”). Closing song “Hoax” sees Swift on piano with a spare string section just barely in the background. She sings, “Don’t want no other shade of blue but you/No other sadness in the world would do.” Compared to previous albums, “Folklore” is noticeably minimalist. The spotlight is on the singer and the songs. At this point in her career, Swift has become a master of weaving songs into little stories that resonate with our psyche and touch the soul. That might seem overly generous compliment to a legit mega celebrity who’s already received accolades to last her a lifetime. But that’s the thing: huge as she is, at her core, Swift is a songwriter who serves the song. And that dedication to her craft, her desire to be the best at it, not only for herself but for those who listen to her—you gotta respect her for that!.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2020

A return to provincial life

Living is simple......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 31st, 2020

Kris: Hinarap ang mga pagkakamali, pinatawad ang sarili…this is not the end of my story

“THANKS to ALL OF YOU, I’m starting MY NEW BEGINNING!” Ito ang caption ni Kris Aquino sa teaser ng programa niyang “Love Life with Kris” sa TV5 na mapapanood na sa Agosto 15, Sabado sa ganap na 5 p.m.. Simple lang ang teaser ng show, naka-all black si Kris with leather jacket habang papasok sa […] The post Kris: Hinarap ang mga pagkakamali, pinatawad ang sarili…this is not the end of my story appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 31st, 2020

Taginis Falls: Moalboal’s hidden freshwater beauty

  CEBU CITY, Philippines— Moalboal. What comes into your mind when you hear about this southern town in Cebu? Simple. Moalboal is a water paradise for the adventure junkie. It is known for its beaches, long stretch of white sand and clear waters. It also known for its beautiful aquatic life that attracts scuba divers […] The post Taginis Falls: Moalboal’s hidden freshwater beauty appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 20th, 2020

YouTube to feature everyone& rsquo;s ordinary day at extraordinary time in new docufilm& nbsp;

YouTube Originals has announced that executive producers Ridley Scott (The Martian, Gladiator) and Kai Hsuing (Lords of Chaos), along with director Kevin Macdonald (Whitney, One Day in September, The Last King of Scotland), will create the new feature film, Life In A Day 2020, ten years after the original Life In A Day. .....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJul 9th, 2020

Matt Nieto now serving good old-fashioned burgers

Matt Nieto knows full well that there has to be life after basketball. "Alam ko na hindi pangmatagalan ang basketball because of age or injury kaya as early as now, I try to see what other ventures I could do besides basketball," he shared. "Para after ng basketball career ko, meron pa rin akong other sources of income and hindi lang ako nakadepende sa basketball." And with that, the three-time champion with Ateneo de Manila University is already putting his degree in management economics to good use. "Now that I have graduated, I try to apply all that I learned in Ateneo here in the real world," he said. Enter 1975 Old Fashioned Burgers - Nieto's brand new business serving up burgers cooked by way of a 45-year-old family recipe. While the family recipe had been there since, well, 1975, the opportunity to share it with others didn't present itself until a month ago. "My friend, Kim Nadal, and I have been playing with the idea of putting up a business even before the pandemic started. Then Kim found out his co-worker's son, JM Cancio, was into cooking and the two of them just talked one night all the way until dawn," he shared. From there, "Matty Ice" and Nadal met up with Cancio and the three of them hit if off from the get-go. "The proposal by JM looked promising so it was a yes for us. 'Di nagtagal, we started trying to perfect the old-fashioned patties using a secret recipe from JM's family," he said. For Nieto, the fact that he is making sure a family recipe lives on was the clincher for him to put his full faith on the busines. "That's really what we want to see here - the story of burgers that were first loved by the children and grandchildren of a family in Marikina back in 1970s," he shared. He then continued, "And I'm sure those burgers will mean much to countless customers who long for classic, simple, old-fashioned burgers that will bring them back to a good, old time." Indeed, 1975 Old Fashioned Burgers livew up to its name in each and every order. "The name says it all. Yan kasi yung taon na nabili ng lola (ni JM) yung panghulma ng burger which is what we still use to mold our patties so you can be sure that the burger is a timeless classic prepared with wisdom spanning 45 years." Make no mistake, though, the 23-year-old is not trading in his basketball jersey for chef's uniform anytime soon. As he put it, "My priority is still to be the best player I can be to help Gilas and NLEX." For now, though, all those who want to try out 1975 Old-Fashioned Burgers could let them live up to their name - after all, Nieto guarantees they always and always would. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 28th, 2020

Banta ni Aiko sa nagsabing may sex video si Andrei: Ilabas mo! Pag hindi mo napatunayan idedemanda kita! 

“MY son took a back seat in showbiz because he cannot take the limelight, because my son is just a simple boy, he just wants a simple life.”  Ito ang ginawang pag-amin ni Aiko Melendez sa unang pagkakataon kung bakit hindi natuloy ang panganay niyang si Andrei Yllana sa showbiz.   Nasabi ito ni Aiko […] The post Banta ni Aiko sa nagsabing may sex video si Andrei: Ilabas mo! Pag hindi mo napatunayan idedemanda kita!  appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 22nd, 2020

Smart shines spotlight on dads who make life simple and easy

Have you ever thought about what your life would be like right now if it weren’t for your dad? It would undoubtedly be much different, and maybe a little harder......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 21st, 2020

4-way tie for lead at Heritage as another wild finish looms

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C. (AP) — The PGA Tour's return to competition has brought together the strongest fields of the year on courses that have not been overly punishing, and the result is the same. It's another free-for-all at the RBC Heritage. Webb Simpson practically had to apologize for a 3-under 68, in which he managed just one birdie on the back nine. He was part of a four-way tie for the lead, and that was good enough for him. He also knows good probably won't cut it Sunday at Harbour Town,. “It's not like I've got a three- or four-shot lead and could shoot a couple under,” he said. “It's going to take a good one.” Tyrrell Hatton had one of six rounds at 63, giving the 28-year-old from England a share of the lead as he goes for his second straight victory, albeit three months apart because of the shutdown from the COVID-19 pandemic. Abraham Ancer, so solid with his irons, had a 65 and joined the lead along with Ryan Palmer, who had a 66. They were at 15-under 198, a number that didn't even start to explain the low scoring. Even with Jordan Spieth and Xander Schauffele sputtering to 75s, the field was 223-under par, the lowest for any round since the RBC Heritage began in 1969. There were 35 players at 10 under or better, compared with only one player (Dustin Johnson) a year ago. The previous mark was seven players at double digits under par through 54 holes. Most telling were the opportunities on Sunday. There were 21 players separated by just three shots going into the final round. A week ago at Colonial, there were 14 players separated by three shots. “I think the fields have been extremely strong,” Ancer said. “Everybody out here was just eager to come out and play. Thre greens are a little bit soft, especially this week, and the ball isn't really rolling out as much as you're used to on the greens and on the fairways. That's yielding a little bit more birdies, for sure." Carlos Ortiz, who started this tournament with two double bogeys after playing only five holes, suddenly has a chance to grab his first PGA Tour victory after two eagles in a round of 63. He was one shot behind, along with Colonial winner Daniel Berger and Joel Dahmen, both with 63s. And there was more testing than usual. Players and caddies on the charter flight to Connecticut for next week's event had to take a saliva test Saturday for the coronavirus before they can get on the plane. Eleven others had testing Friday night because they were deemed to have been in close contact with Nick Watney, whose positive test on Friday was the first in golf's return. Among them was Sergio Garcia, who flew with Watney from Austin, Texas. The initial test was negative. Garcia was nervous as he waited for the result, though not so nervous he couldn't put down a 65 to join the chase. He was two shots behind, along with Ian Poulter and Joaquin Niemann. Bryson DeChambeau, starting the day one shot behind, hit his approach into the par-5 second in the trees and it never came down. He has added 40 pounds of mass, still not enough to uproot the tree and shake it loose. That led to a bogey, and more damaging was no birdies on the back nine for a 70. Even so, he remained three shots behind in a group that included Johnson, who birdied three of his last four holes to go from around the middle of the pack to 12-under 201, three shots behind and very much in the picture. That's all it took Saturday, and it likely won't be any different in the final round. Brooks Koepka quietly posted a 68 and was in the group three shots behind. Chalk it up to June, a new date for the RBC Heritage because of the pandemic. The tournament usually is the week after the Masters in April, when the temperature is slightly cooler, the greens are firmer and the rye grass hasn't been taken over by Bermuda. It's soft. And these are the best players in the world, all of them eager to get going again. “Because we're not at a major championship-style golf course last week or this week, where you're going to have separation because of bad scores, I think that's probably why,” Simpson said when asked to explain the bunched score. Perhaps that explains why Justin Thomas called it “the worst 66 I've ever shot in my life.” Hatton has won back-to-back before in his career, under entirely different circumstances. In 2017, he won in Scotland and Italy in consecutive weeks. Now he goes after two in a row three months apart, having won at Bay Hill in March before the pandemic shut down sports. It apparently wasn't long enough for anyone to accumulate much rush. “I think we’ve all had enough notice to try and get ready to play tournaments again,” said Hatton, who rented a house in Orlando, Florida, during the stay-at-home mandate. “So it’s not massively surprising to see guys playing as well as they are, and hopefully the guys at home are enjoying it, watching on TV.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 21st, 2020

Ron Morales enjoys ‘simple, laid-back life’ in Canada

When a new actor learns from a veteran co-star or someone who has been in the showbiz industry longer than him, trust that the former will always remember the pointers perhaps for life, wherever he is or whatever field he shifts into......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 11th, 2020

The Secret of Lolo Jose in Reaching the Big 100

Reaching a hundred-year-old may be hard to achieve these days, given the kind of lifestyle that this generation is having. But there are still some who made it to the big 100-year-old and beyond. And the question left hanging, is there really a secret to a longer life? A simple answer from Lolo Jose (not […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsJun 6th, 2020

Muzzle Mr. Met? Mascots wonder why they re banned from MLB

By DAN GELSTON AP Sports Writer PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The Phillie Phanatic had stories of his favorite adventures -- from the Galapagos Islands to the cobblestone streets of Philadelphia -- read to him most weeks from his very best buds. The Philly furball was tucked in with a bedtime story from Bryce Harper. Andrew McCutchen and manager Joe Girardi stopped by as guest readers to entertain fans and unite the Phillies community. But should the Phillies play ball this year, well, the book will close on the Phanatic. MLB wants to ban the birds -- sorry, Pirate Parrot -- and Bernie Brewer, Blooper, Bernie the Marlin, heck, all costumed creatures great and small from the ballpark this season. Firebird, Paws, the Oriole Bird, all face extinction -- at least this season, should baseball resume. Not even a muzzle on Mr. Met or a mask on Mariner Moose would help the cause. Gasp! Baseball’s furriest and funniest fans are forbidden from entering a ballpark. And that’s not cool. “Every mascot should be essential because of its ability to connect and distract with fun,” mascot guru Dave Raymond said. Raymond should know as well as any performer, as the first person to take on the 6-foot-6, 300-pound, 90-inch waist frame of the Phanatic. He’s since become a mascot consultant to the stars and helped create, brand and train the next generation of hundreds of stadium characters. Mascots are as much a ballpark staple as hot dogs and the long ball, and each fuzzy fist bump or chance concourse encounter hooks the youngest fans on the game. As baseball prepares for a summer slate without fans, Raymond wonders: What’s a game without a mascot? “You don’t have to convince me of that,” Raymond said. “It’s the powers that be that don’t understand that simple truth.” There’s already a blueprint MLB could follow that explains why mascots fit in barren ballparks. Take a look across the globe. Mascots remained a staple of baseball games in Taiwan and the KBO League in South Korea. American fans who stayed up late (or is it, woke up early?) to watch KBO games on ESPN were mesmerized by mascots gone wild in empty stadiums. The LG Twins mascots -- twin robot boys named Lucky and Star -- wore masks. So did cheerleaders and a drum section that provided the soundtrack for an otherwise dreary atmosphere. The Chinese Professional Baseball League barred spectators over concerns of spreading the new coronavirus in a crowded space, but the league decided it was safe to let in cheerleaders and costumed mascots. “This is the most important time to leverage fun, when people are sick and dying and dealing with the brutality of life,” Raymond said. “That is the time that you find a way to distract people and entertain them.” Philadelphia Inquirer cartoonist Rob Tornoe drew the Phanatic (wearing a mask) sitting atop the dugout with his phone and on hold with the unemployment office. “This is life or death now for a lot of characters, a lot of performers,” former Timberwolves mascot Jon Cudo said. It’s not that dire for most MLB performers who often have other duties within the organization or remained active in the community with food drives, firetruck parades or other feel-good efforts during the pandemic. Raymond had former and current mascots, including Cudo, join this week on his webinar, “What The Heck Should My Mascot Do Now?” The best suggestion to stay connected with fans -- with the ATV temporarily parked -- is engaging through social content. Mascot Mania has gone wild on Instagram and TikTok. Mr. Met cleans windows. D. Baxter the Bobcat taught crosswalk safety. Wally the Green Monster records virtual messages for charity. Then again, mascots have problems just like us: Who gives the Phanatic a trim during quarantine? “The Phanatic doesn’t need to get his hair cut,” Raymond said. “It’s actually a positive when it gets unkempt and long.” The Phanatic already underwent one makeover this year — his new look features flightless feathers rather than fur-colored arms, stars outlining the eyes, a larger posterior and a powder blue tail, blue socks with red shoes, plus a set of scales under the arms — because of a lawsuit filed against the team by the creators of the original Phanatic. The creators threatened to terminate the Phillies’ rights to the Phanatic as of June 15 and “make the Phanatic a free agent” unless the team renegotiated its 1984 agreement to acquire the mascot’s rights. Mascots were lumped in with other baseball traditions that would be weeded out under a 2020 proposal. The traditional exchange of lineup cards would be eliminated, along with high-fives, fist bumps and bat boys and girls. “I don’t know of anybody who bought season tickets to watch the bat boy,” Raymond said. “But you can say that in spades for the mascots. We’d be losing one of the draws that brings in people beyond the statistic nerds.” Plus, any fan who attended a Phillies game in the late 1990s at Veterans Stadium knows the Phanatic can play in an empty ballpark. Mascots just want to honk, honk, honk for the home team and they do care if they ever get back. “I’m just imploring them to value the character brands,” Raymond said. “There is a safe way for you to have fun, and frankly, fun is the most important thing you can invest in right now.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 31st, 2020