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Nograles: Safety measures must be in place before select provincial bus routes reopen

Cabinet Secretary Karlo Nograles said there should be proper coordination among local governments to prevent the spread of COVID-19......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarSep 27th, 2020

Return to work safely with DELMIA Quintiq Workforce Planner by Dassault Syst& egrave;mes

The current crisis has completely changed the dynamics of corporate workforce management. The office, traditionally viewed as the place where collaboration and innovation happen, has been changed by necessary health and safety protocols, with distancing measures barring close contacts and work from home arrangements emptying office spaces altogether. As more workplaces start to reopen, however, businesses have to adapt to a new office norm that must take heed of a plethora of evolving rules, including reopening guidelines, safe distancing measures, border controls and travel advisories......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 20th, 2020

Capitol Tourism Officer assures safety of Cebu’s water adventures

CEBU CITY, Philippines — The Cebu Provincial Tourism Office (PTO) has assured the public that safety measures are in place in the different water adventure destinations here in the province. PTO Chief Maria Lester Ybañez said tour guides for water adventures like the Aguiid Falls in Samboan had been trained to also rescue tourists who […] The post Capitol Tourism Officer assures safety of Cebu’s water adventures appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 12th, 2020

Russia reports record virus cases but shuns new restrictions

Russia registered its highest-ever number of new coronavirus infections on Friday after officials warned that tight restrictions could be put back in place if people continued to flout restrictions. New cases in Russia have surged past the record levels seen in May Dimitar DILKOFF AFP/File/ MANILA BULLETIN Restaurants and bars in Moscow were bustling and many residents were ignoring orders to wear masks in public as nationwide infections surged in September, but officials stopped short of imposing new sweeping measures to slow the spread of the virus. European leaders across the continent are scambling to amend virus regulations against the backdrop of a surge in new cases, and even Germany, which was praised for its early handling of the pandemic, has suffered a large increase in new infections. But officials in Russia, which has the world’s fourth-highest caseload after the United States, India and Brazil, have so far dismissed the idea there is a second wave of infections or any need for a new lockdown.   A government tally registered 12,126 new cases on Friday, surpassing the country’s previous record set in May by several hundred cases. “I’m really afraid that things will go back to how they were in the spring, that everyone will be quarantined and we won’t be allowed to go to work,” Vladimir, a teacher in Saint Petersburg who declined to give his last name, told AFP.  – Training dogs to detect virus – As Russia is experiencing a surge in coronavirus cases, the country’s flagship airline Aeroflot is training sniffer dogs to detect the coronavirus by scent. Aeroflot uses a special jackal-dog hybrid called Shalaika in Russian to detect explosives. Now dog handlers say the Shalaikas — who have a powerful sense of smell — can be taught to sniff out the coronavirus. “The dog is not looking for the virus, the dog is looking for a person with signs of the disease,” Elena Batayeva, head of canine monitoring at Aeroflot, told reporters. Russia imposed one of the most severe nationwide lockdowns at the beginning of the pandemic. Non-essential businesses were shuttered and Moscow residents only permitted to move freely with official digital passes. But most restrictions were lifted ahead of a large WWII military parade in June and a nationwide vote on amendments that paved the way for President Vladimir Putin to remain in power until 2036. Officials in Moscow, which is the epicentre of Russia’s pandemic, have taken only minor steps to slow the spread of cases. Mayor Sergei Sobyanin has ordered the elderly and vulnerable to stay at home and told employers to keep at least a third of staff working remotely.  Mask-wearing is compulsory on public transport and inside shops, but some Muscovites are not convinced others are doing enough to stop the spread of infections. “The city is making the necessary decisions. But it won’t work without people responding to these measures, helping themselves and those around them,” Sobyanin said Friday. Tatyana Nemirovskaya, a 30-year-old PR specialist, told AFP that Muscovites are “definitely not” following the government’s guidelines. The head of Russia’s consumer rights watchdog, Rospotrebnadzor, which is spearheading the country’s virus response, warned this week of “new measures” if the current rules were not followed. The Kremlin said Friday that if the situation continues to deteriorate it will “require some actions, decisions”. – ‘Without masks, having fun’ – But Putin’s spokesman Dmitry Peskov placed the blame on Russians for the surging caseload, saying it was clear that “many people don’t think it is necessary to take care of providing the safety of their health.”  Standing next to a memorial to medics who have died during the pandemic in Saint Petersburg, Stella, a resident of Russia’s second city, said people had dropped their guard after mass restrictions were lifted. “The rules were slightly eased and people calmly walked around without masks, having fun and everything began again,” she said. Russia announced in August it had registered the world’s first coronavirus vaccine, named Sputnik V after the Soviet-era satellite and a number of officials have said they volunteered for inoculation, including Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu.  Putin this week said “around 50 people” in his inner circle, including staff and family, had been vaccinated. Russia has recorded a total of 22,257 fatalities from the virus, a much lower figure compared to other badly-hit countries. Kremlin critics have suggested the authorities have downplayed the death rate to hide the severity of the outbreak......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 9th, 2020

On World Teachers’ Day, groups call for higher education budget

It is the Duterte administration's responsibility to provide these basic demands for enough learning modules per student, available gadgets and laptops for both student and teachers for online classes, adequate health measures are in place to ensure health safety for both teacher and student, and sufficient teaching expenses allowances for our teachers in this new normal for education." The post On World Teachers’ Day, groups call for higher education budget appeared first on Bulatlat......»»

Category: newsSource:  bulatlatRelated NewsOct 6th, 2020

UN expert: Pandemic’s worst impacts on poverty yet to come

GENEVA — The United Nations independent expert on poverty is warning that the worst impacts from the coronavirus pandemic on poverty are yet to come, and that measures taken by governments to protect people so far have been insufficient. “The social safety nets put into place are full of holes,” said Olivier De Schutter, a […] The post UN expert: Pandemic’s worst impacts on poverty yet to come appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 11th, 2020

PAL among top 10 safest airlines vs COVID-19

Flag carrier Philippine Airlines has been named as one of the top 10 safest airlines in terms of health and safety measures in place as travelers around the world grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 29th, 2020

PAL among top 10 safest airlines vs COVID-19

Flag carrier Philippine Airlines has been named as one of the top 10 safest airlines in terms of health and safety measures in place as travelers around the world grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 28th, 2020

GCash assures users of safety measures vs cybercriminals

Mobile wallet GCash assured its users that different security measures have been put in place to protect them from fraud and cybercriminals......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2020

Eagle Ridge, other top golf country clubs reopen

Eagle Ridge Golf and Country Club, which has kept its well-maintained sprawling complex in Cavite COVID-19-free during and after the first lockdown last May, reopens Wednesday with the same guidelines on health and safety protocols in place......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 19th, 2020

What’s in style? Safe shopping.

Rustan’s goes all out with safety measures, including the latest in disinfection and sanitation. THANK YOU FOR SMOKING. Rustan’s utilizes Spanish technology Sanivir, which contains active ingredients proven to kill bacteria, molds, and coronavirus These extraordinary times have completely shifted the definition of so many ordinary words. Take, for example, “weekends.” What does a weekend even mean, when everyone is living their weekends day in, day out? People cooped up inside their homes, Netflix and chilling (or pacing, depending on current anxiety levels), wearing their Natori Fortuna Mandarin all day, as governments all over the world caution to shelter in place.  Or “homecooked.” Everything’s veritably homecooked now—whether it’s cooked in your home, by you, or cooked in somebody else’s home, by an upstart baker you support because she’s your niece, or by your favorite chef, who is left with no choice but to create his oeuvres from his home kitchen.  Or “luxury.” Let’s be honest. Luxury—its BC (before Covid) definition—contained overused keywords like glamour, opulence, indulgence, lavishness. But times, they’ve changed.  Fancy things now seem so unnecessary, so excessive, so out of touch, so…pointless—in a world that has hastily pivoted back to the basics. Sipping tea from a Royal Albert 1980 Roseblush cup doesn’t seem as luxurious as being able to score some actual, hard-to-acquire Gold Yen Zhen tea from TWG, even if you have to gulp it from those ubiquitous bamboo cups.  The pandemic has changed what luxury meant. Now, luxury is the feeling of being safely ensconced in our cocoons, safe from the virus, safe from the madding crowds. Safety is luxury. To be more accurate: Luxury is being safe, while experiencing as few inconveniences as possible. One Home, One HopeMarketers and entrepreneurs are now realizing, after putting in all necessary work to convince their clients to come back, that a sense of safety is beyond physical, it is psychological. It’s Plexiglass with perception, masks coupled with marketing.  Brands, to successfully ride out these challenging times, need to do more than just tick off government checklists—they need to bank on their legacies, their ethos, their abiding sense of connection to loyal clientele.  AT YOUR SERVICE. Rustan’s opened up a Sanivir desk to allow its customers to avail of its method In the travel industry, as it is in the retail industry, it’s about leveraging on your loyal clientele’s sense of home. “Home” is no longer just their place of residence, but their familiar zones. It’s about “feeling at home.” As people start to nervously and grudgingly go out, they will only want to stay and explore sacred spaces where they’ve “felt at home.” Luxury retailer Rustan’s understands this well. “Our goal for the past 70 years has always been to serve the community with great service and to provide a safe environment that feels like home,” Nedy Tantoco, chairman of Rustan Commercial Corporation, says. “In this new chapter, we are committed to the idea of ‘One Home, One Hope.’ As an establishment that has been a second home for many shoppers, we will stay dedicated in implementing thorough safety protocols to ensure that our employees and shoppers are protected and can visit us with ease of mind.” And this is why higher-end businesses like Rustan’s will flourish, despite the financial challenges Covid-19 brings. They have the space, and they obviously can very well afford to put stringent safety measures in place. Precise precautions are in their DNA. These are establishments that cater to the VVIPs, whose exacting standards they’ve always tried to meet.  And it’s not just loyal clients who will seek out these private spaces—the occasional and habitual shopper will gravitate toward businesses that offer them this hushed environment. Going inside cramped little boutiques have lost their novelty, and many will shirk away from places that tend to be crowd favorites.  At Rustan’s, shoppers have always counted on the intimacy of the shopping experience. Unobtrusive but alert sales personnel have always kept their distance as you scan the racks, and there’s always a sense of quiet order—a serene retail floor space, backed by an efficient team who anticipate your needs and who move with the fluidity of a well-directed orchestra.  This efficiency will be in full display when you visit the store again—that is if you still haven’t since it reopened in June.   Opened after three months of closure, the luxury retailer has implemented, in compliance with government regulations, security measures like foot baths, thermal scans, hand sanitation, and mandatory wearing of masks. You’ll also see staff repeatedly disinfecting touchpoints like escalator rails and elevator buttons, and alcohol dispensers are going to be ubiquitous.   RETAIL WONDER. Sanivir is perfect for retail spac-es as smoke is dry and won’t stick to clothing Managers, sales associates, security personnel, and cleaners are all wearing masks, face shields, and goggles. But it’s the little touches that will remind you how they’ve set the bar high—sanitation boxes are placed in fitting rooms for clothes that are not purchased, fitting rooms are sanitized after every use, and store personnel are required to steam the clothes before putting them back on display.  At the payment counter, all credit cards will be sanitized, and packages will be disinfected before being handed to the customer. At the store’s East Café, tables are separated with plastic shields, and so are the wash basins in the restrooms, which will each have a sanitary officer, whose only job is it to disinfect the toilet after every use.  And that’s just the stage. Backstage, it’s just as—if not more—exacting. Introducing Sanivir, the latest in disinfection technology “Even in our employees’ canteens we have placed plastic shields to protect each of our employees while they are having their lunch break,” Nedy says. The company has required all returning employees to be tested for Covid-19.  Rustan’s is also continually disinfected using Sanivir, a technology introduced in the Philippines by chemist Pinky Tobiano of KPP Powers Commodities, who is also CEO of Qualibet Testing Services. “Sanivir is a smoke disinfectant from Spain, which contains glutaraldehyde and orthopenyl phenol—two active ingredients have been tested that can kill bacteria, molds, and viruses that have been proven against coronavirus by laboratories in EU.” PINKY’S PROMISE. Pinky Pe Tobiano, the chemistwho brought the technology to the Philippines “It was great timing and serendipitous that we found the product right before the pandemic escalated to the level it is now,” Pinky tells Manila Bulletin Lifestyle. “Sanivir was both an innovative and unique product that addresses the problem we currently have—it is easy to use, cost-friendly, effective, and safe.” It is a perfect disinfectant for a retail space—it only utilizes smoke, is dry, and won’t stick to clothing. “When Pinky introduced to me her disinfection program, I immediately asked her to do my father’s house and my own house,” Nedy shares. “I was so satisfied with the service that I asked her if she could open a service desk at Rustan’s to allow our customers the chance to avail of this disinfecting method. It’s so easy. Any housewife can do it. It allows us the ease of disinfecting without a fuss. It also works for our cars. The service desk has been open for two weeks at Rustan’s Ayala Avenue. And I am happy to say that it has met full acceptance with quite a number of Rustan’s customers.” Its ease of use is an advantage. “Just open the can, remove the plastic cover of the wick, set on a flat surface, light the wick, and leave for the next six to eight hours. The smoking process lasts for only one to two minutes, then disinfection takes place for the next six to eight hours,” Pinky says. “That’s good for 14 days.” And the cost? Surprisingly very minimal.  “One can of Sanivir of 25 grams is P1,750 and it’s good for 14 days for a room of 30 to 50 square meters,” Pinky says. “The cost per day is only a P125 investment. If you have five people in the room, the investment per person per day is only P25.”    But for those who are not in the mood to shop in-store, Rustan’s online service has amped up its service. Apart from its website, fortuitously launched a year ago, you can also tap the Personal Shoppers on Call Service, where sales associates respond to you on Viber, after which you can have your items delivered to you, or picked up by the curbside. Nedy shares, “And very soon, we will launch our Rustan’s Concierge Service, where customers can call a single number, and will be immediately assigned a personal shopper to attend to their needs.”  Now, many ways words and concepts are redefined in these troubled times—but having your own personal shopper, one who’ll do your shopping for you as you leisurely read the latest Kevin Kwan Sex and Vanity book in the comfort of your home?  We’re guessing that that’s a definition of luxury that won’t likely ever change—unprecedented crisis or not.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2020

DFA temporarily closes Roxas Boulevard office to assess health, safety measures

In a statement released Monday night, the DFA said the temporary closure is part of its "assessment of public health and safety measures currently in place," and that it would make another announcement, after the assessment, in 48 hours......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 28th, 2020

Fan experience to change profoundly amid COVID-19 pandemic

By DAVE SKRETTA AP Sports Writer KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Dayton Moore remembers so clearly the vast sections of empty seats inside Kauffman Stadium when he took over as general manager of the Kansas City Royals, and he remembers just as vividly — nearly a decade later — how those seats filled and fans roared as the long-suffering club won the World Series. Those dueling memories make the thought of playing games in empty stadiums hard for Moore to fathom. “I know how much strength all players draw from the fans and environment,” he said, when asked about plans to play a shortened season without crowds, “and you need that support to get through an entire Major League Baseball schedule.” As lockdowns are lifted and restrictions eased, sports are finally starting to emerge in the coronavirus pandemic. But in virtually every situation, fans are not yet being allowed to attend and the only consensus for now is that there could be a long period of empty or nearly empty seating. Some U.S. universities are modeling for 25% capacity for the upcoming football season or maybe half-full arenas for the ensuing basketball season. “I think for most sports, a reduced crowd wouldn't negatively impact the overall experience, especially in a situation like baseball or even the NFL,” said Katy Lucy, a digital marketing agent from Atlanta whose fandom is split between all things Georgia Bulldogs and the Washington Capitals. “But it would be different for sure for those who attend in person." Count her family among those who would pause before heading to the ballpark. “For me personally, I’m not sure I would feel comfortable attending a live sporting event until there is a known treatment or widely available vaccine,” Lucy said. “I trust the institutions to put the proper measures in place; however, making sure that they are enforced is another matter.” Many college and pro sports teams already were dealing with declining ticket sales. Watching at home or streaming games are factors, as is the changing social makeup of fan bases. Dynamic pricing, increases in parking and concession prices, and a push toward luxury seating have exacerbated the problem. Major League Baseball attendance has declined six of the past seven seasons. In college football, 13 of the 130 schools that played in the Football Bowl Subdivision reported average crowd sizes of 50% or less last season. Even the NFL has seen an increase in empty seats despite its generally rock-solid popularity. So as coronavirus concerns linger, how are teams going to lure fans back when stadiums do reopen? Loyalty and engagement apps, widespread around the major leagues and colleges even before the pandemic, will become even more common and interactive as teams try to recapture lost revenue. There also will be more behind-the-scenes content and enhancements available via smartphones that will only be available to those in the stadium or arena, offering fans something unique over fans watching at home. “Fans want that experience to be top-notch, period. That's why teams are thinking about this,” said Britton Stackhouse Miller, senior vice president at Fortress U.S., a developer of engagement and integration systems with clients in European soccer, baseball, the NBA, NFL and NHL. Temperature checks, hand sanitizer distribution stations and touchless vending will become the norm for a while. Even concessions will change, though one big difference — gulp — could lead to a lot of grumbling. “If you don't sell beer the number of visits to the bathroom drops dramatically,” said Marc Ganis, the director of sports consulting firm Sportscorp. “So for a time we may have to think about not selling beer.” It won't just be the vast oceans of bench seats left open, either. Many experts believe those hardy fans will be the first to return. It's the corporate suites from which many colleges and pro franchises derive so much of their gameday revenue that may end up being empty until long after games have resumed. Economic woes may last for some time. For fans who stay home, leagues are looking for ways to keep them engaged, too. When Germany's top soccer league returned without fans, broadcaster Sky knew it had a problem with silence coming through the TV. Engineers created “carpet audio” from previous games between the same teams, then teased out roars for specific events such as goals and red cards, giving those watching at home the option of a more realistic experience. “This was the only idea that we thought could be most respectful to the fans,” said Alessandro Reitano, vice president of sports production for Sky Deutschland. “To be honest, it's a major success.” Old crowd noise is a bit like an old game, though. It lacks a certain authenticity. So along came ChampTrack, which created an app that utilizes the microphones of fans. It captures their every roar and groan and sends the audio to its server, which then aggregates the noise into a single stream. That stream is then returned to the viewer using proprietary algorithms to provide the broadcast with real-time sound, which is then immediately erased to ensure personal privacy. “Once they press play on our web app, they can hear what everyone else is cheering about and their own cheer,” said ChampTrack chief executive Elias Anderson, adding the system could soon handle as many as 150,000 fans for each game. Sound is one element of the fan experience. Optics is another. “When it was clear there would be no audience this season, the fans had the idea of bringing their images to the stadium,” said Lubbo Popken, deputy press secretary for German soccer club Borussia Monchengladbach, which affixed fan likenesses to their seats. “We were surprised how many people wanted to be part of this idea and have their images in the stadium. It really changed the atmosphere in the empty stadium.” Of course, none of that is the same as having real fans creating real noise......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 8th, 2020

Cebu Airport Ready to Resume Operations with Enhanced Protocols

The Mactan-Cebu International Airport (MCIA) is ready to resume operations as safety measures for passengers and returning overseas Filipino workers and seafarers are in place at Terminals 1 and 2. Andrew Harrison, GMR Megawide Cebu Airport Corporation (GMCAC) chief executive advisor, on Monday said the Mactan-Cebu International Airport Authority (MCIAA) and the private management have […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2020

Virus-proofing sports facilities presents a big challenge

By DAVE CAMPBELL AP Sports Writer MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The jersey-wearing camaraderie. The scent of sizzling sausages. The buzz before a big game. The distinctive atmosphere of live sports, that feeling in the air, will return in time as pandemic restrictions are eased. But will that very air be safe in a closed arena with other fans in attendance? The billions of dollars spent on state-of-the-art sports facilities over the last quarter-century have made high-efficiency air filtration systems more common, thanks in part to the pursuit of green and healthy building certifications. Upgrades will likely increase in the post-coronavirus era, too. The problem is that even the cleanest of air can’t keep this particular virus from spreading; if someone coughs or sneezes, those droplets are in the air. That means outdoor ballparks have high contaminant potential, too. “Most of the real risk is going to be short-distance transmission, people sitting within two, three or four seats of each other,” said Ryan Demmer, an epidemiologist at the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health. “It’s not really about the virus spreading up, getting into the ventilation system and then getting blown out to the entire stadium because this virus doesn’t seem to transmit that way. It doesn’t aerosolize that well.” The three hours spent in proximity to thousands of others is part of the fan experience. It's also why major sports leagues have been discussing plans to reopen in empty venues, for now. High-touch areas with the potential to spread the virus — called fomite transmission — are plentiful at the ballgame, of course. Door handles. Stair rails. Restroom fixtures. Concession stands. Hand washing by now has become a societal norm, but disinfectant arsenals need to be brought up to speed, too. “I can’t really find good hand sanitizer easily in stores. So think about trying to scale that up, so everybody who comes into U.S. Bank Stadium gets a little bottle of Purel. Things like that can be modestly helpful,” Demmer said. There is much work to be done. Vigilant sanitizing of the frequent-touch surfaces will be a must. Ramped-up rapid testing capability during pre-entry screening could become common for fans. Minimizing concourse and entry bottlenecks, and maintaining space between non-familial attendees, could be mandatory. Mask-wearing requirements? Maybe. Most experts, including those at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, believe the primary mode of transmission for COVID-19 is close person-to-person contact through breathing, coughing or sneezing but there's no consensus on some of the details. “There’s still widespread disagreement between experts on which mode of transmission dominates for influenza. So the likelihood of us figuring this out soon for this virus is low,” said Joe Allen, director of the Healthy Buildings Program and an assistant professor at Harvard’s School of Public Health. “We may never figure it out, but I also think it’s irrelevant because it’s a pandemic and we should be guarding against all of them.” Including, of course, the air. The American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers designed the Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) scale to measure a filtration system's effectiveness (from 1-16) at capturing microscopic airborne particles that can make people sick. Not just viruses, but dust, pollen, mold and bacteria. Most experts recommend a MERV rating of 13 or higher, the minimum standard for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification. An emerging technology in this area is called bipolar ionization. Connecticut-based AtmosAir has a bipolar ionization air treatment system in about 40 sports venues. Staples Center in Los Angeles was one of the first major sports customers. TD Garden in Boston and Bridgestone Arena in Nashville are among the others who’ve signed on. The Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority approved last year a 10-year contract for a little more than $1 million with AtmosAir to install its system in U.S. Bank Stadium, home of the Vikings and the first indoor NFL stadium to use it. The building, which measures 1.8 million square feet, has 53 air handling units with AtmosAir tubes installed, including 30 in the seating bowl. The ions act like fresh air, reducing the amount of outside air needed to be introduced for the cleansing process. The protein spikes in the coronavirus particles make them easier to catch and kill, said Philip Tierno, a New York University School of Medicine professor of microbiology and pathology. Said AtmosAir founder and CEO Steve Levine: “We’re never going to create a mountaintop, but we’re going to put in maybe three to four times the ions over the ambient air and then let those ions attack different pollutants in the air. The ions grab onto particles and spores and make them bigger and heavier, so they’re much easier to filter out of the air." The next time fans do pass through the turnstiles, in a few weeks or a few months, in most cases they will probably encounter an unprecedented level of cleanliness. “There will be some controls that are visible, extra cleaning and disinfection, but some of it will be invisible, like for what’s happening in the air handling system,” said Allen, the Harvard professor. “The consumers will decide when they feel comfortable going back, and that’s going to depend on what strategies are put in place in these venues and stadiums and arenas and, most importantly, how well these organizations communicate that to the paying public.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 1st, 2020

CDN POLL: Netizens favor lifting of ECQ in Cebu City

MOALBOAL, Cebu —Several Cebu netizens agreed to already migrate Cebu City’s status from Enhanced Community Quarantine to General Community Quarantine starting on June 1. However, they wanted safety measures like the wearing of facemasks or face shields and the need to implement social distancing still in place. “Downgrade it but [the] wearing of facemasks and […] The post CDN POLL: Netizens favor lifting of ECQ in Cebu City appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 27th, 2020

Greenhills shopping center to reopen next month

Greenhills shopping center in San Juan is set to reopen next month with safety protocols in place to prevent the spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 or COVID-19, the city government announced over the weekend......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 24th, 2020

Megaworld Lifestyle Malls to Reopen with More Stringent Safety Measures

Megaworld Lifestyle Malls is reopening its lifestyle malls and commercial centers with more stringent safety measures to ensure a ‘Safer and Happier’ experience for all its guests and to protect retail partners, store personnel and employees against COVID – 19. Heightened safety measures including the strict implementation of social distancing, mandatory thermal checks, compulsory wearing […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsMay 18th, 2020

Mactan Cebu Airport adopts DOTR guidelines for ‘new normal’

CEBU CITY, Philippines – The Mactan-Cebu International Airport (MCIA) has started to put in place measures to prepare for the “new normal” even before they could resume operations. “The Mactan-Cebu International Airport (MCIA), the country’s friendliest resort-airport, is ramping up preparations for the “new normal” to ensure that preventive health and safety measures for both […] The post Mactan Cebu Airport adopts DOTR guidelines for ‘new normal’ appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 9th, 2020

Stringent measures in place: ASPAP

The Accredited Service Providers of PAGCOR (ASPAP) assured the public that it will be observing all protocols established under the enhanced community quarantine (ECQ) and that the safety of everyone is a top priority......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMay 8th, 2020

New golf measures deny Spieth an ace

Los Angeles--Jordan Spieth’s return to tournament golf on Thursday was underscored by the three-time major winner falling victim to new safety measures put in place because of the coronavirus pandemic......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMay 2nd, 2020