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Missing village chief’s body recovered

Authorities yesterday recovered the body of a barangay captain who drowned during the onslaught of Typhoon Ambo in Cauayan City, Isabela......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarMay 19th, 2020

Body of missing Badian tour guide found

CEBU CITY, Philippines –Divers recovered at around noontime on Friday, October 9, the body of a tour guide from Badian town who was reported missing on Thursday after he went spearfishing in Barangay Sta. Filomena in the neighboring Alegria town. Police Executive Master Sergeant Joel Caballero, officer-in-charge of Alegria Police Station, said that the body […] The post Body of missing Badian tour guide found appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 9th, 2020

Cardona to lock down village with 21 confirmed virus cases starting August 3

CARDONA, Rizal – The municipal government of Cardona has issued an executive order imposing “a localized lockdown  of Rosario Street and other identified households in Barangay Del Remedio, Cardona, Rizal subject to the concurrence of Regional IATF IV-A.” EO 19 issued by Mayor Teodulo C. Campo provides that entry and exit to Rosario Street and other identified households “will be prohibited for the duration of the lockdown, except for the gravest reasons as may be determined by the local chief executive.” The lockdown will start at 1 a.m. of August 3 until 12 midnight of August 16.  Although the lockdown is for the duration of 14 days, it can be shortened “should data indicate that it is safe to do so.” The local government sanitation personnel have conducted decontamination procedures in Barangay Del Remedio and the villages of San Roque, Dalig, Looc, Iglesia, Calahan and Patunhay. As of August 1, there are 35 active confirmed cases in the municipality, with 13 cases coming from Barangay Del Remedio alone. There are 58 confirmed COVID-19 cases in the town including 21 cases from Barangay Del Remedio. Twenty-two persons have so far recovered, including seven persons from Barangay Del Remedio. Ten of the 18 villages in this lakeshore town, including six villages in Talim Island and four villages in the mainland, remain COVID-19 free as of August 1. Fishing and farming are among the primary sources of livelihood of residents here......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2020

Finau, Palmer share lead at Memorial as Tiger hangs on

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer DUBLIN, Ohio (AP) — Tony Finau figured he was on the right track when he shot 59 at Victory Ranch last week in Utah. That kind of score isn't happening at Muirfield Village, where the greens are getting firmer by the hour. Finau still took enough confidence from playing with his kids at home during a week off, and it translated into 14 birdies over two days and a share of the 36-hole lead at the Memorial. Finau recovered from two bogeys after three holes of his second round Friday, making birdie on the rest of the par 5s and finishing with a wedge to 2 feet for birdie and a 3-under 69. That put him at 9-under 135 with Ryan Palmer (68), who had only one bogey over two rounds. The way Muirfield Village is playing, both are impressive. They were a shot in front of Jon Rahm (67), who has another chance to reach No. 1 in the world this week for the first time in his career. U.S. Open champion Gary Woodland had a 70 and was two behind. For Tiger Woods, it was a matter of making it to the weekend. Woods said his back felt stiff while warming up, and missing a pair of 3-footers didn't make him feel any better. He managed two birdies and a 7-foot par save on his final three holes for a 76 that allowed him to make the cut on the number at 3-over 147, matching his highest 36-hole score at the Memorial. “Not very good,” Woods said. “I three-putted two holes early, and whatever kind of momentum I was going to create, I stifled that early and fought it the rest of the day.” Finau elected to stay home last week instead of playing Muirfield Village twice in a row. He won't compare Victory Ranch with Muirfield Village, though it inspired him. He was 14-under par through 16 holes until making a bogey on the 17th hole and settling for his second sub-60 round away from the PGA Tour. “I don't know how many times I've been 14 under through 16 holes on a good golf course,” Finau said. “But it told me I was in good form and just told me how good I am at scoring. So I think I definitely carried some of that right into this week, and that confidence I think is pretty cool.” The cut of 147 matched the highest of the season — it also was 147 at Bay Hill. Among those going home was Bryson DeChambeau, who was in reasonable shape until hitting his tee shot into a hazard on the 15th, taking a penalty drop, hitting the next two out-of-bounds and making 10. It was his highest score on a hole in his career. DeChambeau came into the Memorial having finished in the top 10 in seven straight tournaments, and having 19 consecutive rounds at par or better. He left with rounds of 73-76, and without comment. Dustin Johnson shot 80-80 for the highest 36-hole score of his PGA Tour career Collin Morikawa, who won at Muirfield Village last week in a playoff over Justin Thomas, recovered from a 76 with a 70 to make the cut with one shot to spare. Thomas had a 67 and was six shots behind. The way Muirfield Village began to look Friday, the weekend at the Memorial might be more about hanging on than going low. The course is replacing all the greens after this week, so officials are letting them go. It doesn’t matter if they’re so fast the grass dies because they’re being ripped up, anyway. Brooks Koepka appeared to hit a solid bunker shot from right of the 16th green until it rolled out a few feet past the hole, and then a few more feet until it was off the green and resting against the collar of rough. That wasn't his biggest problem. Koepka dumped a shot in the water on his final hole at No. 9 and made double bogey for a 75. That put him at 3-over 147, same as Woods. Rory McIlroy shot 72, which goes in the book as a round of even par. It was anything but that. He hit into the creek and muffed a chip for a double bogey on the par-5 11th. He smoked a fairway metal to 8 feet for eagle on the par-5 fifth. He hit wedge to 10 feet for a pair of birdies. He chunked a wedge into a bunker and made bogey. He was at 2-under 142. “I don't know what it was,” he said. “It was a few birdies and an eagle thrown in there and a few mistakes. There's some good in there, some mediocre and there was some pretty poor shots. But I battled back well.” Palmer played the Workday Charity Open last week at Muirfield Village and missed the cut. Instead of staying in Ohio, he went home to Texas to work with swing coach Randy Smith, and he found a fix to whatever was holding him back. “One little, small flaw in my back swing,” Palmer said. He also did some work on the greens with Steve Stricker, and Palmer feels good enough about his chances on the weekend. Stricker didn't do too badly, either. The 53-year-old Ryder Cup captain had a 67 and was at 4-under 140, along with Jim Furyk, who turned 50 two months ago and shot 68......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 18th, 2020

Big finish for Woods gets him to the weekend at Memorial

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer DUBLIN, Ohio (AP) — Five months without competition, and Tiger Woods was grinding over key shots and big putts Friday at the Memorial. None was bigger than a 7-foot par putt on his final hole. It kept him from going home. Woods missed a pair of 3-foot putts early that shut down any momentum, twice missed the green with awkward chip shots in deep rough and had to finish birdie-birdie-par for a 4-over 76. It was just enough to make the cut on the number at 3-over 147, his highest 36-hole score at Muirfield Village since his Memorial debut in 1997. The Memorial, the Masters and the Arnold Palmer Invitational are the only tournaments he has played at least 15 times without failing to make the cut. Woods said his back felt a little stiff while warming up and he couldn't move through his swing like he would have liked. He said it was a struggle on a warm, calm morning at Muirfield Village. But when asked if it was enough to keep him from playing the rest of the week, Woods replied, “I would like to have the opportunity to play tomorrow.” Woods was outside the cut when he finished, and he was helped by a pair of fellow Californians. Max Homa finished with two bogeys, and Bryson DeChambeau made a 10 on the par-5 15th hole, moving the cut to 3 over. Ryan Palmer (68) and Tony Finau (69) managed just fine and were tied for the lead, leaving Woods 12 shots behind going into the weekend. The finish at least gave him a chance. Woods had to lay up from deep rough short of the water on the sixth hole — he started on the back nine — and missed a par putt just outside 5 feet to fall to 6 over for his round. He looked to be done. He wasn't moving well, the look of someone who would be heading home shortly. But he found the fairway on the par-5 seventh and made birdie from a greenside bunker. Then, he rolled in 20-foot putt for birdie on the par-3 eighth. He found more trouble on the ninth, sending his tee shot to the right, in rough and blocked by trees, leaving his only option to chip out to the fairway. From there, his wedge spun back to 7 feet below the hole and he made that par for to have hope. “I finished birdie-birdie-par,” he said. “That's about the only positive to it today.” He wasn't sure what to make about his back, which has undergone four surgeries, the last one to fuse his lower spine. He has recovered well enough to win three more times, including the Masters last year for his 15th major. Woods last played Feb. 16 in the cold at Riviera, where he finished last in the Genesis Invitational with a 76-77 weekend. He attributed stiffness that week to the cold. As for Ohio in July? Woods said he felt fine when he woke up, not so much while going through his practice sessions. “It wasn't quite as good as I'd like, and it it what it is,” he said, adding later, “It's going to happen more times than not.” What really irritated him was his putting. He three-putted from about 35 feet on the par-5 11th, missing a 3-footer for birdie. Two holes later, after a superb play from the rough to right side of the green, he rolled a fast putt to 3 feet and missed that par putt. And then when he chopped up the par-5 15th for bogey, the rest of the day became a battle. From a fairway bunker right of the 17th fairway, he sent his shot high on the hill into rough so deep it took him a few minutes to find it. With the greens so brittle, he hit that through the putting surface into more rough, and he had to make an 8-foot putt to escape with bogey. Making the turn, Woods had an awkward lie with his ball in the collar of a bunker. He caught all ball and sent that long, through the green and into a bunker, failed to get up-and-down and took double bogey. His next shot sailed to the right toward a hazard, and Woods simply hung his head. He still managed to have enough left at the end to give him a chance. Woods is a five-time winner of the Memorial, and his next victory would set the PGA Tour career record of 83. Also looming is the first major of the year at the PGA Championship in three weeks. For a 44-year-old who won the first of his 82 tour titles at age 20, time isn't on his side. “Aging is not fun,” he said. “Early on in my career, I thought it was fantastic because I was getting better and better and better. And now I'm just trying to hold on.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 18th, 2020

Missing girl, 14, found dead in sugarcane farm

BACOLOD CITY – Laborers found last Monday a decomposing body of a Grade 8 student, who was reported missing for five days, in a sugarcane plantation in Barangay Binubuhan, Bago City, Negros Occidental. Maj. John Joel Batusbatusan, city police chief, withheld the name of the 14-year-old victim, who was half-naked when found. Police believed she […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsJan 7th, 2020

Federer says a star s legacy isn t at risk with late decline

By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Roger Federer arrives for his interview at the precise appointed time, steering his white sedan into a parking spot in an industrial area dotted by art galleries about 15 minutes from his luxury apartment in this home-away-from-home. After obliging a selfie request from someone on the street, Federer makes his way up to a second-story loft area and sits. He crosses his legs, kneads his right calf and winces. “Just started training. I'm surprised I could walk the stairs as good as I have,” Federer says with a laugh. “My calves are, like, killing me. Just getting back into it. The shock on the body is, I don't want to say 'immense,' every time, but I've been on vacation for two weeks. The shock just hits you hard.” Ah, the ravages of age. Federer, who won the first of his men's-record 20 Grand Slam titles when he was 21 and now is 38, explains to The Associated Press that he must “go back to the drawing board” after “just missing out on The Big One,” a reference to his fifth-set tiebreaker loss to Novak Djokovic in the Wimbledon final in July. So all of just two days into Federer's preparation for next season -- he flies to Melbourne on Jan. 9, a week before the Australian Open draw -- he is taking a 48-hour break, sitting out his two-a-day fitness sessions and not lifting a racket. No one this old has won a Grand Slam title in the professional era. As a younger man, Federer says, he didn't allow himself such a respite, working six or eight days in a row to get going. But now? The “waves,” he calls them, making an undulating motion with his famous right arm -- time on, then time off -- offer his body a chance to recover. They also let him “go through the wall” on the day before a rest period, because “otherwise, you maybe would hold back just ever so slightly, because you just don't know how you're going to feel the next day.” Federer recognizes that continuing to play tennis at a high level long past the age when many greats of the past were done (his idol, Pete Sampras, competed for the final time at 31) means he repeatedly faces questions -- from fans, from the media, from those around him -- about how long he will continue on tour. And while he can't provide a definitive answer -- because, quite simply, he says he doesn't have one -- Federer is willing to discuss this aspect of the subject: He does not consider it important to walk away at the top of his game and the top of his sport. When he's told about a newspaper opinion piece from way back in 2013 -- 2013! -- that posited he should quit then to avoid ruining his legacy, Federer just smiles and waves his hand. He knows, of course, that he's managed to reach another seven Grand Slam finals since the start of 2014, winning three. But he also says the notion that an older athlete could harm his or her status by hanging around too long is nonsense, no matter what the decline looks like. “I don't think the exit needs to be that perfect, that you have to win something huge ... and you go, 'OK. I did it all.' It can be completed a different way, as long as you enjoy it and that's what matters to you," Federer says. “People, I don't think, anyway, remember what were the last matches of a John McEnroe, what were the last matches of a Stefan Edberg. Nobody knows. They remember that they won Wimbledon, that they won this and that, they were world No. 1. I don't think the end, per se, is that important.” That doesn't mean, of course, that he isn't as competitive as ever or doesn't want to win a 21st major championship -- above all, No. 9 at Wimbledon, after it slipped away despite two match points in 2019 -- or his first Olympic singles gold at the Tokyo Games next year. Or win any tournaments, for that matter, which would push him closer to Jimmy Connors' professional era record of 109 trophies (Federer has 103). He's still good enough, after all, to be ranked No. 3 — having spent a record 310 weeks at No. 1, he is currently behind No. 1 Rafael Nadal and No. 2 Djokovic — and to go 53-10 with four titles this season. If it seems as though the rest of the world is insisting it needs to know when and how retirement will arrive, Federer says it's not something on which he expends a lot of energy. Not anymore, anyway. “I mean, I don't think about it much, to be honest,” Federer says. “It's a bit different (now) that I know I'm at the back end of my career. But I feel like I've been toward 'the back end of my career' for a long, long time.” So much so that when he got sick while on a skiing trip in January 2008 with what eventually was diagnosed as mononucleosis, he vowed to stay off the slopes, a decision he stuck to, although not without some regret. His children -- twin daughters, 10, and twin sons, 5 -- all ski, and he and his wife, Mirka, have a home in a resort in his native Switzerland. Yet Federer sticks to his role as “the chief 'getting the kids ski-ready' operator guy.” “I was like, 'OK, you know what? That's a sign. I'm going to stop skiing, because I don't want to get hurt at the back end of my career. Maybe I have another four good years left in me. This was (12) years ago now. So it shows you how long ago I've been thinking: 'Maybe I have another four years. Maybe I have another three years. Maybe I have another two years.' ... I've been on this sort of train for long enough for me not to actually think about it a whole lot,” he says. “But sure, sometimes with family planning, discussions with my wife, we talk a little bit sometimes. But never like, 'What if?' Or, 'What are we going to do?' Because I always think, like, we have time for that and then we'll figure it out when that moment comes." Even his agent, Tony Godsick, who has represented Federer since 2005, raises the topic. “It would help make my job easier,” Godsick says in a telephone interview. “I don't want to know for my own personal travel. Or I don't want to know to have the scoop before anyone else. I want to know so I can plan. ... I mean, he won't go on a retirement tour, but I'd like to have some advance notice, maybe throw some more cameras around when he's out playing, so we can capture some more footage.” Godsick pauses, then spaces out the next five words for emphasis: “But. He. Really. Doesn't. Know.” “I really do think he has the flexibility to actually not decide ... until he feels like it's the time. And that will come when Mirka says, 'I can't do it anymore,' and 'I can't be on the road with the kids,' and 'The kids are not enjoying it.' Or his body might say, ‘Hey, Rog, stop pushing me so hard,'” Godsick says. “Maybe it's a time when he realizes on the practice court he doesn't either have the motivation or the ability to get better. And at that point, then maybe he says, 'I certainly have squeezed all the juice out of this lemon in terms of innovating and getting better.' And I don't think that time is there yet. Which is good news.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 19th, 2019

Joke as playing captain turns into reality for Tiger

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press NASSAU, Bahamas (AP) — Tiger Woods meant it as a joke. And it was accompanied by laughter. Woods was introduced as U.S. captain for the Presidents Cup in Australia on March 13, 2018, and the first question was whether he considered being a playing captain. "Yes, I have," Woods said. The laughter that followed that day at Bay Hill could have been interpreted two ways. His answer was quick and short, no elaboration necessary, because a guy who dominated golf like no one else had never considered himself anything but a player. Or maybe it was simply laughable to think of Woods playing in team matches again. At the time, it had been four years and five months since he played on his last team, the 2013 Presidents Cup at Muirfield Village. He had gone through four back surgeries since then, limiting him to only six tournaments in the previous two years. And only five months earlier, when he was a vice captain at the Presidents Cup, he said he could envision a scenario where he never competed again. "It was a joke," Woods said Tuesday at the Hero World Challenge, smiling at the memory. "But it turned into reality. Here we are." That now seems so long ago. The notion that he would be at Royal Melbourne without his clubs is absurd. Starting with the Tour Championship last year, when Woods had gone five years without winning, he won at East Lake to complete one phase of his comeback. Then, he won the Masters in April, the missing piece, because he had gone 11 years since his last major and 14 years since his last green jacket. And then he had another surgery on his left knee — his fifth, making the knee 1 up over the lower back — and returned two months later by winning the Zozo Championship in Japan for his 82nd victory on the PGA Tour, tying Sam Snead for the career record. "To come back from what I've come back from and have won three events, it's been pretty good," Woods said. He is not entirely back to normal because Woods turns 44 at the end of the month, and his body — no matter how often it's been repaired — doesn't respond the way it did when he was in his early 30s. What doesn't get enough attention was the knee surgery the week of the Tour Championship to clean up minor cartilage damage. The surgery was supposed to be after his Hero World Challenge last year, but he wanted to start the season at Torrey Pines and surgery wouldn't have allowed it. So he put it off, and then it caught up with him later in the year when he couldn't practice as much and rarely squatted down to read putts. Was it worth it? Of course. "I did get a Masters out of it," Woods said. The surgery ultimately gave him a busier schedule than he would have imagined, and it gave golf a boost at a time of the year that it's easily forgotten. What follows is two weeks of Tiger in dual roles. He is the tournament host of the Hero World Challenge that features 18 of the top 50 players in the world at Albany Golf Club. Woods has won his tournament five times, all of them at Sherwood Country Club in California when he was at full strength. He has never played well in the Bahamas, but he has never been at full strength. Next week, he heads to Royal Melbourne as the captain of a team that has little to gain and much to lose. The Americans have not lost the Presidents Cup since 1998, such dominance that winning is a given. The last thing Woods wants is to be in charge of a team that allows the International team to end years of futility, particularly a team that has only two players who have won tournaments this year — Joaquin Niemann and C.T. Pan, both Presidents Cup newcomers. He is the first playing captain since Hale Irwin in 1994 for the inaugural matches that really did feel like an exhibition. "It's a pretty neat responsibility," Woods said. "And the role's not easy. There's a lot of moving parts, whether it's talking to the guys, talking to my vice captains, organizing what we need to have done down there, not only to be ready but also, I need to keep sharp. I need to keep practicing. Because at minimum, I'll be responsible for two points." Players are required to play at least once before Sunday singles. "I'm host here and a player," he said of the Bahamas. "And next week, I'm captain and a player. So it's a lot of hats going on." But at least he's playing. That's what he suggested the day he was appointed Presidents Cup captain, even if he says he meant it jokingly. Deep down, he probably didn't......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 4th, 2019

GenSan maritime police missing after clash with smugglers

GENERAL SANTOS CITY (MindaNews / 28 Nov) – Maritime police clashed with smugglers dawn on Thursday in a shootout at sea off a coastal village here, resulting in the disappearance of a police officer and the wounding of three others when their rubber boat capsized. Lt. Col. Jimeper Gamido, deputy chief of the Regional Maritime […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsNov 28th, 2019

Half-naked girl, 10, found dead in Negros

  A 10-year-old girl was found dead Wednesday night in a sugarcane field in Murcia, Negros. Maj. Robert Dejucos, town police chief, said family members of the victim found her body around 9 p.m., almost five hours after she was reported missing. The victim, whose name was withheld, sustained head injuries and broken bones, police […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsOct 31st, 2019

Body of unidentified man found in Barangay Tagba-o, Cebu City

Cebu City, Philippines—A dead man was found near the side of the road in Sitio Cab-asan, Barangay Tagba-o in Cebu City past 11 a.m. on Wednesday, October 2, 2019.  According to Tagba-o village chief Anna Tabal, the body was found by a motorist traversing the Cab-asan road in this mountain barangay.  The still unidentified man […] The post Body of unidentified man found in Barangay Tagba-o, Cebu City appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 2nd, 2019

26 dead, 9 missing in sea mishap

ILOILO CITY – The death toll in last Saturday’s sea tragedy on the Iloilo Strait which separates this city from the island province of Guimaras has reached 26 while nine others are still missing. “We recovered 11 bodies today,” said Donna Magno, chief of the Iloilo City Risk Reduction and Management Office and official incident […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsAug 4th, 2019

FIFA makes penalty shootout rule change during World Cup

By Rob Harris, Associated Press VALENCIENNES, France (AP) — The debut of video review in women's soccer is causing confusion and has pushed FIFA to make a rule change heading into the knockout phase of the World Cup. FIFA received approval from the game's lawmaking body to suspend the rule that goalkeepers must be shown yellow cards for stepping off the goal-line during penalty shootouts. With video assistant referees able to keep a closer eye on infringements, FIFA feared more goalkeepers could be penalized — and sent off if it's a second booking with no substitute allowed during shootouts. But the penalty kick will still be retaken. The International Football Association Board granted the temporary dispensation on Friday which means goalkeepers can only be booked at the tournament for stepping off the line with both feet during a penalty kick in normal time. "The caution for a goalkeeper who commits an offense was introduced in the laws as a deterrent," FIFA refereeing chief Pierluigi Collina said in comments provided by the governing body. "But what better deterrent than the VAR? It's not possible that a goalkeeper moves both her feet off the goal line without being noticed. In addition we felt that the risk for a second caution was too high considering the number of penalties that are taken." Penalty kicks have already been retaken during the group stage because VAR has scrutinized goalkeepers' movements more closely. Argentina was facing elimination after missing a penalty kick but it was ordered to be retaken after a video review, and the team scored to clinch a 3-3 draw. That clinched third place in Group D and a place in the round of 16. "If a goalkeeper commits an offence like encroaching before the penalty kick is taken, the VAR cannot do anything but intervene and inform the referee that the penalty kick must be retaken and the goalkeeper cautioned," Collina said. "All the teams were duly informed at the beginning of March and goalkeepers had enough time to get used to it." But the law could be revisited at future meetings of IFAB, which includes four FIFA delegates and a representative from each of the four British associations. "After the end of the tournament the disciplinary sanction for offences committed by the goalkeeper at penalties might be further discussed within IFAB's panels," Collina said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 22nd, 2019

Five things we learned from Game 4 of the 2019 Finals

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com OAKLAND, Calif. – Five things we learned from the Toronto Raptors’ 105-92 victory over the Golden State Warriors in Game 4 of the 2019 NBA Finals on Friday at Oracle Arena: 1. Dynasties eventually become ‘die-nastys’ Will we get one more game at Oracle Arena? The scene of so much Golden State wonderfulness the past five seasons? A building about to be abandoned when the Warriors move from Oakland to a state-of-the-art arena across the Bay? Hold up. Asking one more game out of the Warriors seems a lot at the moment. These guys just suffered their second consecutive home playoff loss by 10 points or more, something that hasn’t happened to this franchise in 50 years. After three straight games scoring precisely 109 points, the Warriors came up 15 short Friday (Saturday, PHL time). They are 0-9 overall this season when held to double digits, and 0-11 in the playoffs during the Steve Kerr era, when they score 94 or fewer. And now they’re on the wrong side of a 3-1 deficit, lacking everything from certain healthy bodies to an edge, a sharpness that was missing in the second half. Granted, Golden State once held a 3-1 edge in a Finals, all the way back in 2016 … when LeBron James, Kyrie Irving and the Cavaliers chased them down and became the only Finals team to claw out of such a chasm. The Warriors did the same to Oklahoma City in the 2016 Western Conference finals. So they not only have a blueprint, they have the know-how and an opportunity to do it again. Like Kerr before him on Friday's (Saturday, PHL time) postgame podium, Warriors forward Draymond Green spoke of simply trying to win one basketball game, the next game, as the proper way to dig out of this series hole. But then he dropped his guard and mentioned winning three in a row, something the Warriors have done often. But they’re a whole year removed from doing that in a Finals (last year’s sweep of the Cavs) with a healthy Kevin Durant. This is a more worn-down, tired team. In fact, Game 4 was more than Golden State’s 102nd game of 2018-19, regular and postseason combined. It was the 102nd playoff game of their five consecutive Finals runs, which means they have crammed an extra season-plus into their schedules compared to the underachievers on lottery teams sitting at home. From the looks of it Friday (Saturday, PHL time), these guys are ready to be toppled, like the Lakers in 1989 and again in 2004, like the Heat in 2014 and the Cavaliers last June. The boisterous Raptors fans who staged their takeover of the Warriors’ building after Game 4 were merely mirroring what their favorite team did on the court from halftime on. Golden State could not stop it. Rudy Tomjanovich might still be inclined to scream into the darkness. (“Never underestimate the heart of a champion!”) But pride only takes you so far, and that’s mostly what the Warriors have left. 2. Third quarter? That’s Toronto’s now It took the Raptors more than 18 minutes to score 30 points Friday night (Saturday, PHL time), stymied by the pace of the game and particularly Golden State’s scrappy, hustling defense. Immediately after halftime, it took Toronto only 12 minutes to put up 37. The time of death for Golden State on Friday was immediately after Kawhi Leonard drained consecutive three-pointers – “F-you” shots, teammate Fred VanVleet memorably coined them – that boosted Toronto from a four-point deficit to a 12-point advantage. The Warriors already had played well enough to rightly feel they should have had a bigger cushion; falling behind so rudely seemed to buckle the defending champs. That they feel third quarters are their birthright made the switcheroo intolerable. “We had a big problem with the third quarter in Game 2,” Toronto coach Nick Nurse said. “We had to make some adjustment there to try to combat the way they come out of the half. We made the decision to put Fred in, [first] in Game 3 and then Game 4 again. Mostly it's to try to keep up pace of our offense going. It gives us two point guards out there that can push the ball, get it in and get it going, and it kind of paid off. “I know Kawhi's two big three's to start the half really changed the whole feel of everybody. Everybody was like, ‘Okay, man, we know we are here, let's go,’ and we just kind of kept going from those two three's.” For the Warriors, who have done that to so many others, turnabout was a pain in the rump. “Oh, this sucks,” Draymond Green recalled thinking as Toronto took control of the quarter. “It sucks really bad. You just try and do whatever you can to change it. Get a stop, get a bucket, get some momentum.  Every time we did, they answered.” Green was asked about the difficulty of rattling the stone-faced Leonard with whatever defensive tactic Golden State could muster, and brushed the question aside. “I don't think you're ever going to rattle Kawhi. Not sure we used that word one time in our scouting report, ‘We're going to rattle him,’” Green said. But it’s not just Leonard now. It’s the Raptors. Time after time, whenever Golden State revved up with a couple of scoring possessions, signaling to their fans they ready to make a run, Toronto snuffed it with a three-pointer or a well-executed pick and roll. They’ve got a team of Kawhis-in-training, unflappable lately if not as inscrutable. “Most teams will take cues from their leaders or their star players, so I think that spreads around a little bit,” Nurse said. But he also praised vets such as Marc Gasol, Danny Green, Kyle Lowry and VanVleet for how steady they’ve been. Now, with the temptation to imagine hoisting a championship trophy, the Raptors might be expected to buy into the stat that, of the 34 teams in The Finals who have led 3-1, 33 of them got their rings. But this team is so focused, so resolute in taking care of business down to the smallest and most mundane task, that all Nurse might have to do is remind them how many aspiring champs won three games in a Finals and still headed into summer empty-handed. (It's 19.) No trophy, no rings. 3. A surge from Serge The chemistry between Serge Ibaka and Kyle Lowry was evident in their playful banter on the podium Friday night. Each slipped into his role, Lowry as the instigator, Ibaka as the target of his playful jibes. “You joining me?” Lowry asked, as Ibaka got to the podium a half minute after him. “Serge Ibaka, everybody. You all know him. Nice outfit. Worth a lot of money. Is that jacket real leather?” “Yes, it’s real leather,” Ibaka said. "Pants too tight, he can't even sit down,” Lowry said. On court, Ibaka’s defensive impact and 20 points in reserve dampened a lot of Warrior enthusiasm. There are nights when Ibaka comes across like Chief in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” a large, lumbering and rather stiff option near the rim with very little to say. Some nights, he even seems to be asleep. But still waters often run deep, too deep for the Warriors in Game 4, it turned out. Ibaka’s here-today, gone-tomorrow shooting touch had him playing in a way that none of Golden State’s three centers – DeMarcus Cousins, Kevon Looney or Andrew Bogut – could match. “Once he gets into the series," Nurse said, "which he did in Game 3 with the blocked shots and the rebounding and stuff, he seems to stay in the series. He usually gives you all of it.” Said Lowry, about knowing when a Serge surge is coming: “He doesn't say anything. When Serge is effective defensively is when he's at his best. I think the scoring just comes. We're going to make sure he gets that pick-and-pop jump shot, he's rolling … When he brings that intensity and that fierceness, it's kind of tough to stop him on both ends of the floor.” 4. Stephen Curry had a bad game One of the most famous pieces of magazine journalism ever was entitled, “Frank Sinatra Has a Cold,” by Gay Talese, a profile written when Sinatra obviously was ill of body and temper, and didn’t even grant Talese an interview. So our headline kind of tells the story as his did: Curry, one of the top five players in the NBA and probably the greatest overall shooter of all time, was not his two-time MVP self. He wasn’t even the Game 3 version (47 points). The Warriors point guard scored 20 fewer points in this one, and was 2-of-9 from three-point range. He missed all five of his shots from the arc in the first half and he picked up some obvious frustration fouls. Curry played 43 of the 48 minutes, and Golden State was outscored by 11 points when he was on the court. “It wasn’t his best game,” Kerr said. Evaluating Curry, for the Warriors, was going to come down to breaking down video and keeping the faith. Evaluating him, for the rest of us, is getting complicated these days by a sense that Curry did not get his due in past Finals – at least in terms of winning the Bill Russell Award as Finals MVP. But that’s no excuse to don rose-colored glasses every time he hits the floor. As scintillating as his performance was in defeat Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) as the Warriors’ only healthy threat, his Game 4 work was raggedy and unproductive. “They have been aggressive all series and trying to take space away from me and Klay,” Curry said. “I missed some shots early that I usually make, especially from the three-point line. But overall, I thought I got good looks.” Every game doesn’t need to be a referendum on the level of Curry appreciation. He might have deserved more consideration as Finals MVP in 2015, when Andre Iguodala snagged it with a strong performance in the clinching game. And even though Kevin Durant was an easy choice in 2017, there were some who felt Curry was more essential (including this voter). In some cosmic and just way, Curry probably should have been recognized with hardware somewhere among the three. But all signs are pointing to Leonard now, so Curry might have to muddle along with "only" those two Maurice Podoloff trophies for regular-season MVP, along with his All-NBA berths and assorted accolades, his ginormous contract and bounty of commercial endorsements, three rings (unless this series turns around) and a better life than most people who’ve ever walked the planet. 5. Durant to play in Game … 8? It’s possible that Durant will come walking through Rick Pitino’s proverbial door and seize what’s left of the championship series by the throat, playing like the two-time Finals MVP he is. Failing that, if there’s a Game 6, maybe that’s the night Durant at least does a Willis Reed impersonation, limping through the Oracle tunnel to a thunderous roar and hitting a couple of early shots to inspire his teammates to something special. (There still, alas, would be a pesky Game 7 for which to account, back in Toronto, likely muddying the drama.) Then again, maybe Durant doesn’t come back at all. For The Finals or with the Warriors, period. Speculation at this point is all over the map. Some think the Warriors planned to hold him out until things got really dire, to buy extra healing time and maybe not use him at all. Others now believe Durant’s rehab process of his strained right calf back-slid to some degree on Thursday, when he participated in a checkpoint workout with the training staff. A few folks think he never was going to return, regardless. After all, the All-NBA forward hasn’t played since May 8 (May 9, PHL time), missing nine fairly important games. This is a league where injuries typically face an “If this were a playoff game, would he play?” threshold. Durant has been nearly as absent from this NBA postseason as LeBron James. Look, all injuries are different, and even the same type of injury can have different timelines with different sufferers. Klay Thompson rushing back from his hamstring issue after skipping only Game 3 is at the crazy-resilient end of the durability scale. Kevon Looney basically rose from the ashes, giving the Warriors a rim runner and 10 points with six rebounds in 20 minutes off the bench. He had been ruled out for the rest of the series after suffering a rib cartilage fracture in his crash to the floor in Game 2. After anticipation of Durant’s availability got out in front of his reality for a few days, the chatter is more tempered now. There’s a shrug and a whiff of uncertainty folded into every mention. If Durant had his Thursday workout, he would have played Friday (Saturday, PHL time). If he had a setback … Heck, at this point it might be more pragmatic for the medical peeps to declare him out and let the Warriors who’ve come this far see this through, yea or nay. “As far as KD, there's been hope that he will come back the whole series,” Draymond Green said. “So that's not going to change now. Obviously we hope to have him, but we'll see what happens. We don't make that final call, he don't really even make that final call.  His body will tell him if he can get out there or not. And if he can, great. And if not, you still got to try to find a way to win the next game.” The Warriors had been holding out hope for Durant’s return as if he was their ace in the hole, imagining him with zero rust or rhythm issues once back and no limitations on his gait. But he has passed the “In case of emergency, break glass” point of urgent help possibilities. Now Durant resembles more the keg hanging from a Saint Bernard dog’s collar. It’s a nice idea, but when was the last time one of those dogs saved somebody who literally drank from the little barrel? Toronto is in a foreign land, by NBA standards. But it ain’t the Alps. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 9th, 2019

Patrick Cantlay rallies from 4 back to win the Memorial

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press DUBLIN, Ohio (AP) — Patrick Cantlay got another handshake with Jack Nicklaus, this time as the Memorial winner. Starting four shots behind, Cantlay closed with an 8-under 64 for a two-shot victory Sunday. It was the lowest final round by a winner in tournament history, and it moved the 27-year-old Californian into the top 10 in the world. Martin Kaymer, trying to end five years without a victory, started with a two-shot lead and never recovered from back-to-back bogeys on the back nine. He shot 38 on the back nine and finished with a 72. Adam Scott was the last player with a chance to catch Cantlay when he ran off three straight birdies to get within two shots, but he narrowly missed birdies on the last two holes and had to settle for a 68. Cantlay first met the tournament host in 2011 when he won the Jack Nicklaus Award as the top player in college at UCLA. And he leaned on the advice of Nicklaus going into the final round to relax, enjoy the surroundings and finish it off. "I finished it," Cantlay told Nicklaus as he walked off the 18th green after making an 8-foot par putt that effectively sealed it. Cantlay finished at 19-under 269 and won for the second time in a PGA Tour career that is younger than it seems. A rising star coming out of UCLA — he was low amateur at the 2011 U.S. Open and opened with a 60 at the Travelers Championship a week later — he missed two full years with a back injury that nearly cost him his career. He is in his third full year since returning, and a victory over a strong field on a strong course is what long was expected of his skills. And there some atonement at Muirfield Village for Cantlay. A year ago, he took a two-shot lead to the back nine and didn't make a birdie the rest of the way, missing a playoff by two shots. This time, he putted for birdie on every hole on the back nine until the 18th. "Being able to win on this golf course, in front of Jacking, making that putt on the last hole, I can't tell you how good it feels," he said. Scott finished at 17-under 271. Only six other players have had a lower 72-hole score at the Memorial since it began in 1976. One of them is Cantlay, who moves to No. 8 in the world with a U.S. Open at Pebble Beach looming. Cantlay is the only player to finish in the top 10 at both majors this year, leading late at the Masters until two bogeys over the last three holes. Tiger Woods knew he had no chance to win the Memorial from 11 shots behind going into the final round, though he still put on a show and got what he needed out of his final event before the U.S. Open at Pebble Beach. He went out in 31 and was 7 under for his round through 12 holes until a sloppy bogey on the 14th and a closing bogey for a 67. He wound up in a tie for ninth at 9-under 279. "The goal today was to get to double digits (under par) and get something positive going into the Open," he said. "I got to double digits, I just didn't stay there." Kaymer is five years removed from his last victory at the 2014 U.S. Open and played like he was ready for that drought to end. He stuffed a wedge into a foot for birdie on the third hole, and stretched his lead to four shots by laying up on the par-5 fifth and spinning back a wedge to 6 feet. Cantlay was the only player who looked capable of chasing him and played like he had to. On the fifth, he sent his drive well to the right into the rough. It was on a hill, with a flat enough lie that he had the gallery move beyond the cart path for a route to the green. His 4-iron ran onto the green, setting up a birdie. No matter. For every birdie he made, Kaymer added another. Cantlay rolled in a 15-foot birdie on the par-3 eighth and was walking off the green, while behind him a work was posting another birdie for Kaymer at the seventh. But it all changed. Cantlay closed out the front nine with a 12-foot birdie to get within two, while Kaymer in the group behind chopped his way to a bogey. And then the German blinked twice with bogeys from bunker on No. 12 and with an errant shot from the fairway on No. 13. With two more birdies, Cantlay was on his way. DIVOTS: Nick Price was selected as the Memorial Tournament honoree for 2020. CBS host Jim Nantz was chosen to receive be the Memorial Journalism honoree. ... Matt Minister, the caddie for Cantlay, grew up in the Columbus area and played college golf at Ohio State......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2019

Body of missing cop in capsized boat recovered

Body of missing cop in capsized boat recovered.....»»

Category: newsSource:  bicolstandardRelated NewsNov 27th, 2016

Woman with missing body parts found in Talamban still unidentified after one month

Woman with missing body parts found in Talamban still unidentified after one month.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 24th, 2020

DOT coordinates with PNP-CIDG in finding missing UP law prof

The Department of Tourism on Tuesday evening expressed its deep concern as the chief of the agency’s Legislative Liaison United was reported missing since Saturday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 24th, 2020

AgNor village chief grateful for PRLEC-initiated projects

BUTUAN CITY, Nov. 23 -- San Antonio Barangay Captain Helario Sajulan is grateful to the projects that are initiated by the Poverty Reduction, Livelihood and Employment Cluster (PRLEC) of the provin.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsNov 24th, 2020

NDRRMC says typhoon response adequate

The National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council said Thursday that it has not been negligent in issuing timely and adequate warnings and advisories related to the strength of typhoon “Ulysses” even if many residents in Metro Manila and nearby provinces seemed to be caught by surprise with the sudden flooding in their areas. (MANILA BULLETIN) Requests from people asking to be rescued from the roof or second floors of their houses, specifically in Marikina City, Pasig City, and Rizal, due to the overflow of the Marikina River have flooded social media and the NDRRMC Operations Center, according to Assistant Secretary Casiano Monilla, Office of Civil Defense deputy director for operations. “Patuloy ang paglilikas natin but since yesterday or even the other day, inililikas na ang ating mga kababayan especially doon sa traditionally naaapektuhan ng bagyo. We were not caught flat-footed dito sa event na ito. Kung minsan lang kasi, kapag nag-ikot ang local officials ay hindi kaagad sumusunod ang mga kababayan. Mas nagrerely tayo kung ano ang ating nararamdaman, kung ano ang prevailing na situation na nararamdaman other than the advise na binibigay ng PAGASA,” he said in a virtual media forum. (We are still conducting rescue operations but since [Wednesday] or even [Tuesday], we have already conducted pre-emptive evacuation of our countrymen especially in areas that are traditionally affected by typhoons. We were not caught flat-footed by this event. Sometimes, the residents don’t listen to local officials even if they are already warned. They usually rely on what they are feeling or the prevailing situation rather than the advise given by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, and Astronomical Services Administration)The NDRRMC has yet to provide data on the extent of damage of  Ulysses and how many people were affected. But NDRRMC chairman and Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana, in a separate interview, said the damage has been “huge.” “[There was] huge damage. [There were] totally flooded villages and low-lying areas were flooded,” Lorenzana said when asked to describe the extent of Ulysses’ effects. Lorenzana said he has briefed President Duterte about the deployment of troops to save some residents in Marikina who were asking to be rescued due to the overflow of the Marikina River. “I just came from the Palace. I briefed him what our troops are doing in Marikina to save people from their rooftops,” he said. Social media users were quick to point out the similarity in the devastation of Ulysses to typhoon “Ondoy” in 2009 which inundated a vast portion of Metro Manila after hours of intense rains. Ondoy left 747 people dead and billions of damages in agriculture and infrasture. In Marikina, Mayor Marcelino Teordoro said Ulysses brought the water level of Marikina River to 22 meters as of 11 a.m. Thursday, which was higher than the 21.5-meter level reached during typhoon Ondoy. Monilla said local government units (LGUs) have the responsibility to conduct search and rescue operations on their affected residents but he noted that the NDRRMC is behind the LGUs to augment their capabilities. “Ondoy really served as a lesson especially sa area ng Marikina at Pasig sa NCR. Nagkaroon na sila even the early warning signals. Sa amin naman, ang pagdirect ng operations ay aming nirerely sa LGUs at kami lang ay tumutulong sa local governments in harnessing the response units para madagdagan ang units na nagre-rescue sa ating mga kababayan (Ondoy really served as a lesson especially in Marikina and Pasig in the National Capital Region. They established early warning signals. On our part, the direction of [rescue] operations rely on the local government units and we just help them in harnessing the response units which will rescue our countrymen),” he said.  “Because highly populated ang lugar it could be a challenge relocating them. Ang Provident [Village] nga which serves as a lesson in Ondoy ay affected din sa ngayon. Highly urbanized kasi ang Metro Manila that’s why it’s really a challenge paano i-relocate ang mga tao na laging affected ng ganito,” he added. Meanwhile, the NDRRMC has also tapped the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) and several private companies to deploy their manpower and assets for search and rescue operations. Gen. Gilbert Gapay, AFP chief, said the Joint Task Force NCR has been leading the rescue efforts in Metro Manila. They were aigmented by two disaster response units from the 7th Civil Relations Group, 101stSearch and Rescue volunteers, and private group REACT PH. Another search and rescue unit from Bantay Bayan volunteers were deployed in areas on Tullahan River and Caloocan City to conduct search and rescue operations. The Joint Task Force Bicolandia, Northern Luzon Command (NolCom), and Southern Luzon Command (SolCom) also deployed thousands of soldiers to coordinate the search and rescue operations in Bicol region, Cordillera Administrative Region, Ilocos (Region 1), Cagayan Valley (Region 2), Central Luzon (Region 3), Calabarzon (Region 4A), and Mimaropa (Region 4B). Monilla said they have received reports that major dams in Luzon have been releasing excess water which may inundate Central Luzon and parts of Metro Manila. “Ang Angat, Ipo, La Mesa, at Wawa dams nagpapakawala ng tubig dahil sa patuloy na pagtaas ng tubig dulot ng ulan na hatid ni Ulysses so baka abutin pa hanggang mamayang hapon o gabi (Angat, Ipo, La Mesa, and Wawa dams were releasing water because of the continuous rain brought about by Ulysses so the [flooding] may persist until afternoon or evening),” he said. .....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsNov 12th, 2020

Cavite village chief gunned down

A barangay captain in Dasmariñas City, Cavite was shot dead on Monday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 11th, 2020