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Sharing good vibes on & lsquo;Grateful Tuesdays& rsquo;

Chemist Pinky Tobiano continues to become a blessing to all the recipients of the Care and Share Program of Grateful Tuesdays. With over 500 families reached, Tobiano together with her friends from the private sectors widened its reach and added more sponsors to help in this activity......»»

Category: entertainmentSource: thestandard thestandardOct 27th, 2020

Sharing more blessings through & lsquo;Grateful Tuesdays& rsquo;

Blessings poured once more in the 7th and season-ender episode of Grateful Tuesdays when Ilocos Sur Mayor Chavit Singson appeared as a special guest last Tuesday, Nov. 3. He gave out P200,000 to four lucky and outstanding citizens......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 16th, 2020

SEA GAMES: The silver that glittered like gold

When the editorial staff of ABS-CBN Sports was tasked to come up with our most memorable coverage, it didn’t take long for this writer to respond. The Philippine men’s volleyball team’s Southeast Asian Games semifinal match was the first thing that came to mind. Pesonally, that game against the highly-fancied Thailand squad topped all the countless volleyball matches that I’ve covered in my career. I’m at a loss for words on how to describe the emotions I felt that chilly night of December 8, 2019. Around 6,700 fans filled the PhilSports Arena in Pasig City not knowing that what they were about to witness was something historic. A magical night that would take away the frustrations they felt the day before when the more popular women’s team finished the preliminary round winless. For us sportswriters covering that assignment, we knew the Filipinos were up for a tough ride. Thailand ruled the last four editions of the event. On the other hand, the Philippines’ last significant outing in the biennial meet was a bronze medal finish back in 1991 – or when the current national team’s oldest member, setter Jessie Lopez was just five-years old.      Did we doubt our own team? Let’s just say we prayed to the high heavens to give us something positive to write about. But don’t get us wrong. Those who followed the formation and preparation of the squad knew it would yield results come the SEA Games. After all, in all three batches of the Nationals that participated in the regional sports meet since 2015, this particular team had the longest time to prepare – around eight months to be exact. The team’s composition itself looked really promising. For the first time, two of country’s best hitters in Marck Espejo and Bryan Bagunas, who both have experience playing in the Japan V. League,  donned the tricolors together. Espejo returned after skipping the 2017 edition so did his teammates in the 2015 squad Rex Intal and setter Ish Polvorosa. Bagunas was on his second tour of duty along with team captain John Vic De Guzman, Mark Alfafara, RanRan Abdilla and libero Jack Kalingking. Head coach Dante Alinsunurin, who was appointed to handle the team after Oliver Almadro and Sammy Acaylar in 2015 and 2017, respectively, tapped an old hand in Lopez and injected young bloods in playmaker Owa Retamar, Jau Umandal, Kim Malabunga, Ricky Marcos and Francis Saura. As part of their buildup the Nationals joined the Thailand Open Sealect Tuna Championship July last year.          The Filipinos achieved a great feat when they won bronze. Fans were able to witness the Nationals’ campaign via YouTube streaming while we volleyball writers, got to file our full stories through the help of De Guzman and Bagunas (God bless their beautiful hearts) who supplied us with game stats and granted postgame interviews. It’s just a shame I never got to cover the team’s training in Japan when the Nationals’ preparation went on full throttle. (Note: A little confusion in the training camp coverage assignments had me flying to Japan with the women’s squad and Lance Agcaoili of Spin.ph joining the men’s team. But it was a great experience, nonetheless, and I’m grateful for Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. for the opportunity.)     I was as confused as the other sportswriters present during the draw for the group stage a couple of months before the SEA Games when Alinsunurin chose to join the four-team bracket with Indonesia, Vietnam and Cambodia. Those three teams are considered contenders every SEA Games edition. And earning a semifinal spot would be harder compared to the other group composed of Thailand, Myanmar and Singapore. Fortunately, the gamble was worth it. Espejo and Bagunas were superb offensively, Malabunga and Retamar made their presence felt and the Nationals’ blocking shocked Cambodia and Vietnam as the Filipinos swept them both to secure a semis seat.   Then came the steamrolling Indonesians. Honestly, I thought the Nationals would sweep their way to the group’s top seeding. That way the PHI’s would've avoided a semis clash with Thailand. Forced to take on the defending champions, the Filipinos found themselves down in the first set. They got back in the second frame before yielding the third. And when the Thais came to match point, 24-21, in the fourth we all thought it was over. Fans were slowly emptying the bleachers not wanting to see the impending defeat. I was already waiting for the final score. Ready break the result. Then a miracle happened. The Nationals nibbled on the Thais' lead to force a deuce. After another deadlock, the Filipinos stole the set. The fifth frame was classic story of ‘who wants it more will win.’ An extended set made it even more dramatic. I vividly remember that sequence when Bagunas hammered the game-clinching kill off a lob from Lopez. After that all that I can recall was me pumping my fist up in the air and slapping the hardest high-fives I ever did with those inside the press room while howling like a madman.    The national team assured itself of a silver after 42 years. A silver after four freaking decades. They did it. Of course, the Indonesians bullied their way to winning the gold medal in a sweep of the inexperienced Filipinos. But who cares, the host team exceeded its podium expectations. That silver that glittered like gold made that coverage truly memorable. But it never crossed my mind that it would be the last important volleyball event that I will get to report. (Note: It would’ve been the UAAP if not for the health crisis that put all sporting events to a halt. Sad.) And that’s why I ended up writing these last few paragraphs. A farewell from this section. From my first article for this website back on December 1, 2014 – a post-mortem of Petron’s breakthrough title in the Philippine Superliga Grand Prix – to my last published story, these were all written with only one thing in mind: in the service of the Filipino sports fan worldwide. Our run may have not been perfect, of course, we had our flaws. We had our fair share of criticisms from fans, athletes, sports personalities and sometimes even from our partner leagues and properties. We accepted our shortcomings. We tried to be better. But we are proud of what we did. We take pride with how we delivered sports stories through various digital executions that showcased sports beyond the confines of competition. On midnight of September 1 while most of you lay sound asleep, deep in slumber, hopefully, having a good dream and hours away from waking up looking forward to a better day, this website will be snapped out of existence.  More than half a decade of sharing stories to the Filipino sports fan will be seeing its last presence online on Monday – a holiday to celebrate the nation’s heroes. This website will then hear its final buzzer, its final whistle. Thousands of articles – written with passion, dedication and love – will be taken down as this website goes offline together with majority of ABS-CBN Sports’ social media accounts. But soon, hopefully, it will once again see the light of day.    We do hope that you will remember us, for we will remember all of you who made us your Kapamilya.   -- 30 --   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles Mark Escarlote has served as a sub-section editor for ABS-CBN Sports' website since 2014. He is among thousands of ABS-CBN employees who will be retrenched on August 31, 2020.   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 29th, 2020

SEA GAMES: The silver that glittered like gold

When the editorial staff of ABS-CBN Sports was tasked to come up with our most memorable coverage, it didn’t take long for this writer to respond. The Philippine men’s volleyball team’s Southeast Asian Games semifinal match was the first thing that came to mind. Pesonally, that game against the highly-fancied Thailand squad topped all the countless volleyball matches that I’ve covered in my career. I’m at a loss for words on how to describe the emotions I felt that chilly night of December 8, 2019. Around 6,700 fans filled the PhilSports Arena in Pasig City not knowing that what they were about to witness was something historic. A magical night that would take away the frustrations they felt the day before when the more popular women’s team finished the preliminary round winless. For us sportswriters covering that assignment, we knew the Filipinos were up for a tough ride. Thailand ruled the last four editions of the event. On the other hand, the Philippines’ last significant outing in the biennial meet was a bronze medal finish back in 1991 – or when the current national team’s oldest member, setter Jessie Lopez was just five-years old.      Did we doubt our own team? Let’s just say we prayed to the high heavens to give us something positive to write about. But don’t get us wrong. Those who followed the formation and preparation of the squad knew it would yield results come the SEA Games. After all, in all three batches of the Nationals that participated in the regional sports meet since 2015, this particular team had the longest time to prepare – around eight months to be exact. The team’s composition itself looked really promising. For the first time, two of country’s best hitters in Marck Espejo and Bryan Bagunas, who both have experience playing in the Japan V. League,  donned the tricolors together. Espejo returned after skipping the 2017 edition so did his teammates in the 2015 squad Rex Intal and setter Ish Polvorosa. Bagunas was on his second tour of duty along with team captain John Vic De Guzman, Mark Alfafara, RanRan Abdilla and libero Jack Kalingking. Head coach Dante Alinsunurin, who was appointed to handle the team after Oliver Almadro and Sammy Acaylar in 2015 and 2017, respectively, tapped an old hand in Lopez and injected young bloods in playmaker Owa Retamar, Jau Umandal, Kim Malabunga, Ricky Marcos and Francis Saura. As part of their buildup the Nationals joined the Thailand Open Sealect Tuna Championship July last year.          The Filipinos achieved a great feat when they won bronze. Fans were able to witness the Nationals’ campaign via YouTube streaming while we volleyball writers, got to file our full stories through the help of De Guzman and Bagunas (God bless their beautiful hearts) who supplied us with game stats and granted postgame interviews. It’s just a shame I never got to cover the team’s training in Japan when the Nationals’ preparation went on full throttle. (Note: A little confusion in the training camp coverage assignments had me flying to Japan with the women’s squad and Lance Agcaoili of Spin.ph joining the men’s team. But it was a great experience, nonetheless, and I’m grateful for Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. for the opportunity.)     I was as confused as the other sportswriters present during the draw for the group stage a couple of months before the SEA Games when Alinsunurin chose to join the four-team bracket with Indonesia, Vietnam and Cambodia. Those three teams are considered contenders every SEA Games edition. And earning a semifinal spot would be harder compared to the other group composed of Thailand, Myanmar and Singapore. Fortunately, the gamble was worth it. Espejo and Bagunas were superb offensively, Malabunga and Retamar made their presence felt and the Nationals’ blocking shocked Cambodia and Vietnam as the Filipinos swept them both to secure a semis seat.   Then came the steamrolling Indonesians. Honestly, I thought the Nationals would sweep their way to the group’s top seeding. That way the PHI’s would've avoided a semis clash with Thailand. Forced to take on the defending champions, the Filipinos found themselves down in the first set. They got back in the second frame before yielding the third. And when the Thais came to match point, 24-21, in the fourth we all thought it was over. Fans were slowly emptying the bleachers not wanting to see the impending defeat. I was already waiting for the final score. Ready break the result. Then a miracle happened. The Nationals nibbled on the Thais' lead to force a deuce. After another deadlock, the Filipinos stole the set. The fifth frame was classic story of ‘who wants it more will win.’ An extended set made it even more dramatic. I vividly remember that sequence when Bagunas hammered the game-clinching kill off a lob from Lopez. After that all that I can recall was me pumping my fist up in the air and slapping the hardest high-fives I ever did with those inside the press room while howling like a madman.    The national team assured itself of a silver after 42 years. A silver after four freaking decades. They did it. Of course, the Indonesians bullied their way to winning the gold medal in a sweep of the inexperienced Filipinos. But who cares, the host team exceeded its podium expectations. That silver that glittered like gold made that coverage truly memorable. But it never crossed my mind that it would be the last important volleyball event that I will get to report. (Note: It would’ve been the UAAP if not for the health crisis that put all sporting events to a halt. Sad.) And that’s why I ended up writing these last few paragraphs. A farewell from this section. From my first article for this website back on December 1, 2014 – a post-mortem of Petron’s breakthrough title in the Philippine Superliga Grand Prix – to my last published story, these were all written with only one thing in mind: in the service of the Filipino sports fan worldwide. Our run may have not been perfect, of course, we had our flaws. We had our fair share of criticisms from fans, athletes, sports personalities and sometimes even from our partner leagues and properties. We accepted our shortcomings. We tried to be better. But we are proud of what we did. We take pride with how we delivered sports stories through various digital executions that showcased sports beyond the confines of competition. On midnight of September 1 while most of you lay sound asleep, deep in slumber, hopefully, having a good dream and hours away from waking up looking forward to a better day, this website will be snapped out of existence.  More than half a decade of sharing stories to the Filipino sports fan will be seeing its last presence online on Monday – a holiday to celebrate the nation’s heroes. This website will then hear its final buzzer, its final whistle. Thousands of articles – written with passion, dedication and love – will be taken down as this website goes offline together with majority of ABS-CBN Sports’ social media accounts. But soon, hopefully, it will once again see the light of day.    We do hope that you will remember us, for we will remember all of you who made us your Kapamilya.   -- 30 --   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles Mark Escarlote has served as a sub-section editor for ABS-CBN Sports' website since 2014. He is among thousands of ABS-CBN employees who will be retrenched on August 31, 2020.   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 28th, 2020

& lsquo;Grateful Tuesdays& rsquo;

About a thousand individuals have received assistance from the digital show Grateful Tuesday led by its host, Chemist Pinky Tobiano......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 5th, 2020

& lsquo;Grateful Tuesdays& rsquo; with chemist Pinky Tobiano

Witness the much-awaited comeback of chemist Pinky Tobiano on the CSTV screen with her new show, Grateful Tuesdays, which premieres tonight at 7:00 on Cornerstone Entertainment FB Page. The show streams simultaneously CSTV Kumu Account......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 22nd, 2020

ONE Championship: Angela Lee banking on grappling experience against Denice Zamboanga

Reigning ONE Women’s Atomweight World Champion Angela “Unstoppable” Lee has been nothing short of dominant at the top of the women’s atomweight division.    The Singaporean star has been able to dispatch every challenger put in front of her, and when she finally steps into the ONE circle once again, Lee will face another new challenger in Filipina newcomer Denice “The Menace Fairtex” Zamboanga.  Just two fights into the Asia-based promotion, Zamboanga has been impressive, posting wins over Jihin Radzuan and two-time title challenger Mei Yamaguchi. Those two outings were enough for Zamboanga to earn a shot at the queen of the atomweight division.  For her part, Lee believes that it will be an great matchup.  “I’m just excited to get back in the ONE Circle again. I’m feeling extremely motivated for my next matchup. I think it’ll be a great fight,” Lee told ONE Championship.  In her two wins, Zamboanga was able to utilize superb wrestling and grappling to grind out victories, which poses an interesting challenge to Lee, who has put her elite-level grappling to good use as well.  “I think Denice is very well-rounded,” Lee said. “She’s an up-and-coming fighter. I also think that her team did a great job in creating a smart game plan for her in the Yamaguchi fight, and she was able to execute that plan and get the decision win.” “She’s young, hungry, and well-rounded. She is the new breed of MMA fighter that can do it all. She can strike, wrestle, and grapple. But I think she may be inexperienced in certain areas of the game,” Lee added.  Lee’s grappling has been her number one weapon throughout her career, winning seven of her ten career fights via submission, including her latest victory over reigning ONE Women’s Strawweight titleholder Xiong Jing Nan.  Having a top-level Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu black belt for a husband and training partner surely helps Lee’s cause.  Lee is married to fellow ONE Championship athlete and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu champion Bruno Pucci.  “I love training with my husband. He always pushes me hard and brings out the best in me,” said Lee. “I’m very grateful to have him as my partner in life and in training. Bruno is a second degree BJJ black belt and a two-time No Gi world champion. He has a lot of knowledge and I really appreciate everything that he shares with me.” Zamboanga definitely provides a refreshing challenge for Lee, but the reigning champion is confident in her chances of holding on to the title.  “I just think it’ll be a great fight. The fans will love it. It will definitely be exciting. But when that final bell rings, you will hear the words, ‘and still,’” Lee concluded......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 30th, 2020

Team Lakay mentor Mark Sangiao looking forward to re-opening gym once lockdown is lifted

Following the May 15 deadline of the Luzon-wide Enhanced Community Quarantine due to the COVID-19 pandemic, some parts of the island have started to ease restrictions on the quarantine with the sole purpose of getting the economy back on track While the National Capital Region will remain under Modified Enhanced Community Quarantine, other places like Baguio City have transitioned into General Community Quarantine, which means some restrictions will be eased up. Gym operations however, are not yet among those restrictions to be lifted. Still, the transition to GCQ is a start, and barring a second wave of infections to hit, a return to the gym could soon be on the horizon, which is welcome news to the members of Team Lakay. For Team Lakay head coach Mark Sangiao, once the lockdown has been lifted, re-opening the gym and returning to the regular routine is the primary goal. “I only have one plan after the lockdown, and that is to go back to our regular training program and routine. I know they are doing their own training at home, but of course things are different in the gym,” Sangiao said. The La Trinidad-based martial arts stable closed their gym doors during the height of the quarantine back in March, and have only returned there to do individual workouts or as a control center for their relief operations. The team hasn’t been able to work out as a group in months and have resorted to home training to keep themselves fit. “While we’re on lockdown, we continue training at home, and when needed for social responsibilities, we go out,” Sangiao stated.  “Then if there’s a chance, we drop by the gym and train. Whoever can go out and is within the vicinity, sometimes we meet up in the gym to work out and do sauna after. I also have more time in managing the team’s social media one thing that I wasn’t able to do in this pandemic,” he added. Still, even with things looking quite bleak right now, Sangiao says that he is grateful for good health. “I would say that we are very fortunate because we are all doing fine here amid the scary things that we’re seeing with COVID. I pray that we find a cure soon for this pandemic.” Obviously, the Team Lakay mentor is longing for things to return to normal so that they can once again enjoy even the little things, like going out for lunch as a team. “Like all the others, I miss a lot of things that we used to do before the lockdown, like eating with the team after training. There is a small restaurant near the gym and we often went there for lunch after our training,” Sangiao shared.  "That’s a very good restaurant, and it became our bonding. As they say, ‘Good memories, and good plans start at the dining table.’” Still, the number one thing that Sangiao, and the rest of Team Lakay want to be able to return to work. “We might visit the place after the ECQ, but just like what I’ve said, I have only one plan after the lockdown – that is to go back to our regular training program and routine and prepare the athletes for their future battles,” he concluded.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 19th, 2020

Soul Surfer Bethany Hamilton shares her incredible story on Rich Franklin s Franklin Speaking podcast

Bethany Hamilton’s inspiring story has captured the imagination of millions who have been moved by her unbreakable spirit in the face of adversity.   The American surfer inspired people across the globe when she returned to the sport she loved, despite the loss of her left arm in a shark attack. Her following has continued to grow because of her subsequent success, and recently, her 2019 documentary, Unstoppable, which is currently streaming on Netflix.  Rich Franklin is also no stranger to adversity. He battled for acceptance and success to become recognized as the best middleweight mixed martial artist in the world as UFC Champion, before becoming Vice President of the world’s largest martial arts organization, ONE Championship.  The hall-of-fame athlete has also encountered many fascinating characters during his career, particularly as the host of Rich Franklin’s ONE Warrior Series, and his new video podcast, Franklin Speaking, which takes the audience on a deep dive as he and co-host Jonathan Fong discover their guests’ stories.   Bethany is among the most colorful and inspiring characters Rich has met. After she first got on a board aged 8, she was a precocious talent in the surfing world who gained her first sponsor just a year later. However, aged 13, a shark took her arm when she was out surfing with a friend.  Losing a limb, particularly at such a young age, would have made most ordinary people give up on their dreams of surfing entirely. But despite such a traumatic ordeal, Bethany was back among the waves just a month later and went on to win competitions all over the world.  She also appeared everywhere from Oprah to Ellen and wowed viewers with her exceptional strength of will. Soon, Bethany evolved from being seen as an unfortunate victim into an inspirational role model.    At times, however, being in the limelight comes at a cost. Having made the transformation from the world of education to mixed martial arts, Rich can relate to the prospect of having to adjust to a sudden wave of attention, and asked about that on the show.  “How did you manage? Especially at that age, because I had trouble with this. I used to be a high school teacher and, what seemed like overnight, my life turned into something where people were standing in line for autographs. How did you manage this at the age of 13?”  Bethany’s responses offered a glimpse into just how difficult it was for her to deal will so much attention at such a tender age.  “It took me a long time to get to a place where I was more accepting of it. The only thing that kept me sane was having good friends and surfing. I think over time, I just saw the beauty in storytelling, and sharing my life was really impactful, and I saw the value of that. I wanted to let that be a part of my life.”  The 30-year-old is certainly no stranger to big challenges. There was one, in particular, which left Rich in awe as he quizzed her about surfing ‘Jaws’ in Maui, which is home to some of the biggest waves in the world.  ‘’The wave could literally take out a house. It’s just so enormous and powerful with the type of waves that are death-defying. I’ve always had a drive for bigger surf, even when I was younger. I was always chasing bigger waves than my peers.”  Bethany, now a mother of two, is a multiple award-winner, has had a film and numerous documentaries made about her inspirational life story, and has published eight books. Her latest venture is an online course entitled Unstoppable Year, which she broke down to Rich and Jonathan.   “I’m taking all of the things I’ve learned along the way or the things I’ve done that have empowered me to overcome and kind of live a somewhat unstoppable life. I’m not perfect, but kind of carrying on life with that unstoppable feeling and knowing that we can overcome when tough stuff comes our way, we can be a blessing to others. We can live thoughtfully and we can change our mindset from negative to positive. Every little choice we make can have a huge impact on our future. We’re packaging that into something really rad and life-changing for people. It really is changing people’s lives, so it’s super fun to be a part of.”  The way Bethany tackles conquering adversity and crushing extraordinary challenges impressed Rich, and their chat offered a fascinating look at how far a strong mindset can get you.  Though she was one of the first guests on the show, her story has set a high bar for what’s to come in the future.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 19th, 2020

Pinoy Sports heroes pay tribute to their real MVPs on Mother’s Day

Athletes are some of the most celebrated and respected people in the world, no doubt.  We look up to athletes for their skills, and we idolize them for how they are, on and off their respective arenas.  But even the biggest athletes have their own idols, their own heroes, and their “’real MVPs”, to quote the great Kevin Durant.  While celebrating our mothers should really be a year-round thing, it won’t hurt to give them a little extra love on Mother’s Day, right?  That’s just what these Pinoy sports stars did for their first-ever coaches and their biggest fans, their mothers.          View this post on Instagram                   Happy momma’s day to our beautiful Rock. She’s been our fan since day one and you deserve all the credit. You and Papa. Through good games and bad, you cheered for us. Trials and challenges, you willed us through. We love you! Happy mother’s day to all the wonderful mothers out there! A post shared by Kiefer Ravena (@kieferravena15) on May 9, 2020 at 11:01pm PDT         View this post on Instagram                   So grateful to have the best mom, friend, coach, supporter, cheerleader, and teacher all in one. Everything I do is for you, and you are the reason behind all my achievements. But most of all, thank you for teaching me that those achievements mean nothing if i’m not a good person. ???? . . You’re my idol forever! Still hope to be like you when I grow up. ily and happy mother’s day?? . . grabe yung support, may tarp and all + yung yakap parang panalo na pero opening ceremonies palang toh ?? . #seagames2019 #wewinasone #karate #bestmom #karategirl #mom A post shared by Jamie Lim (@jamiechristinelim) on May 10, 2020 at 12:19am PDT         View this post on Instagram                   Happy Mother’s Day to the most amazing woman I gladly call mommy ???????????? Love you mom! ?? A post shared by Agatha Chrystenzen Wong (@agathawongy) on May 9, 2020 at 9:58pm PDT         View this post on Instagram                   Happy Mother‘s Day @josefinadaquis & @stephaniedaquis Love you both ?? A post shared by Rachel Anne Daquis, XFS (@rachdaquis13) on May 9, 2020 at 10:16pm PDT         View this post on Instagram                   To the reason behind our victories and most especially why we can rise from a defeat, Happy Mother’s day Mudra! Thank you for all your unconditional love and sacrifices for the entire family ?? Everyday should be Mother’s day!!! ???? A post shared by Dani Ravena (@daniravenaaa) on May 9, 2020 at 11:48pm PDT         View this post on Instagram                   Happy Mother’s Day, mama! ILY ILY ???? A post shared by Wave Papi (@_kokoparas) on May 9, 2020 at 11:22pm PDT         View this post on Instagram                   Happy Mother’s Day to all the mothers out there! A post shared by Rex Intal ???????? (@rexintal) on May 9, 2020 at 9:34pm PDT         View this post on Instagram                   To all those who still have their mothers with them, please do me a favour and go hug your mothers as tightly as you all can, while you still have her. Happy mother’s day Ma, I love you and I wish I could hug you right now ???????????????????? A post shared by Ernestine Tiamzon (@ernietiamzon) on May 9, 2020 at 10:40pm PDT          .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 10th, 2020

Marano s YouTube channel reaches 100K subscribers

National women’s volleyball team captain Aby Marano reached another career milestone. But this time outside the volleyball court. The F2 Logistics star’s Youtube channel, which she christened ‘Vlog-galag’, reached 100,000 subscribers. The 27-year old middle blocker posted on her Instagram account a photo of her holding an edited silver play button plaque after getting a notification of the milestone on Thursday. Marano has yet to receive the actual award.         View this post on Instagram                   Thank you so much swishiees! Thank you for appreciating Vlog-galag. Hobby ko lang magshoot ng memories namin and YT is the only platform na pwede ko masave lahat even wala na kong copy sa gadgets ko. Ngayon, naka 100k subscribers na! Jusko NKKLK! ???? KILIG ME! Hindi ko inexpect na magugustuhan nyo. Will keep filming fun memories during our down times para makilala nyo kami ng lubos outside the volleyball court ???? Special thanks sa aking mga teammates na always game for vloggalag and more fun! Yung mga maniningil sakin jan, wag kayo mag-alala, gawin niyo kong ninang sa lahat ng mga anak niyo di ko kayo tataguan tuwing pasko! HAHAHA ♥? Love you swisshiees, x.o.x.o ???????? P.S. edited yung plaque wag kayong ano jan ???????? A post shared by Abigail Palmares Maraño (@abymarano) on Apr 22, 2020 at 9:02pm PDT Known for her tenacity, aggressiveness and passion inside the volleyball court with a beast mode don’t care attitude, Marano showed her lighter side with her vlog entries. Sending good vibes and pure fun as well as giving viewers a chance to peer on how Marano and her vlog guests – mostly volleyball stars - are outside the court. Marano’s vlog also features her travels with her club and national squad teamates as well as fun clips with her beau NorthPort guard Robert Bolick......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 23rd, 2020

Shaun Ildefonso stars in ABS-CBN Sports’ “SRSLY” digital series

UAAP star Shaun Ildefonso brings his A game from the basketball court to the digital world in the new series “SRSLY” of ABS-CBN Sports. In “SRSLY,” the NU Bulldogs team captain gets to speak his mind and let his personality shine as he talks about sports culture and trending topics in the sports world with a no-holds-barred approach. The show, shot entirely in Shaun’s home due to the enhanced community quarantine, can be viewed on ABS-CBN Sports accounts on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Youtube, where its first four episodes have already garnered 5.5 million views across all platforms. As the star of the show, the 22 year-old forward brings the same intensity that he is known for inside the court, where he is used to banging bodies and roaring at the crowd, while also showing his fun and charming side as he reacts to viral social media posts. In the first three episodes, Shaun called out haters while praising UAAP volleyball athletes, gave his two cents on how athletes are coping without sports, and provided a critique on the tribute performance of PBA players. In the latest episode, he gives his take on famous athlete-couples such as Kiefer Ravena and Alyssa Valdez and Deanna Wong and Jema Galanza. “I think the authenticity of my reactions and genuineness of my opinion sets this series apart,” said Shaun, who’s used to sharing the spotlight with his father, basketball legend Danny Ildefonso, and brother Dave, another UAAP superstar and a Gilas Pilipinas pool member.   But while the show allows him to freely express his thoughts, Shaun said that “SRSLY” looks to remind viewers to not take everything too seriously. He hopes that his good vibes rub off to his viewers as he believes that having a good laugh from time to time is needed. “Stay lighthearted in these times of anxiety and uncertainty, take moments to relax and get a good laugh in because everyone needs it,” he said.  “SRSLY” is one of the exclusive social media content being offered by ABS-CBN Sports as its parent network ABS-CBN transitions into a digital company, with the biggest online presence among all media companies in the Philippines and a growing list of digital properties.  Watch the first four episodes on the YouTube channel, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter accounts of ABS-CBN Sports, the sports arm of the country’s leading media and entertainment organization. Celebrate sports culture in the Philippines with Kapamilya sports fans. Follow @ABSCBNSports on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram and subscribe to the ABS-CBN Sports YouTube channel. To watch more sports videos, visit sports.abs-cbn.com. For updates, follow @ABSCBNPR on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram or visit www.abscbnpr.com.      .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 19th, 2020

UAAP Season 82: Sato leading with energy, good vibes

Graduating Risa Sato is embracing her role as team captain for the National University Lady Bulldogs this UAAP Season 82 women’s volleyball tournament. Back after a year removed from collegiate volleyball action, Sato is bringing in the good vibes and happy approach to the game as well as the experience and maturity needed by the young Lady Bulldogs. Her leadership on and off the court did wonders for NU, which won two straight games before the tournament was halted in light of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.        In spite of obvious obstacles in communication with the Fil-Japanese middle having difficulties expressing herself in English and Filipino, she’s still able to get her message across by example.    “Sabi ko sa mga teammate ko na, kasama mga rookies, sabi ko sa kanila na basta wag kayong kakabahan. Basta enjoy lang tayo. Basta enjoy ang laro. You look at me. Smile, smile ganyan,” said Sato, who averaged 12.5 points per game including six kill blocks per outing in NU’s first two games.    During practice, Sato actively preaches the Japanese style of volleyball discipline. “Malaki po ang epekto niya kasi po iba ang laro niya, iba po ang pagiging jolly niya, iba po ang pagi-enjoy niya, pag-iingay nya sobrang nadadala kami,” said NU sophomore Ivy Lacsina of Sato. “Mas marami po kaming natututunan sa kanya kasi galing nga siya ng Japan so ang mga nakuha niya dun pinapa-adapt niya sa amin,” she added. “Sobrang good para sa amin kasi hindi lang galing sa coaches ang natututunan namin kundi dahil din sa kanya.” Head coach Norman Miguel knows Sato’s limitations that’s why he encourages his other veterans to help her in leading the team. “Nu’ng in-appoint namin siya as team captain, automatic sinabihan namin ang ibang seniors na ‘Kayo ang katulong ni Risa when it comes to expressing her feelings and emotions, her thoughts kasi hirap nga siyang mag-express,” she said. Former NU star Jaja Santiago has nothing but praises for Sato.   “Ang maganda naman kay Risa di siya sumusuko na matuto talagang mag-Tagalog. Dati kasi natatandaan ko yan lagi siyang umiiyak. Kasi may gusto siyang sabihin, gusto niyang matutunan ang ganitong skills pero di niya ma-express ang sarili niya,” said the Japan V. Premier League import. “Pero ngayon makikita mo siya na siya na ang nagga-guide sa players, sya ang kumakausap sa mga players. Happy ako nakaka-adapt na siya sa Pilipinas,” added Santiago.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles          .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 17th, 2020

UAAP Season 82: No time to relax for fired up Lady Eagles

Even after a dominating win to set their title defense in motion, Ateneo de Manila University feels that it is still far from the same form that won the Lady Eagles the throne last year.   Graduating hitter Kat Tolentino points out that the Lady Eagles can’t afford to relax with just a step in their long journey to remain seated on the throne.   “It was a good first win. There’s still a lot that needs to be fixed. It’s just the start of the season. It doesn’t mean anything for us,” said Tolentino on Wednesday following Ateneo’s 25-13, 25-17, 25-23, drubbing of University of the Philippines in the UAAP Season 82 women’s volleyball tournament at the MOA Arena. The Lady Eagles buckled down to business and showed how serious they are in keeping the title perched in their campus in Katipunan, crushing the Fighting Maroons in one hour and 31 minutes. But the battle is far from over.   “We’re still trying to defend the crown and like what coach (Oliver Almadro) said ‘Just because you won last year, doesn’t mean that it’s the same as this year.’ So we’re gonna continue working hard,’” said Tolentino. Despite losing key players in now graduate Bea De Leon and Maddie Madayag after their title conquest last season, the Lady Eagles showed that they remained to be a deep team proven by their balance scoring.      “Sabi nga kanina this game is all about teamwork and I think na, yes, we have a lot to improve on but I’m grateful na whatever we planned on and worked on, it worked. Kasi we worked as a team,” said rookie Faith Nisperos. Tolentino had plenty of help with Nisperos and Jules Samonte, who slid back to middle, chipping in 10 points each while Ponggay Gaston and returning Jho Maraguinot combining for 10 markers. The win will serve as a morale-booster for Ateneo as they prime up for a bigger battle ahead when the Lady Eagles take on archrival De La Salle University on Saturday.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 4th, 2020

UAAP Season 82: Nakaramdam din ako ng takot at kaba -- Nisperos

Just like any other freshman, Ateneo de Manila University’s Faith Nisperos didn’t deny that she felt a bit jittery in her debut with the defending champion Lady Eagles in the UAAP Season 82 women’s volleyball tournament. Good thing she had her teammates to lean on as the blue-chip recruit proved that she’s as good as advertised. "Siyempre we can never hide the fact na siyempre tao lang nakakaramdam rin ng kaba and takot,” Nisperos admitted. “Pero seeing my teammates with me, like the journey we had parang yun yung helped me not to be scared kasi alam ko na magtutulungan kami,” she added. “So na-overcome ko ‘yun." The two-time high school Most Valuable Player recruited from Nazareth School of NU announced her arrival in the seniors’ division with a 10-point outing in the Lady Eagles’ 25-13, 25-17, 25-23 victory to open their title-retention bid. “As everyone knows its really my dream [to play in Ateneo]. Of course, I felt a little nervous at first but then I know itong opportunity na ito is a blessing na ibinigay ni Lord,” she said. “What I feel is I’m very grateful na ibinigay niya ito sa akin.” Nisperos received praises from head coach Oliver Almadro and graduating senior Kat Tolentino. “I’m happy na nakapaglaro na siya but of course I’m saying to Faith also na she should deliver kung anong job at hand, it’s not about making a lot of points, it’s all about helping each other, for her helping her teammates to improve also and do their job,” said Almadro. “Siyempre masaya kasi finally nakakapaglaro na si Faith sa UAAP seniors. I’m really praying and convincing her to improve more and work harder.” “She’s shown a lot of promise in practice so I’m excited with more games to come,” said Tolentino. “She did well in this game too.”     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 4th, 2020

Meet the BAE of Philippine volleyball

“May bago ng boyband.” Philippine men’s volleyball team star Marck Espejo drew good laugh from his buddies Ranran Abdilla and Bryan Bagunas when asked about their reactions when fans tagged the trio with a playful name. The Nationals made the headlines after their breakthrough podium finish in the 2019 Thailand Open Sealect Tuna Volleyball Championships in Sisaket a couple of weeks back. But it was the trio of Bagunas, Abdilla and Espejo who took the spotlight. The trio logged in incredible numbers in the tournament and capped it off with a grander performance in the PHI’s come-from-behind five-set win over Saraburi-Thai Denmark in the battle for third. Espejo had 35 points, Bagunas fired 24 while Abdilla, who was converted into a utility, got 19 markers. Some witty fans tagged them as #BAE on social media, taking the first letter of their surnames to create a trend-worthy name for the Nationals’ big three.    “’Yung una kong naisip dun parang nagagawan na kami ng kalokohan so yung men’s team pala nabibigyan na ng pansin ng mga tao,” said Espejo, who was named 2nd Best Wing spiker in the tournament in his return to the national squad since making his debut in 2015. “Hindi lang pala yung eyes ng mga tao sa women’s team yung suporta rin pala meron na sa men’s team,” added the five-time UAAP Most Valuable Player, who played in the Japanese club league last year. Bagunas recalled that it all started when the explosive trio took a picture after their game. “Nag-picture tayong tatlo nun eh na ako, ikaw [Abdilla] saka si Marck, siguro kaya lumabas yung BAE na yun,” said Bagunas, the reigning UAAP MVP who is in his second stint with the national team. Abdilla, who like Bagunas is on his second tour of duty for the Nationals after donning the tricolors in the 2017 Southeast Asian Games, at first didn’t get what the acronym meant.     “Nu’ng una akala ko kung ano ‘yung BAE tapos nung binasa ko siya, nung inisip ko siya, ‘Ay oo nga ano’” he said. “Alam mo naman mga Filipino matatalino ‘pag dating sa mga ganyan. Diyan tayo magagaling hindi nawawalan ng kalokohan ‘yan.” Though the tag may bring some sort of pressure on the trio to perform as the face of the team, they also treat it as a morale boost.   “Pampa-good vibes siya, sa amin naman lahat ng mga wingers namin pwede talaga eh,” said Abdilla. Bagunas thought of it as an indication that they are slowly gaining a fan base after being overshadowed by the more popular women’s division.    “Nakikita na ng mga fans ang men’s volleyball team na parang umu-OK na rin yung sitwasyon ngayon. Yung mga players talagang nagkakaisa na, nagsasama-sama lalo na ngayong SEA Games na dito gagawin,” he said. “Sana suportahan talaga ng maraming mga fans ng volleyball. Sana hanggang sa dulo nandoon ang suporta nila. Sana suportahan na lang nila kung anong meron kami ngayon.” Espejo saw their bronze medal finish as a stepping stone not only to earn the respect and support of the fans but to also give the nation something to believe in come the 2019 SEA Games that the country will host on November. “Masarap sa feeling, tho yun nga kahit sabihin pa natin nung natalo kami nung first game nagsilabasan yung mga bashers pinapansin yung mga laro namin,” said Espejo. “Magandang lesson din sa kanila and sa amin na nakapag bronze kami at kung ano muna yung meron ang national team doon muna mag-focus wag muna hanapin yung wala.” As for BAE, they’ll try to live up to the hype. “Papanindigan na yan! Nandyan na yan eh!” said Bagunas.   ---     Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 18th, 2019

UAAP Season 81 Finals: Ayaw ko pang i-let go ang UST -- Sisi Rondina

If given a chance, outgoing University of Sto. Tomas ace Sisi Rondina would still want to play for the Tigresses.  The Season Most Valuable Player bid goodbye to the black and gold on Saturday – a fruitful five-year stint that saw Rondina give her all from the struggling days of UST up to the final moment of the Tigresses in the biggest stage of the UAAP Season 81 women’s volleyball tournament.         “Kanina kasi that time na the ball was checked out alam ko na pagka-hit pa lang ng bola, pagkapuntos pa lang ng kalaban alam ko na matatapos na ako as a Golden Tigress and ‘yun ‘yung sobrang nasaktan ako,” said Rondina after UST absorbed a stinging 17-25, 22-25, 22-25, Game 3 loss to Ateneo de Manila University at the MOA Arena. The Cebuana hotshot hammered 18 points with 11 digs and seven excellent receptions in her last three sets as a Tigress. As the final attack of Jules Samonte went off the block for the Lady Eagles’ championship point, Rondina knew there’s no turning back. No more chance for redemption – at least for her.       “Ayaw ko eh, ayaw ko talaga [umalis], gusto ko na maging Golden Tigresses as champion,” said Rondina. “Sabi ko nga kanina, kinokontra namin ang destiny na para sa Ateneo talaga.” “Ako sa sarili ko, destiny talaga ng Ateneo kinontra lang namin. It was a good run for us kasi who knows, na maniniwala na mga bata ang kasama ko and partida mga bata pero pag naglaro kakaiba,” added Rondina, who led a rookie-laden Tigresses squad to its first Finals appearance in eight years.   Despite falling short of fulfilling her promise to be remembered as the woman who will bring back the title to Espana, Rondina remained proud of where her sacrifices and efforts led UST to.   “Gusto ko [maalala nila ako] isa sa mga nagpabalik sa Finals kahit hindi korona. Kapag sinabing Sisi Rondina, gusto ko lang na, ‘UST oriented ‘yan, mahal niya ang UST, hindi pinapahiya ‘yung UST.’ Kung gusto lang naman nila akong ma-remember,” she said. “Isa rin is mahal na mahal ang UST, mga ganoon. Ayaw ko pang i-let go ang UST.” Still, the power-hitting player was grateful to her teammates’ effort to give her a chance to play in the Finals “Napakasaya ko kasi sila ang nagpatikim sa akin kung ano ang Finals, Finals be like. Kahit anong sasabihin ko hinding-hindi na talaga ako makakabalik, kahit gustuhin ko mang bumalik. Sabi nga sa kanta, may dulo pala ang langit,” Rondina said. “For me I’m blessed to have them [teammates], kahit na second place kami kasi sobrang unforgettable moment, day and time, sobrang gusto ko kasi na sana pag graduate ko may maiiwan ako sa UST na hindi makakalimutan ng iba,” she said. Rondina will leave UST without a title. But she surely inspired a new breed of Tigresses and a community.     ---   Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 18th, 2019

Vice Ganda brings good vibes in ‘FPJ’s Ang Probinsyano’

Vice Ganda brings good vibes in ‘FPJ’s Ang Probinsyano’.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJul 28th, 2016

Coaching great John Thompson of Georgetown dead at 78

By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — John Thompson, the imposing Hall of Famer who turned Georgetown into a “Hoya Paranoia” powerhouse and became the first Black coach to lead a team to the NCAA men’s basketball championship, has died. He was 78 His death was announced in a family statement released by Georgetown on Monday. No details were disclosed. “Our father was an inspiration to many and devoted his life to developing young people not simply on but, most importantly, off the basketball court. He is revered as a historic shepherd of the sport, dedicated to the welfare of his community above all else,” the statement said. “However, for us, his greatest legacy remains as a father, grandfather, uncle, and friend. More than a coach, he was our foundation. More than a legend, he was the voice in our ear everyday.” One of the most celebrated and polarizing figures in his sport, Thompson took over a moribund Georgetown program in the 1970s and molded it in his unique style into a perennial contender, culminating with a national championship team anchored by center Patrick Ewing in 1984. Georgetown reached two other title games with Thompson in charge and Ewing patrolling the paint, losing to Michael Jordan’s North Carolina team in 1982 and to Villanova in 1985. At 6-foot-10, with an ever-present white towel slung over his shoulder, Thompson literally and figuratively towered over the Hoyas for decades, becoming a patriarch of sorts after he quit coaching in 1999. One of his sons, John Thompson III, was hired as Georgetown’s coach in 2004. When the son was fired in 2017, the elder Thompson -- known affectionately as “Big John” or “Pops” to many -- was at the news conference announcing Ewing as the successor. Along the way, Thompson said what he thought, shielded his players from the media and took positions that weren’t always popular. He never shied away from sensitive topics -- particularly the role of race in both sports and society -- and he once famously walked off the court before a game to protest an NCAA rule because he felt it hurt minority athletes. “I’ll probably be remembered for all the things that kept me out of the Hall of Fame, ironically, more than for the things that got me into it,” Thompson said on the day he was elected to the Hall in 1999. Thompson became coach of the Hoyas in 1972 and began remaking a team that was 3-23 the previous season. Over the next 27 years, he led Georgetown to 14 straight NCAA tournaments (1979-92), 24 consecutive postseason appearances (20 NCAA, 4 NIT), three Final Fours (1982, 1984, 1985) and won six Big East tournament championships. Employing a physical, defense-focused approach that frequently relied on a dominant center -- Alonzo Mourning and Dikembe Mutombo were among his other pupils -- Thompson compiled a 596-239 record (.715 winning percentage). He had 26 players drafted by the NBA. One of his honors -- his selection as coach of the U.S. team for the 1988 Olympics -- had a sour ending when the Americans had to settle for the bronze medal. It was a result so disappointing that Thompson put himself on a sort of self-imposed leave at Georgetown for a while, coaching practices and games but leaving many other duties to his assistants. Off the court, Thompson was both a role model and a lightning rod. A stickler for academics, he kept a deflated basketball on his desk, a reminder to his players that a degree was a necessity because a career in basketball relied on a tenuous “nine pounds of air.” The school boasted that 76 of 78 players who played four seasons under Thompson received their degrees. He was a Black coach who recruited mostly Black players to a predominantly white Jesuit university in Washington, and Thompson never hesitated to speak out on behalf of his players. One of the most dramatic moments in Georgetown history came on Jan. 14, 1989, when he walked off the court to a standing ovation before the tipoff of a home game against Boston College, demonstrating in a most public way his displeasure against NCAA Proposition 42. The rule denied athletic scholarships to freshmen who didn’t meet certain requirements, and Thompson said it was biased against underprivileged students. Opposition from Thompson, and others, led the NCAA to modify the rule. Thompson’s most daring move came that same year, when he summoned notorious drug kingpin Rayful Edmond III for a meeting in the coach’s office. Thompson warned Edmond to stop associating with Hoyas players and to leave them alone, using his respect in the Black community to become one of the few people to stare down Edmond and not face a reprisal. Though aware of his influence, Thompson did not take pride in becoming the first Black coach to take a team to the Final Four, and he let a room full of reporters know it when asked his feelings on the subject at a news conference in 1982. “I resent the hell out of that question if it implies I am the first Black coach competent enough to take a team to the Final Four,” Thompson said. “Other Blacks have been denied the right in this country; coaches who have the ability. I don’t take any pride in being the first Black coach in the Final Four. I find the question extremely offensive.” Born Sept. 2, 1941, John R. Thompson Jr. grew up in Washington, D.C. His father was always working — on a farm in Maryland and later as a laborer in the city — and could neither read nor write. “I never in my life saw my father’s hands clean,” Thompson told The Associated Press in 2007. “Never. He’d come home and scrub his hands with this ugly brown soap that looked like tar. I thought that was the color of his hands. When I was still coaching, kids would show up late for practice and I’d (say) ... ‘My father got up every morning of his life at 5 a.m. to go to work. Without an alarm.‘” Thompson’s parents emphasized education, but he struggled in part of because of poor eyesight and labored in Catholic grammar school. He was moved to a segregated public school, had a growth spurt and became good enough at basketball to get into John Carroll, a Catholic high school, where he led the team to 55 consecutive victories and two city titles. He went to Providence College as one of the most touted basketball prospects in the country and led the Friars to the first NCAA bid in school history. He graduated in 1964 and played two seasons with Red Auerbach’s Boston Celtics, earning a pair of championship rings as a sparingly used backup to Bill Russell. Thompson returned to Washington, got his master’s degree in guidance and counseling from the University of the District of Columbia and went 122-28 over six seasons at St. Anthony’s before accepting the job at Georgetown, an elite school that had relatively few Black students. Faculty and students rallied around him after a bedsheet with racist words was hung inside the school’s gym before a game during the 1974-75 season. Thompson sheltered his players with closed practices, tightly controlled media access and a prohibition on interviews with freshmen in their first semester -- a restriction that still stands for Georgetown’s basketball team. Combined with Thompson’s flashes of emotion and his players’ rough-and-tumble style of play, it wasn’t long before the words “Hoya Paranoia” came to epitomize the new era of basketball on the Hilltop campus. Georgetown lost the 1982 NCAA championship game when Fred Brown mistakenly passed the ball to North Carolina’s James Worthy in the game’s final seconds. Two years later, Ewing led an 84-75 win over Houston in the title game. The Hoyas were on the verge of a repeat the following year when they were stunned in the championship game by coach Rollie Massimino’s Villanova team in one of the biggest upsets in tournament history. Success allowed Thompson to rake in money through endorsements, but he ran afoul of his Georgetown bosses when he applied for a gambling license for a business venture in Nevada in 1995. Thompson, who liked playing the slot machines in Las Vegas, reluctantly dropped the application after the university president objected. Centers Ewing, Mourning and Mutombo turned Georgetown into “Big Man U” under Thompson, although his last superstar was guard Allen Iverson, who in 1996 also became the first player under Thompson to leave school early for the NBA draft. “Thanks for Saving My Life Coach,” Iverson wrote at the start of an Instagram post Monday with photos of the pair. The Hoyas teams in the 1990s never came close to matching the achievements of the 1980s, and Thompson’s era came to a surprising and sudden end when he resigned in the middle of the 1998-99 season, citing distractions from a pending divorce. Thompson didn’t fade from the limelight. He became a sports radio talk show host and a TV and radio game analyst, joining the very profession he had frustrated so often as a coach. He loosened up, allowing the public to see his lighter side, but he remained pointed and combative when a topic mattered to him. A torch was passed in 2004, when John Thompson III became Georgetown’s coach. The younger Thompson, with “Pops” often watching from the stands or sitting in the back of the room for news conferences, returned the Hoyas to the Final Four in 2007. Another son, Ronny Thompson, was head coach for one season at Ball State and is now a TV analyst. ___ Joseph White, a former AP sports writer in Washington who died in 2019, prepared this obituary. AP Sports Writer Howard Fendrich contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 15th, 2020

Strangers make unexpected connection in & lsquo;Good Times Bad& rsquo;

What happens when two grieving souls meet? Would they stop being lonely?.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 11th, 2020

Mimiyuuuh sa bashers: You’re all hating there but watch us getting money…

NAKAKA-GOOD vibes ang chikahan ng Kapamilya actress na si Bea Alonzo at ng online sensation at vlogger na si Mimiyuuuh. Napanood namin ang latest vlog ni Bea kung saan inimbitahan nga niya ang YouTube content creator at fashion designer bilang special guest. Dito napag-usapan nina Bea at Mimiyuuuh ang tungkol sa kahalagahan ng edukasyon at […] The post Mimiyuuuh sa bashers: You’re all hating there but watch us getting money… appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 26th, 2020