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Signs of recovery convince S& P to keep Philippines investment grade

Debt watcher S&P Global Ratings kept the Philippines’ investment grade rating, citing emerging signs of economic recovery that could ease the strain on the government’s balance sheet that's tarnished by the pandemic......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarMay 27th, 2021

British Chamber Philippines to continue promoting investment opportunities

(As released) British Chamber of Commerce Philippine Executive Director and Trustee Chris Nelson said vaccination is crucial to help the country’s economic recovery and attract more foreign direct investments......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 18th, 2021

CCE asks the government to promote 1,500 investment projects in intellectual property infrastructure – El Financiero

The country’s economy is showing signs of recovery supported by domestic consumption, public spending and exports; However, more growth can be achieved if the investment.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsJul 22nd, 2021

EDITORIAL - From stable to negative

Eight years after getting its first investment grade credit rating and “stable” outlook, the Philippines received a downgrade to “negative” from Fitch Ratings......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 15th, 2021

Philippines investment grade at risk after Fitch turns negative

The Philippines’ hard-earned credit rating that the Duterte administration tried to protect by limiting pandemic spending is now at risk of being downgraded, as the health crisis is seen leaving deep economic scars......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 12th, 2021

S& P keeps stable outlook for Philippines

S&P Global Ratings has maintained its investment grade rating and stable outlook for the Philippines as the country continues to recover from the pandemic-induced recession......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 27th, 2021

DBP gets & lsquo;BBB& rsquo; rating for US dollar notes

Debt watcher Fitch Ratings assigned an investment grade or “BBB” rating to Development Bank of the Philippines’ proposed US dollar senior unsecured notes, which will constitute direct, unconditional, unsubordinated, and unsecured obligations......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMar 2nd, 2021

‘Philippines imminent recovery best time for economic Cha-cha’

Now is the “best time” to introduce amendments to the prohibitive economic provisions of the 1987 Constitution, as the country has started to show signs of recovery from the global pandemic, leaders of the House of Representatives maintained yesterday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 20th, 2021

2 exchanges ask Congress to swiftly pass CREATE bill

The Philippine Stock Exchange and Philippine Dealing System Holdings Corp. on Monday asked Congress to swiftly pass the proposed Corporate Recovery and Tax Incentives for Enterprises Act to make the Philippines an attractive investment hub in the region and the domestic capital market a viable venue for raising funds......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 19th, 2021

Fitch affirms & lsquo;BBB& rsquo; rating with & lsquo;stable& rsquo; outlook on PH

Fitch Ratings said Monday it affirmed the Philippines’ investment grade score of “BBB” with a stable outlook, citing the country’s resilience amid the global pandemic and strong growth outlook that may hit around 6.9 percent in 2021 and 8 percent in 2022......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 11th, 2021

Pandemic strategy gets Fitch s nod with investment grade kept

Since the pandemic struck, it was no secret that economic managers have shrugged off calls for fiscal stimulus in a bid to keep the Philippines’ hard-earned investment grade rating......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 11th, 2021

AirAsia sees signs of recovery

The AirAsia Group, Asia’s largest low-cost carrier, expects air travel to bounce back soon as it sees strong signs of recovery in its key domestic markets, including the Philippines......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 19th, 2020

Sari-sari stores for micro-retailers launched

The Philippine Disaster Resilience Foundation, Coca-Cola Beverages Philippines Inc., Smart Communications, Unilever, Hapinoy, PASCO Philippines Corp., and US investment banking firm Jefferies LLC recently launched a joint Sari-Sari Store program aiming to jumpstart the early recovery of 400 micro-retailers in the Greater Manila area by giving them the opportunity to avail up to P10,000 worth of retailer packages. The launch was held as part of a virtual orientation for over 330 Hapinoy sari-sari store partners......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 30th, 2020

FMIC sees slower Q3 economic decline

A slower decline in economic output of not more than five percent can be expected in the third quarter of the year as signs of recovery continue to be seen in the industry sector, said the investment banking arm of the Metrobank Group......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 19th, 2020

‘Prolonged virus outbreak a major risk to recovery’

Japanese investment house Nomura said the prolonged coronavirus outbreak in the Philippines is likely to remain a major risk to the country’s recovery from the economic fallout caused by the pandemic......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 27th, 2020

REITs to jumpstart property recovery — JLL

The introduction of real estate investment trust in the Philippines has boosted investment sentiment for the property sector, with the office segment seen as the most attractive asset class, real estate services and consultancy firm JLL Philippines said......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2020

What’s in style? Safe shopping.

Rustan’s goes all out with safety measures, including the latest in disinfection and sanitation. THANK YOU FOR SMOKING. Rustan’s utilizes Spanish technology Sanivir, which contains active ingredients proven to kill bacteria, molds, and coronavirus These extraordinary times have completely shifted the definition of so many ordinary words. Take, for example, “weekends.” What does a weekend even mean, when everyone is living their weekends day in, day out? People cooped up inside their homes, Netflix and chilling (or pacing, depending on current anxiety levels), wearing their Natori Fortuna Mandarin all day, as governments all over the world caution to shelter in place.  Or “homecooked.” Everything’s veritably homecooked now—whether it’s cooked in your home, by you, or cooked in somebody else’s home, by an upstart baker you support because she’s your niece, or by your favorite chef, who is left with no choice but to create his oeuvres from his home kitchen.  Or “luxury.” Let’s be honest. Luxury—its BC (before Covid) definition—contained overused keywords like glamour, opulence, indulgence, lavishness. But times, they’ve changed.  Fancy things now seem so unnecessary, so excessive, so out of touch, so…pointless—in a world that has hastily pivoted back to the basics. Sipping tea from a Royal Albert 1980 Roseblush cup doesn’t seem as luxurious as being able to score some actual, hard-to-acquire Gold Yen Zhen tea from TWG, even if you have to gulp it from those ubiquitous bamboo cups.  The pandemic has changed what luxury meant. Now, luxury is the feeling of being safely ensconced in our cocoons, safe from the virus, safe from the madding crowds. Safety is luxury. To be more accurate: Luxury is being safe, while experiencing as few inconveniences as possible. One Home, One HopeMarketers and entrepreneurs are now realizing, after putting in all necessary work to convince their clients to come back, that a sense of safety is beyond physical, it is psychological. It’s Plexiglass with perception, masks coupled with marketing.  Brands, to successfully ride out these challenging times, need to do more than just tick off government checklists—they need to bank on their legacies, their ethos, their abiding sense of connection to loyal clientele.  AT YOUR SERVICE. Rustan’s opened up a Sanivir desk to allow its customers to avail of its method In the travel industry, as it is in the retail industry, it’s about leveraging on your loyal clientele’s sense of home. “Home” is no longer just their place of residence, but their familiar zones. It’s about “feeling at home.” As people start to nervously and grudgingly go out, they will only want to stay and explore sacred spaces where they’ve “felt at home.” Luxury retailer Rustan’s understands this well. “Our goal for the past 70 years has always been to serve the community with great service and to provide a safe environment that feels like home,” Nedy Tantoco, chairman of Rustan Commercial Corporation, says. “In this new chapter, we are committed to the idea of ‘One Home, One Hope.’ As an establishment that has been a second home for many shoppers, we will stay dedicated in implementing thorough safety protocols to ensure that our employees and shoppers are protected and can visit us with ease of mind.” And this is why higher-end businesses like Rustan’s will flourish, despite the financial challenges Covid-19 brings. They have the space, and they obviously can very well afford to put stringent safety measures in place. Precise precautions are in their DNA. These are establishments that cater to the VVIPs, whose exacting standards they’ve always tried to meet.  And it’s not just loyal clients who will seek out these private spaces—the occasional and habitual shopper will gravitate toward businesses that offer them this hushed environment. Going inside cramped little boutiques have lost their novelty, and many will shirk away from places that tend to be crowd favorites.  At Rustan’s, shoppers have always counted on the intimacy of the shopping experience. Unobtrusive but alert sales personnel have always kept their distance as you scan the racks, and there’s always a sense of quiet order—a serene retail floor space, backed by an efficient team who anticipate your needs and who move with the fluidity of a well-directed orchestra.  This efficiency will be in full display when you visit the store again—that is if you still haven’t since it reopened in June.   Opened after three months of closure, the luxury retailer has implemented, in compliance with government regulations, security measures like foot baths, thermal scans, hand sanitation, and mandatory wearing of masks. You’ll also see staff repeatedly disinfecting touchpoints like escalator rails and elevator buttons, and alcohol dispensers are going to be ubiquitous.   RETAIL WONDER. Sanivir is perfect for retail spac-es as smoke is dry and won’t stick to clothing Managers, sales associates, security personnel, and cleaners are all wearing masks, face shields, and goggles. But it’s the little touches that will remind you how they’ve set the bar high—sanitation boxes are placed in fitting rooms for clothes that are not purchased, fitting rooms are sanitized after every use, and store personnel are required to steam the clothes before putting them back on display.  At the payment counter, all credit cards will be sanitized, and packages will be disinfected before being handed to the customer. At the store’s East Café, tables are separated with plastic shields, and so are the wash basins in the restrooms, which will each have a sanitary officer, whose only job is it to disinfect the toilet after every use.  And that’s just the stage. Backstage, it’s just as—if not more—exacting. Introducing Sanivir, the latest in disinfection technology “Even in our employees’ canteens we have placed plastic shields to protect each of our employees while they are having their lunch break,” Nedy says. The company has required all returning employees to be tested for Covid-19.  Rustan’s is also continually disinfected using Sanivir, a technology introduced in the Philippines by chemist Pinky Tobiano of KPP Powers Commodities, who is also CEO of Qualibet Testing Services. “Sanivir is a smoke disinfectant from Spain, which contains glutaraldehyde and orthopenyl phenol—two active ingredients have been tested that can kill bacteria, molds, and viruses that have been proven against coronavirus by laboratories in EU.” PINKY’S PROMISE. Pinky Pe Tobiano, the chemistwho brought the technology to the Philippines “It was great timing and serendipitous that we found the product right before the pandemic escalated to the level it is now,” Pinky tells Manila Bulletin Lifestyle. “Sanivir was both an innovative and unique product that addresses the problem we currently have—it is easy to use, cost-friendly, effective, and safe.” It is a perfect disinfectant for a retail space—it only utilizes smoke, is dry, and won’t stick to clothing. “When Pinky introduced to me her disinfection program, I immediately asked her to do my father’s house and my own house,” Nedy shares. “I was so satisfied with the service that I asked her if she could open a service desk at Rustan’s to allow our customers the chance to avail of this disinfecting method. It’s so easy. Any housewife can do it. It allows us the ease of disinfecting without a fuss. It also works for our cars. The service desk has been open for two weeks at Rustan’s Ayala Avenue. And I am happy to say that it has met full acceptance with quite a number of Rustan’s customers.” Its ease of use is an advantage. “Just open the can, remove the plastic cover of the wick, set on a flat surface, light the wick, and leave for the next six to eight hours. The smoking process lasts for only one to two minutes, then disinfection takes place for the next six to eight hours,” Pinky says. “That’s good for 14 days.” And the cost? Surprisingly very minimal.  “One can of Sanivir of 25 grams is P1,750 and it’s good for 14 days for a room of 30 to 50 square meters,” Pinky says. “The cost per day is only a P125 investment. If you have five people in the room, the investment per person per day is only P25.”    But for those who are not in the mood to shop in-store, Rustan’s online service has amped up its service. Apart from its website, fortuitously launched a year ago, you can also tap the Personal Shoppers on Call Service, where sales associates respond to you on Viber, after which you can have your items delivered to you, or picked up by the curbside. Nedy shares, “And very soon, we will launch our Rustan’s Concierge Service, where customers can call a single number, and will be immediately assigned a personal shopper to attend to their needs.”  Now, many ways words and concepts are redefined in these troubled times—but having your own personal shopper, one who’ll do your shopping for you as you leisurely read the latest Kevin Kwan Sex and Vanity book in the comfort of your home?  We’re guessing that that’s a definition of luxury that won’t likely ever change—unprecedented crisis or not.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2020

Moody s keeps Philippines investment grade rating

With a stable outlook, changes to the credit rating are unlikely over the next 18-24 months......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 16th, 2020

ABAP head hopes pandemic-delayed Tokyo Olympics to push through

The Association of Boxing Alliances in the Philippines (ABAP) is keeping its fingers crossed that the Tokyo Olympics will push through in July next year. “I’m just hoping that the Olympics will push through because this is our best chance,” ABAP president Ricky Vargas told Tuesday’s online version of the Philippine Sportswriters Association (PSA) Forum. Vargas was reacting to wire reports saying that over half of Tokyo residents that took part in a recent survey are not comfortable with the staging of the Olympics in 2021. They either backed a “further delay or an outright cancellation” of the Tokyo Olympics. The Philippines has qualified two boxers in Eumir Marcial and Irish Magno to the Tokyo Games, and had hoped for a few more to make the grade, including Nesthy Petecio, Carlo Paalam, Rogen Ladon, and Ian Clark Bautista. “When I look at our boxers, we were ready (for Tokyo 2020),” said Vargas, who was joined by ABAP secretary-general Ed Picson in the forum and presented by San Miguel Corporation, Go For Gold PH, Amelie Hotel Manila, Braska Restaurant, and the Philippine Amusement and Gaming Corporation (PAGCOR) and powered by Smart. But because of the COVID-19 pandemic, everything came to a halt, including the rest of the qualifying tournaments. “We lost steam,” said Vargas. Picson said the Filipino boxers remain steadfast in their training even if there’s no definite schedule on hand. He said training is done mostly with the coaches’ online supervision. “But it’s not the same. Training online is not the same. We need to be able to go back to the gym and spar and box. Not only here but overseas as well,” said Vargas. “Given the situation, that is the next best thing,” Picson added. Vargas said it’s difficult to pin their hopes on a vaccine for things to be even close to what they used to be. “Mahirap hintayin ‘yung vaccine. They may have the vaccine but normally it takes years before we’d like to risk ourselves in getting the vaccine,” he added.   “It’s very sad if the Olympics will not push through at least next year. Or we wait for the next Olympics (in Paris in 2024),” Vargas said. “It’s a very tough decision. The IOC (International Olympic Committee), I’ve been reading, is having a very difficult time because of all the investment put in by the Japanese government,” he added. The ABAP chief had high hopes that the country could win the elusive gold in the Tokyo Olympics – through boxing. But the pandemic, somehow, had turned things around......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 30th, 2020

Kat Tolentino: How she ended up as a Lady Eagle

Suffering an injury is a dreadful experience for any athlete. What more if it’s a career-threatening one? Kat Tolentino went through three harrowing knee injuries in a span of three years – two of those she suffered while in Canada. But those misfortunes played a big role in convincing Tolentino to fly to the Philippines and eventually become one of the most recognized names in collegiate volleyball. The Ateneo de Manila University volleyball star in an interview on So She Did podcast shared how she ended up in the Lady Eagles' nest.   “It was actually a long story but basically, when I was in Grade 11, my brother was out there in the Philippines already, he was playing basketball for Ateneo and I was just visiting him for vacation,” said Kat, sister of former Blue Eagle Vince. The Ateneo volleyball management that time already knew who the 6-foot-2 spiker was and she was invited to train with the then Roger Gorayeb-mentored Lady Eagles. “I actually don’t even have the shoes at that time or any like knee pads,” she recalled. “So I have to borrow from my cousin and then I borrowed knee pads from the men’s team.” She played with the team but it didn’t convince her to follow the footsteps of her brother, living alone in a tropical country that is thousand of miles away from home. “For me I was in Grade 11 at that time and I didn’t really think like, ‘Oh I want to go to the Philippines’. In fact, I was kind of confused why my brother moved there,” said Tolentino, who is currently back in Canada after the cancellation of the UAAP Season 82 due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. “I think, it’s just crazy because at that time, I was getting mad at my mom because I was like, ‘Why are you making me move to the Philippines?’ I was only like Grade 11,” she added. Tolentino that time wasn’t ready to get out of her comfort zone. Naturally, she chose to stay in the Great White North. Tolentino was in University of Canada when she suffered her second left anterior cruciate ligament injury in 2014, a year after her first.    “I went to University in Canada for one year and I don’t know if you know that I had three ACL injuries. So the second ACL injury, I was in University in Canada but I just decided after I got the second one in Canada, I needed change and I wanted to experience something different,” she said. Tolentino thought a new environment might change her fortune. Luckily, the Lady Eagles’ door remained open. “Ateneo contacted me when they heard I got injured again,” she said. “They said that they’re still willing to help me and wanted to help me with my rehab and therapy and they had a very good surgeon. So yeah, they just called up and I ended up there.” The hype was high for the Fil-Canadian when she finally got the chance to don the blue and white when the then two-time UAAP champion Ateneo joined the now defunct Shakey’s V-League Collegiate Conference in July 2015. But the injury bug followed her to the Philippines and once again bit Tolentino hard. The hitter suffered a right ACL injury while warming up and had to undergo another operation and months of rehabilitation. She was forced to miss UAAP Season 78 and watched helplessly from the sidelines as archrival De La Salle University dethroned the Lady Eagles. After months of therapy, Tolentino finally made her official debut in the UAAP in Season 79 in 2017 – a victorious welcome over University of Sto. Tomas. Ateneo fell short in the Finals that year. The following season, the Lady Eagles missed the championship entirely for the first time in six years. In Season 81, Tolentino helped Ateneo capture its third title. She announced after winning the crown that she’s leaving the team but decided to make a return for a swan song this year. Unfortunately, the league cancelled the tournament after just four playdates. Asked if she’ll be back for another tour of duty if given the chance, Tolentino admitted that she’s still thinking about it. “I think for me it’s not something I can decide now,” she said. “I would be thankful if they would allow me to go back but I can’t say anything right now.” Looking back, Tolentino would like to think that her second ACL injury brought her to Ateneo. It wasn’t the best of situation to be in to make a life-changing decision but it in the end it turned out just fine.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 22nd, 2020

National emergency investment scheme to save firms in peril

The proposed National Emergency Investment Corporation (NEIC), an investment vehicle that will enter into joint ventures or manage enterprises facing liquidity troubles due to COVID-19 disruptions, has become imperative. The NEIC creation, contained in House Bill 6619 forms part of the Accelerated Recovery and Investments Stimulus for the Economy of the Philippines Act. HB 6619 […] The post National emergency investment scheme to save firms in peril appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsJun 6th, 2020