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PhilHealth probes & lsquo;upcasing& rsquo; practice of hospitals, providers

State insurer Philippine Health Insurance Corp. (PhilHealth) said Thursday it was looking into instances of “upcasing” committed by hospitals and healthcare providers amid the COVID-19 pandemic......»»

Category: newsSource: thestandard thestandardAug 20th, 2021

Hospitals, doctors eye disengagement from PhilHealth

The biggest hospitals and physicians organizations in the country are disengaging from the Philippine Health Insurance Corp. over its circular suspending payments to hospitals and health care providers whose claims are under investigation......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 21st, 2021

& lsquo;Hospitals near full capacity& rsquo;

All areas in Metro Manila are now classified as either high-risk or critical risk for COVID-19, the Department of Health said Friday as the disease continued to spread and hospital beds filled up, and the country hit a four-month high in both the number of new infections and active cases......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 14th, 2021

Government probes & lsquo;vax slots for sale& rsquo;

The government vowed Saturday to punish individuals found to be behind the reported sale of COVID-19 vaccination slots in the cities of Mandaluyong and San Juan......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 23rd, 2021

NCR hospitals & lsquo;at critical level& rsquo; even as infection rate declines

The Department of Health said Tuesday that intensive care unit (ICU) beds in 14 out of 21 hospitals in Metro Manila was at a "critical" level or "almost 100 percent.”.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 7th, 2021

& lsquo;PH suffers major setback& rsquo;

A former Health secretary said the surge in coronavirus cases has set the country “10 steps back from square one,” as some Metro Manila hospitals have filled up 80 to 85 percent of their COVID-19 bed capacity, putting them in the “high risk” category......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMar 19th, 2021

Fact checking

‘Fact-Checking Facebook’s Fact Checkers’ is the heading of an opinion piece by the editorial board of the world-renowned business paper Wall Street Journal in its March 5 edition. In a stinging rebuke of the much-criticized and highly problematic practice of tech giant Facebook in deleting or throttling with impunity what it tags as “misleading or misinformed pieces” in a user’s account or, worse, suspending or completely banning such account without even a by-your-leave advise......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMar 10th, 2021

PhilHealth says P15B & lsquo;liquidated& rsquo;

State medical insurer PhilHealth said Tuesday it had "liquidated" most of the P15 billion that former officials were accused last year of pocketing......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 26th, 2021

& lsquo;More Filipino OFW nurses die of virus because of work ethic& rsquo;

Filipino nurses in the United States of America and other parts of the world are bearing the brunt of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic because of their exceptional work ethic that drives them to spend more days and longer hours in the hospitals where they serve, Anakalusugan party-list Rep. Michael Defensor said on Sunday......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsDec 20th, 2020

Coaching great John Thompson of Georgetown dead at 78

By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — John Thompson, the imposing Hall of Famer who turned Georgetown into a “Hoya Paranoia” powerhouse and became the first Black coach to lead a team to the NCAA men’s basketball championship, has died. He was 78 His death was announced in a family statement released by Georgetown on Monday. No details were disclosed. “Our father was an inspiration to many and devoted his life to developing young people not simply on but, most importantly, off the basketball court. He is revered as a historic shepherd of the sport, dedicated to the welfare of his community above all else,” the statement said. “However, for us, his greatest legacy remains as a father, grandfather, uncle, and friend. More than a coach, he was our foundation. More than a legend, he was the voice in our ear everyday.” One of the most celebrated and polarizing figures in his sport, Thompson took over a moribund Georgetown program in the 1970s and molded it in his unique style into a perennial contender, culminating with a national championship team anchored by center Patrick Ewing in 1984. Georgetown reached two other title games with Thompson in charge and Ewing patrolling the paint, losing to Michael Jordan’s North Carolina team in 1982 and to Villanova in 1985. At 6-foot-10, with an ever-present white towel slung over his shoulder, Thompson literally and figuratively towered over the Hoyas for decades, becoming a patriarch of sorts after he quit coaching in 1999. One of his sons, John Thompson III, was hired as Georgetown’s coach in 2004. When the son was fired in 2017, the elder Thompson -- known affectionately as “Big John” or “Pops” to many -- was at the news conference announcing Ewing as the successor. Along the way, Thompson said what he thought, shielded his players from the media and took positions that weren’t always popular. He never shied away from sensitive topics -- particularly the role of race in both sports and society -- and he once famously walked off the court before a game to protest an NCAA rule because he felt it hurt minority athletes. “I’ll probably be remembered for all the things that kept me out of the Hall of Fame, ironically, more than for the things that got me into it,” Thompson said on the day he was elected to the Hall in 1999. Thompson became coach of the Hoyas in 1972 and began remaking a team that was 3-23 the previous season. Over the next 27 years, he led Georgetown to 14 straight NCAA tournaments (1979-92), 24 consecutive postseason appearances (20 NCAA, 4 NIT), three Final Fours (1982, 1984, 1985) and won six Big East tournament championships. Employing a physical, defense-focused approach that frequently relied on a dominant center -- Alonzo Mourning and Dikembe Mutombo were among his other pupils -- Thompson compiled a 596-239 record (.715 winning percentage). He had 26 players drafted by the NBA. One of his honors -- his selection as coach of the U.S. team for the 1988 Olympics -- had a sour ending when the Americans had to settle for the bronze medal. It was a result so disappointing that Thompson put himself on a sort of self-imposed leave at Georgetown for a while, coaching practices and games but leaving many other duties to his assistants. Off the court, Thompson was both a role model and a lightning rod. A stickler for academics, he kept a deflated basketball on his desk, a reminder to his players that a degree was a necessity because a career in basketball relied on a tenuous “nine pounds of air.” The school boasted that 76 of 78 players who played four seasons under Thompson received their degrees. He was a Black coach who recruited mostly Black players to a predominantly white Jesuit university in Washington, and Thompson never hesitated to speak out on behalf of his players. One of the most dramatic moments in Georgetown history came on Jan. 14, 1989, when he walked off the court to a standing ovation before the tipoff of a home game against Boston College, demonstrating in a most public way his displeasure against NCAA Proposition 42. The rule denied athletic scholarships to freshmen who didn’t meet certain requirements, and Thompson said it was biased against underprivileged students. Opposition from Thompson, and others, led the NCAA to modify the rule. Thompson’s most daring move came that same year, when he summoned notorious drug kingpin Rayful Edmond III for a meeting in the coach’s office. Thompson warned Edmond to stop associating with Hoyas players and to leave them alone, using his respect in the Black community to become one of the few people to stare down Edmond and not face a reprisal. Though aware of his influence, Thompson did not take pride in becoming the first Black coach to take a team to the Final Four, and he let a room full of reporters know it when asked his feelings on the subject at a news conference in 1982. “I resent the hell out of that question if it implies I am the first Black coach competent enough to take a team to the Final Four,” Thompson said. “Other Blacks have been denied the right in this country; coaches who have the ability. I don’t take any pride in being the first Black coach in the Final Four. I find the question extremely offensive.” Born Sept. 2, 1941, John R. Thompson Jr. grew up in Washington, D.C. His father was always working — on a farm in Maryland and later as a laborer in the city — and could neither read nor write. “I never in my life saw my father’s hands clean,” Thompson told The Associated Press in 2007. “Never. He’d come home and scrub his hands with this ugly brown soap that looked like tar. I thought that was the color of his hands. When I was still coaching, kids would show up late for practice and I’d (say) ... ‘My father got up every morning of his life at 5 a.m. to go to work. Without an alarm.‘” Thompson’s parents emphasized education, but he struggled in part of because of poor eyesight and labored in Catholic grammar school. He was moved to a segregated public school, had a growth spurt and became good enough at basketball to get into John Carroll, a Catholic high school, where he led the team to 55 consecutive victories and two city titles. He went to Providence College as one of the most touted basketball prospects in the country and led the Friars to the first NCAA bid in school history. He graduated in 1964 and played two seasons with Red Auerbach’s Boston Celtics, earning a pair of championship rings as a sparingly used backup to Bill Russell. Thompson returned to Washington, got his master’s degree in guidance and counseling from the University of the District of Columbia and went 122-28 over six seasons at St. Anthony’s before accepting the job at Georgetown, an elite school that had relatively few Black students. Faculty and students rallied around him after a bedsheet with racist words was hung inside the school’s gym before a game during the 1974-75 season. Thompson sheltered his players with closed practices, tightly controlled media access and a prohibition on interviews with freshmen in their first semester -- a restriction that still stands for Georgetown’s basketball team. Combined with Thompson’s flashes of emotion and his players’ rough-and-tumble style of play, it wasn’t long before the words “Hoya Paranoia” came to epitomize the new era of basketball on the Hilltop campus. Georgetown lost the 1982 NCAA championship game when Fred Brown mistakenly passed the ball to North Carolina’s James Worthy in the game’s final seconds. Two years later, Ewing led an 84-75 win over Houston in the title game. The Hoyas were on the verge of a repeat the following year when they were stunned in the championship game by coach Rollie Massimino’s Villanova team in one of the biggest upsets in tournament history. Success allowed Thompson to rake in money through endorsements, but he ran afoul of his Georgetown bosses when he applied for a gambling license for a business venture in Nevada in 1995. Thompson, who liked playing the slot machines in Las Vegas, reluctantly dropped the application after the university president objected. Centers Ewing, Mourning and Mutombo turned Georgetown into “Big Man U” under Thompson, although his last superstar was guard Allen Iverson, who in 1996 also became the first player under Thompson to leave school early for the NBA draft. “Thanks for Saving My Life Coach,” Iverson wrote at the start of an Instagram post Monday with photos of the pair. The Hoyas teams in the 1990s never came close to matching the achievements of the 1980s, and Thompson’s era came to a surprising and sudden end when he resigned in the middle of the 1998-99 season, citing distractions from a pending divorce. Thompson didn’t fade from the limelight. He became a sports radio talk show host and a TV and radio game analyst, joining the very profession he had frustrated so often as a coach. He loosened up, allowing the public to see his lighter side, but he remained pointed and combative when a topic mattered to him. A torch was passed in 2004, when John Thompson III became Georgetown’s coach. The younger Thompson, with “Pops” often watching from the stands or sitting in the back of the room for news conferences, returned the Hoyas to the Final Four in 2007. Another son, Ronny Thompson, was head coach for one season at Ball State and is now a TV analyst. ___ Joseph White, a former AP sports writer in Washington who died in 2019, prepared this obituary. AP Sports Writer Howard Fendrich contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 15th, 2020

Our & lsquo;heroes& rsquo; fund

As I write this piece, more than 4,000 overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) are stranded in various quarantine facilities, collateral damage to another example of a failed bureaucracy: the continuing failure of the Philippine Health Insurance Corp. (PhilHealth) to pay its P1-billion debt to the Philippine Red Cross (PRC) for the latter’s COVID-19 testing services......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 27th, 2020

3 hospitals charged for upcasing from PhilHealth

3 hospitals charged for upcasing from PhilHealth.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  pepRelated NewsOct 16th, 2020

& lsquo;Purge PhilHealth of crooks& rsquo;

President Rodrigo Duterte has ordered newly-appointed Philippine Health Insurance Corp. (PhilHealth) president Dante Gierran to rid the state-run agency of corruption in six months, the Palace said Thursday......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 18th, 2020

& lsquo;Your Honor please, I move& hellip;& rsquo;

It is a common phrase uttered by a lawyer in open court before making a request or application for relief. In legal parlance this is known as a “motion.” A motion shall be made in writing except those made by the lawyer in open court. For a young lawyer like myself 28 years ago, appearing in court for a motion hearing is the rite of passage into litigation practice......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 10th, 2020

Doja Cat releases full version of & lsquo;Freak& rsquo;

Multi-platinum rapper and record producer Doja Cat has officially released “Freak” at all digital service providers via Kemosabe/RCA Records. .....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 5th, 2020

& lsquo;Special powers needed to fix PhilHealth mess& rsquo;

A leader of the House of Representatives on Saturday denounced senators’ rejection of the proposed emergency powers for President Rodrigo Duterte to fix the corruption-laden Philippine Health Insurance Corp. (PhilHealth)......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 5th, 2020

Gierran told: & lsquo;Get the big fish& rsquo;; 40 linked to pocketing OFW premiums

Senators on Wednesday gave the newly appointed president of the Philippine Health Insurance Corp. (PhilHealth) the benefit of the doubt, saying he had the qualifications to rid the state insurance agency of deep-seated corruption......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 2nd, 2020

PhilHealth& rsquo;s ex-legal chief rips into Senate & lsquo;trial by publicity& rsquo;

Resigned Philippine Health Insurance Corp. (PhilHealth) senior vice president for legal sector Rodolfo del Rosario Jr. on Friday has maintained his innocence amid allegations of corruption and irregularities in the state insurer, saying there is no “mafia” in the agency......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 29th, 2020

PBA teams try to get back into game shape as restart looms

Philippine Basketball Association (PBA) commissioner Willie Marcial admits that it would take some time for players to get back in game shape after almost five months removed from training due to the pandemic. There’s no doubt that they will show signs of obvious rust.   “Sigurado ‘yun, tinatanong ko ang mga players. Ang hirap magkaroon ng game shape,” said the league official. “Maski mag-practice ka ng ganito tapos scrimmages ka lang ng two to three weeks, hindi mo makukuha ang game shape mo.” “Talagang wala 'yung kondisyon, wala 'yung timing, wala 'yung shooting. So medyo kakalawangin pa ng konti ang mga players,” he added. But Marcial assured PBA fans that teams are now working doubly hard to get their players back into their competitive form as the league prepares for the restart of the Philippine Cup soon – possibly through a ‘bubble concept’ set-up. [Related story: Batangas, Laguna, Araneta all options for 'PBA Bubble'] In fact, at least half of the 12 member clubs have already began their respective individual workouts under a strict health and safety protocol Tuesday morning. [Related story: PBA: Ginebra earliest to start practice under "new normal"] Speaking during the online session of the Philippine Sportswriters Association Forum, Marcial, who was joined by league chairman Ricky Vargas of TNT, said that he has full confidence with how teams will whip up their players back into top form. “’Yun ang ginagawa ng mga coaches. ‘Yun ang ginagawa ng buong team na ayusin nila,” said Marcial. “Baka ‘yung iba nga kung may scrimmages twice a day na ‘yan para preparasyon.” The commissioner added that he already reminded the players to show the same level of competitiveness once the government gives the greenlight for games to resume. “[Sabi ko] ‘di tayo pwedeng maglaro na parang scrimmage. Kung maglalaro tayo eh ‘yung talagang totoong laro. Da-dive tayo. Kung ano ang ginagawa natin, may fans o wala, kailangan ‘yun ang gawin natin. Pumayag naman sila,” said Marcial.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 25th, 2020

Scrapping of PhilHealth case rates, IRM pushed

The head of the House committee looking into the fund irregularities in Philippine Health Insurance Corp. on Monday called for the scrapping of the insurer’s “case rates” and its interim reimbursement mechanism or IRM for hospitals......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 25th, 2020

Si Coach Boc ang game-changer ko -- Dawn Macandili

If there is one person that multi-awarded libero Dawn Macandili would give credit to for all that she has achieved in her career aside from college coach Ramil de Jesus it would be assistant coach Benson Bocboc. The quiet and soft-spoken De La Salle University deputy has been De Jesus’ numbers guy on the Lady Spikers bench, his reliable scout and a trusted strategist. [Related story:  DLSU's weapon against Ateneo: Clipboard and tablet] But for Macandili he is more than just DLSU’s man who crunches numbers or the one who prepares scouting reports.   “Si Coach Boc ang game-changer ko,” Macandili said in her appearance on Volleyball DNA hosted by Anton Roxas and Denden Lazaro. Macandili said that when Bocboc went on board as the Lady Spikers prepared for Season 78 – the start of DLSU’s third three-peat – he immediately went down to work to help strengthen DLSU’s floor defense particularly focusing on liberos Macandili and CJ Saga.     “Nu’ng dumating si Coach Boc, sobrang na-focus niya ang mga libero kasi ang style niya is Japanese training,” Macandili shared. “In-introduce niya kami sa mga drills na pang-Japanese. Sobrang na-amaze ako, ‘Wow Japanese style na defense.’” Macandili added that it was the first time since she joined the Lady Spikers that a practice session solely dedicated for liberos was added into their training schedule.    “Ang daming drills na pinapagawa sa amin. Natutuwa ako kasi I’m always looking forward to learning something new,” she said. Bocboc according to Macandili was very technical, correcting them down to the smallest details. “Lagi niya kaming ini-introduce sa techniques. Gusto ko siyang ma-master. So every training may pinapagawa siya sa amin. Iba rin kasi talaga siyang mag-correct, to the slightest detail,” said the Tanauan, Batangas pride. “Dun ko na-realize na volleyball is very technical. Di lang basta na marunong kang mag-receive, marunong kang mag-dig pass. Hindi, kung marunong kang mag-receive kailangan ganito ang form mo, kailangan ganito kababa, mga ganoon.” He came into the team at the most critical time as DLSU was then shifting to a new approach to its system following two straight heartbreaking championship losses to the powerhouse Alyssa Valdez-led archrival Ateneo de Manila University Lady Eagles. “[Up to the] smallest details ang itinuturo niya sa amin and makikita mo talaga ang effect niya sa training and sa game,” said Macandili. Under Bocboc’s guidance, Macandili had her breakout season in 2016 as she played a key role in the Lady Spikers’ ascent back to the UAAP throne. Macandili in Season 78 was named Best Receiver, which she would win again the following year, and Best Digger while helping DLSU begin another three-year reign. Macandili would continue to rack in individual accolades, winning the Most Valuable Player award in the Philippine Superliga in 2016, being named the 2nd Best Libero in the 2017 AVC Asian Women’s Senior Championship as a member of the national team before wrapping up her UAAP career by bagging the Finals MVP in Season 80 - the first defense specialist to receive the honor. All thanks to the DLSU assistant coach. “Nag-iba talaga ang mindset ko nun sa volleyball na parang ang lawak niya na ang dami ko pang di alam. Doon ako na-engganyo na I want to learn more, more, more. I want to learn more talaga,” she said.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 24th, 2020