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Pandemic creating lockdown generation as 1 in 6 youths stop work — UN

"I don't think it is giving way to hyperbole to talk about the danger of a lockdown generation," ILO chief Guy Ryder told a virtual press conference......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarMay 27th, 2020

Russia reports record virus cases but shuns new restrictions

Russia registered its highest-ever number of new coronavirus infections on Friday after officials warned that tight restrictions could be put back in place if people continued to flout restrictions. New cases in Russia have surged past the record levels seen in May Dimitar DILKOFF AFP/File/ MANILA BULLETIN Restaurants and bars in Moscow were bustling and many residents were ignoring orders to wear masks in public as nationwide infections surged in September, but officials stopped short of imposing new sweeping measures to slow the spread of the virus. European leaders across the continent are scambling to amend virus regulations against the backdrop of a surge in new cases, and even Germany, which was praised for its early handling of the pandemic, has suffered a large increase in new infections. But officials in Russia, which has the world’s fourth-highest caseload after the United States, India and Brazil, have so far dismissed the idea there is a second wave of infections or any need for a new lockdown.   A government tally registered 12,126 new cases on Friday, surpassing the country’s previous record set in May by several hundred cases. “I’m really afraid that things will go back to how they were in the spring, that everyone will be quarantined and we won’t be allowed to go to work,” Vladimir, a teacher in Saint Petersburg who declined to give his last name, told AFP.  – Training dogs to detect virus – As Russia is experiencing a surge in coronavirus cases, the country’s flagship airline Aeroflot is training sniffer dogs to detect the coronavirus by scent. Aeroflot uses a special jackal-dog hybrid called Shalaika in Russian to detect explosives. Now dog handlers say the Shalaikas — who have a powerful sense of smell — can be taught to sniff out the coronavirus. “The dog is not looking for the virus, the dog is looking for a person with signs of the disease,” Elena Batayeva, head of canine monitoring at Aeroflot, told reporters. Russia imposed one of the most severe nationwide lockdowns at the beginning of the pandemic. Non-essential businesses were shuttered and Moscow residents only permitted to move freely with official digital passes. But most restrictions were lifted ahead of a large WWII military parade in June and a nationwide vote on amendments that paved the way for President Vladimir Putin to remain in power until 2036. Officials in Moscow, which is the epicentre of Russia’s pandemic, have taken only minor steps to slow the spread of cases. Mayor Sergei Sobyanin has ordered the elderly and vulnerable to stay at home and told employers to keep at least a third of staff working remotely.  Mask-wearing is compulsory on public transport and inside shops, but some Muscovites are not convinced others are doing enough to stop the spread of infections. “The city is making the necessary decisions. But it won’t work without people responding to these measures, helping themselves and those around them,” Sobyanin said Friday. Tatyana Nemirovskaya, a 30-year-old PR specialist, told AFP that Muscovites are “definitely not” following the government’s guidelines. The head of Russia’s consumer rights watchdog, Rospotrebnadzor, which is spearheading the country’s virus response, warned this week of “new measures” if the current rules were not followed. The Kremlin said Friday that if the situation continues to deteriorate it will “require some actions, decisions”. – ‘Without masks, having fun’ – But Putin’s spokesman Dmitry Peskov placed the blame on Russians for the surging caseload, saying it was clear that “many people don’t think it is necessary to take care of providing the safety of their health.”  Standing next to a memorial to medics who have died during the pandemic in Saint Petersburg, Stella, a resident of Russia’s second city, said people had dropped their guard after mass restrictions were lifted. “The rules were slightly eased and people calmly walked around without masks, having fun and everything began again,” she said. Russia announced in August it had registered the world’s first coronavirus vaccine, named Sputnik V after the Soviet-era satellite and a number of officials have said they volunteered for inoculation, including Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu.  Putin this week said “around 50 people” in his inner circle, including staff and family, had been vaccinated. Russia has recorded a total of 22,257 fatalities from the virus, a much lower figure compared to other badly-hit countries. Kremlin critics have suggested the authorities have downplayed the death rate to hide the severity of the outbreak......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 9th, 2020

Samar student uses leaves to create portraits

TACLOBAN City – Instead of using paper or canvas, a second-year education student has been using leaves in making portraits during the lockdown caused by the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. (Photo courtesy of Jhonil Bajado) Ryan Rio-Legatub Managaysay, a second year Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education – Social Studies student at the Samar State University from Tarangnan, Samar, uses “salikupkop” (Algoamorpha quercifolia) leaves, a medicinal fern, and also known as basket fern. His professor Jhonil Bajado discovered Ryan’s talent and posted it on social media. He said he already knew that Ryan had a knack for creating using visual arts as he had done some artworks for their school activities before.  “His first leaf art was a portrait of mine. He was not confident to show it to me at first, because he did not consider it worthy (of) my attention, he said. In fact, I saw it in his ‘My Day’ post first, before he sent it to me via Messenger upon my request. Knowing how unassuming this kid is, I know he was just hesitant to show the artistic work of his hand,” Bajado shared. Bajado describes his student as a timid 21-year-old, who came from a humble family. His commissioned artworks have allowed him to help augment their family’s income.  Bajado said he asked Ryan to do artworks of people, who influenced him as a person, and as a student, or other personalities he wished to bring to life through his leaf artworks.  “I was dumbfounded with what he sent me. He was able to do 2 to 3 artworks per day…I cannot help but be overjoyed with his God-given talent and share it with the world,” he added. His artworks have included portraits of Pope Francis, President Rodrigo Duterte, Senator Manny Pacquiao, Mayor Isko Moreno, Boy Abunda, Samar 2nd Dist. Rep. Sharrie Ann Tan, among others. “These artworks are, to me, a symbolic representation of the Bisayan resilience and the Filipino artistry, who are always able to find good vibes despite life’s adversity,” Bajado said. Bajado aims to share Ryan’s artworks to help the local artist grow and realize his full potential......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 29th, 2020

Robredo hits Roque’s gag request to Octa Research Group

The Duterte administration wants the Octa Research Group to stop publicizing their recommendations on the pandemic response because of its intention not to follow them, Vice President Leni Robredo said on Sunday. Vice-President Leni Robredo (OVP / Facebook / MANILA BULLETIN FILE PHOTO) “Ang nakikita ko lang na dahilan kung bakit ililihim, hindi susundin iyong datos, iyong pagdedesisyon hindi nakasunod sa datos (The only reason I see why it must be hidden is that they won’t follow the data, they would decide not based on data),” she said during her weekly radio show.According to Robredo, it would be better for experts from the group to make public their research instead of just communicating it to the government in private.“For the benefit of everyone na alam ng tao kung ano iyong mga resulta ng research (the people should know the result of the research),” she asserted.The vice president disagreed with Presidential spokesperson Harry Roque who discouraged the local research group from publicizing their recommendations on placing areas under strict lockdown to avoid confusion.The Octa Research team, composed primarily of faculty members and alumni of the University of the Philippines and the University of Santo Tomas, has been regularly issuing reports on the COVID-19 situation nationwide.Roque said the group does not have the same number of experts working with the Inter-agency Task Force on Emerging Infectious Diseases (IATF-EID).“I wish they would refrain from making these recommendations publicly,” he said.His statement came after the Octa team recommended to implement stricter lockdown measures in Bauan, Batangas; Calbayog, Western Samar; and General Trias, Cavite due to an increase in COVID-19 cases.   These places were not being mentioned by the IATF......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 18th, 2020

Smart bats for cybersecurity as online use surges due to pandemic

With the government imposing strict quarantine rules, more and more people are turning to the internet for their daily activities. Video conferences gained popularity during the lockdown as companies employed work-from-home schemes and schools shifted to online learning......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 18th, 2020

3 million students still unenrolled: ‘Lost generation’ must catch up

MANILA, Philippines – When the Department of Education (DepEd) began the virtual enrollment of millions of students in June, Janet Villamar, 44, braced for a conversation any parent fears. Like millions of others, her family was being buffeted by the perfect storm of the COVID-19 pandemic and the economically devastating lockdown. Her husband, who had […] The post 3 million students still unenrolled: ‘Lost generation’ must catch up appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 13th, 2020

Chris Nick creates the modern flapper

His fall/winter 2020 collection takes cues from the 1920s, Années folles, the ‘Crazy Years.’ What happened in the ’20s, 100 years ago? They went roaring, années folles, as the French called them. The Jazz Age in the US, the Golden Age in Europe, emerging from World War I, descending to the Great Depression. It was the time of The Lost Generation, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ezra Pound, Cole Porter. It was the time of the Surrealists, Andre Breton, Arthur Rimbaud, Charles Baudelaire. It was a time of radical views and paradigm shifts. It was the time of women’s suffrage and women’s emancipation, when fashion at last entered the modern era, with women ditching the restricting clothes in favor of comfort, slipping into short skirts or trousers. It was the time of the flapper, defined informally as a fashionable young woman intent on enjoying herself and flouting conventional standards of behavior. It is in ode to these “Crazy Years” that designer Chris Nick de los Reyes came up with his fall/winter collection 2020. “I started conceptualizing the collection December of 2019 and, as we entered a new decade, the ’20s came to mind,” he says. “The Roaring ’20s saw an explosion of art, culture, and racial pride. Social change was evident and economic growth was booming.” Contrast that to these times, 100 years since, when we are between what seemed like a boom and what lies ahead, possibly a much-changed world that has survived a pandemic. “Very timely,” says Chris of his current collection that is a form of defiance, a chin up against the tendency to dwell in the darkness, just as the 1920s emerged from a decade of war and the Black Plague. “Fashion does not necessarily have to stop. We must look forward, seek advancement.” More than giving Filipino women a temporary means of escapism, the collection celebrates the craving “for light, speed, fun” that this decade in the last century sought. In today’s restrictions, despite today’s restrictions, those cravings remain and Chris Nick lets them have it in fashion. Whereas the flapper of the 1920s was a form of rebellion, in Chris’ interpretation, it is a symbol of strength. “The modern flapper in my eyes is dressed up in classics with a distinct aura of authority, sensuality, and wit,” he says. “And as a Filipina, she brings traditional Filipiniana into the current times.” It is a time of fear and great uncertainty, but the modern Filipina maintains a positive outlook. With fashion as her outlet, she is unafraid to express herself, her individuality. “These women are leaders of change,” says Chris. “With a strong personality, attitude, and a whole lot of charisma, they are symbols of confidence.” His collection at once conceals and reveals—but not too much, never too much—the female form in tulle, satin, silk, and wool mostly in black, the designer’s favorite color, the color of power, seduction, fantasy, and mystery. Chris also plays with texture with a boldness he’s never had before, although his style signature mixing tailored pieces with evening dresses, embellishing masculine silhouettes with fringes, feather, and sparkle, makes each piece distinctly, unmistakably Chris Nick......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 3rd, 2020

Meralco to beef up energy portfolio, eyes 3,000-MW capacity in next five years

It is full steam ahead for the power generation projects of Manila Electric Co. in the next five years, despite a 43-percent drop in operating income, as the pandemic lockdown gnawed on its commercial and industrial businesses......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 16th, 2020

Cash remittances dip 6.4% in January-May

The central bank said cash remittances or transfers via the banking system has declined by 6.4 percent year-on-year in the first five months of the year to $11.554 billion from $12.349 billion.  “The decline in cash remittances was due to the negative effects of the continued limited operating hours of some banks and institutions that provide money transfer services during the lockdown and the repatriation of many OFWs (Overseas Filipino Workers) in March 2020,” said the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) in a statement Monday. The cash remittances of land-based overseas Filipinos dropped 7.2 percent to $8.965 billion compared to same time last year of $9.664 billion. The remittances of sea-based workers also dipped 3.6 percent to $2.589 billion from $2.684 billion.  “By country source, the US registered the highest share to total overseas Filipinos remittances at 39.4 percent for January–May. It was followed by Singapore, Saudi Arabia, Japan, the United Kingdom, United Arab Emirates, Canada, Hongkong, Qatar, and Taiwan,” the BSP said. “The combined remittances from these countries accounted for 78.8 percent of total cash remittances.” For the month of May only, remittances sent through the banks decreased by 19.3 percent to $2.106 billion compared to $2.609 billion same time in 2019. Also for the month of May, personal remittances fell by 19.2 percent to $2.341 billion versus $2.896 billion in May 2019. Personal remittances from land-based workers with work contracts of one year or more slipped by 21.2 percent to $1.77 billion in May from $2.24 billion. Sea-based workers and land-based workers with work contracts of less than one year also declined by 12.4 percent to $519 million from $592 million in 2019. According to the BSP, “this is the third consecutive month that personal remittances posted year-on-year contraction amid the adverse effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on global economic activity, travel, and employment, resulting in the repatriation or deferment of employment of many OFWs.” For the cumulative January-May, personal remittances went down by 6.4 percent year-on-year to $12.835 billion from $13.707 billion. Personal remittances as defined by the BSP, is the “sum of net compensation of employees, personal transfers and capital transfers between households.” For 2020, the BSP expects cash remittances to contract by five percent and end up with $28.6 billion and then recover next year, bouncing back to a four percent growth to $29.8 billion. Last year, cash remittances reached $30.133 billion or up 4.1 percent from 2018, while personal remittances grew by 3.9 percent year-on-year to $33.467 billion......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 3rd, 2020

Economic recovery takes ‘one step back’

The Philippine economic recovery is taking a step back to curb the surging coronavirus outbreak and fix the fragile health system waging a “losing battle” against the pandemic. Finance Secretary Carlos G. Dominguez III said yesterday that the return of Metro Manila and nearly provinces to a stricter lockdown may take a toll on the drivers of economic rebound in the near-term. But Dominguez said that if the reimposed stricter modified enhanced community quarantine (MECQ) is correctly implemented, it will have a favorable impact on the nation’s long-term economic prospects. “In the short run, the return to MECQ may negatively affect livelihoods, consumer demand and production. However, if the time is used to boost all our medical resources and prevent further spread of the virus, then the MECQ will be positive for the long haul,” Dominguez said. As this is a new virus, Dominguez explained that nations, including the Philippines, continuously learn to adapt to the challenges posed by the new and uncertain environment induced by coronavirus. “The whole world is learning how to dance with this virus: two steps forward and one step back,” Dominguez said.Earlier, the DOF chief pushed for a shift of Metro Manila and Calabarzon—accounting for about 70 percent of the country’s gross domestic product (GDP)—“as quickly as possible” to the most lenient quarantine status to kickstart the economy. However, President Duterte ordered Metro Manila, Bulacan, Cavite, Laguna, and Rizal back under the MECQ from August 4 to 18 following a surge of COVID-19 cases and the appeal of healthcare workers. The two week shift to MECQ for Metro Manila and its adjacent provinces starting today ceased some businesses and public transport, while work and quarantine passes are also reinforced to restrict non-essential movements. Reverting to MECQ is an unwelcome develop for the economic managers as it could derail hopes for a recovery in the third quarter of the year. Acting Socioeconomic Planning Secretary Karl Kendrick T. Chua earlier said the economic impact of the quarantine measures in country was “more severe than expected.”  Days before Metro Maila reverted to MECQ, Dominguez said the local economy had already hit bottom and started to recover from the coronavirus-induced crisis, noting business activities have begun to pick up. The government had gradually eased the tough virus lockdown measures after the economy shrank by 0.2 percent in the first quarter......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 3rd, 2020

DID YOU KNOW… Maddie Madayag started off as a wushu artist

Maddie Madayag is poetry in motion when it comes to her blocking. Her defense at the net is an art form. But before the Davaoena flexed her muscles into becoming one of this generation’s notable middle blockers, she excelled in a different art - martial arts that is. Madayag already donned the tricolors performing on the mat as a wushu artist long before the former Ateneo de Manila University hammered her way into winning two UAAP titles and landing a spot in the national women’s volleyball team. Before pounding the volleyball or putting up a great wall at the net to stop an opponent’s attack, Madayag wowed judges with her routines with weapons especially with the long spear or quiang. However, her love affair with the Chinese martial arts started with a little nudge from her mother, Donna. “I actually tried taekwondo and ballet but then it didn’t work for me. Nag-wushu ako noong elementary but then only because my mom forced me. Para lang matuto ako mag-self defense,” said Madayag during her appearance in Volleyball DNA.      “I don’t know. I was kind of lazy siguro back then. I wanted to watch TV, cartoons, I just wanted to chill. But then my mom wanted me to learn other things din naman. She didn’t want me to stay at home,” added Madayag. It didn’t take long for Madayag to appreciate the sport.   “After nu’ng summer I learned to love the sport so I told my mom I wanted to continue,” she said. Showing talent, athleticism and being naturally competitive, Madayag landed a spot in the junior team. She even competed in the 2009 Asian Junior Wushu Championship in Macau where she won a medal.   Her wushu stint, however, ended when she entered high school. Madayag cited conflict of schedule as the reason for leaving the sport. Then came her interest in volleyball.     “My friends (in Davao Christian High School) told me na, ‘Tara Madz tryout tayo sa volleyball’. After ng tryout na yun ako lang na-recruit because I was the tall one,” said Madayag, who added that she was around 5-foot-8 that time. It was volleyball that opened an opportunity for the Southern lass to fly to the Big City and eventually land on the Lady Eagles’ nest in Katipunan. Madayag accomplished great things after fully embracing the team sport. But what if Madayag pursued her first love? For sure with her talent she’ll get a spot in the national team alongside wushu star Agatha Wong.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 24th, 2020

Pro-bound Eumir Marcial could make debut by October

After signing his MP Promotions contract earlier this month, there already seems to be a number of plans in place for Eumir Felix Marcial.  While Marcial is taking steps towards his professional career, the 24-year old decorated amateur pug has maintained that his prime objective right now is to bring home a gold medal for the Philippines in the Olympics. (READ ALSO: Eumir Marcial set on going pro but maintains Olympic gold medal is top priority) Marcial secured his spot in the Tokyo Olympics before the COVID-19 pandemic forced oa postponement of the Summer games to 2021.  Keeping that in mind, MP Promotions appears to be all-in on making Marcial’s gold medal dream into a reality, and that includes gearing his professional training towards becoming the best version of himself in time for Tokyo.  “We have a lot of great things in store, getting Eumir’s career going, we’re bringing him to the US, we’ll train him here, working under some of the top trainers and good sparring, and we’re really just kind of focused on the for first year is winning that gold medal, so everything we do leading up to Tokyo, when he has a few professional fights, is gonna be with in mind that we keep everything good for Tokyo,” explained MP Promotions President Sean Gibbons on Tuesday’s PSA Forum.  With about a year before Tokyo, Gibbons hopes to have Marcial compete in around three professional bouts starting this October.  “We’d hope to possibly have about three fights, because you have about nine months, you have a year before the Olympics, almost to the day right now, but I think you have to stop about three months before, so hopefully, we’ll do something in October, and then we’ll work from there, hopefully three fights before he has to stop and go fully concentrate on the Olympics.”  Gibbons maintains that for now, all of Marcial’s moves will have his Olympics appearance in mind, meaning that his first few pro bouts will likely be 4 to 6-round contest, which is similar to what he’ll be competing in at the Summer games.  To start out, just [4 and 6-rounders] because again, we’re trying to keep in line with what he’s going to be doing in Tokyo, so everything is geared towards preparation for that, and that’s why you start off with a 4 or 6-rounder, then another 4-6 depending again, we have to talk to Eumir, talk to his coaches, talk to everybody, but the idea is to sharpen up a lot of out-of-competition, not the actual fights itself, but all the training he’ll do and, let’s say when he comes to Los Angeles, all the different types of sparring and whoever we work with, along with his coaches,”  Gibbons also gave credit to Marcial’s current coaching team with the National Team, coach Ronald Chavez and coach Don Abnett, the men who have helped transform Marcial to the decorated amateur star and prospect that he is today.  “That’s one of the things I want to say also:  he’s had very good coaches so far, they’ve done very well, so we’re going to adapt whatever Eumir wants, with his coaches, whoever the team chooses in LA to work with,” said Gibbons.  “Yung gusto ko parin kasi, yung makasama ko sa training yung coaches ko, yun parin yung gusto ko makasama dito,” explained Marcial. “Sila pa din yung gusto ko makasama dahil siyempre, Olympics parin, ito parin yung pinag-hahandaan natin, so yun yung gusto kong makasama na mga coach, kasi siyempre amateur parin yung lalaruin natin doon, and gusto ko parin ma-maintain yung style ko yung paano mag-laro sa amateur.”  The commitment to the Olympics, Gibbons says, is something that Marcial has been focused on.  “Eumir has always told me, ‘I promised my dad, I promised the country that I’m gonna win the gold medal.’, so that’s what were doing everything to start the career with, in mind to get better to beat the guy from Ukraine, to beat the Russians, to beat those guys.” As for weight class, Gibbons says that Marcial should be competing around 160-162-pounds or at middleweight in order to keep him in the same division as the one he'll be competing at in the Olympics.  "It appears that we’ll probably  be doing it at middleweight, 160-pounds right in there, 160-162-pounds because again, Eumir is fighting in the Olympics at 165-pounds, that’s 75 kilos, and again, you don’t want to take a guy too low when you’re basically just preparing everything for Tokyo. Somewhere around the weight that he’s been fighting at as an amateur."  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 21st, 2020

‘Rising despite lockdown’

MANILA, Philippines — The Philippines is one of nine countries that are seeing a rise in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) cases despite having the world’s toughest lockdowns to stop coronavirus transmission, according to a groundbreaking University of Oxford tracker that examines governments’ responses to the pandemic worldwide. “Lockdowns are not silver bullets,” said Thomas Hale, head […] The post ‘Rising despite lockdown’ appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 12th, 2020

A few more adjustments to help jeepney drivers

  IN the gradual return to normal after government lockdown restrictions closed down many businesses and offices and forced all workers to stay at home so as to stop the spread of the coronavirus, a great deal of the work has had to be done by the Department of Transportation (DoTr). This is because the […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsJun 27th, 2020

Pauline Lopez says getting stuck in Subic during quarantine was 'blessing in disguise'

When the Philippines got hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, lockdown and quarantine measures were implemented almost instantly that a number of people got stuck away from home.  Such was the case for SEA Games gold medalist and National Taekwondo star Pauline Lopez, who found herself stuck in Subic throughout the Luzon-wide quarantine.  “I’ve been stuck in the lockdown in Subic. It’s much safer here, it’s been good,” Lopez told ABS-CBN Sports. “I got stuck here with some of my friends because before the lockdown, the weekend before the lockdown, we came here with my friends, and then they announced the lockdown so we got stuck here.” The silver lining, Lopez says, is that the situation isn’t as bad in Subic as it is in Manila, and also she’s able to train with people.  “But I think maybe it was a blessing in disguise, because it’s much safer here and also, I’m able to train,” she said.  Lopez added that she hopes to be able to return to Manila by the end of the month.          View this post on Instagram                   ?? A post shared by pauline lopez (@pauweenie) on Apr 25, 2020 at 8:00pm PDT           View this post on Instagram                   ????????‍?? A post shared by pauline lopez (@pauweenie) on May 13, 2020 at 9:20pm PDT Since the pandemic brought upon a lot of uncertainty and fear, most people had the comfort of being around family during such a trying time.  For Lopez however, whose family is back in the United States, it was admittedly difficult at first.  “It was rough in the beginning, pero I’ve adjusted. It’s still hard because my family is in the states, pero okay lang, medyo sanay na ako. I’ve been so used to being away from them.” Thankfully, technology has done a great job of bridging the distance between people, and even though they’re apart, Pauline says that she’s in always constant communication with her dad.  (READ ALSO: Pauline Lopez’s special bond with dad Efren comes from shared passion and love for Taekwondo) “There’s FaceTime, there’s always a call, messenger, Instagram, pero this time it’s different kasi we’re in a pandemic, and being away from my family, it’s been hard, but my dad still continues to motivate me more than ever, but it’s more of just keeping my spirit high, you know, the so-called champion spirit.” The last few months have definitely been difficult for almost everyone who’s been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, and while it may be hard to stay positive at times, Pauline says that she’s done whatever she can to remain in high spirits.  “I still try to remain positive during this time, so that’s how I’ve been keeping my positivity, with training, with keeping up with my dad, with checking up on my family and friends.” Lopez's situation didn't stop her from using her platform to help those who were affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 22nd, 2020

Berger a winner at Colonial, and PGA Tour feels like it, too

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — The PGA Tour spent two months learning about the COVID-19 pandemic and trying to develop a safe plan to return, followed by another month hoping for the best. Commissioner Jay Monahan said his confidence in the plan came with a dose of uncertainty. “If we ... got into a situation where we were dealing with a number of positive tests, that's something — candidly — that I lost a lot of sleep over in the weeks that preceded coming,” Monahan said. Monahan felt every bit a winner as Daniel Berger at the Charles Schwab Challenge. The tour administered 487 tests for the new coronavirus at Colonial, and the results on all of them came back negative. On the golf course, a dozen of some of golf's best players — from Rory McIlroy to Justin Thomas, Xander Schauffele to Jordan Spieth — all had a chance going into the final round. “Listen, there is more work to be done,” Monahan said. “But this is a phenomenal start to our return.” It was a healthy return, except for a somewhat sickly finish. Berger made a 10-foot birdie putt on the 18th hole and heard the deafening silence of a big moment with no spectators allowed at Colonial. He got into a playoff when Collin Morikawa missed a 6-foot birdie putt for the win and Xander Schauffele missed his try from 25 feet. The playoff was held on the 17th hole, another reminder of how this week was different. Playoffs always start on the 18th hole because that's where the gallery is packed into the grandstands. With no fans allowed, and with the 17th tee right next to the clubhouse, off they went. Morikawa hit a deft chip to 3 feet. Berger chipped even closer from behind the green and rapped in his par. They presumably were headed to the 18th tee until Morikawa's 3-footer spun out, and Berger was the winner. Schauffele should have been in the playoff, but his 3-footer for par on the 17th in regulation dipped in the right side of the cup and spun out of the left side. Talk about a horrible horseshoe. “If there are fans and everything with the ‘oohs’ and ‘aahs,’ I’d probably be a little more (ticked) off,” Schauffele said. “Maybe that’s a good thing for me right now. But it was definitely weird." Justin Rose had an 18-foot birdie putt on the 18th that looked good all the way until it wasn't. He finished one behind along with Bryson DeChambeau and Jason Kokrak, who also missed birdie chances on the last hole. This isn't the first time Rose or anyone else has missed a big putt. It wasn't the first time Rose let out a gutteral moan from missing. It was just the first time he actually heard it. “If the crowd are there, their groans or cries, whatever it may be, would have drowned me out,” Rose said. “You suddenly realize you actually do make some noise sometimes yourself. And it surprised me a little bit there on 18.” There were reminders all week of no fans, but rarely why golf had been shut down since March 12 because of the rapid spread of COVID-19, a pandemic that canceled one major (British Open) and postponed the others until later in the year. “The only time I thought about it was when I was having to take the tests, and that was really it,” Keith Mitchell said. “Hopefully, nobody comes down with it and we can keep on playing.” Players on the charter to the next stop — Hilton Head on the South Carolina shore — had to swing by the pool area at Colonial after the third round for a saliva test. If negative, they board the plane and don't have to be tested at Hilton Head. Everyone else driving, flying commercial or flying private face another test when they arrive. Tony Finau learned a new skill beyond chipping and putting. He learned to spit for his test. “You just kind of roll your tongue around inside your mouth, and it seems to bring a little bit more, and also if you just lean your face down, it seems to come out a little easier,” he said. So few talking about the virus was an indication of how safe it felt. In this case, the week doesn't end until the next tournament begins. “I was asked, ‘What’s a successful week look like?' It means us getting to the RBC Heritage and having another successful week,” he said. “I feel very good about the setup there, and we're ready to go again." Monahan had said as the tour prepared to return that it was critical not to fall into a trap that all is well. He said he wouldn't feel comfortable until told he could be comfortable, and likely would mean a vaccine. Morikawa said being back to golf and being back to normal were different matters. “Just because we played one week doesn’t mean we can go party and go do everything else like we used to,” Morikawa said. “We still have to follow these guidelines and maintain safety and strict rules with how far we stay from each other because it’s still out there. “We just have to be cognizant of what’s around us and where we put ourselves, because we want the tour to keep playing......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 15th, 2020

How Pinoy athletes kept winning during the lockdown

Sporting events may be suspended or canceled, but that won't stop your favorite Filipino athletes from inspiring or entertaining people as they spend their extra time off doing worthwhile activities during the lockdown period. From reaching out to affected communities to learning a new skill, here are what your idols are up to during the community quarantine. 1)  Proudly serving the nation as frontliners Some athletes have taken their in-game dedication off the court, as they proudly serve the country as frontliners during the COVID-19 pandemic. MPBL players such as Bacoor City's Eric Acuña and Bacolod-Master Sardines' Jopher Custodio are currently heeding the call as frontliners for the Philippine Army, as well as their fellow soldiers UST women’s volleyball coach Kung Fu Reyes and volleyball star Jovelyn Gonzaga. Pasay Voyager's Dhon Reverente also suited up for the Philippine Navy while his teammate Jesse Bustos is serving in the frontlines in another way, using his camera as a photojournalist for a daily newspaper.  2)  Raising funds and holding donation drives Your beloved players continue to exemplify teamwork in these challenging times as they help the dedicated frontliners and affected households in different parts of the country. UST student-athletes joined former Golden Tigresses star Sisi Rondina in auctioning their jerseys for a cause to donate supplies to the frontliners of Barangay Luz in Cebu City. Meanwhile, volleyball legends Alyssa Valdez and Charo Soriano led a fundraiser called "Volleyball Community Gives Back PH," which aims to supply frontliners in the country with PPEs and other essentials—with celebrities like Kathryn Bernardo and Pia Wurtzbach joining their cause. Former DLSU Lady Spikers standout and Creamline utility spiker Michele Gumabao also provided relief packs and gave them personally to the affected communities in Pampanga with the help of the group Your 200 Pesos. 3)  No days off for training and getting the gains Leagues and competitions may have been put on hold, but athletes won't be stopped from keeping themselves in tiptop shape. Observing quarantine, ONE Championship's heavyweight champion Brandon Vera took his workout to the forest, preparing for his upcoming bout against Arjan Bhullar, while Team Lakay fighters, such as Eduard Folayang, Kevin Belingon, and Joshua Pacio improvised household materials as gym equipment. National athletes, such as karateka Junna Tsukii, wushu artist Agatha Wong, and Olympic medalist Hidilyn Diaz, did rigorous training sessions at home to keep themselves in form for upcoming tournaments. High-flyer Ricci Rivero also taught his fans some basic dribbling drills to improve basketball handles—as seen in an episode of "Upfront" on LIGA cable sports channel. 4) Unlocking new skills and focusing on fave hobbies Your fave sports idols also overcame boredom by learning new skills and focusing on their favorite hobbies. For instance, DLSU Green Archers guard Aljun Melecio learned to cook scrumptious lechon while taking a time-out from the hardwood. UAAP volleyball champion and national team player Rex Intal also reminded us that he is a dedicated painter with his mixed portrait of Kobe Bryant and Michael Jordan, channeling his passion for sports and art into one. And did you know that top local setter Jia Morado is a talented photographer? Check out her Instagram and be amazed by her works. 5)  Taking their talents to TikTok Athletes joined the trending TikTok craze as a source of entertainment during the lockdown. Former UAAP stars Kim Kianna Dy and Jema Galanza posted their dance covers of Young Thug's "Relationship," and Deanna Wong took on "The Weekend" dance challenge. UST Golden Tigresses' rookie Imee Fernandez also wowed the TikTok crowd with a pre-workout dance video, which garnered over 600,000 views online. For Ateneo Blue Eagles guard SJ Belangel, TikTok has also been his avenue to overcome his shyness, doing hilarious skits online.   6)  Becoming stars online No live sports to entertain the audiences? It's not a problem for these athletes who continue to provide fun content to every sports fan, with the help of ABS-CBN Sports. Catch Shaun Ildefonso as he does an entertaining commentary about everything sports on "SRSLY." Also watch Cherry Nunag’s wacky chikahan with famous athletes in "Kalye Confessions: Stay-at-Home Edition." Lastly, the lockdown won't stop the basketball conversation as Beau Belga chats with your favorite hoop idols online, while still chowing down on their fave treats on "Extra Rice with Beau Belga." Watch all of these on ABS-CBN Sports' Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and YouTube channel. Also stay tuned for more new offerings from the sports arm of ABS-CBN.  These athletes have proven they are truly winners in and out of the court. While waiting for live sports to return, you can rewatch the best games of these athletes on LIGA (SD channel 86 and HD channel 183 on SKYCable) and game highlights and special features on ABS-CBN Sports' social media pages and official YouTube account. ABS-CBN Sports will continue its commitment to providing a variety of world-class, exciting, and inspiring content to every Pinoy sports fan. Visit sports.abs-cbn.com and follow @ABSCBNSports on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. For updates, you may also visit www.abs-cbn.com/newsroom or follow @ABSCBNPR on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 8th, 2020

ONE champ Joshua Pacio now lives in the Team Lakay gym…literally

For the last couple of months, athletes like reigning ONE Strawweight World Champion Joshua “The Passion” Pacio of Team Lakay have been left with little to no alternative but to work out from home, thanks to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and the quarantines, lockdowns, and restrictions that it brought upon.  Pacio and his Team Lakay teammates have been doing a good job of keeping themselves fit even during home quarantine, but at some point, elite athletes will need to log in some gym time.  While Baguio and Benguet have already transitioned to General Community Quarantine, there remains no word as to when fitness establishments, like Team Lakay’s gym in La Trinidad, will be allowed to open up again.  (READ ALSO: Team Lakay mentor Mark Sangiao looking forward to re-opening gym once lockdown is lifted) Because of this, Pacio has decided to move into the gym for the time being in order to be able to train properly.  “If you’re an athlete you can always train at home but it’s different from the gym,” Pacio shared with ONE Championship. “When I train, I always want to improve by one percent every day. I decided to live in the gym because I know we have athletes there who can work with me.” Joining Pacio in the gym are teammates Jhanlo Sangiao, Edilberto Coquia Jr., Carlo Von Bumina-ang, and Renato Hepolito Jr.  According to Team Lakay head coach Mark Sangiao, former champs Eduard Folayang and Kevin Belingon also drop by the gym, but only when they absolutely need to.  “We have two rooms where we can stay, with beds,” Pacio said. “I’m just lucky to get a pass that’s why I have access to this gym,” said Pacio.  The 24-year old Pacio is on arguably the best stretch of his young career, regaining the ONE Strawweight World Championship against Yosuke Saruta back in mid-2019 and successfully defending it against Rene Catalan and former champion Alex Silva since.  The young champion, who can already be considered the promotion’s best strawweight ever, is always on a mission of self-improvement, and finding a way to get gym time in - even if it means living in it - is a testament to his hard work and dedication.  “Even though I am already at the top, I know that I have a lot of quality opponents waiting for me,” Pacio said. “Even though we’re in this situation, I have to find ways to improve.” Pacio admits that the quarantine took a toll on his fitness, but believes that he can get back on track in no time.  “Now I know I am still far from my desired shape, especially with my weight,” Pacio said. “But if they give me a date, I know I can quickly catch up. I am ready to return any time this year,” he concluded......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2020

ONE Championship: Edward Kelly using quarantine time to get son hooked on martial arts

The COVID-19 pandemic has essentially hit the pause button on most of the world’s sporting events and has led to quarantines and restrictions being placed on almost every country in the world.  With no games or matches and no gyms open, athletes have been able to spend their time at home with their families and loved ones.  For Team Lakay featherweight Edward Kelly, the quarantine has been a time for him to introduce martial arts to his son 4-year old Alexander, something that he was already planning to do so before the pandemic.  (READ ALSO: Team Lakay's Edward Kelly stays sharp with home-made training machines)   “Before the quarantine I was thinking of tagging my son along during training as much as possible so he’s exposed to martial arts this early,” Kelly shared with ONE Championship.  Alexander comes from a family of martial artists, with his dad and uncle Eric being two of the country’s best.  Kelly hopes that his son will also find the same passion and drive for martial arts. “For me and kuya Eric, being involved in martial arts is the best thing that happened to our lives, so as much as possible I will encourage Alexander as well.”  Quarantined at home in Bataan, Edward and Alexander have had all the time in the world to get some training done.  “Especially now since we’re in quarantine and we don’t have anything to do but to train. He will tell me, ‘Let’s train daddy,’ and he joins me when I’m running as well,” Kelly shared. “I’m happy because I can see how he loves what he’s doing and I hope he continues to love it.”         View this post on Instagram                   We are lucky to be near to a basketball court for my cardio training. Alexander likes it also.????. #extendedquarantine #trainingwithson #court #bonding #happytimes #wifevideographer #onechampionship #teamlakay #ferocious2.0 A post shared by edward kelly (@edwardjkelly) on Apr 21, 2020 at 2:18am PDT           View this post on Instagram                   Alexander's turn for home quarantine training.????????????. A post shared by edward kelly (@edwardjkelly) on Apr 5, 2020 at 7:29am PDT           View this post on Instagram                   Modified all coz of quarantine.. Thanks my son for your time and song.????????????. #stayactive #staysafe #hometraining #ferocious2.0 #teamlakay #onechampionship A post shared by edward kelly (@edwardjkelly) on Apr 4, 2020 at 3:40am PDT The Kellys aren’t the only Team Lakay father-and-son tandem that have been working throughout the lockdown, as Team Lakay head coach Mark Sangiao and his son Jhanlo have been able to work together a lot as well. The 16-year old Jhanlo has already competed in the amateurs, and has drawn praise from the likes of ONE Championship Vice President Rich Franklin.  (READ ALSO: Mark Sangiao sees world championship potential in son Jhanlo) Kelly hopes to see his son go that same route as well.  “I hope he follows my footsteps. That’s my dream. I want him to be involved in mixed martial arts, because I’ve been here for the longest time and I can guide him. Just like coach Mark (Sangiao) and his son Jhanlo,” he said.  “I hope he falls in love with it when he grows up. I want to see him compete professionally,” Kelly added.  Alexander still has a lot of learning, training, and growing up to do before he can finally compete as a professional. When that day finally comes however, Daddy Edward knows just where he wants to see his son compete.  “We all know that it’s going to be difficult, but everything can be fixed during training. With what I experienced with ONE, they’re always on top of things, particularly the health of their athletes. That’s why the whole Team Lakay loves ONE,” Kelly said. “Fingers crossed, this is the start for him. What I do now is to tag him along in my training if he wants to. Most times he wants to so I’m hoping it continues,” he added. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 1st, 2020

Pentecost during a pandemic

Metro Manila and most of the country are about to emerge from months of strict lockdown. But are people safe to leave the safety of their homes, reopen their businesses or go to work and face the crowd of people who are certain to flood the streets and workplaces? Will there be a resurgence or worse, a new wave of infections as a result of the easing of restrictions on movement and travel to jumpstart the economy after a prolonged inactivity? Are Filipinos socially responsible enough to live differently moving forward? Is this a question of health/safety considerations as against economy and financial considerations?.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMay 29th, 2020

Life After Lockdown: Work-from-home becomes a norm, but companies must address arising downsides

The advantages of remote work (as we knew it before the lockdown) have been reduced or eliminated altogether by complications arising from the coronavirus pandemic......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 27th, 2020