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Retracted study on e-cigs validates vapers& rsquo; concerns

Local vaping groups lauded the decision of the Journal of the American Heart Association to retract the publication of a study, which implied that e-cigarette use is associated with increased risk of having had a heart attack......»»

Category: financeSource: thestandard thestandardMar 5th, 2020

Groups push e-cigs as U.S. journal retracts study

Vaping groups in the Philippines said the retraction of an “unreliable” study on electronic cigarettes by a US health publication validates their position that smoke-free nicotine products such as e-cigarettes, heat-not-burn tobacco products, and snus are much less harmful alternatives to cigarette smoking. The Vapers PH and the Coalition of Asia Pacific Tobacco Harm Reduction […] The post Groups push e-cigs as U.S. journal retracts study appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsMar 8th, 2020

Muzzle Mr. Met? Mascots wonder why they re banned from MLB

By DAN GELSTON AP Sports Writer PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The Phillie Phanatic had stories of his favorite adventures -- from the Galapagos Islands to the cobblestone streets of Philadelphia -- read to him most weeks from his very best buds. The Philly furball was tucked in with a bedtime story from Bryce Harper. Andrew McCutchen and manager Joe Girardi stopped by as guest readers to entertain fans and unite the Phillies community. But should the Phillies play ball this year, well, the book will close on the Phanatic. MLB wants to ban the birds -- sorry, Pirate Parrot -- and Bernie Brewer, Blooper, Bernie the Marlin, heck, all costumed creatures great and small from the ballpark this season. Firebird, Paws, the Oriole Bird, all face extinction -- at least this season, should baseball resume. Not even a muzzle on Mr. Met or a mask on Mariner Moose would help the cause. Gasp! Baseball’s furriest and funniest fans are forbidden from entering a ballpark. And that’s not cool. “Every mascot should be essential because of its ability to connect and distract with fun,” mascot guru Dave Raymond said. Raymond should know as well as any performer, as the first person to take on the 6-foot-6, 300-pound, 90-inch waist frame of the Phanatic. He’s since become a mascot consultant to the stars and helped create, brand and train the next generation of hundreds of stadium characters. Mascots are as much a ballpark staple as hot dogs and the long ball, and each fuzzy fist bump or chance concourse encounter hooks the youngest fans on the game. As baseball prepares for a summer slate without fans, Raymond wonders: What’s a game without a mascot? “You don’t have to convince me of that,” Raymond said. “It’s the powers that be that don’t understand that simple truth.” There’s already a blueprint MLB could follow that explains why mascots fit in barren ballparks. Take a look across the globe. Mascots remained a staple of baseball games in Taiwan and the KBO League in South Korea. American fans who stayed up late (or is it, woke up early?) to watch KBO games on ESPN were mesmerized by mascots gone wild in empty stadiums. The LG Twins mascots -- twin robot boys named Lucky and Star -- wore masks. So did cheerleaders and a drum section that provided the soundtrack for an otherwise dreary atmosphere. The Chinese Professional Baseball League barred spectators over concerns of spreading the new coronavirus in a crowded space, but the league decided it was safe to let in cheerleaders and costumed mascots. “This is the most important time to leverage fun, when people are sick and dying and dealing with the brutality of life,” Raymond said. “That is the time that you find a way to distract people and entertain them.” Philadelphia Inquirer cartoonist Rob Tornoe drew the Phanatic (wearing a mask) sitting atop the dugout with his phone and on hold with the unemployment office. “This is life or death now for a lot of characters, a lot of performers,” former Timberwolves mascot Jon Cudo said. It’s not that dire for most MLB performers who often have other duties within the organization or remained active in the community with food drives, firetruck parades or other feel-good efforts during the pandemic. Raymond had former and current mascots, including Cudo, join this week on his webinar, “What The Heck Should My Mascot Do Now?” The best suggestion to stay connected with fans -- with the ATV temporarily parked -- is engaging through social content. Mascot Mania has gone wild on Instagram and TikTok. Mr. Met cleans windows. D. Baxter the Bobcat taught crosswalk safety. Wally the Green Monster records virtual messages for charity. Then again, mascots have problems just like us: Who gives the Phanatic a trim during quarantine? “The Phanatic doesn’t need to get his hair cut,” Raymond said. “It’s actually a positive when it gets unkempt and long.” The Phanatic already underwent one makeover this year — his new look features flightless feathers rather than fur-colored arms, stars outlining the eyes, a larger posterior and a powder blue tail, blue socks with red shoes, plus a set of scales under the arms — because of a lawsuit filed against the team by the creators of the original Phanatic. The creators threatened to terminate the Phillies’ rights to the Phanatic as of June 15 and “make the Phanatic a free agent” unless the team renegotiated its 1984 agreement to acquire the mascot’s rights. Mascots were lumped in with other baseball traditions that would be weeded out under a 2020 proposal. The traditional exchange of lineup cards would be eliminated, along with high-fives, fist bumps and bat boys and girls. “I don’t know of anybody who bought season tickets to watch the bat boy,” Raymond said. “But you can say that in spades for the mascots. We’d be losing one of the draws that brings in people beyond the statistic nerds.” Plus, any fan who attended a Phillies game in the late 1990s at Veterans Stadium knows the Phanatic can play in an empty ballpark. Mascots just want to honk, honk, honk for the home team and they do care if they ever get back. “I’m just imploring them to value the character brands,” Raymond said. “There is a safe way for you to have fun, and frankly, fun is the most important thing you can invest in right now.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News7 hr. 8 min. ago

& lsquo;Pinoys prayed more during quarantine& rsquo;

As the country was reeling from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, most Filipinos turned to prayer and slowed down on vices during community quarantines in Metro Manila and other parts of the country, based on a nationwide study......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMay 28th, 2020

Bagunas tests negative for COVID-19, cleared to go home

Bryan Bagunas tested negative for coronavirus (COVID-19) and was cleared to go home after almost a week since he arrived from Japan. The Philippine men’s volleyball team star received his swab test result on Thursday, six days after he arrived in Manila. In a Twitter post by Dyan Castillejo, the 30th Southeast Asian Games silver medalist got his test result through the help of Bases Conversion and Development Authority President and CEO and deputy chief implementer of the national policy against COVID-19 Vince Dizon, Department of Tourism secretary Berna Romulo-Puyat and the Philippine Sports Commission chairman William 'Butch' Ramirez.. Negative Result received and happy to be able to leave hotel after 7 days and go home ! @bryanbagunas01_ SeaG Volleyball Silver Medalist . Thank u for the quick help Vince Dizon and DOT Sec Berna and PSC pic.twitter.com/HtLOiO84BM — Dyan Castillejo (@DYANCASTILLEJO) May 21, 2020 Bagunas, who plays for Oita Miyoshi Weiss Adler in the Japan V. Premier League, on Wednesday aired his concerns about the duration of receiving his test result in his Twitter account. Like other Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs) and others flying in from abroad, Bagunas had undergo swab testing as part of the government’s preventive measure against the pandemic. He was holed up in a hotel in Quezon City while waiting for his clearance. The two-time UAAP champion and Season 81 Most Valuable Player returned to the country after the cancellation of a pre-season tournament in Japan where his team was supposed to participate. Bagunas, a native of Balayan, Batangas, plans to fly back to Japan in August or September.     ---      Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 21st, 2020

UFC champ Miocic welcomes octagon s return, has concerns

By TOM WITHERS AP Sports Writer CLEVELAND (AP) — Heavyweight champion Stipe Miocic welcomes UFC's plans to reopen the octagon. The fighter — and firefighter — does have some concerns, though. After scrapping an idea to hold fights on tribal land in California and cancelling or postponing several events since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, UFC will return to competition May 9 in Jacksonville, Florida. UFC President Dana White recently announced UFC 249 will be held without fans at VyStar Veterans Memorial Arena. Two additional fight cards are scheduled for May 13 and May 16 at the venue. Miocic said his only reservation about the sport's reopening is related to health reasons. “As long as everyone is safe, I hope it works out,” said Miocic, who has continued to work as a firefighter and paramedic during the outbreak. "And not just the fighters, I worry about everyone’s safety. It takes one person to (infect) three people, and how fast it can spread, it’s crazy.” Miocic recaptured his title belt in August by pummeling Daniel Cormier at UFC 241. On Thursday, the affable 37-year-old said his recovery following surgery to repair a torn retina continues to go well — “I have some spots, but definitely I can see" — and that he misses his training routine while awaiting a return to normalcy. Until then, Miocic has been working shifts for the Valley View (Ohio) Fire Department. Personal safety is always a priority in his “other” job, and Miocic said he and his co-workers have remained vigilant during these unprecedented times. “I have a job to do, and when I go to the station I make sure I stay clean,” he said on the phone from his home in North Royalton, Ohio, “We’re smart. We’re clean. We’re masked. We wear goggles, gloves and gowns when he have to. It’s our routine, so I’m not really worried about that.” Miocic has teamed with Modelo beer to raise funds for personal protection equipment for first responders during the pandemic. On May 5, the brewer has pledged to donate $1 (up to $500,000) for any social media post using the hashtag #CincUp. Miocic also has been working out, but not like he normally would while training for a fight. A third matchup with Cormier, who knocked him out in the first round in 2018, appears likely but isn’t official. He joked that most of his cardio work these days comes from chasing his young daughter around the house. Already proven to be adept with his hands, Miocic has filled idle time with home projects. He’s surprised himself with a knack for wallpapering. Removal, that is. “I’m good at bringing things down,” he joked. A die-hard Cleveland sports fan, Miocic was pleased with the Browns’ selections in last week’s NFL draft. “I thought we did really well actually,” said Miocic, who trained last year with Browns star defensive end Myles Garrett. “We were smart. I think we got a few of the pieces that we need. I think we’re doing the right things.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 1st, 2020

PSC cancels all sports activities, takes belt-tightening measures

The Philippine Sports Commission announced the cancellation of all sports activities until December 2020 and will implement several belt-tightening measures to ensure that it can keep its commitment to continue to support the members of the national team. PSC chairman William ‘Butch’ Ramirez and other top officials held a virtual meeting on Wednesday and discussed the ways and means they could meet outstanding commitments of the agency. The decision came following the consecutive directives of the Department of Budget Management (DBM) on projects that will be discontinued (National Budget Circular 580) and the Inter-agency Task Force (IATF) on Emerging Infectious Diseases on prohibited activities even beyond the Enhanced Community Quarantine amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Consequently, the board also decided to finally withdraw further financial support to the twice-postponed 10th ASEAN Paragames. The PSC shall, however, honor its previous commitments with the APG organizing committee to cover initial operations expenses. “We heed the call of the national government to cut expenses as we reroute majority of our resources to fighting the pandemic, but we also stand by our commitment to keep supporting members of the national team,” explained Ramirez. Ramirez also announced that there is a status quo on allowance releases for national athletes and coaches, and thanked the PAGCOR for its steady remittances to the agency.  With the present lockdown however, PAGCOR’s income has been greatly affected, and shall probably impact its remittances to PSC subsequently.  “We continue to study projections and proposals and the board is ready to take necessary actions should they be needed,” said the sports chief.  Commissioners Celia Kiram, Ramon Fernandez, Arnold Agustin and Charles Maxey joined Ramirez along with Executive Director Merly Ibay, Deputy Executive Directors Dennis Rivera and Atty. Guillermo Iroy, as well as Chief of Staff Marc Velasco.  As a way to help the fight against the contagion, PSC also opened several of its sports stadiums and arenas as quarantine facilities. The Ninoy Aquino Stadium and Rizal Memorial Coliseum inside the Rizal Momorial Sports Complex now serve as quarantine facilities as well as the PhilSports Arena in Pasig City.     .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 29th, 2020

Samsung 321 App now comes with COVID-19 Hotlines

Samsung 321 app’s newest update now includes COVID-19 Hotline numbers to aid users for any concerns and emergencies related to the global pandemic. .....»»

Category: techSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 23rd, 2020

Sports leagues seek return to play but with no guarantees

By EDDIE PELLS AP National Writer With no games being played, recent sports headlines have centered around hopes and dreams — namely, the uncharted path leagues and teams must navigate to return to competition in the wake of the pandemic. Virtually all leagues talk publicly about their desire to return before summer. But behind closed doors, they are hatching different potential plans: all 30 baseball teams playing in Arizona; home run contests to decide tie games; the Stanley Cup being hoisted in an empty arena that neither team calls home; end-of-season soccer standings decided by vote; college football games in spring. Over the past week, The Associated Press spoke to more than two dozen policymakers, coaches and players across the globe to get their candid assessments of plans to return from the stoppages caused by the coronavirus. The conclusion: While it’s critical to put optimistic restart scenarios in place, there is no certainty any of these plans will work without buy-in from politicians and an OK from players and medical experts. Underpinning it all would have to be a drastic ramp-up in testing, a vaccine or treatment breakthrough, or some other solution. In short, the return of any sports, no matter how innovative the plan, will be risky and uncertain for the rest of this year and into 2021. “It’s not about 22 players walking onto a pitch and throwing a ball out,” said FIFA Vice President Victor Montagliani, whose concerns about restarting soccer mirror those of all sports worldwide. The organizers of the Olympics were among the last to postpone their event, then among the first to set a new date – exactly 52 weeks after the original July 24 cauldron lighting had been scheduled. The decision to reschedule for a date 15 months down the road came just before an unexpected spike in cases hit Japan. The worry that followed underscored the many open questions about the arc of the outbreak. “I think everyone’s probably working on multiple options. It’s ’If this, then what?'” said Tim Hinchey, the CEO of USA Swimming, the sport's governing body in the United States. Virtually all the big-time team sports are coming up with scenarios to play games with no fans in the stands. The Washington Post reported that while the NFL is publicly committed to its usual kickoff date in September, it is looking into contingencies that include shortening the season or playing in front of half-full or empty stadiums. College athletic directors have come up with a half-dozen or more scenarios for football season, including, according to Oklahoma's Joe Castiglione, a scenario in which part of the season would be played in spring. One theme gaining wide acceptance: If it's not safe enough for students to return to school or attend games, then athletes shouldn't be asked to return either. Without the millions from football, all college sports are in peril. NASCAR, which has been holding virtual races, has given teams a tentative schedule under which the season would resume May 24 without fans. The NHL has drawn up plans that include resuming the season this summer, going directly to the playoffs and/or playing games in empty arenas in neutral-site cities. The PGA Tour announced a mid-June restart and meshed its schedule with the already reworked majors calendar. In a nod to the precariousness of it all, Andy Pazder, the tour’s chief officer of tournaments and competition, said if events cannot be held in compliance with health regulations, then “we will not do anything.” That's also where the NBA appears to be for now. The league that got in front of the coronavirus pandemic first, calling off games on March 11, is in a holding pattern. Most of the league’s conversations center on how to resume the season, not whether to cancel it. In Australia, ambitious plans to resume play in the National Rugby League by the end of May got shot down by Prime Minister Scott Morrison. England’s Premier League also says it wants to finish its season but would only do so “with the full support of the government” and when “medical guidance allows.” Meanwhile, in Scotland, a wild round of voting has already taken place to decide whether to lock in standings for leagues there and get ready for next season. Major League Baseball in the U.S. is talking about bringing all 30 teams to Maricopa County, Arizona, for a regular season at spring training sites. Dr. Anthony Fauci, the infectious disease expert who has been calling for restraint in resuming any normal activities, offered a glimmer of hope when he suggested sports could conceivably return. He suggested no fans in arenas and constant testing for the players, who would likely need to be quarantined in hotels for weeks or months. Not all the players are on board. “I’m going to go four or five months without seeing my kid when it’s born? I can tell you right now that’s not going to happen,” Ryan Zimmerman of the Nationals wrote in a diary for AP. Zimmerman’s third child is due in June. Whether Zimmerman shows or not, baseball could be a vastly different game if it returns in 2020. Some other ideas floated include wrapping up the season in December, scheduling a multitude of doubleheaders with seven-inning games and quickly deciding ties with home run derbies. Yet for all those scenarios, nobody's quite sure what will happen if, despite all the precautions, an outbreak hits a team. Could one positive test eviscerate an entire season? Before setting anything in motion, all the leagues are waiting for a consensus to emerge from government and health experts, to say nothing of players and owners. Right now, Montagliani said, "the paramount skill set required from us is risk management and nothing else.” ___ Reporting by AP Sports Writers Doug Ferguson, Jenna Fryer, Rob Harris, Stephen Wade, Ron Blum, Steve Douglas, Ben Walker, Dennis Passa, Stephen Whyno, Tim Reynolds, Brian Mahoney, Howard Fendrich, Ben Walker, Rob Maaddi, Ralph Russo, Larry Lage......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 19th, 2020

Quezon City values its health workers

We write to address the concerns raised by Mr. Charlie V. Manalo in his column Naked Thoughts on April 16, 2020. The column raises the plight of the city’s health workers during these trying times......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 18th, 2020

PSC& rsquo;s immediate goal: Bring Yulo, Obiena, Diaz back home

Bringing back national athletes training abroad for the Tokyo Olympics and other international competitions will be one of the top concerns of the Philippine Sports Commission once the enhanced community quarantine imposed by the government is over......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 14th, 2020

Mark Sangiao expects same effort as other Team Lakay stars from son Jhanlo

With young guns like ONE Strawweight World Champion Joshua “The Passion” Pacio, top ONE flyweight contender Danny “The King” Kingad, and top ONE strawweight contender Lito “Thunder Kid” Adiwang in the fold, it looks like Team Lakay is primed to continue to be a top-tier stable in the Philippines for years to come. While Pacio, Kingad, and Adiwang have already established themselves on the biggest martial arts stage in the world and are already stars in their own right, but the future of the Benguet-based mixed martial arts stable could ultimately lie within 17-year old son Jhanlo Sangiao, the son of Team Lakay’s founder and head coach, Mark Sangiao. MMA legend and ONE Warrior Series CEO Rich “Ace” Franklin has already spoken highly about the young Lakay, and being the son of one of the Philippines most respected MMA mentors already comes with a certain level of pressure. Coach Mark recalls the day Jhanlo first started taking a liking to the sport. “When he was 10 years old, he went to Canada to study. He came back in 2012. He joined me in Batang Pinoy’s wushu competitions, then from there he started training rigorously,” Sangiao shared via ONE Championship. “He was training with us. He was not getting tired when punching mitts. That’s when he really got interested.”  “I started training when I was 12 years old. I was young back then. I was like an extra,” Jhanlo also shared. “Just running around the corner, throwing a few punches here and there, until I finally joined their routine full time.” For dad-slash-head coach Mark however, he maintains that there is no shortcut to success. If Jhanlo wants to reach the same heights as his Team Lakay teammates, he also needs to put in the work. “As a coach, I always tell him that if he wants to reach something in this sport, then he has to work the same as his teammates. That’s what he is going through right now,” Coach Mark said. At a young age, Jhanlo has already shown flashes of brilliance, and it’s no surprise given that he trains with some of the best in the world on a daily basis. In the end however, Coach Mark says that it’s up to the younger Sangiao to commit to becoming a martial artist, like his father was before him. “It all depends on him if he really wants to do this,” Coach Mark said. “He has to do his assignments if he wants to reach the level that he aims to be at.” “My prayer is that he stays healthy and nothing bad happens to him in this sport,” Coach Mark added. If Jhanlo were to indeed follow in the footsteps of his dad and his Team Lakay manongs, Coach Mark knows where he wants his son to compete. “In ONE Championship, they treat their athletes right. That’s where I want my son to be if he decides to become a professional mixed martial artist,” he shared.  As for the young Sangiao himself, it seems clear that he knows what he wants to do and who ultimately became his inspiration to become a martial artist. “When I was a boy, I always watched my father compete in MMA until I thought to myself, ‘I want to compete as well,’” Jhanlo expressed. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 8th, 2020

British Open canceled, Masters to November in major rescheduling

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer The Masters goes from that annual rite of spring to two weeks before Thanksgiving. The U.S. Open now is scheduled in September for the first time since amateur Francis Ouimet took down Britain’s best at Brookline in 1913 to put golf on the map in America. And the oldest championship of them all won’t even be played. Golf organizations tried to salvage a season unlike any other Monday with a series of changes, starting with the British Open being canceled for the first time since 1945. The PGA Championship, which last year moved to May, would go back to August. That would be followed by the PGA Tour’s postseason, the U.S. Open and Ryder Cup in consecutive weeks, and then the Masters on Nov. 12-15. “Any Masters is better than no Masters,” Augusta native Charles Howell III said. Still to be determined was when — or even if — golf could resume because of the COVID-19 pandemic that has shut down sports worldwide. Augusta National Chairman Fred Ridley said the Masters identified November as “intended dates.” CEO Seth Waugh said the PGA of America was “holding” Aug. 6-9 as dates for the PGA Championship at Harding Park in San Francisco. USGA chief Mike Davis said moving from June to September was the best chance to mitigate health and safety concerns — Winged Foot is 5 miles from New Rochelle, New York, a virus hot spot — to have “the best opportunity” of staging the U.S. Open. The British Open effectively is pushing its schedule back one year, saying the 149th Open still is set for Royal St. George’s on July 15-18, leaving the 150th Open for St. Andrews the following year. “I can assure everyone that we have explored every option for playing The Open this year, but it is not going to be possible,” R&A chief Martin Slumbers said. Golf’s major organizations, starting with the PGA Tour and its calendar filled with tournaments, have been trying to piece together a puzzle for the last three weeks. Each agreed to announce their plans together in a show of collaboration. Still missing is the starting line, along with some details on what could be the most hectic pace golf has ever known. “We hope the anticipation of staging the Masters Tournament in the fall brings a moment of joy to the Augusta community and all those who love the sport,” Ridley said. “We want to emphasize that our future plans are incumbent upon favorable counsel and direction from health officials.” Augusta National closed early this year because of the coronavirus and does not open until October. The bloom of dogwoods and azaleas will give way to fall foliage. Instead of being the second full week in April, it will compete against football. “It feels like in these extraordinary times, we need to do extraordinary things,” said Kevin Kisner, who grew up 20 miles away in Aiken, South Carolina. “We can sacrifice a little bit of our life being perfect.” The PGA Tour has tentatively planned to complete its FedEx Cup season close to schedule, with the Tour Championship finishing on Labor Day. It is contemplating putting tournaments in dates that previously belonged to the U.S. Open, British Open and Olympics. “It’s a complex situation, and we want to balance the commitments to our various partners with playing opportunities for our members — while providing compelling competition to our fans,” PGA Tour Commissioner Jay Monahan said. “But all of that must be done while navigating the unprecedented global crisis that is impacting every single one of us.” The new schedule: — Aug. 6-9: PGA Championship. — Aug. 13-16: End of PGA Tour regular season at Wyndham Championship. — Aug. 20-23: Start of FedEx Cup playoffs at The Northern Trust. — Aug. 27-30: BMW Championship, second playoff event. — Sept. 4-7: Tour Championship for the FedEx Cup. — Sept. 17-20: U.S. Open at Winged Foot. — Sept. 25-27: Ryder Cup at Whistling Straits. It was not immediately clear how the teams from Europe and the United States would be determined for the Ryder Cup, although European captain Padraig Harrington has said he would not be opposed to picking all 12 players. For the 24 players, that means going from what long has been regarded as the toughest test in golf to what has become the most tiresome three days in golf. “It’s definitely better than leaving the Tour Championship and going to France, or leaving the Bahamas to go to Australia,” said Patrick Cantlay, referring to the Americans' most recent Ryder and Presidents cup itineraries. Like everything else, so much remains up in the air until golf get the signal to resume. Gian Paolo Montali, the general director for the 2022 Ryder Cup, said on Italian radio Monday that officials faced a May deadline to postpone the Ryder Cup to odd-numbered years (as it was before the matches were postponed by the Sept. 11 attacks). He described the chances as 50-50. Montali also said players already have vetoed a Ryder Cup without its raucous fans. Other details must be sorted out, such as U.S. Open qualifying. The next tournament on the PGA Tour schedule is Colonial on May 21-24, though that appears unlikely. Ridley said every player who has received invitations to play the Masters in April will stay on the list. He said the Augusta National Women’s Amateur was canceled, and every player can keep their spots for next year provided they don’t turn pro. The U.S. Senior Open at Newport Country Club in Rhode Island and the U.S. Senior Women’s Open at Brooklawn Country Club in Connecticut have been canceled. As for the British Open, Shane Lowry gets to keep the claret jug longer than anyone since Dick Burton, who won in 1939 at St. Andrews in the last Open before World War II. Burton went from “champion golfer of the year” to member of the Royal Air Force. Lowry said in a video tweet he understood and supported the R&A’s decision. “You can trust me when I say the claret jug is going to be in safe hands for another year,” Lowry said. ___ AP Sports Writer Andrew Dampf in Italy contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 7th, 2020

Folayang, Eustaquio, ONE Championship stars react to closed-door events

While most of the sporting world has stopped due the current COVID-19 outbreak, Singapore-based martial arts promotion ONE Championship is intent on keeping the show going, as they’ve already announced that they will be putting on closed-door, audience-free shows starting April. Looking to push a message of positivity, the upcoming closed-door events were entitled HOPE, STRENGTH, DREAMS, and INSPIRATION, all of them set to be held in Singapore. And while mixed martial artists often rely on the crowd for an extra boost when inside the circle, ONE Championship’s athletes have expressed their support and agreement to the closed-door setting given the worldwide enforcement of social distancing and staying at home. For former two-time ONE Lightweight World Champion Eduard “Landslide” Folayang putting on events in a closed-door setting will uphold the safety of the athletes, the fans, and the staff while still also giving the athletes a chance to make a living. “We’re under a pandemic now, so we have to look at the safety of the athletes, the staff, and the fans. It’s better [to hold closed-door events] than the fights being canceled altogether. I think it’s a good move because the fans can just wait for it on their TVs or social media accounts," Folayang said via ONE Championship.  “The sports events that people are waiting for, like the NBA, are canceled as well, so I think that will be the advantage for ONE. I know there are a lot of people who want to watch live, but I know that even they wouldn’t push through because of health concerns,” he added. Reigning ONE Middleweight and Heavyweight World Champion “The Burmese Python” Aung La N Sang said that he promises to put on a show for the fans no matter where the event is held. “Thank you to the ONE fans for keeping us in business. We promise to put on amazing shows, even with closed-door events. The staff is taking extra precautions and as an athlete, I am super thankful for them. And for me, it doesn’t matter if it’s a closed-door event, a stadium event, or [an event] in the parking lot, I plan on putting on great shows for the fans.” Former ONE Flyweight World Champion Geje “Gravity” Eustaquio understands that while a closed-door setting will hurt a bit in terms of revenue, it’s better for the fighters to compete closed-door than to have their fights cancelled completeley. “It’s a very wise move. On the athletes’ part, that decision is very favorable because we all know the hardships athletes go through to prepare [for a bout]. It’s always a dream for them to compete, so it would not be good if their matches get canceled altogether.” “The good thing is ONE Championship understands that. That’s why I am in favor of the events to go through, albeit in closed doors. Of course, it will hurt the company a little bit, especially when it comes to gate revenue. But sometimes, you have to make sacrifices,” Eustaquio added. Reigning ONE Featherweight World Champion Martin “The Situ-Asian” Nguyen hopes for the best as the pandemic continues to affect the whole world. “At the end of the day, this virus is just a phase that will pass hopefully sooner than later. We just have to be smart in these certain situations and take self-care, as well as be mindful of others.” ONE Flyweight World Grand Prix runner-up Danny “The King” Kingad knows the risks of putting on a live event during this time of a virus pandemic. “I think boss Chatri made a great decision. I think that’s okay for the rest of us. After all, we cannot take into account each and every person who enters the arena during events – and we can’t be too sure because one person could be the start of an outbreak.” “For me, that’s a great decision, putting everything in closed doors for the meantime,” he continued. Former ONE Strawweight World Championship challenger Rene “The Challenger” Catalan echoed Kingad’s sentiments, saying that a mass gathering - much like a normal, packed ONE Championship event - can be the start of disease transmission, especially one as highly contagious as the COVID-19 virus. “For me, sir Chatri’s decision to continue the event in closed-doors is the right move. If an event pushes through which is open to the public, there is a big possibility for disease transmission. It’s a good move, and the right move, to push for closed-doors, as long as the competition continues.”  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 23rd, 2020

The Lancet publishes papers from 2 studies of Takeda& rsquo;s dengue vaccine candidate

Pharmaceutical Company Limited (TSE:4502/NYSE:TAK) Takeda announced that The Lancet published two papers related to its dengue vaccine candidate (TAK-003), reporting on results from the 18-month analysis of the ongoing pivotal Phase 3 Tetravalent Immunization against Dengue Efficacy Study trial and results from the final 48-month analysis of the Phase 2 DEN-204 trial......»»

Category: techSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMar 19th, 2020

ONE Championship: Denice Zamboanga sees holes in champ Angela Lee s game

Denice "The Menace Fairtex" Zamboanga's confidence is at an all-time high ahead of her highly-anticipated bout against reigning ONE Women's Atomweight World Champion Angela "Unstoppable" Lee later this year.  The fast-rising Filipina phenom earned her shot following a dominant performance against two-time World Title challenger Mei "V.V" Yamaguchi at ONE: KING OF THE JUNGLE on 28 February at the Singapore Indoor Stadium. In just her second appearance in The Home of Martial Arts, Zamboanga shocked the world when she defended the Japanese veteran’s repeated attempts to take the match to the ground while picking her apart on the feet.  “I think I am ready to face the champion, because my coach told me no one ever did that to Mei Yamaguchi,” Zamboanga said.  Zamboanga's performance was so convincing that ONE Championship CEO and Chairman Chatri Sityodtong granted her the World Title shot after the match. This early, “The Menace Fairtex” sees one thing that she could use to her advantage in their upcoming showdown for all the marbles.  "She's a very well-rounded fighter, but I think I have an advantage when it comes to my cardio," she said. "Her strength is in grappling but I am also strong in that one too. To win [on] the ground, I have to study all of her fights, and I will study well.” From the looks of it, Zamboanga has been using her idle time scouting Lee, and she has no doubts that if she can push the World Champion to her limits, she has a chance to steal the crown.  “I saw all of her fights. Usually in the 5th round, she fades. You can see it in the Xiong Jing Nang fight,” Zamboanga said.   “For me, I am confident with my cardio and I believe that’s her weakness. That’s what I would prepare for.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 18th, 2020

No fans, no work: Arena workers caught in sports shutdown

By TIM REYNOLDS AP Basketball Writer MIAMI (AP) — David Edelman can usually be found at a Denver Nuggets basketball game or a Colorado Rapids soccer game. As an usher, he interacts with fans in a role he calls a staple of his life. But there are no Nuggets games for at least a month. No Rapids games, either. And Edelman has no idea what he’ll do now. “This is what I do for a living,” Edelman said earlier this week, as the realization hit that sports were going on hiatus because of the coronavirus. “This is my income.” Thousands of workers would have staffed the 450 NBA and NHL games that will not be played over the next month in response to the pandemic. And then there are the more than 300 spring training and regular-season baseball games, 130 NCAA Division I men’s and women’s tournament games, 50 or so Major League Soccer matches, all international golf and tennis tournaments, and who-knows-how-many high school, small college and other entertainment events canceled or postponed because of the global health crisis. The total economic impact of the loss of sports and other events because of the pandemic — assuming only a month shutdown — is impossible to calculate but will reach the billions, easily. Tickets aren’t being sold, so teams and leagues and organizing bodies lose money. Fans aren’t going to events that aren’t happening, so taxi drivers and ride-share operators have no one to ferry to and from those places. Hotel rooms will be empty. Beers and hot dogs aren’t being sold, so concessionaires and vendors lose money. Wait staff and bartenders aren’t getting tips. Without those tips, their babysitters aren’t getting paid. The trickle-down effect sprawls in countless directions. Some teams are trying to help. Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban, within minutes of the NBA shutdown announcement, said he wanted to find a way to help workers who will lose money because games won’t be played. By Friday, he had his plan: “We will pay them as if the games happened,” he told The Associated Press in an email. Other teams, including the Cleveland Cavaliers, have made similar commitments to workers at not just NBA events but also the building’s minor-league hockey games. The Miami Heat, Toronto Raptors, Washington Wizards, Golden State Warriors and Atlanta Hawks were among the earliest NBA franchises to reveal they’re working on how they’ll take care of arena staffs. So have the NHL’s Washington Capitals, among others, and the ownership group for Detroit's Pistons, Red Wings and Tigers on Friday said they were setting up a $1 million fund “to cover one month's wages for our part-time staff for games, concerts and events that they would have otherwise worked." “Our teams, our cities and the leagues in which we operate are a family, and we are committed to looking out for one another,” New Jersey Devils owner Josh Harris said. There were many more significant gifts revealed later Friday. Zion Williamson of the New Orleans Pelicans said he would “cover the salaries” for workers at the team’s arena for the next 30 days. Blake Griffin of the Detroit Pistons pledged $100,000 for workers there, the San Jose Sharks said part-time arena workers would get paid for all games not played and Florida Panthers goalie Sergei Bobrovsky said he was giving $100,000 to workers in that club’s arena -- a donation matched by his teammates and followed by another pledge from the team’s ownership group. “This is a small way for me to express my support and appreciation for these wonderful people who have been so great to me and my teammates and hopefully we can all join together to relieve some of the stress and hardship caused by this national health crisis,” Williamson wrote on Instagram. At Chicago Blackhawks hockey games alone, about 1,500 workers are in or outside the building on event nights: guest services, concessions, parking, security, box office and so on. “The per game payroll is more than $250,000,” said Courtney Greve Hack, a spokeswoman for the United Center. If that’s the NHL norm — no official numbers are available — then workers around the league would stand to lose more than $60 million if hockey does not return this season. “I get it,” said Chris Lee, who owns a coffee and smoothies franchise in Arizona that draws 70% of its annual revenue sales at spring training and Arizona Coyotes hockey games. “But this is going to be really tough.” Lee was packing up cups that won’t be used when baseball announced Thursday that spring training was ending about two weeks early. He and his staff — one full-timer, 14 part-time employees — aren’t sure what comes next. The enormity of the numbers stacks up quickly. The group that owns the Raptors and other pro sports clubs in Toronto, Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment, says it's trying to help 4,000 workers in that city. Extrapolate that across other Canadian and U.S. pro sports cities, and those teams could be looking at 100,000 workers feeling some sort of pinch — not counting the impact at college and other levels. Cavaliers star Kevin Love pledged $100,000 to help the workers in Cleveland address what he described as their “sudden life shift.” On Friday, reigning NBA MVP Giannis Antetokounmpo of the Milwaukee Bucks made a $100,000 pledge on behalf of his family “It’s bigger than basketball! And during this tough time I want to help the people that make my life, my family’s lives and my teammates lives easier," Antetokounmpo wrote on Twitter. The NCAA men’s Division I tournament generates about $900 million annually through television and marketing rights alone. In Albany, New York, which was scheduled to host men’s tournament games for the first time in 17 years, organizers estimated the economic loss from the three-day event to be about $3 million. Bars and restaurants bought tons of additional stock and perishables to prep for crowds that won't arrive. It’ll probably take a few years before the NCAA can bring the tournament back to many of the cities slated to host games next week. “It’s incredibly disheartening. There’s no question about that,” said Mark Bardack, president of public relations and management firm Ed Lewi and Associates, which had worked for more than a year on the planning of the tournament in Albany. “To have it all disappear, though obviously no one’s fault.” Some arena workers, many not wanting to be identified because of workplace policies about speaking to reporters, said they are living paycheck-to-paycheck. They’re not alone, of course: A study last fall by the American Payroll Association said 74% of workers in the U.S. would “experience financial difficulty” if their usual payday was delayed by as little as one week. In Philadelphia, Rodney Thompson works on commission selling popcorn and beer at 76ers basketball games, Flyers hockey games and Phillies baseball games. They’re all on hold. "The more I sell, the more I make,” the 56-year-old said. “The less I sell, the less I make. It would hurt me, financially. I would have no income coming in. ... I make pretty good money. But if there's no fans, there's no work.” ___ AP Hockey Writer Stephen Whyno in Washington, AP Sports Writers Tom Withers in Cleveland, David Brandt in Scottsdale, Arizona, Josh Dubow in San Francisco, Stephen Hawkins in Dallas and Dan Gelston in Philadelphia, and Associated Press Writers Matthew Carlson and Tim Cronin in Chicago contributed to this report. ___ The Associated Press receives support for health and science coverage from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 14th, 2020

Coalition asks DOH to discuss rights of vapers

An Asian alliance of tobacco harm reduction advocacy organizations asked the Philippines’ Department of Health to bring up the rights of Filipino smokers who want to switch to safer alternatives during the Ninth Session of the Conference of the Parties of the World Health Organization’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control to be held in November 2020......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMar 12th, 2020

AVC postpones Asian men’s club championship in Thailand

In light of the recent development of the global outbreak of the coronavirus (COVID-19) the Asian Volleyball Confederation has decided to postpone the 2020 Asian Men’s Club Volleyball Championship to a later date. According to AVC’s Twitter post on Tuesday, host Thailand have asked for the postponement of the tournament slated from April 18 to 25 in Nakhon Ratchasima. The sports’ continental governing body decided to move the tournament to August 10-17, citing concerns over the spread of the virus that already claimed thousands of lives and to best preserve the health and safety of players, officials and fans. A total of 15 teams have confirmed participation in the tourney including the 30th Southeast Asian Games silver medalist Philippine men’s volleyball team. The other participating countries are host Thailand (2), Australia, Hong Kong, Iran, Vietnam, Korea, Japan, Chinese Taipei, Kazakhstan, Qatar, Sri Lanka, China and Uzbekistan......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 12th, 2020

Tomorrow& rsquo;s Workplace: Humans, AI co-existing as colleagues

Artificial Intelligence (AI) has taken over the way we live, work, and do business. Specifically, in the Asia Pacific region, businesses are adopting advanced AI faster than their counterparts in the rest of the world. According to a recent study, 22 percent of companies in APAC are at the advanced stages of machine learning deployments against just 7 percent in Europe and 11 percent in North America. Clearly, companies in Asia Pacific are ahead in driving business improvements by integrating AI technology in their functions......»»

Category: techSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMar 8th, 2020

UAAP Season 82: UP, UE battle for first win

One is enough. University of the Philippines head coach Godfrey Okumu is putting up a better game plan this time as the Fighting Maroons try to bounce back from an opening day setback against University of the East on Saturday in the UAAP Season 82 women’s volleyball tournament at the MOA Arena. The Diliman-based squad’s character will be tested in its 10:30 a.m. encounter with the Lady Red Warriors. The match will air live on ABS-CBN S+A Channel 23, ABS-CBN S+A HD Channel 166, LIGA SkyCable Channel 86, LIGA HD SkyCable Channel 183, iWant and via livestream.   “I would just say that all the teams are good and we all have the same purpose. We are taking it a point at a time, a set at a time, and day by day,” said Okumu, who hopes to see a better showing from his wards following a 13-25, 17-25, 23-25, drubbing at the hands of defending champion Ateneo de Manila University last Wednesday.  “We will study how they play but I wouldn't like to lose another game in this first round. One game should be enough for me,” he added. Leading UP’s charge is Tots Carlos, who had 11 points in her first game as a graduating senior. But the do-it-all hitter needs to get significant support on offense from her teammates especially seniors Isa Molde, Jessma Ramos and Marist Layug to get on the winning track. But the Fighting Maroons are sure to face tough resistance from UE. The Lady Warriors also dropped their opening day assignment, losing to Far Eastern University, 9-25, 20-25, 17-25, last Tuesday. Mean Mendrez, Ja Lana, Yeye Gabarda and rookie setter Jel Quizon will spearhead UE’s march while senior Seth Rodriguez is expected to work better this time after finishing with just one point the last time out.   Show your school spirit. Get official UAAP university licensed merchandise from www.uaapstore.com. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 6th, 2020