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Ravena joins Jordan family

NLEX ace guard Kiefer Ravena has signed with the Jordan Brand, becoming the first Filipino athlete in an elite circle that includes NBA superstars Jayson Tatum of the Boston Celtics, Luka Doncic of the Dallas Mavericks and the New Orleans Pelicans’ Zion Williamson......»»

Category: sportsSource: philstar philstarMay 4th, 2021

Dreams are not impossible to achieve – Kiefer

From a high school and collegiate phenom to a national team mainstay, Milo ambassador, PBA superstar and now a world staple as the first Filipino athlete to join the elite Jordan Brand family, Kiefer Ravena has achieved it all......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 6th, 2021

Ravena 1st Pinoy to join Jordan brand

Kiefer Ravena, national star from the Gilas Pilipinas team and Philippine Basketball Association, is the newest athlete, and first Filipino, to join the Jordan Brand’s growing family. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMay 5th, 2021

Kiefer Ravena first Filipino athlete to sign with iconic Jordan brand

"I still can’t believe that I’m part of the Jordan Brand Family," he said in a post on his Instagram......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 4th, 2021

Cocolife ambassador Ravena signs with Jordan Brand

Another first for Philippine basketball......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJun 8th, 2021

Kiefer Ravena joins Shiga Lakestars in Japan B. League

Kiefer Ravena will be joining his brother Thirdy in Japan after signing with the Shiga Lakestars......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 2nd, 2021

PH taekwondo jins seek Olympic berths in Jordan

By KRISTEL SATUMBAGA Four national taekwondo jins left for Amman, Jordan on Thursday, each one determined to book an Olympic berth when they compete in the Asian Qualification Tournament set May 21 to 22. Elaine Alora, who competed in the 2016 Rio Olympics, aims for a second shot at the Games when she joins Pauline […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsMay 14th, 2021

Kiefer Ravena raves about joining Luka Doncic, Zion Williamson with Jordan brand

Ravena made the news last Tuesday, May 4, when he was named to be the first Filipino signed to the Jordan brand......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 7th, 2021

Singer-songwriter Poppert Bernadas joins Ogie& lsquo;s ATeam

In continuing with its quest to promote impeccable singing and songwriting talent, ATeam (the Artist and Event management Company of Ogie Alcasid) welcomes Poppert Bernadas into its growing family of talented artists......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 4th, 2021

Ariana Grande joins ‘The Voice’

Popstar Ariana Grande replaced Nick Jonas in the 21st season of the reality show The Voice. “I’m so honored and excited to join The Voice family! I have been a huge fan of the show for such a long time. I can’t wait to go head-to-head with the incredible coaches, get to know these new artists and […] The post Ariana Grande joins ‘The Voice’ appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsMar 31st, 2021

KathNiel joins toktok family

Before the first quarter of the year ends, toktok welcomes its newest brand ambassadors, the King and Queen of Hearts Kathryn Bernardo and Daniel Padilla. .....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 12th, 2021

Coaching great John Thompson of Georgetown dead at 78

By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — John Thompson, the imposing Hall of Famer who turned Georgetown into a “Hoya Paranoia” powerhouse and became the first Black coach to lead a team to the NCAA men’s basketball championship, has died. He was 78 His death was announced in a family statement released by Georgetown on Monday. No details were disclosed. “Our father was an inspiration to many and devoted his life to developing young people not simply on but, most importantly, off the basketball court. He is revered as a historic shepherd of the sport, dedicated to the welfare of his community above all else,” the statement said. “However, for us, his greatest legacy remains as a father, grandfather, uncle, and friend. More than a coach, he was our foundation. More than a legend, he was the voice in our ear everyday.” One of the most celebrated and polarizing figures in his sport, Thompson took over a moribund Georgetown program in the 1970s and molded it in his unique style into a perennial contender, culminating with a national championship team anchored by center Patrick Ewing in 1984. Georgetown reached two other title games with Thompson in charge and Ewing patrolling the paint, losing to Michael Jordan’s North Carolina team in 1982 and to Villanova in 1985. At 6-foot-10, with an ever-present white towel slung over his shoulder, Thompson literally and figuratively towered over the Hoyas for decades, becoming a patriarch of sorts after he quit coaching in 1999. One of his sons, John Thompson III, was hired as Georgetown’s coach in 2004. When the son was fired in 2017, the elder Thompson -- known affectionately as “Big John” or “Pops” to many -- was at the news conference announcing Ewing as the successor. Along the way, Thompson said what he thought, shielded his players from the media and took positions that weren’t always popular. He never shied away from sensitive topics -- particularly the role of race in both sports and society -- and he once famously walked off the court before a game to protest an NCAA rule because he felt it hurt minority athletes. “I’ll probably be remembered for all the things that kept me out of the Hall of Fame, ironically, more than for the things that got me into it,” Thompson said on the day he was elected to the Hall in 1999. Thompson became coach of the Hoyas in 1972 and began remaking a team that was 3-23 the previous season. Over the next 27 years, he led Georgetown to 14 straight NCAA tournaments (1979-92), 24 consecutive postseason appearances (20 NCAA, 4 NIT), three Final Fours (1982, 1984, 1985) and won six Big East tournament championships. Employing a physical, defense-focused approach that frequently relied on a dominant center -- Alonzo Mourning and Dikembe Mutombo were among his other pupils -- Thompson compiled a 596-239 record (.715 winning percentage). He had 26 players drafted by the NBA. One of his honors -- his selection as coach of the U.S. team for the 1988 Olympics -- had a sour ending when the Americans had to settle for the bronze medal. It was a result so disappointing that Thompson put himself on a sort of self-imposed leave at Georgetown for a while, coaching practices and games but leaving many other duties to his assistants. Off the court, Thompson was both a role model and a lightning rod. A stickler for academics, he kept a deflated basketball on his desk, a reminder to his players that a degree was a necessity because a career in basketball relied on a tenuous “nine pounds of air.” The school boasted that 76 of 78 players who played four seasons under Thompson received their degrees. He was a Black coach who recruited mostly Black players to a predominantly white Jesuit university in Washington, and Thompson never hesitated to speak out on behalf of his players. One of the most dramatic moments in Georgetown history came on Jan. 14, 1989, when he walked off the court to a standing ovation before the tipoff of a home game against Boston College, demonstrating in a most public way his displeasure against NCAA Proposition 42. The rule denied athletic scholarships to freshmen who didn’t meet certain requirements, and Thompson said it was biased against underprivileged students. Opposition from Thompson, and others, led the NCAA to modify the rule. Thompson’s most daring move came that same year, when he summoned notorious drug kingpin Rayful Edmond III for a meeting in the coach’s office. Thompson warned Edmond to stop associating with Hoyas players and to leave them alone, using his respect in the Black community to become one of the few people to stare down Edmond and not face a reprisal. Though aware of his influence, Thompson did not take pride in becoming the first Black coach to take a team to the Final Four, and he let a room full of reporters know it when asked his feelings on the subject at a news conference in 1982. “I resent the hell out of that question if it implies I am the first Black coach competent enough to take a team to the Final Four,” Thompson said. “Other Blacks have been denied the right in this country; coaches who have the ability. I don’t take any pride in being the first Black coach in the Final Four. I find the question extremely offensive.” Born Sept. 2, 1941, John R. Thompson Jr. grew up in Washington, D.C. His father was always working — on a farm in Maryland and later as a laborer in the city — and could neither read nor write. “I never in my life saw my father’s hands clean,” Thompson told The Associated Press in 2007. “Never. He’d come home and scrub his hands with this ugly brown soap that looked like tar. I thought that was the color of his hands. When I was still coaching, kids would show up late for practice and I’d (say) ... ‘My father got up every morning of his life at 5 a.m. to go to work. Without an alarm.‘” Thompson’s parents emphasized education, but he struggled in part of because of poor eyesight and labored in Catholic grammar school. He was moved to a segregated public school, had a growth spurt and became good enough at basketball to get into John Carroll, a Catholic high school, where he led the team to 55 consecutive victories and two city titles. He went to Providence College as one of the most touted basketball prospects in the country and led the Friars to the first NCAA bid in school history. He graduated in 1964 and played two seasons with Red Auerbach’s Boston Celtics, earning a pair of championship rings as a sparingly used backup to Bill Russell. Thompson returned to Washington, got his master’s degree in guidance and counseling from the University of the District of Columbia and went 122-28 over six seasons at St. Anthony’s before accepting the job at Georgetown, an elite school that had relatively few Black students. Faculty and students rallied around him after a bedsheet with racist words was hung inside the school’s gym before a game during the 1974-75 season. Thompson sheltered his players with closed practices, tightly controlled media access and a prohibition on interviews with freshmen in their first semester -- a restriction that still stands for Georgetown’s basketball team. Combined with Thompson’s flashes of emotion and his players’ rough-and-tumble style of play, it wasn’t long before the words “Hoya Paranoia” came to epitomize the new era of basketball on the Hilltop campus. Georgetown lost the 1982 NCAA championship game when Fred Brown mistakenly passed the ball to North Carolina’s James Worthy in the game’s final seconds. Two years later, Ewing led an 84-75 win over Houston in the title game. The Hoyas were on the verge of a repeat the following year when they were stunned in the championship game by coach Rollie Massimino’s Villanova team in one of the biggest upsets in tournament history. Success allowed Thompson to rake in money through endorsements, but he ran afoul of his Georgetown bosses when he applied for a gambling license for a business venture in Nevada in 1995. Thompson, who liked playing the slot machines in Las Vegas, reluctantly dropped the application after the university president objected. Centers Ewing, Mourning and Mutombo turned Georgetown into “Big Man U” under Thompson, although his last superstar was guard Allen Iverson, who in 1996 also became the first player under Thompson to leave school early for the NBA draft. “Thanks for Saving My Life Coach,” Iverson wrote at the start of an Instagram post Monday with photos of the pair. The Hoyas teams in the 1990s never came close to matching the achievements of the 1980s, and Thompson’s era came to a surprising and sudden end when he resigned in the middle of the 1998-99 season, citing distractions from a pending divorce. Thompson didn’t fade from the limelight. He became a sports radio talk show host and a TV and radio game analyst, joining the very profession he had frustrated so often as a coach. He loosened up, allowing the public to see his lighter side, but he remained pointed and combative when a topic mattered to him. A torch was passed in 2004, when John Thompson III became Georgetown’s coach. The younger Thompson, with “Pops” often watching from the stands or sitting in the back of the room for news conferences, returned the Hoyas to the Final Four in 2007. Another son, Ronny Thompson, was head coach for one season at Ball State and is now a TV analyst. ___ Joseph White, a former AP sports writer in Washington who died in 2019, prepared this obituary. AP Sports Writer Howard Fendrich contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 15th, 2020

Kamala Harris’s husband Doug Emhoff to be first ‘second gentleman’

When Kamala Harris makes history as the first woman and first Black US vice president, her husband Doug Emhoff will break his own new ground: as the original “second husband.” Media and entertainment lawyer Douglas Emhoff is seen here with his wife Kamala Harris after she took part in the vice presidential debate in Salt Lake City, Utah on October 27, 2020; he will make history as America’s first “second husband” (AFP/ MANILA BULLETIN) Harris and Emhoff, who married in 2014 — she for the first time, he for the second — will also be the first mixed-race couple to occupy their positions. He is white while she is the daughter of Indian and Jamaican immigrants. Both are 56. The contours of Emhoff’s new role as the nation’s “second husband” — some prefer “second gentleman” — have yet to be determined; he has been vague about his plans so far.  Traditionally, the spouses of presidents and vice presidents have been expected to forge a careful balance of supportiveness and independence. Many pick a charitable cause to promote. Emhoff, who was credited as a “secret weapon” on the campaign trail for his wife — even earning his own following on social media — is an accomplished lawyer specializing in media, sports and entertainment law. He took leave in August from the multinational DLA Piper, which has lobbying offices in Washington. That could raise prickly conflicts of interest with Harris’s work. Emhoff has been publicly vague about whether he will stay with the firm, though he ha stold interviewers he might want to pursue pro bono legal work. Emhoff marks another milestone: he would be the first Jew to be part of America’s first or second families. Friends have described him as a less-than-observant Jew but one who identifies strongly with, and is deeply shaped by, Judaism.  The Jewish publication Forward embraced him as the “Second Mensch.” When its reporter asked Emhoff’s mother Barbara about his religious upbringing, she was coy, but offered: “He was bar mitzvahed in New Jersey, I can tell you that.” Born in Brooklyn and raised in New Jersey, he is said to have happy memories of Jewish summer camp, where he won athletic awards. While in high school, his father moved the family to Los Angeles. Emhoff earned a law degree at the University of Southern California, then worked at other law firms before reaching DLA Piper. When Emhoff met Harris on a blind date arranged by friends, it was “love at first sight,” he later said.  His children by his first marriage — Cole, named after John Coltrane, and Ella, named after Ella Fitzgerald — have embraced their stepmother as “Momala.”  Emhoff’s ex-wife Kerstin Mackin remains friendly and even joins the family at Thanksgiving. The “second husband-elect,” incidentally, shares one thing with Donald Trump: both are avid golfers.  .....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsNov 8th, 2020

Celebrating the Filipino family

As the country observes the 28th National Family Week (Sept. 21-27, 2020) the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints joins the National Committee on the Filipino Family (NCFF) and all partner government agencies and civil society groups in celebration of the family......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 22nd, 2020

For Mike Nieto, all roads lead to leading

Mike Nieto's leadership is not just for the basketball court. Apparently, his voice carries just as much weight inside the Nieto household in Cainta. "Hanggang bahay, umaabot yung pagli-lead ko," he shared with a laugh. "Rinig na rinig palagi boses ko sa bahay. Since I've proven to them na I can be a leader sa court, siyempre, I can also be a leader dito sa bahay." What does that mean exactly? Well, let's just say that whenever the Nieto family decides they want and need some quality time together, it's the 23-year-old who sets the time and the place where it would happen. "I think nasanay na rin kasi sila na ako ang palaging nagsasalita kahit sa ganyang bagay so most of the time, ako na talaga nagsasabi saan at anong oras kami pupunta," he said. This is not at all that surprising as when you talk about Mike Nieto, you talk about leadership. That has long been the calling card of the 6-foot-2 swingman - from his days as a Blue Eaglet to his time as a Blue Eagle and from his stint in Batang Gilas to his current run in the Gilas Pilipinas pool. But… Why do people say that in the first place? What is it with Mike Nieto that just speaks, leader? FTW: For The tWin To get the answer, we need to go back to the start. As in, the very, very start. Technically, Mike is the leader of the four Nieto siblings as he is the firstborn of Ateneo de Manila legend Jett and super mom and dentist Girlie. Matt is his brother, but is younger by two minutes. Make no mistake, though, the twins have always gotten along. "Kami ni Matt, ever since, close na talaga kami. We started playing basketball at the age of six and from then on, naging magkasama na kami sa lahat ng bagay," Mike said. He then continued, "Even course namin sa college, pareho kaya almost lahat ng classes namin, classmates kami. Ever since talaga, unusual na hindi kami magkasama." Indeed, the Nieto twins have always been some sort of a package deal. Hence, the reports of their commitment to Ateneo for college had headlines such as "Ateneo scores 'twin kill' as Nieto brothers commit to play for Blue Eagles." Through and through, however, Mike was thought to be the leader - even though Matt is the point guard. The reason for that? Because "Big Mike" is more vocal. And why is he more vocal" Well, because he had a two minute headstart on "Matty Ice" at letting his voice be heard. Seriously, though, Mike said it was just because he doesn't waste any time at all in being vocal - and that's why he's being heard first and more often. "Siguro, mas maingay lang kasi ako kay Matt. Ako kasi, kapag may nakita akong mali sa ginagawa ng teammates ko, siguradong makakarinig agad sila sa akin," he shared. He then continued, "Hindi ako papayag na lilipas ang isang bagay na alam kong makakasama sa team. Talagang maglalabas at maglalabas ako ng mga salita hanggang ma-solve ang problema." That doesn't mean that Matt doesn't lead, though. As his twin put it, "Matt is the leader on the court. That's the assignment Coach Tab [Baldwin] gave him and I think he has done well with that." Well, yeah, Matt has three rings as court general of the Blue Eagles' dynasty to show for that. LOL: Lead out Loud It was another court general altogether, however, who had made the biggest mark on Mike Nieto. While he never was a point guard due to his wide frame, he was always trying to emulate one of the best ball-handlers in the history of Philippine basketball. "Jimmy Alapag is my role model when it comes to leadership," he said. "I'm just very lucky that for a long time now, he would talk to me on how I can affect the team positively on and off the court." When Alapag was in his prime as captain of Gilas Pilipinas, Nieto was put on the pedestal as skipper of Batang Gilas. While he knew full well that was a tall task, he was also eager to prove himself worthy. "Sa Batang Gilas under coach Jamike [Jarin], he made me team captain kahit second year high school pa lang ako. But that made me realize na I have the capabilities of being a leader," he said. With that, Mike had the responsibility of making sure the likes of Paul Desiderio, Richard Escoto, Jollo Go, Jolo Mendoza, and Renzo Navarro were kept in line. And from then on, he just did not stop keeping at it. Whether it be as the Jrs. MVP as a Blue Eaglet or a rotation regular as a Blue Eagle, Nieto's biggest contribution has always been his leadership. "Being a leader is never easy. At the end of the day, you have to gain the trust of your teammates and your coaches - that's the hardest part," he said. Ask his teammates from high school, many of whom were still his teammates come college, and they would say they always have his back. "Buti na lang nakuha ko ang tiwala ng lahat ng tao na nakapaligid sa akin. Kaya rin ako nag-succeed being the team captain ng every team na nagiging part ako," he said. While he has always had the full faith of longtime teammates and good friends Thirdy Ravena, Gian Mamuyac, Mendoza, and of course, twin Matt, Mike could only acknowledge that it was another challenge altogether being the voice of the team that swept the season. "Ang malaking naging difference ngayong college from high school, kinailangan kong magsalita ng English mas madalas," he said, through chuckles. With foreigners such as Ange Kouame and Filipino-foreigners like Raffy Verano, Nieto, indeed, did have to make sure his communication lines were crystal clear. The thing about leaders, though, is that they give their all in anything and everything - whether that be giving a pep talk or passing the message to somebody like Kouame who only started learning English in 2017. IMO: In My Opinion And the thing about leaders? They do not necessarily care about themselves. Imagine Mike Nieto, a Jrs. MVP, a team captain for Batang Gilas, a literal blue-blood in Katipunan. Do you know his averages through their three-peat? In 47 games total, he saw 14.2 minutes of action and had 5.2 points and 3.7 rebounds per game. Still, that did not matter at all. All that mattered for Mike are all those Ws. "To be a leader, you have to prove palagi that you can lead on and off the court," he said. "I think yun ang napatunayan ko kay coach Tab - na handa akong i-sacrifice ang personal goals ko para sa ikabubuti ng team. Wala akong pakialam sa sarili ko since ang nasa utak ko lang is kung ano ang makabubuti para sa team namin." But did he? Did Nieto prove himself to Coach Tab - a coach who has gone around the world and seen it all? The talented tactician's statement right after Ateneo completed its perfect run through UAAP 82 speaks volumes. “Look at all of us and think about where we’re gonna be in 10 or 15 years, you’ll forget most of us,” he said in the post-game conference where he sat alongside the Nieto twins, Ravena, Isaac Go, and Adrian Wong. “But you won’t forget Mike Nieto.” Coach Tab then went on to explain why he said so. As he put it, "Mike is a natural leader. Mike is a communicator. Mike is a thinker. In terms of touching people, making lives better, and making sure that everybody around him has a better chance than what he has, that’s our captain." High praise coming from the very mentor who has been getting nothing but high praise. Safe to say, though, Mike has proven himself to coach Tab. TBC: To Be Continued In doing so, Mike Nieto has also made it possible for the two of them to continue working together. Mike, twin Matt, fellow Blue Eagle Go, University of the East's Rey Suerte, and San Sebastian College-Recoletos' Allyn Bulanadi were the first five names listed for the Gilas pool. The likes of Ravena, Dwight Ramos of Ateneo, Justine Baltazar of De La Salle University, Dave Ildefonso then of National University, and the University of the Philippines foursome of Javi and Juan Gomez de Liano, Kobe Paras, and Jaydee Tungcab also made the list not long after. But the fact remains that "Big Mike" - he of zero starts, but three titles in a row in his last three years in blue and white - was one of the first names there. With that, he is now one of the few Batang Gilas players who have successfully gotten promoted to the Men's team. "Of course, sino bang ayaw i-represent ang bansa natin, 'di ba? That's why I'm very grateful for this opportunity to be part of the Gilas pool," he said. He then continued, "That's why I've been working on my game even harder so that I can provide whatever Gilas needs from me." Of course, what Gilas would need from Nieto is, first and foremost, his leadership. After all, that is still and would always be his greatest strength. To do so, though, the youngster would have to prove himself yet again - not only to Filipinos who are forever invested in their national team, but more importantly, his teammates, many of whom are already superstars in the PBA. For Mike, however, this is nothing new - nothing new at all. "Ever since I was in grade school, people have been doubting that I can progress my game to the next level. What we can't forget is that at the end of the day, it's in your hands if you want to prove them wrong or prove them right," he said. He then continued, "I actually enjoy these kinds of moments since dito talaga lalabas ang totoong pagkatao mo. Ang sigurado ko lang, I will fight for my spot in Gilas." And so, from a successful high school career and then an even more successful college career, Nieto is now seeking success as part of the Gilas pool. Does he deserve to be there? That's for the haters to hate, the doubters to doubt, and the bashers to bash. And that's for Mike Nieto to lead them out of the darkness. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 27th, 2020

LOOK: LeBron unveils new Tune Squad jerseys for Space Jam sequel

The members of the Tune Squad are getting new jerseys for Space Jam: A New Legacy. On the eve of his playoff debut with the Los Angeles Lakers, LeBron James offered a sneak peak of the brand-new jersey his team will wear in the upcoming Space Jam sequel. The new look was shown through a video posted on various social media accounts associated to James, including the LeBron James Family Foundation. Would it be the Family Reunion without a special surprise?! @mavcarter gives our I Promise families the first ever look at @KingJames in his @spacejammovie ‘A New Legacy’ jersey! ???????? pic.twitter.com/XsPYL1dvcU — LeBron James Family Foundation (@LJFamFoundation) August 18, 2020 Earlier this year during the NBA All-Star break, a set of Tune Squad and Monstars uniforms were released to the public. [Related: LOOK: Space Jam 2 uniforms featuring the Tune Squad and the Monstars] The Tune Squad uniform then was more of a refreshed take of the originals worn during the 1996 movie with Michael Jordan. Space Jame: A New Legacy starring LeBron is set for a 2021 release.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 18th, 2020

UAAP 77 Finals MVP Aroga on Coach E: He s my Phil Jackson

In 2014, Eric Altamirano guided National University to its first championship in 60 years. It may be just one title in his six-season stint there, but for a blue and gold side which has long been suffering, it was an all-important one. And so, coach Eric will remain a beloved figure in Sampaloc for all his life. Apparently, he also remains a beloved figure in Dallas in the US - at least in the house where Alfred Aroga now resides in. Reminiscing about the Bulldogs' historic championship in The Prospects Pod, that year's Finals MVP was asked about what Altamirano means to him. "Coach E, as I've always said, he's my Phil Jackson," he answered. Jackson was the coach for the Michael Jordan-led Chicago Bulls' six championships, the Shaquille O'Neal and Kobe Bryant-led Los Angeles Lakers' three-peat, and, finally, the Kobe-led LA Lakers' back-to-back. In terms of rings, Coach Phil has Coach E beat, without a doubt. In terms of life lessons, though, "The Zen Master" is apparently not that far from the always amiable Filipino mentor. "I will call his house 'The Promised Land' because there are a lot of players that went in that house and look where they are today," Aroda said. "In his house, he didn't care where you came from, if you're black, green, yellow, blue. He didn't care about it. As long as you're in his house, there are rules to follow and those rules help you be a better person." Transferring from Cameroon to Manila, the 6-foot-7 big man stayed in the Altamirano household for all of his time in blue and gold. There, he learned all about discipline - something he had formerly failed to grasp. "There's a curfew, first of all. Then there are things you can't do - you can't drink, you don't smoke, you don't womanize, you go to Church, you got to be respectful," he shared. He then continued, "His family really embraced me and I needed that because I remember when I first went to the Philippines, I was like a wild animal, I was so aggressive, I didn't know how to respond to adversities so he had to coach me on that." For all of that, Aroga is nothing but thankful. "Coach E is always there for me. Coach, I would never repay you for everything you did for me so the only thing I can do is be successful and be grateful that I had you," he said. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 15th, 2020

United City FC rounds out roster with National Team keeper Anthony Pinthus

United City Football Club caps its full roster announcement, ahead of the FIFA transfer window deadline this week, with the signing of 22-year old Fil-Swiss goalkeeper — Anthony Pinthus from the Azkals Development Team, who also served as a goalkeeper for the Philippine Under-23 National Men's Football Team, during the 30th South East Asian Games campaign. Prior to his ADT stint, Pinthus was also affiliated with clubs such as FC Kosova, FC Wohlen, and GC Zurich U21.  According to UCFC co-founder Eric Gottschalk, “True to our mission of developing young players, we have signed Antony Pinthus, on loan from ADT.  This was also agreed on by both clubs and supported by Philippines National Head Coach Scott Cooper, to expose Pinthus to the AFC Cup competition. “  “He is the most promising goalkeeper of the Philippines after Neil and Roland and we are happy that he decided to join us for this season, as we believe that UCFC is the right platform to expose him to top Asian football, while learning from our veterans such as Stephan Schroeck and Bienve Maranon.” Gottschalk continues, “The signing of Pinthus marks the completion of the roster ahead of the transfer window deadline this week.  As for the position of Head Coach, we have prepared a shortlist of a number of highly qualified individuals and we will make an announcement  in due time.” Pinthus joins the roster, along with Stephan Shrock, OJ Porteria, Sean Patrick Kane, Ron Bayan, Jun Badelic, Angelo Marasigan, Robert Mendy, Arnie Pasinabo, Tristan Robles, Dennis Villanueva, Joshua Dutosme, Takashi Odawara, Hikaru Minegishi, Bienvenido Maranon, Mike Ott, Manuel Ott, Pocholo Bugas, Jordan Jarvis, Jorrel Aristorenas, and Jose Miguel Clarino......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 13th, 2020

Spieth chasing Grand Slam and hardly anyone notices

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The spotlight on Jordan Spieth should be bright enough to cut through the marine layer blanketing Harding Park this week at the PGA Championship. Win this major and he joins the most exclusive club in golf with the final leg of the career Grand Slam. Only five other players — Tiger Woods, Jack Nicklaus, Gary Player, Ben Hogan and Gene Sarazen — have won all four majors since the Masters began in 1934. This is his fourth chance, and each year becomes more difficult. The longest anyone went from winning the third leg to completing the Grand Slam was three years by Player and Nicklaus. And hardly anyone is talking about it. It's not because Brooks Koepka is trying to become the first player to win the PGA Championship three straight times in stroke play, or because Tiger Woods is going for his record-tying fifth PGA. It's not even because golf has returned amid a coronavirus pandemic that has kept spectators away from a major championship for the first time. Spieth has become an afterthought because he hasn't won since he captured the British Open three years ago. Who would have guessed that? Certainly not the 27-year-old Texan. “If you told me that, I'd probably say that guy is kind of a jerk and I'd walk the other way,” Spieth said with a smile. “But here we are. And I hope to end that as soon as possible.” So much has changed since his last visit to the TPC Harding Park. That was in 2015 for the Cadillac Match Play. Spieth was the newly minted “Golden Child” in golf as the Masters champion. He would win the U.S. Open the following month, miss a British Open playoff by one shot at St. Andrews and be runner-up at the PGA Championship. No one ever made such a spirited bid for the calendar Grand Slam. Now, the world ranking tells the story. Spieth was No. 2 after winning at Royal Birkdale and getting his first shot at the career Grand Slam in the 2017 PGA Championship (he tied for 28th). He was No. 8 in the world going to Bellerive for the PGA Championship the following year (he tied for 12th). He was No. 39 going to Bethpage Black last year. He played in the final group with Brooks Koepka on Saturday, albeit eight shots behind, and fell back quickly. He tied for third. Now he has plunged all the way to No. 62, out of the top 50 for the first time since he was a 20-year-old rookie. More troublesome than not winning is that Spieth has rarely contended. He has not finished within three shots of the lead since his remarkable rally in the final round of the Masters two years ago left him two shots behind Patrick Reed. Is there hope? He has no doubt. Is there a chance at Harding Park? He has experience. “Majors aren’t necessarily totally about form,” Spieth said. “They’re about experience and being able to grind it out, picking apart golf courses. So I feel like I probably have more confidence going into a major no matter where my game is at than any other golf tournament.” Exactly what went wrong is a topic of debate and discussion. He was ill all of December before going into the 2018 season. His alignment got off. His putting, the hallmark of his game, went sideways. And he's been trying to put back the pieces ever since. The last two years he hasn't made it to the Tour Championship. His only real success of late has been a more positive attitude. Spieth used the word “grace” at Colonial, his way of saying he will learn to shrug off mistakes and keep going. “I almost feel at times like the game is testing me a little bit right now,” he said. Last week, he spoke of a shot that hit a tree. Whereas it used to bounce in the fairway, this one went off a cart path and out-of-bounds. The same thing happened at Hilton Head. “I feel like you can look at it a couple ways,” Spieth said. “You can get really upset and complain about it — which I’ve done and that’s not helpful — or you can look at it like, ‘Hey, this is part of the game testing you, and the better you handle these situations, the faster you progress forward.’” Spieth says he is in no hurry. At 27, he has plenty of golf ahead of him in his career. As brilliant as his 2015 season was, he'd like to think his best years are ahead of him. But there's only one PGA Championship this year. One shot at the career Grand Slam. “It's something that I really want,” Spieth said. “It's probably the No. 1 goal in the game of golf for me right now is to try and capture that. I’d love to be able to hold all four trophies.” The way the last three years have gone, any trophy would do......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 5th, 2020

Ratliffe has advice for Japan-bound Thirdy: 'Be super confident'

The Japan-bound Thirdy Ravena has a big believer in South Korea's Ricardo Ratliffe. Ratliffe, the former Star import and current naturalized player for the Korean national team, says that Thirdy is due for big things on the basketball court. The leading scorer and rebounder of the 2019 FIBA World Cup calls Ravena as the future of Philippine basketball. "I definitely think so," Ratliffe said on 2OT with PBA broadcasters Magoo Marjon and Carlo Pamintuan. Ratliffe got a close look at Thirdy when his South Korean national team took on Ravena's Ateneo Blue Eagles in the 2018 Jones Cup. [Related: JONES CUP: Blue Eagles get burned by red-hot Korea] Korea won the game, 90-73, but Thirdy earned a believer despite the loss. The Koreans finished that Jones Cup at third place while the Blue Eagles went fourth. "He's like a Filipino Russell Westbrook. I saw him in the Jones Cup and he killed us. We brought our real national team and he played well against us," Ratliffe recalled. "I'm like who is this dude? And he's in college? His athleticism is off the charts," Ratliffe added. As a veteran international player himself, Ratliffe likes Thirdy's move to Japan to play pro ball. Ravena is set to take flight in the B.League after signing with San-en NeoPhoenix. [Related: Thirdy, NeoPhoenix open home campaign against powerhouse Jets] "I know he's gonna go out there and represent for the Philippines. I think he has a bright future ahead of him," Ratliffe said of Thirdy. In NeoPhoenix, Thirdy joins a team that only won five games in the COVID-19 shortened 2019-2020 season. As a young player making the jump, Ratliffe believes it was the best move Ravena could make. "I think he made a right decision choosing a lesser team, especially at the start, just to test the waters and see how he likes it. It's a big culture difference out there. Japan is kinda similar to Korea where we're really strict on stuff," Ratliffe said of Thirdy. "So I think he just has to go out there with a free mind and be super confident, he gotta always know that he's still one of the best players in the country so just go out there with that mindset and play like it. At the end of the day, if it doesn't work out and he doesn't like it in Japan, he can always go home so there's no need to stress about it," Ratliffe added.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 16th, 2020

BEST Center graduate Fajardo joins Dickinson U in New Jersey

New Jersey—MILO BEST Center graduate Ella Fajardo is entering a new stage in her athletic journey after officially joining Fairleigh Dickinson University in New Jersey where she and her family currently resides. The 17-year-old cager is among the elite few who have undergone a rigorous selection process to be in the school’s roster for the Division I of the United States’ National Collegiate Athletic Association, marking an unprecedented milestone in her basketball career thus far......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJul 16th, 2020