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PBA: No problem with limited exposure

TNT KaTropa star Jayson Castro doesn’t see any problem with coach Nash Racela’s decision to limit the minutes of his veteran players in lieu of the team’s young guns as they look to find the winning formula in their drive towards making the quarterfinals of the PBA Philippine Cup......»»

Category: newsSource: tempo tempoJan 20th, 2017

SMDC partners with local farmers through SM Foundation

ACCESS to various basic goods, including fresh produce, has been limited because of stringent physical distancing measures implemented to halt the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19). To address this problem, SM Development Corporation (SMDC) started rolling out its weekly community grocer initiative, The Good Guys Market, where SMDC residents can start purchasing affordable fresh […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsMay 18th, 2020

ONE Championship: Eduard Folayang is also a world champion dad

Filipino mixed martial arts star and former ONE Lightweight World Champion Eduard "Landslide" Folayang will likely go down in Philippine sports history as one of the country's most celebrated combat sports athletes.  The Team Lakay star is considered the face of Philippine mixed martial arts, and has become a hero for many Pinoy fans.  Outside the cage however, Folayang, who is one of the nicest guys in the world, is also a champion father to his two daughters, 3-year old Yeshuareigns and 1-year old Yahamaziach.  “Eduard wants to give all his time to his kids. He goes home and the first thing he does is hug the kids, he always wants to play with them," said Folayang's wife Genevieve.  “What I appreciate the most is he’s very hands on. He feeds them himself, he puts them to sleep himself," she added.  Being a professional athlete however, Folayang spends a lot of time sharpening his tools and pushing himself to get better, which means that sometimes, it takes a toll on his time with his children.  “He always wants to teach his kids, but sometimes his [lack of] time becomes a problem,” Genevieve admitted.  Otherwise, the two-time ONE Lightweight World Champion has been nothing but an ace father.   “He researches things to teach to his girls at their age and how it can effectively be taught. He also attends seminars for parenting. As parents, we always think of learning new things on raising children," adds Genevieve.  With Folayang's martial arts career still very much alive, Genevieve has taken the role of homemaker, taking care of the children while Eduard continues to train and compete.  “Since we got married, we decided together that I stay at home,” she said. “I worked for one year, then I stopped when I was pregnant. I grew up with very hard-working parents, and they had limited time for us. So I know how that feels.” With a decorated mixed martial arts career and a beautiful family at home, clearly, the Folayangs are doing something right.  In the cage and at home, Eduard Folayang is a champion, just don't expect him to do much in the kitchen though.  “He might be very hands on, but just don’t expect him to cook," Genevieve jokes. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 15th, 2020

They died before their COVID-19 test results came back

Some of the deaths were attributed to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) days after the patients passed, highlighting the problem with the country’s very limited testing capabilities......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 23rd, 2020

Haikyuu and other anime to binge now that the sports world has stopped

Metro Manila is under Community Quarantine and confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the country continue to spike, breaking the triple-digit mark. Most major sporting events worldwide are either suspended until further notice or cancelled altogether. People are advised to stay home to help contain the novel coronavirus. Reruns of classic games can only do so much to fulfill all of our sporting fix during these unprecedented times. With that being said, why not try sports anime? Here are some you can binge-watch now that there's no actual sports going on. Binge-watch at home of course, stay safe out there, Kapamilya.   HAIKYUU One week of UAAP Season 82 volleyball was certainly not enough, especially with how long we had to actually wait for it. If you're yearning for some volleyball, how about give Haikyuu a try. With Hinata Shoyo and the rest of his Karasuno High School volleyball team under the spotlight, Haikyuu is arguably the best sports anime ever, it's certainly the best volleyball anime out there. Season 4 is currently ongoing, which means you have three previous seasons you can just binge to catch up. You'll want to hit quick sets after you watch this show, but you shouldn't because we're supposed to stay home and there's more sports anime to watch.   SLAM DUNK Everyone knows Slam Dunk, it's the anime that got most of us into basketball. Younger people, now is the perfect time to catch this classic of a show. People around this writer's age (born in the 1990s), now is the perfect time to rewind. Let Hanamichi "Basketball Genius" Sakuragi, and the rest of the crazy bunch at Shohoku High take our minds off of the fact that sports just actually stopped.   KUROKO NO BASKET Another basketball anime, Kuroko has a pretty interesting premise. Five outstanding players from a powerhouse junior high, known as "The Generation of Miracles," go their separate ways in high school and instantly become rivals. Title character Tetsuya Kuroko played behind the Generation of Miracles and has joined Seirin High with another freshman, Taiga Kagami. Together, they lead Seirin's quest to victory, with the Generation of Miracles standing in their way because of course. Think of Kuroko as Slam Dunk on steroids and get in the zone with this highly-rated anime about the sport near and dear to our hearts.   HAJIME NO IPPO Another classic, Hajime no Ippo follows title character Makunouchi Ippo as he goes on a quest to become a champion boxer. Bullied his entire life, Ippo found boxing as his escape. Ippo's passion, hard work, and determination will be more than enough to inspire you, just don't go around punching poeple after you watch this anime.   FREE! Swimming is good way to combat the scorching summer heat, but under current circumstances, that's not exactly advisable. Instead, consider Free and Haruka Nanase's freestyling ways. Iwatobi High's swim team could help refresh us all as we deal with the quarantine and the summer heat.   EYESHIELD 21 American football is not as popular in the Philippines, as evidenced by the NFL's limited exposure here. Still, it's a pretty compelling sport and Eyeshield 21 is a nice way to get a crash course about it. Our hero here is Sena Kobayakawa, who much like Ippo, is always bullied. Unlike Ippo, he uses his incredible speed to literally run away from his bullies. Sena becomes his high school's running back but is listed as team secretary to prevent rival schools from recruiting him, hence becoming the title character "Eyeshield 21."   PRINCE OF TENNIS Most teams on sports animes are considered underdogs, but not Seishun Gakuen. Seigaku is different in a sense that this team is loaded and an actual contender, they just need that extra oomph to get over and that's where protagonist Ryoma Echizen comes in. The Prince of Tennis definitely has oomph, and then some. Much like Slam Dunk, Prince of Tennis is a classic from yesteryear. Much like Eyeshield 21 is to football, this anime will ease you into tennis but with the anime twist, of course.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 16th, 2020

Seminar on practical taxation, tax compliance slated

A robust business and tax compliance system is essential to ensure reduced exposure to BIR audit. Non-compliance and limited knowledge of the tax regulations impose a lot of risks and issues......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 8th, 2020

UAAP Season 82: Kami mismo problema sa game -- Mendrez

Not taking any credit away from Far Eastern University’s good outing, graduating hitter Mean Mendez felt that the University of the East Lady Warriors shot themselves on the foot with their poor reception. “For me parang ang bilis matapos ng game namin,” said Mendrez on Tuesday after UE’s 9-25, 20-25, 17-25, defeat in the UAAP Season 82 women’s volleyball tournament at the MOA Arena. “Parang nagkaroon ng problema sa receive kaya nawalan kami ng kumpiyansa lalo na ako.” Mendrez was on point as the Lady Warriors, who were obviously still adjusting from the departure of multi-awarded libero Kat Arado and do-it-all Judith Abil, allowed FEU to land 14 aces including five from Lady Tamaraws setter Angel Cayuna. FEU started off hot, burying UE early, 6-0, in the opening frame as the Lady Tams took advantage of the Lady Warriors’ spotty service reception. “Pinakaproblema lang talaga namin is service receive kasi once na maka-receive kami, walang problema sa setting at sa attacking, 'yun lang talaga naging problema,” said Mendrez, who was the only Lady Warrior in double figure scoring with 13 points. “'Yun kasi pinaka-base ng laro eh. After service, receive.” UE had a chance to turn its fortune around early in the third set but failed to sustain its momentum. “Kami mismo ang problema sa game kanina,” said Mendrez. “Nahihirapan kami kaagad na putulin 'yung lamang nila, 'di namin natuluy-tuloy 'yung sunud-sunod na points namin. Parang mabilis kami napuputol kaagad tapos hindi namin mahinto pag nagle-lead sila ng points.” It also didn’t help that veteran middle Seth Rodriguez had a bad outing and was limited to just one point in the match that only lasted for 75 minutes.  Mendrez hopes that they will be able to address this problem as they move on to the season. “Siguro double-time talaga kami lalo na ako. Nahihirapan kami once maputol 'yung momentum namin na sunud-sunod. Tapos hirap na kami 'pag nalalamangan na,” she said. “'Yun ang weak point namin 'pag nalalamangan na, sobrang hirap humabol.”     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles              .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 3rd, 2020

Practical taxation and tax compliance for businesses

A robust business and tax compliance system is essential to ensure reduced exposure to BIR audit. Non-compliance and limited knowledge of the tax regulations impose a lot of risks and issues......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 19th, 2020

Why the secret to changing yourself is changing the world

It is often said that if we want to change the world, we must begin with ourselves. There is wisdom in this recommendation. If we want others to act on a big problem, we might want to start by making a good example. Plus, while we have a very limited control over what happens in the world around us, we can control how we behave and how we react to what happens to us......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 11th, 2020

Globe Digital Thumbprint Program Helps Keep Schoolchildren Safe From Online Sexual Exposure

With many schoolchildren being able to access the internet without adult supervision, they are inadvertently exposed to indecent photos and videos which may not be limited to just actual search anymore. Online sites have found creative ways to lure the youth into checking out sexually-charged materials through keywords that may seem harmless, spam emails, or […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsOct 23rd, 2019

Jazz pairing improved offense with already tough defense

By John Coon, Associated Press SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Playing rugged defense has helped Utah become a consistent playoff team. Now the Jazz seek to become a bigger postseason threat with a more versatile offense. Utah made a flurry of offseason moves designed to bolster the team’s outside shooting and give coach Quin Snyder additional shot creators. The Jazz traded for veteran point guard Mike Conley and signed small forward Bojan Bogdanovic, both of whom were leading scorers on their previous teams. Utah also added Jeff Green to give the team another versatile shooter. The roster makeover is designed to take some of the scoring and shot creation burden away from Donovan Mitchell. “It’s no secret we want to pick-and-roll a lot,” Mitchell said. “It honestly makes my life easier trying to find guys. Now (opponents) have a harder decision to make on defense.” If Mitchell takes another step forward in his third season, defensive decisions for opponents will become even more complicated. He averaged a team-high 23.8 points per game a year ago but shot just 43.2% from the field while facing relentless defensive pressure. Utah’s newest additions figure to give Mitchell easier looks at the basket and make the whole offense run smoother. Conley averaged 21.1 points and dished out 6.4 assists per game in his final season with Memphis. Bogdanovic averaged a career-best 18 points per game for Indiana last season while shooting 49.7% from the field. Green tallied 12.3 points per game for Washington on 47.5% shooting. These new additions have the Jazz setting some lofty goals. “Obviously, our ultimate goal is to win the championship,” Conley said. “We’re not fooling ourselves like we’ve been there, done that. We’re gonna come in and work every day and try to maximize each day.” Other things to know about the Jazz heading into the season: CENTER OF ATTENTION Rudy Gobert posted career highs in points (15.9) and rebounds (12.9) per game, as well as field goal percentage (.669), in his sixth NBA season. He capped it off with his second straight defensive player of the year award. Now Gobert has set his sights on reaching his first NBA All-Star game as he enters his seventh year. He believes the Jazz have put him in a position to make an even bigger impact by plugging in players around him and Mitchell who will create more spacing on the floor. “They can build a team around us and around our abilities to put a lot of pressure on the rim,” Gobert said. “It’s on me to be the guy that I’ve been defensively, even better, and offensively keep showing I’m getting better every year.” PERIMETER UPGRADE Getting long-distance shots to fall ended up being a problem for Utah during a first-round playoff exit against Houston. Outside shooting could now be a strength for the Jazz going forward. Five current players ranked in the Top 100 in 3-point shooting percentage a season ago. Bogdanovic leads the way after ranking 10th in the league in 3-point shooting last season. The forward, who signed a four-year, $73 million contract with the Jazz in July, connected on 42.5% of his outside shots with the Pacers last year. Utah will find ways to pair him with Joe Ingles, the team’s top returning perimeter shooter. Ingles made 39.1% of his attempts last season. TRANSITION STOPPERS Defending well in transition was a key component of Utah’s defense last season. The Jazz ranked second in the league when it came to defending transition baskets, allowing opponents to score just 11.4 fastbreak points per game. Utah led the NBA in the same category two years ago, allowing 9.5 fastbreak points per contest. Expect it to be a point of emphasis again. “Doesn’t matter who’s on the floor, we gotta get back,” Snyder said. SECOND CHANCE Former lottery pick Emmanuel Mudiay signed with the Jazz on a one-year, $1.7 million deal in July. He is coming off four mostly disappointing seasons with Denver and New York. He did show some flashes of potential with the Knicks a year ago, averaging a career-best 14.8 points. Mudiay has dealt with an injured hamstring during the preseason, complicating his bid to become the backup point guard behind Conley. EXUM REHABBING Injuries have limited Exum to 56 games over the last two seasons. He continues to rehab from a season-ending knee injury a year ago. The No. 5 overall pick in the 2014 draft, Exum is in the second year of a three-year, $33 million deal he signed with Utah in 2018......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 16th, 2019

New innovation for urban runners launched

Introducing Boost HD: a new innovation in Boost technology. adidas has engineered Boost HD for more stability with the same unrivalled energy return and comfort. It’s a new expression of the best.   Sitting lower to the ground, Pulseboost HD is ready for the unexpected. A sudden stop, juke or quick change in direction on a busy city street is not a problem with a completely new package of performance benefits for runners.   -   Boost HD is engineered for more stability with the same best-in-class comfort and energy return—a new expression of the best. -   Continental™ Adaptive Traxion is a new Continental™ Rubber outsole developed by artificial intelligence, giving maximum grip to quickly change direction on any surface, dry or wet. -   Adapt Knit is a new flexible upper that stretches where you need it.   Stephan Schneider, Sr. Product Manager, adidas Running, said: “Running in a city is unlike running anywhere else. Traffic, lights and crowds make for a unique experience—high challenges that come with high reward. We wanted to create something that was born from urban runners. Their infrastructure. Their inspirations. Their energy.   To create Pulseboost HD, we started by breaking down the elements of running in a city, namely position of the foot. For example, runners are more on their forefoot than midfoot. We then used computational design and, most importantly, insight from key urban runners to create Pulseboost HD. This isn’t a product made by adidas, it is a shoe created by urban running culture.”   To highlight the design and collaboration story, the shoe features the GPS coordinates for New York, Paris and Berlin, where runners from each city helped develop Pulseboost HD.   In partnership with Spotify, adidas put a QR code on the tongue that links directly to a custom playlist based on where you are in the world, ensuring every runner is ready to move. Scan the code with a mobile device to launch Spotify and unlock an exclusive playlist.   The limited-edition monochrome colorway is now available in stores and at adidas.com.ph. It will retail for Php5,500.   GET READY FOR MORE BOOST: The release of Boost HD is just the beginning. adidas is gearing up to celebrate the legacy of its culturally iconic footwear innovation. The world will be invited to fall in love all over again with the feeling that with Boost on your feet, you can take on anything.   Sign up for more information at adidas.com.ph/feeltheboost. Follow the conversation on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter and using #Boost and @adidasrunning......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 5th, 2019

PBA: If Jones can be asked to defend LeBron, he can defend Brownlee

Looks like TNT figured out a way to slow down super import Justin Brownlee. In Game 1 of the 2019 PBA Commissioner’s Cup semifinals, the KaTropa’s own super import took on Brownlee on defense and it worked. With Terrence Jones all over him, Brownlee was limited to only one point in the fourth quarter of a Game 1 loss to the barangay. The strategy was something the KaTropa discussed but in an effort to not burn Jones out, TNT implement the move when they needed it most. In the fourth quarter of Game 1, the KaTropa certainly needed to slow down Brownlee in order to complete a comeback win. “Yeah that was definitely something we were talking about with Terrence, you know towards the end of the game,” active consultant Mark Dickel said on Terrence Jones picking up Justin Brownlee on defense. “The problem is, of course, trying not to wear Terrence out. I’m playing him so many minutes anyhow, it’s a hard ask if we play you three on one end and then you gotta guard their guard on the other end,” Dickel added. In Game 1, Jones played the whole way through, suiting up for 48 minutes. For the rest of the series, Jones on Brownlee will continue, whether it’s by design or not. Dickel says Jones will want to pick up Brownlee on defense anyway but it’s up to TNT to time that strategy well. Jones is certainly more than capable to guard Brownlee, it’s just not ideal to do it for 48 minutes. “Brownlee’s an incredibly hard player to guard but…Terrence’s capable, man. Throughout his career, he has always won and he has a role even in the NBA his matchup is LeBron James. They don’t put you on him unless you can defend, so I know he’s capable,” Dickel said. “It’s just a hard ask if we expect him to do that for 48 minutes. It’ll be something this situational more towards the end of the game but Terrence is competitive. He wants to guard the best player all the time. That was gonna happen whether I ask him to do it or not,” Dickel added.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 28th, 2019

EDITORIAL - Stunted and malnourished

Organized labor’s campaign for a wage increase has reminded the country of another problem arising from poverty and limited resources: malnutrition......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 1st, 2019

The job’s not done : Raptors reset, as NBA Finals loom

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press TORONTO (AP) — The parade that the Toronto Raptors enjoyed last week was an impromptu and quick one. A chance at the real parade awaits. There is a clear back-to-work vibe coming from the Raptors as they get ready for Game 1 of the NBA Finals against the two-time defending champion Golden State Warriors on Thursday night (Friday, PHL time) in Toronto. There was some reveling late last week for an hour or two after winning the Eastern Conference title, but that feeling is nowhere to be found anymore. [Watch the Playoffs on NBA League Pass for 30% less with this limited time offer! Select Annual package and use code SAVE30 at checkout to redeem] “We know that we accomplished some great things,” Raptors guard Danny Green said. “But the job’s not done.” When the Raptors won the East, after the on-court celebrations and a few moments back in the locker room, someone got the brilliant notion to take the silver conference-championship trophy to what’s known as “Jurassic Park” — the outdoor area usually called Maple Leaf Square, unless the Raptors are playing. So, with players flanked by security and Drake — of course — Kyle Lowry carried the trophy out through an arena concourse long after the game was over on Saturday night (Sunday, PHL time), past hundreds of lingering fans who tried to get hugs and photos, and the group eventually made their way toward the outdoor stage. Most fans were gone by then, and the party didn’t last long. By Sunday (Monday, PHL time), Lowry had shifted his focus to the finals anyway. “Pretty much,” Lowry said. “It’s a big task at hand. We know we’ve got a good team, and we’ve got to be focused every single possession. They’re all going to be massive in this series.” Handling this moment is sure to be a challenge for the Raptors, since most of the players on Toronto’s roster haven’t been to the finals before. If there is a silver lining there, it’s that Toronto has already dealt with the mood-swing pendulum in these playoffs. The most worried Raptors coach Nick Nurse has been about a game so far this postseason was Game 1 of the East finals at Milwaukee — a game that came a couple days after Kawhi Leonard’s buzzer-beating jumper hit the rim four times before dropping in and giving Toronto a win in Game 7 of the East semifinals against Philadelphia. “If there was ever a time I thought maybe a disastrous moment could happen, it was then,” Nurse said. “But man, we played great. Totally outplayed them. We played tough. We didn’t win the game but I thought we outplayed them almost all the way through. We just didn’t get the ball to bounce our way. We might have used a couple bounces a couple days earlier. But again, that just showed me our team was capable of kind of keeping their emotions in check.” They’ll need to be that way again Thursday night (Friday, PHL time). Fred VanVleet doesn’t think it’ll be a problem. “None of us in October and July and June of last year were working out thinking about the conference finals,” the Raptors’ backup guard said Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). “Obviously, it’s a great accomplishment, and we’re happy to be taking that next step. But you want to win a championship. You want to win the whole thing. It’s not about just making it to the finals.” The arena will be electric for Game 1. Jurassic Park will be rocking yet again. But the quick little trophy parade through the halls and stairwells of Scotiabank Arena — one where Green revealed on his podcast earlier this week that reserve OG Anunoby was inadvertently decked in the eye by a celebrating fan, and where Leonard needed two security staffers to clear his path — will be long forgotten by the Raptors when Game 1 rolls around. “I think everybody understands that,” Raptors center Marc Gasol said. “You get to kind of soak it in and enjoy that moment and after that night, the next morning, it’s on to the next challenge.” Everyone knows what that challenge is, too. The Warriors are coming. “I think along this little playoff run there’s been some critical, critical games,” Nurse said. “There’s been some ups and downs, and again, I know I keep (sounding like a) broken record, but we’re just trying to take what’s in front of us. And right now, it’s Game 1.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 28th, 2019

F1 eyes may have opened after Alonso s Indy 500 flop

By Dave Skretta, Associated Press INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Alexander Rossi had no idea what he was getting into when he moved from Formula One to IndyCar. Turning left the whole race? Looks easy. But as Rossi soon found out — and as two-time world champion Fernando Alonso and his McLaren team learned in failing to qualify for the Indianapolis 500 last weekend — getting around Indianapolis Motor Speedway at speeds eclipsing 230 mph is a lot tougher than it looks. "I didn't understand what oval racing was. I didn't understand what IndyCar racing was, because there is no exposure to it in Europe," said Rossi, an American who moved to Europe as a teenager and made his F1 dreams come true with seven starts during the 2014 and '15 seasons. "So when guys haven't been a part of it," Rossi said, "they don't understand how difficult it is, how unique it is to everything they've done. On TV, let's be honest, it doesn't look that challenging, so being a European driver, in your mind you're at the pinnacle of the sport. You think, 'Of course I can go over there and do that and it wouldn't be a problem.'" That inherent arrogance was underscored two years ago, when Alonso showed up at the Indy 500 for the first time. He ran near the front all race, only for his Honda engine to let him down. Naturally, many F1 drivers were quick to pounce on their rival open-wheel series, claiming it must not be too difficult to win in IndyCar if Alonso could be competitive right out of the gate. "I looked at the times and, frankly, for his first-ever qualifying for Fernando to be fifth — what does that say about Indy?" five-time F1 champion Lewis Hamilton mused to L'Equipe shortly afterward. "A great driver," he said, "if he cannot win in Formula 1, will look for other races to win." In other words, Hamilton was calling IndyCar second-rate. That's part of why so many eyebrows jumped at McLaren's spectacular disappointment. "Fernando may have done well in 2017, so there may have been a feeling like all he has to do is show up and take it over," said Mark Miles, the chairman of Hulman & Co., which owns Indianapolis Motor Speedway. "I think this causes that sense of, 'Hey, this is harder than we thought.'" The team that bumped the well-funded, England-based team with the rich racing heritage from this year's field? None other than Juncos Racing, the tiny team founded by Argentina-born Ricardo Juncos and to this day run on such a shoestring budget that it was still signing up sponsors on Wednesday. The moment Kyle Kaiser put their car in the field last Sunday was the moment McLaren's world collapsed, leading to the firing of Bob Fernley, who headed its IndyCar operation. "We got it wrong," the team's boss, Zak Brown, said Thursday ahead of this weekend's Monaco Grand Prix, the showcase race on the F1 calendar. "There are little stories behind each of those individual issues and how they transpired, but you know, we didn't execute and therefore we didn't qualify for the Indy 500." In doing so, they showed just how difficult it is to win the "Greatest Spectacle in Racing," and perhaps earned IndyCar drivers a certain measure of respect from their F1 counterparts. "You've got to be a good driver, but setup and all those things at those margins is so important," said F1 driver Daniel Ricciardo, who has never driven an Indy car or raced on an oval. "I don't know the ins and outs, but everything needs to work right and that's the thing with race cars. It's a love-hate relationship. Obviously, this year for (Alonso) was more of a hate one. "It's sad to see," Ricciardo added. "Obviously as part of the F1 family, we want him to do well." One of the reasons the Indy 500 is so difficult is it tests the machines — and how they are tuned — just as much as the drivers. Manufacturers such as Mercedes and Ferrari can pump $300 million into their teams and essentially buy the crucial tenths of a second they need to win races, but IndyCar teams work with a relatively stock setup that puts the onus on crew and driver. "A big team like McLaren, and you see a small team like Juncos, it just shows this competition, it's not easy no matter who you are," three-time Indy 500 winner Helio Castroneves said. "It is one of the toughest places on Earth to get in, and you've seen big teams like Penske have failed." Rossi has so far bucked the trend, winning the 100th running of the Indy 500 in his 2016 debut. He was second the following year and fourth last year, each time benefiting from the experience, equipment and resources that his Andretti Autosport team has poured into its efforts over the years. "Fernando is a world champion. You expect him to do a good job," Rossi said. "But at Indianapolis, to find speed, it's experience, kind of the tricks of the trade that money can't buy, and I think that gets lost on a lot of people, and I think that was on full display this past week." ___ AP Auto Racing Writer Jenna Fryer and AP Sports Writer Jerome Pugmire contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 24th, 2019

Raptors running out of options as series shifts to Toronto

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com MILWAUKEE – The Toronto Raptors are two bounces on the rim into their Eastern Conference championship series against Milwaukee. Two more and – unless things change radically for the Raptors in every phase of the game from what we’ve seen – the basketball metaphor of their 2019 postseason is going to fall harmlessly to the side. No points, no buzzer-beater, no victory, no nothing. [Watch the Playoffs on NBA League Pass for 30% less with this limited time offer! Select Annual package and use code SAVE30 at checkout to redeem] Two games into this best-of-seven series, it’s already hard to see a way out for the Raptors that doesn’t include Hefty bags, cleaned-out lockers and a wide-open month of June. Toronto played well enough to win in Game 1, yet managed to lose it anyway thanks to an open elevator shaft of a fourth quarter that qualified instantly as something that would haunt them. Then they played miserably in Friday's (Saturday, PHL time) Game 2, save for a stretch in the third quarter when slippage in Milwaukee’s focus appeared as culpable as anything Raptors-related. Kyle Lowry, Toronto’s veteran point guard, is wandering around these days with a modified blue oven mitt on his left hand. It’s there to protect the thumb he sprained in Game 7 against Philadelphia. That’s the game that got the Raptors here, the one decided by Kawhi Leonard’s eternal-highlight shot at the end that bounced four times on the rim before dropping through the net. It’s been kind of downhill for their crew since then. Anyway, Lowry was asked a series of questions after Milwaukee's 125-103 triumph at Fiserv Forum about the defense, about the rebounding, about the shift from the Bucks’ floor to the Raptors’ for Games 3 and 4 beginning Sunday (Monday, PHL time). And Lowry earnestly answered by saying, yes, they have to defend better, they have to rebound better and they definitely have to assert themselves more to defend their Scotiabank Arena home court. Lowry said the right things. Problem is, that’s a lot of things. The Raptors don’t appear to have the wherewithal – or even the duct tape, if you prefer – to fix so many flaws at once. They have been outrebounded 113-86, a major factor in the Bucks’ 41-20 advantage in second-chance points. They have been outscored by 30 points in the two games and most of the difference has come from the bench (76-51), adding to the sense that Milwaukee isn’t just beating Toronto, it’s ganging up on them. Defensively, the Raptors haven’t been nearly good enough and their coach, Nick Nurse, put the blame squarely on them. He went into detail – both before and after Game 2 – to explain the difference between a good contest of a jump shot and a great, playoffs-worthy contest. After talking at length before tipoff about needing and hoping to see effort from his players as a sign they grasped the urgency involved, it had to be embarrassing for Nurse to acknowledge afterward that, no, that effort in fact was not there. “We were just a step too slow on just about everything,” he observed. To illustrate how casually his players closed on Bucks’ shooters, Nurse did a deep dive on a play in which center Marc Gasol needed to get out to Nikola Mirotic. “It was a good contest, but it wasn't a full-out contest,” the Toronto coach said. “We know the level of contest is going to affect these shots or not, and if you don't go with everything you've got and jump high and really try to let them know you're right pressed up against them, then the chances of [the shots] going in are pretty good.” Poor Gasol. This supremely skilled big man who was so valuable to the Memphis Grizzlies in numerous playoff wars is an early nominee for series scapegoat here. He at least had 12 rebounds and five assists in the opener, but his contributions and minutes fizzled in Game 2. By the time he got to 1-for-9 (3-for-20 in the series), the 34-year-old Gasol was looking creakier than his brother Pau, 38, who was wheeling himself through the halls on a scooter Friday night (Saturday, PHL time) after undergoing foot surgery this week. Then there’s Danny Green, a helpful 3-and-D guy with tons of postseason experience from his San Antonio days. Green’s challenge has been touching the ball enough to make a difference; he’s 3-for-11, getting about two thirds as many shots as he’d expect. But as he noted, Toronto’s ball movement has been spotty, the Bucks’ top-ranked defense stingy and little has been done to alter either from one game to the next. “Our offense was out of whack a little bit tonight, and we didn’t tighten it up,” Green said. A little more Norman Powell, a little less Gasol going forward? Doesn’t seem like it’ll be enough. Now take Pascal Siakam and Lowry from the margin for error that Toronto really doesn’t have. They were good for 45 points in the opener but scored a total of 23 Friday (Saturday, PHL time), each burdened with foul trouble from daring to mess with Milwaukee’s gears. Siakam, a favorite to be named the NBA’s Most Improved Player, wound up as the night’s most removed player, his minutes dropping from more than 42 on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) to 26 on Friday (Saturday, PHL time). There’s no reason to let Leonard off the hook, either. The Raptors’ best player has scored 31 points in each game, but they’ve been about as quiet as 62 points can be, coming almost from a bubble that has nothing in common with the rest of Toronto’s attack. Sometimes Leonard is bailing them out, sure, but many times the ball and the possession stop with him. The Bucks are OK with that, defending him with Khris Middleton, Eric Bledsoe and helpers. Leonard has taken 20 of his team’s 45 free throws, but dished only four assists in the two games. That’s one area in which Leonard is so different from – and so far in this series, lacking when compared to – Giannis Antetokounmpo. The Bucks’ star, with his gravitational pull on defenders, creates a bounty of opportunities for others. Leonard isn’t making any of his teammates better at this stage. And let’s not forget the intangibles. Antetokounmpo is the catalyst for Milwaukee’s superior team chemistry, a top-five talent who is all in on the Bucks’ ambitions and the players corralled around him. Leonard? For all anyone knows, he still has one foot out the door to free agency. His laconic nature doesn’t lend itself to firing up others, and it’s difficult to see how he leads by anything other than example. The cloud of Leonard’s future has been squatting over Toronto’s whole season. Every game is a referendum on whether he feels he has enough help or not. Does Nurse or another Raptors coach dare to challenge him, for fear he’ll start packing his bags immediately? Did anyone object to his “load management” nights off this season? It has been a tough way to grind through a long year, held hostage by your star’s inscrutability. But it’s what they signed up for when GM Masai Ujiri traded for him with just one season to woo and recruit. Compare that to what Bucks coach Mike Budenholzer was sharing about Antetokounmpo, as far as pushing him to greater heights. “We're coaching him and we're on him,” Budenholzer said. “We think he can be doing more, and he just soaks it up.” As the series shifts to Canada, the Raptors will look to Friday’s (Saturday, PHL time) third quarter as quickly as the Bucks will dismiss it. Toronto outscored Milwaukee 39-31 over those 12 minutes, the only portion of the game in which they managed to send a ripple of nervousness through the building. OK, well, maybe not quite that, but a few fans surely noticed that what had been a 28-point lead soon after halftime got chiseled down to 13. Not once, but twice. But Malcolm Brogdon and George Hill went to work off the Bucks’ bench, Giannis came back mean-muggin’ to start the fourth and that most definitely was that. Playoff protocol says we must give the Raptors their home games to demonstrate a difference. But they need to know that 0-2 is a gaping hole, from which only 20 teams in NBA history have come back in a seven-game series. Two more bounces on the rim, and we’ll see which way the Raptors fall. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 18th, 2019

Stephen bests Seth in Curry brothers backyard basketball showdown

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com OAKLAND, Calif. — For a special moment, Game 2 of the Western Conference finals relocated from Oracle Arena to a backyard court with a hoop in suburban Charlotte, N.C., and every player save for two suddenly disappeared, and 19,595 witnesses were reduced by 19,593, with the remaining pair watching and pointing from the kitchen window. Yes, late-1990s nostalgia intervened in a tight contest between the Warriors and Trail Blazers. It was Curry vs. Curry all over again, an entertaining spectacle for their amused parents yet a tense one for their sons, Steph and Seth, fiercely trying to take down the other. [Watch the Playoffs on NBA League Pass for 30% less with this limited time offer! Select Annual package and use code SAVE30 at checkout to redeem] Even if you weren’t there at the Curry household for those brotherhood battles back in the day, couldn’t you just envision how they developed, much as it did on a dramatic Thursday, two decades later on the other side of the country? There was so much riding on those 1-on-1s then, such as a noogie for the loser, the last remaining cookie for the winner, and most certainly bragging rights, at least for the day. This time, the stakes were tame by comparison, just an ordinary game in mid-May that could dictate which brother eventually goes to the NBA Finals and which one sits next to Dell and Sonya in the stands and watches, nothing more or less. “Yeah, sure,” laughed Seth. “Something like that.” OK, perhaps this was huge after all. This was Steph with 37 points and eight assists rallying the Warriors back from 17 points down, only to get push-back from his brother, who played the best game of his NBA career. This was Seth, younger by three years, getting 16 points and four steals in the game -- all four out of Steph's pocket -- to give the Blazers an unexpected lift. The performance earned enough confidence from coach Terry Stotts that he played the entire fourth quarter. Seth was assigned to check Steph, and vice-versa, and it was a family issue played out before the basketball world. It was a thrilling one at that, because at one point you weren’t sure which Curry would get the best of the other. “This was like the coolest experience I think I’ve ever had playing against him,” said Steph. “Every minute he was out there defensively, he was a pest. Made big shots in the fourth quarter. He was amazing tonight.” Seth made all three of his shots in the fourth quarter, all of them on three-pointers, and a few in Steph’s mug. If he wasn’t the Blazers’ best option, at least he was an option, one that the Warriors -- and the other Curry -- had to respect. He helped the Blazers cling to an eight-point lead with four minutes and change left, until the expected happened and those early bragging rights were rudely snatched back. Playing once again without the comfort of Kevin Durant, Steph shot and willed his team to victory and a 2-0 lead in the series, drawing a foul beyond the arc and draining three free throws to put the Warriors up two. Seth had one last answer, a 29-footer that temporarily regained the lead before the Warriors wore down Portland and went home, 114-111, on Andre Iguodala's last-second strip of Damian Lillard. In all, it was a must-see contest … and the game wasn’t too bad, either. “I mean, they’re brothers,” said Lillard. “For me, having my own older brother, I know what it’s like to go against your brother and what it means. They both know there’s going to be conversations about this at some point when this series is over and they’re going to play like it.” Perhaps somewhat surprisingly, there wasn’t much chatter between them; Seth said they were too involved in the game for that. Well, maybe just a touch: “He tried to distract me at the free-throw line in the fourth quarter and I knew I had to go back at him to stay focused on what I needed to do,” admitted Steph. There was more of an urgency on Seth’s part to make this game and this drama happen. After his brother and Klay Thompson took turns dropping an avalanche of jumpers on the Blazers in Game 1, Portland needed a new strategy to defend the pick and roll. So they decided to trap constantly, and they needed agile players for that, which meant less time for Enes Kanter and more time for others, including Seth. Of course, there was another reason to play Seth for 29 minutes: Who else knows Steph Curry better than him? “I’ve seen every Warriors game and every Steph game for the past 10 years,” he said. “I feel like I know some things he likes to do, but it wasn’t enough.” That’s true. You can have all the scouting reports and, in this case, all the backyard hoop experience in the world. There’s only so much one can do against a two-time Kia MVP and widely-regarded Best Shooter Of All Time. Still: there were those four steals by Seth, two of them clean picks off Steph, who’s difficult to strip because of his crafty dribble. And those shots against him. Seth was a problem Thursday (Friday, PHL time), and an irritating one. “I felt like he was thinking where I was at times,” Seth said. I was just trying to make it tough on him. He’s going to do what he does, but if you make him work a little more, make it tough on him, that’s all you can ask.” Seth's had the harder road to this point. While Steph became a basketball icon, Seth kept bouncing between teams over five years, never securing the big contract, fighting to carve a spot in the rotation, and finally getting the chance to do just that. Just a few years ago, Seth played for the Warriors’ G-League team in Santa Cruz, in the shadow of his brother, wondering when he’d get his chance to make his own path. “I don’t take this for granted,” he said. “To get to this point and be a contributor, this is what I worked for all those years. I was confident I could be here, and now that I’m here, I will try to make the most of it. I always want the ball and try to be aggressive and tonight when I found the ball in my hands, I was locked in.” This will give Stotts and the Blazers something to ponder as the series moves to Portland, where they’ll try to keep from becoming another piece of Warriors playoff roadkill. Chances are good, then, that Seth’s spot in heavy rotation is safe. “Every time we played them this season, Seth has played great and I think it has something to do with playing his brother,” said Lillard. “This time I thought he guarded Steph well, and Steph is always on the move, out there running around, coming off screens and just looking to shoot the ball. That’s what he does.” Well, there’s one little detail that Lillard left out, one that Steph Curry was too happy to provide: “It worked out perfectly tonight: He played well and we won.” Shaun Powell has covered the NBA for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here, and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 17th, 2019

Curry, Lillard battle for NBA supremacy, Oakland s affection

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com OAKLAND — He arrived at the Western Conference finals wearing the jersey of the Oakland A’s, who play right next door at the Coliseum, just a five-minute drive from where he was born. Damian Lillard paused and signed a few autographs before entering Oracle Arena, because he is a man of the people, and these are his people. None of them mention that, in their hearts, they’re rooting for him to lose this playoff series, and so it goes unspoken, a truce in a sense. For this fleeting moment, they’re Lillard fans, until the ball goes up. And then it’s all for Steph Curry, all night long. There is a competition within the competition between the Warriors and Blazers, and it is the battle for the affection of Oakland. There is Lillard, the pride of the Brookfield Village neighborhood, who has blossomed into a bonafide star with the Blazers. And then there’s Curry, the symbol of a basketball renaissance here, who has raised the profile of Oakland the last several years. Now you see why The Town is a bit conflicted. A bit. [Watch the Playoffs on NBA League Pass for 30% less with this limited time offer! Select Annual package and use code SAVE30 at checkout to redeem] The conference championship may well hinge on the performance of these All-NBA guards. Game 1 was fairly lopsided, both in terms of the teams — Warriors 116, Blazers 94 — and the two principles. Lillard struggled Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time) and appeared whipped, physically if not mentally, no doubt from a grueling seven-game second round that just wrapped up 48 hours earlier. He missed 8-of-12 shots, had seven turnovers and, in a rarity for him, he was a non-factor for Portland. He’s a combined 7-for-29 in his last two games. Meanwhile, Curry rolled, dropping 36 points and the Blazers along with them. And so, this is the verdict: Portland cannot hope to stretch this series beyond four games, five tops, without the max from Lillard. He obviously means that much. And Curry, now working without the comforts of his injured co-star Kevin Durant for the second straight game, and maybe without Durant for another two games, needs to keep his skills elevated to prevent suspense from encroaching on the series. The Warriors are well aware of what Lillard has done to them in the past; he has averaged more points against the hometown team (27.0) than any in his career likely because of provincial pride. Yet Golden State is also aware that he has yet to beat them in any game or series of significance. “He’s one of the best guards in this league and carries a chip on his shoulder and it has (worked) well for him in his career,” said Draymond Green. “A special talent. I know he’s excited to be back home playing in the last year at Oracle. So it’s special for him but it don’t mean nothing to us. We’ve got to come out here and try to stop him. A tall task.” While the East Bay has given birth to its share of NBA stars, with Bill Russell, Jason Kidd and Gary Payton among them, Lillard is still freshly active and refreshingly loyal. The connection between him and Oakland remains unwavering despite fame and distance and the fact it’s his job and desire to shock the world in the next few weeks. He played at St. Joseph Notre Dame in Alameda and then finished at Oakland High, and a thick section of fans at Oracle Wednesday were wrapped in Blazers gear and made their preference clear. Most were either from the old neighborhood or family members. His high school coach, Damon Jones, is a Warriors season ticket holder, and Jones said: “Nobody bought me a drink tonight.” The coach added, playfully: “They gave me a hard time. When the Warriors scored, they wanted to turn around and slap five but then caught themselves at the last minute.” Jones remembers Lillard as being a promising and quick guard who picked up the nuances of the game rapidly. “He was very personable for someone his age, a solid teammate,” Jones said. “He still keeps in touch with all of his former teammates. It’s a brotherhood and he’s the leader. He’s always trying to be a positive influence on everyone around here.” Lillard returns every summer to give away backpacks with school supplies and funded the renovation of the Oakland High gym. He’s a familiar sight around town in the offseason and always approachable, and that loyalty and devotion doesn’t go unnoticed. “People here respect him,” said Raymond Young, Lillard’s AAU coach. “When he comes here to play, people here say they’re going to clap for Damian but cheer for the Warriors. Only he can get that kind of reaction. His loyalty comes from his family. His mother and father were no-problem parents. They let us coach him. He was a joy to be around. Still is.” Lillard is even more endearing because he comes from humble beginnings and is self-made. Both of his youth coaches are admittedly shocked by his impact in the NBA. He wound up at Weber State. He wasn’t highly recruited by the big schools. Even nearby Cal-Berkeley came late. “But if he goes there,” said Young, “does all this happen?” Lillard is revered in another place as well. Portland is also smitten by his loyalty; in an age of transient stars, Lillard has never wanted to play anywhere else. Perhaps this has cost him some visibility, with a majority of his games tipping off at 10:30 ET. It’s a price he’s more than willing to pay. Lillard has never taken a team this deep into the playoffs, where legends and reputations are made, and so being in the conference finals represents some new and deserved shine for him. A layer of that invisibility was peeled off in these playoffs where Lillard has come up massive. His shot from nearly 40 feet that eliminated Oklahoma City in the first round, and the bye-bye wave reaction, became iconic. Then he followed up with a strong second round as well against the Nuggets, although as that series crept to the conclusion, Lillard shot just 3-for-17 in that Game 7, then followed up with a 4-for-12 Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time), proof that he might be gassed — and also that the Warriors cooked up a defensive game plan specifically for him. “Obviously it’s a little bit difficult physically and emotionally just because you’re excited about being in the Western Conference finals,” said Lillard. “You come straight here form Denver and get ready for the best team in the league. But once we lace our shoes and put our uniforms on, it’s fair and square. You got to go out there and handle your business. "They did a good job defensively and even when I was trying to find (teammates), they were getting deflections. They were making me play in a crowd. I thought they were successful at that … in this first game.” But his toughest task of all might be upstaging Curry, particularly here in Oakland. While Lillard has flourished through much of the postseason, Curry by comparison has been mild, especially by his standards. The missed layups, a famously flubbed dunk attempt and sporadic three-point shooting was unsightly. And then, after Durant limped off the floor, Curry felt a sense of urgency and a flush of greatness. He buried the Rockets with a pair of epic fourth quarters, then kept the faucet running Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). The Blazers couldn’t limit or at least slow him anywhere on the floor, especially from the three-point line, where Curry was a sizzling 9-for-15. And no missed layups. In his last six quarters of basketball, Curry has scored 69 points with 13-for-24 shooting on 3s. “I know what I’m capable of doing on the floor," Curry said, "and the situation calls for me to be more aggressive and hopefully that will continue. It’s nice to see the ball go in. I want to maintain that. I didn’t shoot well for 4.5 games the last series. Every game is different. You have to reestablish yourself and that’s my perspective no matter how I play.” Curry didn’t arrive wearing the baseball jersey of the home team, and if anything has been spotted at San Franciso Giants games across the Bay, where the Warriors will call home starting next season. But don’t get anything twisted. Curry’s bond with Oakland, developed over time, is genuine and real for someone born and bred a country away in Charlotte, and the feeling is mutual. The tug of war for the heartstrings of Oakland is subtle between the pair of franchise players on the floor in this playoff series. Call it a draw from the standpoint of whom the fans here respect and appreciate. There’s enough love to be shared by both. Yet in the basketball sense, this series is on the verge of being owned by the one wearing the jersey that reps Oakland. Curry has more momentum and better teammates, and Durant is on deck. Oakland, therefore, will indeed cheer for one of its own, for Damian Lillard. But the way this series and these playoffs are going, The Town is anxious to pop bottles with Steph Curry once again, at the usual place and time, for one last time. Shaun Powell has covered the NBA for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here, and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 15th, 2019

The Trail Blazers patience has been rewarded

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press Bravo, Portland. Bravo. Doing the right thing isn’t easy in the NBA, where patience is a rare virtue. The Trail Blazers were swept in the first round of the 2017 playoffs. They got swept again in the first round last season. Portland had lost 10 consecutive playoff games going into this year. Ordinarily, that’s a recipe for firings, trade demands and roster dismantling. Instead, the Blazers stayed the course. And their reward is a trip to the Western Conference final, starting Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time) against two-time defending champion Golden State. [Watch the Playoffs on NBA League Pass for 30% less with this limited time offer! Select Annual package and use code SAVE30 at checkout to redeem] “It speaks to the character of our organization and what we’ve become,” All-Star guard Damian Lillard said. The Blazers have become a model of consistency. They could have gone the other way. A lot of teams have gone the other way. Neil Olshey, the Blazers’ general manager, took an uncommonly measured approach last season and kept Terry Stotts — currently the fourth-longest-tenured coach in the NBA. Lillard stayed committed and didn’t stomp his feet or force a trade like so many other players in his situation have done or tried to. CJ McCollum, Lillard’s backcourt partner who carried them Sunday (Monday, PHL time) with 37 points, doesn’t mind that he could get more shots elsewhere. “This is arguably the biggest win that we’ve had in the franchise for a long time,” Stotts said after Sunday’s (Monday, PHL time) Game 7 win at Denver — the first Game 7 road win in team history. “To be a part of it, to do it the way we did, I’m thrilled.” In a lot of ways, Sunday (Monday, PHL time) epitomized what the Blazers have done in recent years. They got down 17 early on the road in a Game 7. They battled, chipped at the deficit, eventually found the right combination of things that worked and didn’t panic. “Just stay with it,” Stotts said. “Trust was the biggest thing.” He was speaking of Game 7. He could have meant the last two offseasons. Trust takes time to build, and the Blazers now have it from top to bottom. This is how close-knit they are: After the game, Lillard lauded teammates, coaches, the training staff, the front office, the team’s security and the members of the sports media relations staff. He forgot nobody. “Everybody we see every day, everybody’s invested in what we’ve created,” Lillard said. Some teams should be taking notes. So should some players. This is an era in which teams spend years tanking instead of competing, yet still charge plenty to fans willing to come see their inferior product. An era where a bad team like Phoenix somehow decides after one year that a well-regarded coach like Igor Kokoskov needs to be fired — a move that means Devin Booker will start his fifth NBA season playing for a fifth different coach. An era where an elite player like Anthony Davis can pursue a trade with a year and a half left on his contract in New Orleans, starting a circus that became a massive problem for both the Pelicans and the Los Angeles Lakers. The Blazers didn’t demand that someone else fix their mistakes. They did it themselves. Olshey knew Portland’s roster was flawed after being swept by Davis and the Pelicans last season, that it wasn’t deep enough to handle injury issues. So he took a chance on Seth Curry, Warriors star Stephen Curry’s brother who wasn’t in the league last season, and signed him over the summer. He swung a trade in February and got Rodney Hood to fortify the bench. He fought off plenty of other clubs to sign Enes Kanter when he was freed by the New York Knicks — and that move proved enormous after center Jusuf Nurkic went down with a broken leg. But the moves Olshey didn’t make the last two summers are part of why the Blazers are here now. So are the moves he made three months ago. So, too, are the moves he made four years ago when the Blazers were rebuilders after LaMarcus Aldridge and three other starters left. “We had the roster turnover four years ago and everybody was quick to shoot us down, count us out,” Lillard said. “And at that point, we didn’t know for sure what direction we were going to go in.” Now they know. They’re heading to Oakland and the Western Conference final. ___ Tim Reynolds is a national basketball writer for The Associated Press. Write to him at treynolds@ap.org.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 13th, 2019

No rest for the weary: Nuggets, Blazers back at it

By Brian Mahoney, Associated Press Nikola Jokic and the Denver Nuggets could use the kind of break everybody else is getting in the second round of the NBA playoffs. If anybody deserved some time off, it’s the All-Star center who just played 65 minutes in a game. But there’s no rest for the weary now. The Nuggets and Trail Blazers will be back on the court Sunday (Monday, PHL time) for Game 4, surely a little low on fuel after they tied an NBA record by playing four overtimes Friday night (Saturday, PHL time) in Portland’s 140-137 victory. [Watch the Playoffs on NBA League Pass for 30% less with this limited time offer! Select Annual package and use code SAVE30 at checkout to redeem] “Both teams are exhausted, so it’s the same for them as it is for us,” Denver coach Michael Malone said. “We will not use that as an excuse. We haven’t used it all year long and we won’t start using it now.” The conference semifinal round is a series of starts and stops, where it’s difficult for any team to build much momentum because there have been so many gaps between games. Philadelphia and Toronto, who have Game 4 of their series Sunday (Monday, PHL time), play just twice in a seven-day span. In the other Eastern Conference semifinal, Milwaukee and Boston had two days off in between both Games 2 and 3, and Games 3 and 4. When Golden State and Houston played Game 3 of their series Saturday night (Sunday, PHL time), it was their first time back on the court since Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). Then there’s Denver and Portland, who barely had time to catch their breath after the Trail Blazers’ victory in Friday’s marathon gave them a 2-1 lead. They are playing every other day to start their series, and would only have an extra day between games if it’s extended to a seventh game. So while Philadelphia’s Joel Embiid has ample opportunity for treatment on his sore left knee that was such a problem when the postseason began, Portland’s Enes Kanter’s left shoulder has little time to heal before he’d have to get back on the court to resume tussling with Jokic. “As far as the minutes, everybody’s tired. Were built for what’s happening right now. That’s what we had to do to win the game,” Portland’s Damian Lillard said. “Now we’ve got to go do our jobs away from the floor to make sure that at 4 o’clock Sunday we’re ready.” At least Portland wrapped up its first-round series against Oklahoma City quickly, earning some down time after Lillard’s long three-pointer ended the series in five games. But the Nuggets had to go the distance against San Antonio, meaning they had only one day off between ending one series and starting the next. Recover quickly and win Sunday (Monday, PHL time), and they’ve evened the series and regained home-court advantage. But if not, the No. 2 seeds are facing a 3-1 hole, which is a tough spot no matter their energy level. The seven-foot, 250-pound Jokic insists he’ll be ready. “They always talking about I’m not in shape. I’m in really good shape. I don’t know what they’re talking about,” Jokic said. “When I came here I was maybe a little bit chubby, but there’s really no difference in me now. I’m feeling good.” A look at Sunday’s (Monday, PHL time) games: RAPTORS AT 76ERS Philadelphia leads 2-1. Game 4, 3:30 p.m. EDT (3:30am, PHL time) NEED TO KNOW: The 76ers have won the last two games after Toronto’s Game 1 victory. The Raptors have not lost three straight since Nov. 12-16. Kawhi Leonard’s 31.5 points per game rank second to Kevin Durant so far, but Toronto has averaged just 91 per game in the last two games. INJURY WATCH: Toronto is listing forward Pascal Siakam, one of the leading candidates for the Most Improved Player award, as doubtful because of a bruised right calf. Siakam, averaging 22.9 points, was called for a flagrant foul when he stuck his right leg in the path of Embiid during the fourth quarter of Game 3. Embiid’s knee appeared to strike Siakam’s calf. Siakam left the game moments later and did not return. KEEP AN EYE ON: The score at halftime. The 76ers had 64 at the break in Game 3, the fourth time they’ve reached 60 in the first half this postseason, and Leonard noted that was an area the Raptors had to improve. PRESSURE IS ON: Kyle Lowry. All Toronto’s players need to step up more in support of Leonard but the point guard in particular acknowledged he needed to be better after a dismal 2-for-10, seven-point performance in Game 3. NUGGETS AT TRAIL BLAZERS Portland leads, 2-1. Game 4, 7 p.m. EDT (7am, PHL time) NEED TO KNOW: CJ McCollum, who scored 41 points in 60 minutes, along with Lillard (58 minutes) and Kanter (56) are the Blazers who went the longest in Game 3. So there might be an opportunity for Rodney Hood, who scored seven points in the fourth OT, or one of Portland’s big men to get a little more time Sunday (Monday, PHL time). INJURY WATCH: Kanter posted a photo of himself on the training table getting treatment soon after Game 3. He finished with 18 points and 15 rebounds and said afterward he didn’t know if he’d be able to play in Game 4. Whatever it freaking takes #RipCity pic.twitter.com/ok9l0Mf5I8 — Enes Kanter (@Enes_Kanter) May 4, 2019 KEEP AN EYE ON: The energy levels. Game 4 might be one of those that isn’t determined by who plays better, but rather by who has the most left in the tank. PRESSURE IS ON: Jokic’s supporting cast. The Serbian has three triple-doubles and ranks second among all players in both rebounds (12.6) and assists (9.1) per game in his first postseason. But the Nuggets probably can’t count on him staying at that level Sunday after he played the fourth-most minutes in NBA playoff history in Game 3, falling just two short of the record, so other players have to take on some of his usual load. ___ AP Sports Writer Anne Peterson in Portland, Oregon contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 5th, 2019