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Quit paying & lsquo;tax& rsquo; to communists or face raps, NICA warns traders

The National Intelligence Coordinating Agency  issued a stern warning Monday against companies and individuals that they will face charges for paying extortion money to the Communist Party of the Philippines -New People’s Army-National Democratic Front which, in effect, finances the group’s reign of terror, especially in the countryside......»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerAug 16th, 2021

Coaching great John Thompson of Georgetown dead at 78

By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — John Thompson, the imposing Hall of Famer who turned Georgetown into a “Hoya Paranoia” powerhouse and became the first Black coach to lead a team to the NCAA men’s basketball championship, has died. He was 78 His death was announced in a family statement released by Georgetown on Monday. No details were disclosed. “Our father was an inspiration to many and devoted his life to developing young people not simply on but, most importantly, off the basketball court. He is revered as a historic shepherd of the sport, dedicated to the welfare of his community above all else,” the statement said. “However, for us, his greatest legacy remains as a father, grandfather, uncle, and friend. More than a coach, he was our foundation. More than a legend, he was the voice in our ear everyday.” One of the most celebrated and polarizing figures in his sport, Thompson took over a moribund Georgetown program in the 1970s and molded it in his unique style into a perennial contender, culminating with a national championship team anchored by center Patrick Ewing in 1984. Georgetown reached two other title games with Thompson in charge and Ewing patrolling the paint, losing to Michael Jordan’s North Carolina team in 1982 and to Villanova in 1985. At 6-foot-10, with an ever-present white towel slung over his shoulder, Thompson literally and figuratively towered over the Hoyas for decades, becoming a patriarch of sorts after he quit coaching in 1999. One of his sons, John Thompson III, was hired as Georgetown’s coach in 2004. When the son was fired in 2017, the elder Thompson -- known affectionately as “Big John” or “Pops” to many -- was at the news conference announcing Ewing as the successor. Along the way, Thompson said what he thought, shielded his players from the media and took positions that weren’t always popular. He never shied away from sensitive topics -- particularly the role of race in both sports and society -- and he once famously walked off the court before a game to protest an NCAA rule because he felt it hurt minority athletes. “I’ll probably be remembered for all the things that kept me out of the Hall of Fame, ironically, more than for the things that got me into it,” Thompson said on the day he was elected to the Hall in 1999. Thompson became coach of the Hoyas in 1972 and began remaking a team that was 3-23 the previous season. Over the next 27 years, he led Georgetown to 14 straight NCAA tournaments (1979-92), 24 consecutive postseason appearances (20 NCAA, 4 NIT), three Final Fours (1982, 1984, 1985) and won six Big East tournament championships. Employing a physical, defense-focused approach that frequently relied on a dominant center -- Alonzo Mourning and Dikembe Mutombo were among his other pupils -- Thompson compiled a 596-239 record (.715 winning percentage). He had 26 players drafted by the NBA. One of his honors -- his selection as coach of the U.S. team for the 1988 Olympics -- had a sour ending when the Americans had to settle for the bronze medal. It was a result so disappointing that Thompson put himself on a sort of self-imposed leave at Georgetown for a while, coaching practices and games but leaving many other duties to his assistants. Off the court, Thompson was both a role model and a lightning rod. A stickler for academics, he kept a deflated basketball on his desk, a reminder to his players that a degree was a necessity because a career in basketball relied on a tenuous “nine pounds of air.” The school boasted that 76 of 78 players who played four seasons under Thompson received their degrees. He was a Black coach who recruited mostly Black players to a predominantly white Jesuit university in Washington, and Thompson never hesitated to speak out on behalf of his players. One of the most dramatic moments in Georgetown history came on Jan. 14, 1989, when he walked off the court to a standing ovation before the tipoff of a home game against Boston College, demonstrating in a most public way his displeasure against NCAA Proposition 42. The rule denied athletic scholarships to freshmen who didn’t meet certain requirements, and Thompson said it was biased against underprivileged students. Opposition from Thompson, and others, led the NCAA to modify the rule. Thompson’s most daring move came that same year, when he summoned notorious drug kingpin Rayful Edmond III for a meeting in the coach’s office. Thompson warned Edmond to stop associating with Hoyas players and to leave them alone, using his respect in the Black community to become one of the few people to stare down Edmond and not face a reprisal. Though aware of his influence, Thompson did not take pride in becoming the first Black coach to take a team to the Final Four, and he let a room full of reporters know it when asked his feelings on the subject at a news conference in 1982. “I resent the hell out of that question if it implies I am the first Black coach competent enough to take a team to the Final Four,” Thompson said. “Other Blacks have been denied the right in this country; coaches who have the ability. I don’t take any pride in being the first Black coach in the Final Four. I find the question extremely offensive.” Born Sept. 2, 1941, John R. Thompson Jr. grew up in Washington, D.C. His father was always working — on a farm in Maryland and later as a laborer in the city — and could neither read nor write. “I never in my life saw my father’s hands clean,” Thompson told The Associated Press in 2007. “Never. He’d come home and scrub his hands with this ugly brown soap that looked like tar. I thought that was the color of his hands. When I was still coaching, kids would show up late for practice and I’d (say) ... ‘My father got up every morning of his life at 5 a.m. to go to work. Without an alarm.‘” Thompson’s parents emphasized education, but he struggled in part of because of poor eyesight and labored in Catholic grammar school. He was moved to a segregated public school, had a growth spurt and became good enough at basketball to get into John Carroll, a Catholic high school, where he led the team to 55 consecutive victories and two city titles. He went to Providence College as one of the most touted basketball prospects in the country and led the Friars to the first NCAA bid in school history. He graduated in 1964 and played two seasons with Red Auerbach’s Boston Celtics, earning a pair of championship rings as a sparingly used backup to Bill Russell. Thompson returned to Washington, got his master’s degree in guidance and counseling from the University of the District of Columbia and went 122-28 over six seasons at St. Anthony’s before accepting the job at Georgetown, an elite school that had relatively few Black students. Faculty and students rallied around him after a bedsheet with racist words was hung inside the school’s gym before a game during the 1974-75 season. Thompson sheltered his players with closed practices, tightly controlled media access and a prohibition on interviews with freshmen in their first semester -- a restriction that still stands for Georgetown’s basketball team. Combined with Thompson’s flashes of emotion and his players’ rough-and-tumble style of play, it wasn’t long before the words “Hoya Paranoia” came to epitomize the new era of basketball on the Hilltop campus. Georgetown lost the 1982 NCAA championship game when Fred Brown mistakenly passed the ball to North Carolina’s James Worthy in the game’s final seconds. Two years later, Ewing led an 84-75 win over Houston in the title game. The Hoyas were on the verge of a repeat the following year when they were stunned in the championship game by coach Rollie Massimino’s Villanova team in one of the biggest upsets in tournament history. Success allowed Thompson to rake in money through endorsements, but he ran afoul of his Georgetown bosses when he applied for a gambling license for a business venture in Nevada in 1995. Thompson, who liked playing the slot machines in Las Vegas, reluctantly dropped the application after the university president objected. Centers Ewing, Mourning and Mutombo turned Georgetown into “Big Man U” under Thompson, although his last superstar was guard Allen Iverson, who in 1996 also became the first player under Thompson to leave school early for the NBA draft. “Thanks for Saving My Life Coach,” Iverson wrote at the start of an Instagram post Monday with photos of the pair. The Hoyas teams in the 1990s never came close to matching the achievements of the 1980s, and Thompson’s era came to a surprising and sudden end when he resigned in the middle of the 1998-99 season, citing distractions from a pending divorce. Thompson didn’t fade from the limelight. He became a sports radio talk show host and a TV and radio game analyst, joining the very profession he had frustrated so often as a coach. He loosened up, allowing the public to see his lighter side, but he remained pointed and combative when a topic mattered to him. A torch was passed in 2004, when John Thompson III became Georgetown’s coach. The younger Thompson, with “Pops” often watching from the stands or sitting in the back of the room for news conferences, returned the Hoyas to the Final Four in 2007. Another son, Ronny Thompson, was head coach for one season at Ball State and is now a TV analyst. ___ Joseph White, a former AP sports writer in Washington who died in 2019, prepared this obituary. AP Sports Writer Howard Fendrich contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 15th, 2020

Yankees face White Sox on cinematic & lsquo;Field of Dreams& rsquo;

New York—Major League Baseball reality meets cinematic magic on Thursday when the New York Yankees and Chicago White Sox play on the “Field of Dreams” at Dyersville, Iowa......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 13th, 2021

Australian athletes face & lsquo;cruel& rsquo; 28 days& rsquo; quarantine

Sydney---A group of Australian Olympic athletes were Wednesday facing 28 days in quarantine on return from Tokyo in a move slammed as “cruel” and “uncaring” as concerns mount over their mental wellbeing......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 11th, 2021

SMB-Ginebra Sunday game postponed

The game between San Miguel Beer and Barangay Ginebra has been postponed, reducing today’s triple-bill into double-header as the PBA continues to impose what it calls ‘precautionary’ measure intended to secure the safety of everyone in the face of danger that’s still lurking......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJul 31st, 2021

G7 strikes & lsquo;historic& rsquo; corporate tax deal

Finance ministers from wealthy G7 nations on Saturday endorsed a global minimum corporate tax rate of at least 15 percent, rallying behind a US-backed plan targeting tech giants and other multinationals accused of not paying enough......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJun 6th, 2021

CHR obtains list of & lsquo;rights abuses& rsquo; by communists

The Commission on Human Rights has been asked to investigate the 1,506 atrocities and International Humanitarian Law violations committed by the Communist Party of the Philippines-New People’s Army-National Democratic Front (CPP-NPA-NDF), collectively known as communist terrorist group (CTG), from 2010-2020......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMay 23rd, 2021

& lsquo;COD parcels& rsquo; scam rampant, Ninja Van warns

Tech-enabled express logistics provider Ninja Van Philippines has warned the public against falling prey to the so-called “cash-on-delivery parcels” scam, which duped online buyers through fraudulent deliveries......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMay 16th, 2021

Ivermectin peddler Defensor warns DOH may face raps over Remdesivir purchases

“All further purchases of remdesivir – after the WHO came out with its adverse recommendation – may be deemed as transactions highly detrimental to the government under the Anti-Graft and Corrupt Practices Act.".....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 9th, 2021

WHO warns PH on & lsquo;jumpers& rsquo;

The World Health Organization warned the Philippines it would lose 44 million doses of donated vaccines for the coronavirus if mayors and government officials continue jumping the line ahead of health frontliners and other persons on the priority list, the Palace said......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMar 26th, 2021

Nurses & lsquo;tired, losing hope& rsquo; amid coronavirus surge, call on DOH& rsquo;s Duque to resign

Filipino nurses are tired and losing hope as they face a fresh coronavirus infection surge that had exceeded single-day case reports from last year’s peak, their group said Saturday, even as they didn’t rule out the possibility of asking for a timeout if COVID-19 cases continue to increase......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMar 21st, 2021

& lsquo;Asia& rsquo;s El Chapo& rsquo; arrested in the Netherlands

The alleged ringleader of Asia’s biggest crime syndicate and one of the world’s most wanted men has been arrested in the Netherlands, with Australian authorities pushing for his extradition to face trial......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 24th, 2021

Duterte: PH to have & lsquo;brighter days& rsquo; in 2021

President Rodrigo Duterte expressed confidence the Philippines will have brighter days in 2021 as Filipinos are stronger to face the challenges that the new year may bring......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 1st, 2021

Dominguez asks BIR to probe alleged rice import & lsquo;dummies& rsquo;

Finance Secretary Carlos Dominguez III said Friday he asked the Bureau of Internal Revenue and Bureau of Customs to help the Department of Agriculture in investigating the reported use of cooperatives by private traders as dummies for rice imports......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 28th, 2020

& lsquo;Academic freedom& rsquo;

I was bemused by the way UP Diliman recently turned away a rally by parents concerned over NPA recruitment of their children. Evidently, those tax-paying parents aren’t covered by academic freedom, UP-style......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 23rd, 2020

Singaporean charged with & lsquo;illegal& rsquo; one-man protest

A Singaporean activist was charged Monday with staging an illegal one-man protest after he stood outside a police station holding a sign bearing a smiley face......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 23rd, 2020

Retired Tyson, Jones says they& rsquo;re ready for & lsquo;real fight& rsquo;

Los Angeles, United States—Mike Tyson and Roy Jones Jr. insisted they are preparing for a bruising battle when the two fifty-something fighters face each other in an eight-round exhibition bout in Los Angeles......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 1st, 2020

UK& rsquo;s opposition Labor Party warns of & lsquo;civil war& rsquo;

Britain’s main opposition Labour party on Friday urged shocked members to stand united against anti-Semitism, appealing against a renewal of internecine “civil war” following the suspension of its left-wing former leader......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 30th, 2020

Rise of the Phoenix

When one talks about the Phoenix Fuelmasters, basketball purists would definitely label the team as a squad built around Calvin Abueva. No question about that, ‘The Beast’ is the face of the Dennis Uy-owned franchise......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 27th, 2020

& lsquo;Have you no sense of decency?& rsquo;

The infamous US senator Joseph McCarthy stoked fears that communists had infiltrated every aspect of American life, and bullied, lied and smeared his way to power in the early 1950s, destroying thousands of careers and lives along the way......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 27th, 2020

Consumer group backs & lsquo;no-disconnection& rsquo; rules issued by ERC

Consumers led by the Power for People Coalition on Wednesday expressed support to the declaration of the Energy Regulatory Commission extending the “no-disconnection” policy for non-paying customers until the end of the year......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 15th, 2020