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Robinsons Retail& rsquo;s profit dropped 29.5% in Q3

Robinsons Retail Holdings Inc. said Thursday net income attributable to equity holders of the parent company contracted 29.5 percent in the third quarter to P750 million from P1.06 billion in the same period last year......»»

Category: financeSource: thestandard thestandardOct 30th, 2020

SM Prime& rsquo;s profit fell 48% to P14.4 b in 1st& nbsp;9 months

Property developer and shopping mall operator SM Prime Holdings Inc. said Monday net income dropped 48 percent in the first nine months to P14.4 billion from a year ago, even as the company reported a slight recovery from the impact of the pandemic in the third quarter......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 26th, 2020

Belle& rsquo;s net profit falls 31% to P577m

Belle Corp. said Friday consolidated net income dropped 31 percent in the first quarter to P577 million from P835 million a year ago......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMay 29th, 2020

UP Men s Basketball players stay fighting amidst COVID-19

The whole world of sports has come to a halt because of the COVID-19 pandemic, but the University of the Philippines Fighting Maroons Men’s Basketball Team (UP MBT) stay fighting. Every member of the team is optimistic that Filipinos and the Philippines will get through the difficult challenges they are facing and are staying positive in words and deeds. Fighting Maroons head coach Bo Perasol has reminded his players to put in the same heart and passion they show in the game into their response to the pandemic, encouraging them to practice teamwork and find ways to help those who are affected by the scourge of the coronavirus. “During these trying times, our “never give up” attitude on court should be evident in how we battle this pandemic together as a team. We are optimistic that we can bounce back and come out stronger. While we face our own personal battles, let’s not forget our fellow Filipinos who are greatly affected by this virus. Let’s do our share, no matter how big or small,” said Perasol. The ongoing Enhanced Community Quarantine (ECQ) and the General Community Quarantine (GCQ) have prohibited sports-related mass gatherings like training, competitions and tournaments. Holed up in their respective homes, the Maroons still find ways to stay competitive and in shape, both physically and mentally. UAAP Season 82 team captain Noah Webb says they “try our best to stay in shape by doing our workouts at home since we can't go to the gym. Our coaches are always guiding us and giving us programs to follow. It’s also very important for us to stay mentally tough since this is a different opponent we are facing.” UP MBT team manager Atty. Agaton Uvero said it is also important for the team and the players to be resilient since a lot of things will change and new protocols will be implemented even after the ECQ is lifted. “Our primary concern will always be the safety of each and every one. But we will stay committed to keeping the team intact so we can still give our best performance with or without games in the near future,” Atty. Uvero said. He reiterated his gratitude to all the team’s fans, supporters, and sponsors who continue to support the Fighting Maroons and their various initiatives. “We will always stay thankful to our fans who never tire of supporting us whether we are in active competition or not. And we will always be indebted to our partners and sponsors -- Robinsons Retail Group, STATS Performance Apparel, Palawan Express Pera Padala, and PayMaya -- for remaining committed to the team despite difficult times like these. Their support and their various efforts to provide assistance and relief to the frontliners and those most affected by the ECQ inspire us and buoy up our spirits,” Atty. Uvero added.   UPMBT players and alumni along with various UP teams and organizations sprang to action soon after the ECQ was declared. They initiated efforts to provide frontliners with necessary items like personal protective equipment (PPEs) and meals. They also reached out to affected communities with rice and other daily necessities.   Among those who raised funds and donated in kind are Fighting Maroons Paul Desiderio, Jett Manuel, Ricci Rivero, Diego Dario, Kyles Lao, Jarrell Lim, Ibrahim Ouattara, Jaybie Mantilla, and the Gomez de Liaño brothers, Joe, Javi, and Juan. NowheretogobutUP Foundation, the UP College of Human Kinetics (CHK), and the Salamat PH Healthcare Heroes also conducted fundraisers to help the frontliners, stranded UP students and staff, and various communities.   “There is so much uncertainty right now and these are extremely difficult times for many Filipinos. That’s why this is the time to be one with our people as we all go through these hardships together. Let’s all do our share in helping one another. Resilience is all about being able to overcome the unexpected. The goal of resilience is to thrive,” said NowheretogobutUP Foundation founding chairman Renan Dalisay......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 3rd, 2020

Rustans boosts Robinsons Retail& rsquo;s income to P923m

Robinsons Retail Holdings Inc., the retail holding company of the Gokongwei Group, said Wednesday net income attributable to equity holders of the parent company surged 45 percent in the first quarter to P923 million from a year ago, lifted by the strong performance of Rustans Supermarket......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 29th, 2020

Meralco& rsquo;s net profit dropped 54% to P2.6b in first quarter

Manila Electric Co., the biggest retailer of electricity, said Monday net income dropped 54 percent in the first quarter to P2.619 billion from P5.671 billion a year ago because of its exposure to Singapore Electricity Market, which suffered a huge decline in electricity prices......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 27th, 2020

BDO& rsquo;s profit declined by 10% to P8.8b in 1st quarter

BDO Unibank Inc., the largest lender in terms of assets controlled by the Sy family, said Friday net income dropped 10 percent in the first quarter to P8.8 billion from P9.8 billion a year ago on weak capital market conditions amid the onslaught of the coronavirus disease 2019......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 24th, 2020

Malaya FC U16 clinch 2nd place in 2019 Borneo Cup

KOTA Kinabalu, Malaysia – Malaya Football Club U16 mustered a second place finish in the 2019 Borneo Football Cup (Borneo Cup), duplicating the same feat they achieved in the previous edition of the highly competitive regional tournament. Composed of players born 2003 or after, the U16 squad arrived in this year’s tournament eager to finally capture the crown that eluded them last year, when they played as U15. But the Malaya boys were denied 0 – 2 by Malaysian team Pasir Gudang in the intense finals played in rainy and muddy conditions at the Stadium Likas. Borneo Cup is a tier 3 Asian Football Confederation (AFC) -sanctioned tournament that attracts some of the best youth football teams from Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Singapore, Hongkong, Australia, and the Philippines. “These boys are already champions of Youth Football League (YFL) in the Philippines. But we want to make sure we are keeping pace with the level of football in the region as well. This is why year after year, Malaya keeps returning to the Borneo Cup,” said Atty. Frank Martin Abalos, the club’s president. The U16 boys were off to a rocky start when they dropped their first match 0 - 1 to DPM Sports School of Malaysia in the group stages. But they regrouped quickly to win their next three matches: 4 – 0 against compatriots Ilonggo Young Booters Club, 9 – 1 against Malaysia’s SAFA Penampang, and 3 – 0 against TABS also of Malaysia;  setting up a semi-final clash with British International School Phuket (BISP) of Thailand. The battle with the Thai squad was close and intense, but the boys from the Philippines prevailed, 1 – 0. The U16 squad was the first of five Malaya FC teams to compete in the 2019 Borneo Cup, which will be played in stages over the next two weeks. Also fielded in the tournament are Malaya FC’s U15 (born 2004), U13 (born 2006), U12 (born 2007), and U11 (born 2008), making them the biggest Philippine contingent in the competition. “We are very happy with what the boys have accomplished here. This is a testament to what we do in Malaya. We give our players the opportunity to learn the beautiful game of football and play in tournaments like Borneo Cup; not only to test their football skills but aid in their holistic development as well,” said Atty. Abalos. Malaya Football is a non-profit organization dedicated to using the sport of football for community development. The club gives children from underprivileged communities the chance to learn and play football through free training and participation in highly competitive leagues such as the YFL, as well as local and international tournaments. A member of the Cavite Football Association (CAFA), Malaya is supported by various individuals, organizations, and corporate sponsors such as Cherrylume, Frontrow, Genesis Transport Service, Telus Philippines, Manila Standard, Allianz-PNB Life, Smart Communications, Barcino, Mister Donut, Bootcamp Football Shop, Pagcor, and Smart Communications......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 2nd, 2019

Robinsons Retail Group and Robina Farms continue to back the UP Fighting Maroons

The University of the Philippines (UP) Fighting Maroons will continue to get valuable support from their most loyal and staunchest supporters, the Robinsons Retail Group and Universal Robina Corporation’s Agro Industrial Group (URC-AIG), as they continue their build-up for the upcoming UAAP season and beyond. They officially renewed their partnership recently with Robinsons Retail Holdings, Inc. President and CEO Robina Gokongwei-Pe, and URC-AIG Group Business Unit General Manager Vincent Henry Go, and UP Fighting Maroons Team Manager Agaton Uvero and Head Coach Bo Perasol signing the Memorandum of Agreement at the UP Executive House in Diliman, Quezon City. Robina Gokongwei-Pe, a UP alumna and avid backer of the Fighting Maroons involved Robinsons Supermarket and Handyman as Fighting Maroons supporters in 2010. Even as UP went winless and won only a total of three games in four seasons (2010-2013), Robina and her group stuck it out with the country’s premier state university in its quest back to relevancy in the field of sports. More recently, Universal Robina Corporation’s Agro- Industrial Group, through its premium farm products unit Robina Farms, was added to the companies that threw its support behind the Fighting Maroons. “We firmly believe that the UP Fighting Maroons shares the same values as us, such as passion for excellence and loyalty to our stakeholders. As we renew our official support for the men’s basketball team, we want them to continue to imbibe the same things that our company lives by as they seek to surpass last year’s achievement. This upcoming UAAP Season 82, it would be another great privilege to stand by this team together with the whole UP community. Hoping to exemplify ISKOs values of honor and excellence in every endeavor” said Vincent Henry Go of AIG’s Robina Farms. “UP’s run last year is proof that everything is possible,” said Universal Robina Corporation – Agro Industrial Group’s Marketing Director Jonathan Diño. “Hopefully, this year’s team will build on what Batch 81 started and bring home the UAAP Championship for the first time since ’86. It’s UP’s time! They should take it. They deserve it.” “We’re always grateful for all the support we have received from our alumni, especially from Ms. Gokongwei and her group of companies, who have been with us through our ups and downs. This team knows what it’s like to be at the bottom, to lack basic necessities like food and allowances. We are thankful for the faith and loyalty of the Robinsons Retail Group,” said UP head coach Bo Perasol. Also present at the signing besides Robina Gokongwei-Pe and Vincent Henry Go were Willy Co (Handyman Vice Chairman), Jody Gadia (Robinsons Supermarket Managing Director), Stanley Co (Handyman Group General Manager), Katherine Yu (Daiso General Manager), Agnes Rafinan (TGP General Manager), Abet Liuson (TGP AVP – Supply Chain), Dr. Florante Palabrica (Robina Farms Farm Operations Director), and Jonathan Dino (Robina Farms Marketing Manager). The Fighting Maroons fresh from their Championship run in Taiwan’s Buddha’s Light International Association (BLIA) Cup coupled with offseason trainings in Las Vegas and Japan, look to give back to their supporters in Season 82......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 14th, 2019

Stocks tumble; BPI, Aboitiz drop

Stocks slumped Friday on continued profit taking, with investors worried over a frightening surge in virus infections across the United States and Europe, the Philippines’ two major trading partners......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated News4 hr. 9 min. ago

Air Asia PH says passenger traffic dropped by 97% in third quarter

The Philippine unit of Southeast Asia’s largest budget carrier said Wednesday passenger traffic fell 97 percent in the third quarter from a year ago because of the COVID-19 pandemic......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 19th, 2020

GMA& rsquo;s profit soars 78% to P3.90b; ABS-CBN loses P7.22b

GMA Network Inc. said Monday net income surged 78 percent in the first nine months to P3.90 billion from P2.19 billion a year ago despite the absence of incremental sales from the 2019 elections......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 17th, 2020

Coaching great John Thompson of Georgetown dead at 78

By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — John Thompson, the imposing Hall of Famer who turned Georgetown into a “Hoya Paranoia” powerhouse and became the first Black coach to lead a team to the NCAA men’s basketball championship, has died. He was 78 His death was announced in a family statement released by Georgetown on Monday. No details were disclosed. “Our father was an inspiration to many and devoted his life to developing young people not simply on but, most importantly, off the basketball court. He is revered as a historic shepherd of the sport, dedicated to the welfare of his community above all else,” the statement said. “However, for us, his greatest legacy remains as a father, grandfather, uncle, and friend. More than a coach, he was our foundation. More than a legend, he was the voice in our ear everyday.” One of the most celebrated and polarizing figures in his sport, Thompson took over a moribund Georgetown program in the 1970s and molded it in his unique style into a perennial contender, culminating with a national championship team anchored by center Patrick Ewing in 1984. Georgetown reached two other title games with Thompson in charge and Ewing patrolling the paint, losing to Michael Jordan’s North Carolina team in 1982 and to Villanova in 1985. At 6-foot-10, with an ever-present white towel slung over his shoulder, Thompson literally and figuratively towered over the Hoyas for decades, becoming a patriarch of sorts after he quit coaching in 1999. One of his sons, John Thompson III, was hired as Georgetown’s coach in 2004. When the son was fired in 2017, the elder Thompson -- known affectionately as “Big John” or “Pops” to many -- was at the news conference announcing Ewing as the successor. Along the way, Thompson said what he thought, shielded his players from the media and took positions that weren’t always popular. He never shied away from sensitive topics -- particularly the role of race in both sports and society -- and he once famously walked off the court before a game to protest an NCAA rule because he felt it hurt minority athletes. “I’ll probably be remembered for all the things that kept me out of the Hall of Fame, ironically, more than for the things that got me into it,” Thompson said on the day he was elected to the Hall in 1999. Thompson became coach of the Hoyas in 1972 and began remaking a team that was 3-23 the previous season. Over the next 27 years, he led Georgetown to 14 straight NCAA tournaments (1979-92), 24 consecutive postseason appearances (20 NCAA, 4 NIT), three Final Fours (1982, 1984, 1985) and won six Big East tournament championships. Employing a physical, defense-focused approach that frequently relied on a dominant center -- Alonzo Mourning and Dikembe Mutombo were among his other pupils -- Thompson compiled a 596-239 record (.715 winning percentage). He had 26 players drafted by the NBA. One of his honors -- his selection as coach of the U.S. team for the 1988 Olympics -- had a sour ending when the Americans had to settle for the bronze medal. It was a result so disappointing that Thompson put himself on a sort of self-imposed leave at Georgetown for a while, coaching practices and games but leaving many other duties to his assistants. Off the court, Thompson was both a role model and a lightning rod. A stickler for academics, he kept a deflated basketball on his desk, a reminder to his players that a degree was a necessity because a career in basketball relied on a tenuous “nine pounds of air.” The school boasted that 76 of 78 players who played four seasons under Thompson received their degrees. He was a Black coach who recruited mostly Black players to a predominantly white Jesuit university in Washington, and Thompson never hesitated to speak out on behalf of his players. One of the most dramatic moments in Georgetown history came on Jan. 14, 1989, when he walked off the court to a standing ovation before the tipoff of a home game against Boston College, demonstrating in a most public way his displeasure against NCAA Proposition 42. The rule denied athletic scholarships to freshmen who didn’t meet certain requirements, and Thompson said it was biased against underprivileged students. Opposition from Thompson, and others, led the NCAA to modify the rule. Thompson’s most daring move came that same year, when he summoned notorious drug kingpin Rayful Edmond III for a meeting in the coach’s office. Thompson warned Edmond to stop associating with Hoyas players and to leave them alone, using his respect in the Black community to become one of the few people to stare down Edmond and not face a reprisal. Though aware of his influence, Thompson did not take pride in becoming the first Black coach to take a team to the Final Four, and he let a room full of reporters know it when asked his feelings on the subject at a news conference in 1982. “I resent the hell out of that question if it implies I am the first Black coach competent enough to take a team to the Final Four,” Thompson said. “Other Blacks have been denied the right in this country; coaches who have the ability. I don’t take any pride in being the first Black coach in the Final Four. I find the question extremely offensive.” Born Sept. 2, 1941, John R. Thompson Jr. grew up in Washington, D.C. His father was always working — on a farm in Maryland and later as a laborer in the city — and could neither read nor write. “I never in my life saw my father’s hands clean,” Thompson told The Associated Press in 2007. “Never. He’d come home and scrub his hands with this ugly brown soap that looked like tar. I thought that was the color of his hands. When I was still coaching, kids would show up late for practice and I’d (say) ... ‘My father got up every morning of his life at 5 a.m. to go to work. Without an alarm.‘” Thompson’s parents emphasized education, but he struggled in part of because of poor eyesight and labored in Catholic grammar school. He was moved to a segregated public school, had a growth spurt and became good enough at basketball to get into John Carroll, a Catholic high school, where he led the team to 55 consecutive victories and two city titles. He went to Providence College as one of the most touted basketball prospects in the country and led the Friars to the first NCAA bid in school history. He graduated in 1964 and played two seasons with Red Auerbach’s Boston Celtics, earning a pair of championship rings as a sparingly used backup to Bill Russell. Thompson returned to Washington, got his master’s degree in guidance and counseling from the University of the District of Columbia and went 122-28 over six seasons at St. Anthony’s before accepting the job at Georgetown, an elite school that had relatively few Black students. Faculty and students rallied around him after a bedsheet with racist words was hung inside the school’s gym before a game during the 1974-75 season. Thompson sheltered his players with closed practices, tightly controlled media access and a prohibition on interviews with freshmen in their first semester -- a restriction that still stands for Georgetown’s basketball team. Combined with Thompson’s flashes of emotion and his players’ rough-and-tumble style of play, it wasn’t long before the words “Hoya Paranoia” came to epitomize the new era of basketball on the Hilltop campus. Georgetown lost the 1982 NCAA championship game when Fred Brown mistakenly passed the ball to North Carolina’s James Worthy in the game’s final seconds. Two years later, Ewing led an 84-75 win over Houston in the title game. The Hoyas were on the verge of a repeat the following year when they were stunned in the championship game by coach Rollie Massimino’s Villanova team in one of the biggest upsets in tournament history. Success allowed Thompson to rake in money through endorsements, but he ran afoul of his Georgetown bosses when he applied for a gambling license for a business venture in Nevada in 1995. Thompson, who liked playing the slot machines in Las Vegas, reluctantly dropped the application after the university president objected. Centers Ewing, Mourning and Mutombo turned Georgetown into “Big Man U” under Thompson, although his last superstar was guard Allen Iverson, who in 1996 also became the first player under Thompson to leave school early for the NBA draft. “Thanks for Saving My Life Coach,” Iverson wrote at the start of an Instagram post Monday with photos of the pair. The Hoyas teams in the 1990s never came close to matching the achievements of the 1980s, and Thompson’s era came to a surprising and sudden end when he resigned in the middle of the 1998-99 season, citing distractions from a pending divorce. Thompson didn’t fade from the limelight. He became a sports radio talk show host and a TV and radio game analyst, joining the very profession he had frustrated so often as a coach. He loosened up, allowing the public to see his lighter side, but he remained pointed and combative when a topic mattered to him. A torch was passed in 2004, when John Thompson III became Georgetown’s coach. The younger Thompson, with “Pops” often watching from the stands or sitting in the back of the room for news conferences, returned the Hoyas to the Final Four in 2007. Another son, Ronny Thompson, was head coach for one season at Ball State and is now a TV analyst. ___ Joseph White, a former AP sports writer in Washington who died in 2019, prepared this obituary. AP Sports Writer Howard Fendrich contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 15th, 2020

AGI recovers in Q3, posts P2.2-B income

Listed Alliance Global Group Inc. (AGI) saw its third-quarter profit surge by 14 percent to P2.2 billion from P156 million in the second quarter as its nine-month net income dropped by 67 percent to P6.4 billion from P19.3 billion year-on-year. In a disclosure on Friday, the Andrew Tan-led holding company said its consolidated revenues improved […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsNov 14th, 2020

Ayala& rsquo;s profit down 75% to P11.4b in first three quarters

Conglomerate Ayala Corp. said Thursday nine-month net profit declined 75 percent to P11.4 billion from P46.1 billion in the same period last year as the pandemic hurt its real estate and banking businesses......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 12th, 2020

Megaworld& rsquo;s profit up by 7% to P2.2b in the third quarter

Condominium and office builder Megaworld Corp. said Wednesday net income bounced back in the third quarter after two consecutive quarters of decline as rental business gradually recovered from the impact of the pandemic......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 12th, 2020

Eagle cement earned P1.37-b profit in third quarter

Eagle Cement Corp., one of the largest cement producers in the Philippines, said Wednesday third-quarter net income reached P1.37 billion, matching last year’s profit, in a positive signal that construction activities are starting to pick up......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 11th, 2020

Vietnam& rsquo;s F1 debut in doubt after scandal

Hanoi---Vietnam’s inaugural Formula One Grand Prix “might not happen” next year, a source told AFP on Tuesday, as a report said it had been dropped from the 2021 calendar following the arrest of a key official. Doubts about the race arose after Nguyen Duc Chung, who was Hanoi’s mayor and a major supporter of the grand prix, was arrested on corruption charges in August......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 10th, 2020

DMCI& rsquo;s earnings dropped 34% in Q3

Conglomerate DMCI Holdings Inc. said Tuesday third-quarter net income declined 34 percent to P1.9 billion from P2.8 billion in the same period last year as the positive performance of real estate and mining business was offset by weak contributions from power generation, construction and water units......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 10th, 2020

RCBC& rsquo;s net profit decreased 11% to P4b in 3rd quarter

Rizal Commercial Banking Corp., one of the country’s largest banks and a member of the Yuchengco Group of Companies, said Tuesday unaudited consolidated net income declined 11 percent in the first three quarters to P4 billion from P4.5 billion a year ago, as it increased provisions for possible loan losses because of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 10th, 2020

Globe reports 10% drop in nine-month profit

Globe Telecom Inc. said Wednesday net income dropped 10 percent in the first nine months because of lower revenues brought about by prolonged community quarantine in the country......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 4th, 2020