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Meat-free food for the Holy Week

  Filipino Catholics observe the discipline of fasting and abstinence as a form of penance during Lent. Giving up meat is commonly observed on Ash Wednesday, Good Friday, and on all Fridays during the 40-day Lent. Eating meat is forbidden but eggs, milk products, and condiments made from meat are allowed. For Cebuanos, “binignit” is […] The post Meat-free food for the Holy Week appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerApr 1st, 2021

Meat-free meals from Cebu’s first favorite this Holy Week

Part of the traditions of the Roman Catholic religion is to be mindful of the meals they eat during Lent — a time for three spiritual practices: fasting, prayer and almsgiving. Abstaining from meat on Holy Week, especially on Fridays, is one of the ways Roman Catholics fast. Some people also give up something for […] The post Meat-free meals from Cebu’s first favorite this Holy Week appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 29th, 2021

Angel Locsin on death of senior citizen: ‘I am very, very sorry’

Actress Angel Locsin took full responsibility for the incident involving a senior citizen who died while waiting in line to get free food items from the community pantry that she opened in Barangay Holy Spirit, Quezon City supposedly in celebration of her 36th birthday. In an Instagram post, the actress-philanthropist confirmed the news herself and […] The post Angel Locsin on death of senior citizen: ‘I am very, very sorry’ appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsApr 23rd, 2021

Palay prices dip to P11/kg in some areas

Palay prices continued to go down, even dipping to as low as P11 per kilogram (/kg) as farmers approach the tail-end of the harvest season with a series of strong typhoons. Latest data from the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) showed that the average farm-gate price of palay continued its downward movement, falling by 4.1 percent to P15.79/kg from the price level of P16.47/kg in the previous week. Year-on-year, the price increased by 0.2 percent from its average price of P15.76/kg in the same week of the previous year. Unfortunately, prices went down to as low as P11/kg in areas like Surigao del Sur and Cavite, which means some farmers were forced to sell their produce at a loss. In other areas like Agusan del Sur and Bulacan, farmers barely made money, with palay sold at exactly or just slightly above P12/kg. In the Philippines, the average production cost of rice farmers stood around P12.72/kg, which is higher or nearly double than what rice farmers in Vietnam and Thailand spend to produce the staple. This means that if prices fell below that amount, farmers would receive earnings that are lower than what they spent for. Some said that with the current production cost, the breakeven farmgate price of fresh harvest should be around P14.50/kg.  Meanwhile, highest palay prices were recorded in areas like Bataan, Nueva Ecija, Zambales, Pampanga, Rizal, and Palawan wherein the commodity were sold at P18/kg to P21/kg, the same PSA data showed. Federation of Free Farmers (FFF) National Manager Raul Montemayor said that in the next few weeks, as farmers approach the tail-end of the harvest season, palay prices will definitely go down further. This, as palay, when damaged by storms, could yield to poor quality rice, which, among other reasons like the continuous entry of imported rice, could result in traders deciding not to buy at all.  “Rainy weather is also to blame since traders have to discount for grain deterioration due to lack of drying facilities,” he said. A data from the Department of Agriculture (DA) showed that as of October 29, Typhoon Quinta already destroyed 79,239 metric tons (MT) of palay worth P1.13 billion within 62,880 hectares of farms. Then there’s the threat of Typhoon Rolly, which is expected to make landfall in Quezon and Aurora provinces on Saturday (October 31) and become a super typhoon. Montemayor also thinks that the continuous decline in palay prices is already “not surprising” since government intervention is doing very little for farmers. According to him, the National Food Authority’s (NFA) palay procurement has had minimal impact despite pronouncements of DA, while the planned suspension of  sanitary and phytosanitary import clearances (SPS-ICs) on rice “came in too late, as in last year, to influence farmgate prices.” “Too little too late [actions] again by the DA,” Montemayor said. “At this time, [DA can do] very little. Damage was already done and most farmers have already harvested. Some typhoon-affected farmers (like those in Occidental Mindoro and Isabela) are asking NFA to buy storm-damaged palay but I doubt if they will do that since the agency itself doesn’t have dryers,” he added. Montemayor was particularly referring to Agriculture Secretary William Dar’s previous order for NFA to intensify its palay procurement in order to address decline in palay prices.  To recall, NFA, whose sole mandate now is to secure the government’s buffer stock, buys palay at P19/kg and is given P7 billion every year to do this. Also, more than a week ago, Senator Cynthia Villar, chairperson of the senate agriculture committee, asked the DA to stop issuing SPS-ICs to rice importers during harvest time, which would probably take effect after the next planting season. Business Bulletin sought the reaction of DA Spokesperson Noel Reyes regarding the decline in palay prices, but he is yet to respond......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 31st, 2020

Free webinar on basic food safety for processed food set on Oct. 19

PASIG CITY, Oct. 15 (PIA) -- The Department of Trade and Industry National Capital Region Office (DTI NCRO) is inviting food entrepreneurs to a free webinar next week.Concerned private busin.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsOct 15th, 2020

Opportunity to reform market economy

The crisis brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic provides a singular opportunity to significantly reform the so-called free market economy that has been embraced by countries of different political shades and persuasions, from socialist China to capitalist America.  Although it cannot be denied that the experiment with market-oriented economic policies by China has resulted in the liberation from dehumanizing poverty of hundreds of millions of people over the last 20  to 30 years, there continues to be scandalous disparity of income and wealth among those who have benefited from these reforms and those who have been left behind.  The massive unemployment that has been caused by the lockdowns of  economies all over the world has worsened the inequity in the distribution of income even in the most developed countries of Europe and elsewhere. The human sufferings that we are witnessing during the worst global economic crisis in 150 year  should bring world leaders to finally come to their senses and listen to what Pope Francis has been saying about   the limitations of the free market economy in respecting the dignity of each human person and in pursuing the common good of society. In The Joy of the Gospel, Pope Francis clearly states that “the dignity of each human person and the pursuit of the common good are concerns which ought to shape all economic policies. At times, however, they seem to be a mere addendum imported from without in order to fill out a political discourse lacking in perspectives or plans for true and integral development.”  The Holy Father points out that  growth in social justice “requires more than economic growth, while presupposing such growth.”  it requires decisions, programs, mechanisms, and processes especially geared to a better distribution of income, the creation of sources of employment, and an integral promotion of the poor which goes beyond a simple welfare mentality.”  In the publication “This Economy Kills,” authors Andrea Tornielli and Giacomo Galeazzi, inspired by the teachings of Pope Francis, enumerate the types of leaders who are needed for authentic human development in both developed and emerging markets.  According to them, we need “men and women who look to the future, who are committed to pursue the common  good and whose goal is not just the next election campaign.  It requires men and women who not only look at the spread and stock market indices as indicators of the health of a country but inquire whether the younger generations have a job, a future, and hope; whether children have kindergartens and schools that can educate them by introducing them to reality; whether couples have the opportunity to buy a house; whether there are effective welfare programs available for the elderly; and whether those who still bet on the future by putting children into the world are justly taxed, rather than penalized.  It requires men and women who are engaged in politics and work in institutions without corrupting themselves or letting others corrupt them, even managing perhaps to revive a minimum of esteem (which has never been so in decline) for that ‘highest form of charity’—that is, politics—in as much as it is exclusively committed to the common good and to the real lives of people, with special attention   and dedication to those in difficulty, those left behind, those  who are excluded and should be included.” We have in the above quote a program that should permeate the so-called new normal post-pandemic.  What I have read so far about prognostications concerning the “new normal” are mostly about means, not ends. There is a lot of talk about the digital transformation that all economic sectors shall have undergone as a response to the changes in consumer lifestyle and business practices brought about by COVID-19. It asserted that digitalization will be a universal practice. Online purchases of practically all types of consumer goods and services; modes of payments; delivery of formal education and all types  of skills training; banking practices; religious services; sports events; forms of entertainment; etc.  These transformations, however,  could occur without addressing the fundamental problem of great disparities in the distribution of income and wealth and may even exacerbate the problem of the poor if, for example, their children are further left behind because they lack the resources to participate in online learning.  Although the means are also important, there should be greater emphasis in the transformation of the ends or objectives of the economic system.  Our leaders should ask themselves how to make the structural changes necessary to reduce mass poverty (which has worsened during the many lockdowns made necessary by the pandemic).  In more concrete terms, the economic system should be geared to providing more nutritious food to the poorest of the poor; better quality education and health care to the bottom 20 percent of the population; free health services to those who cannot afford them;  socialized housing for the homeless; and well paying jobs for the unemployed and underemployed. The new normal should give the highest priority to providing the small farmers with what they need to eke out a decent living by providing them with the necessary infrastructures such as farm-to-market roads, irrigation systems, post-harvest facilities, access to credit and other farm support services that have long been denied the Filipino farmers.  I have always maintained that the first cause of dehumanizing poverty in the Philippines is the long-term neglect of rural and agricultural development.  It is not a coincidence that 75 percent of those who fall below the poverty line are in the rural areas. Many of them are the beneficiaries of agrarian reform who, after being provided with one or two hectares of land, were completely abandoned to their own resources.  They are the landless farm workers, the “kaingeros” (slush-and-burn farmers), and the subsistence fisherfolk. Hopefully, the shortage of food during  the pandemic has made it crystal clear that food security should be on top of our economic objectives.  Food security now and in the future can be made possible only by a significant increase in the productivity with which we use our agricultural resources.  To be continued For comments, my email address is bernardo.villegas@uap.asia.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 3rd, 2020

In Mecca, dreams of a ‘green hajj’

A smaller carbon footprint, less waste, and more environmentally friendly — this year’s pilgrimage to Mecca, dramatically scaled down due to coronavirus, has opened up the prospect of a “green hajj”. This year’s dramatically downscaled Hajj pilgrimage has had a much less adverse effect on the environment than previous years (AFP Photo/STR) In addition to being a logistical and security headache, one of the planet’s largest gatherings, which drew some 2.5 million people last year, also typically poses huge environmental challenges. The procession of so many worshippers, over a short time and in a limited space, results in an assault on the desert kingdom’s delicate environment. Thousands of vehicles generate substantial air pollution, while the pilgrims leave behind an avalanche of waste, including enormous quantities of plastic water bottles. This year’s hajj, limited to a maximum of 10,000 attendees, was by all accounts literally a breath of fresh air. But for environmental activist Nouhad Awwad, it’s not so much the size of the crowd that determines the impact on the environment but more “our collective behaviour”. “This year’s hajj, although taking place at a difficult time globally, can be a source of hope,” the Greenpeace campaigner told AFP. “It gives an idea of what a green pilgrimage could look like,” she added. The scenes in Mecca since the hajj began on Wednesday are very different from those of past years. Rather than the vast crowds that move between the sites, casting rubbish as they go and sometimes prone to deadly crushes, the movement of the pilgrims has been limited and orderly. Even the pebbles they use to symbolically “stone the devil” have been sanitised, as part of elaborate amenity kits provided by authorities that include disinfectant and masks. “Everything is clean and there are only a few municipal workers collecting the small amounts of garbage,” Azim Allah Farha, a pilgrim from Afghanistan who has performed the hajj several times before, said at Mount Arafat, the site of one of the main rituals. One of those workers, Rahim Fajreddine, recalls the hundreds of tonnes of rubbish — plastic bags, cans and food plates — left in past years at the rocky hill outside Mecca where pilgrims pray and repent in the high point of the hajj. “Large numbers of workers had to be mobilised to remove all the debris they left behind as they passed,” he recalled. Eco awakening Until recently, the environment was not a central concern of Saudi Arabia when it came to the hajj. As “Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques”, the kingdom was concerned primarily with accommodating as many pilgrims as possible, mindful of the long waiting lists for Muslims, who must complete the hajj at least once in their lifetime if they are able. Huge extensions have been built in recent decades to increase the capacity of the two mosques and pilgrimage sites. Saudi Arabia hopes to welcome 30 million pilgrims to the kingdom annually by 2030. However, by 2018 the local authorities launched a waste separation programme and began to consider recycling. Signs in several languages were posted to encourage the pilgrims to do their bit and dispose of their waste properly. This year, despite the relatively tiny number of pilgrims, the municipality deployed more than 13,000 cleaners to the holy sites, equipped with hundreds of skips, according to an official statement. ‘This is our future’ Awwad said that although this year’s hajj is leaving a small environmental footprint because of the constraints generated by the global pandemic, in the future the same outcome must be achieved by choice. “By investing in sustainable development and adopting green practises, we can continue to live our traditions and perform our rituals while keeping our skies clear of pollution and our streets free of waste,” the activist said. She imagines “a hajj with its millions of pilgrims in total symbiosis with their environment, in a Mecca powered by solar energy”. In a kingdom that ranks as the world’s top energy exporter, and where the shift to renewables is going slower than planned, her vision is unlikely to become a reality any time soon.   “But this is the future we should all be working towards,” she insisted......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsAug 1st, 2020

Muzzle Mr. Met? Mascots wonder why they re banned from MLB

By DAN GELSTON AP Sports Writer PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The Phillie Phanatic had stories of his favorite adventures -- from the Galapagos Islands to the cobblestone streets of Philadelphia -- read to him most weeks from his very best buds. The Philly furball was tucked in with a bedtime story from Bryce Harper. Andrew McCutchen and manager Joe Girardi stopped by as guest readers to entertain fans and unite the Phillies community. But should the Phillies play ball this year, well, the book will close on the Phanatic. MLB wants to ban the birds -- sorry, Pirate Parrot -- and Bernie Brewer, Blooper, Bernie the Marlin, heck, all costumed creatures great and small from the ballpark this season. Firebird, Paws, the Oriole Bird, all face extinction -- at least this season, should baseball resume. Not even a muzzle on Mr. Met or a mask on Mariner Moose would help the cause. Gasp! Baseball’s furriest and funniest fans are forbidden from entering a ballpark. And that’s not cool. “Every mascot should be essential because of its ability to connect and distract with fun,” mascot guru Dave Raymond said. Raymond should know as well as any performer, as the first person to take on the 6-foot-6, 300-pound, 90-inch waist frame of the Phanatic. He’s since become a mascot consultant to the stars and helped create, brand and train the next generation of hundreds of stadium characters. Mascots are as much a ballpark staple as hot dogs and the long ball, and each fuzzy fist bump or chance concourse encounter hooks the youngest fans on the game. As baseball prepares for a summer slate without fans, Raymond wonders: What’s a game without a mascot? “You don’t have to convince me of that,” Raymond said. “It’s the powers that be that don’t understand that simple truth.” There’s already a blueprint MLB could follow that explains why mascots fit in barren ballparks. Take a look across the globe. Mascots remained a staple of baseball games in Taiwan and the KBO League in South Korea. American fans who stayed up late (or is it, woke up early?) to watch KBO games on ESPN were mesmerized by mascots gone wild in empty stadiums. The LG Twins mascots -- twin robot boys named Lucky and Star -- wore masks. So did cheerleaders and a drum section that provided the soundtrack for an otherwise dreary atmosphere. The Chinese Professional Baseball League barred spectators over concerns of spreading the new coronavirus in a crowded space, but the league decided it was safe to let in cheerleaders and costumed mascots. “This is the most important time to leverage fun, when people are sick and dying and dealing with the brutality of life,” Raymond said. “That is the time that you find a way to distract people and entertain them.” Philadelphia Inquirer cartoonist Rob Tornoe drew the Phanatic (wearing a mask) sitting atop the dugout with his phone and on hold with the unemployment office. “This is life or death now for a lot of characters, a lot of performers,” former Timberwolves mascot Jon Cudo said. It’s not that dire for most MLB performers who often have other duties within the organization or remained active in the community with food drives, firetruck parades or other feel-good efforts during the pandemic. Raymond had former and current mascots, including Cudo, join this week on his webinar, “What The Heck Should My Mascot Do Now?” The best suggestion to stay connected with fans -- with the ATV temporarily parked -- is engaging through social content. Mascot Mania has gone wild on Instagram and TikTok. Mr. Met cleans windows. D. Baxter the Bobcat taught crosswalk safety. Wally the Green Monster records virtual messages for charity. Then again, mascots have problems just like us: Who gives the Phanatic a trim during quarantine? “The Phanatic doesn’t need to get his hair cut,” Raymond said. “It’s actually a positive when it gets unkempt and long.” The Phanatic already underwent one makeover this year — his new look features flightless feathers rather than fur-colored arms, stars outlining the eyes, a larger posterior and a powder blue tail, blue socks with red shoes, plus a set of scales under the arms — because of a lawsuit filed against the team by the creators of the original Phanatic. The creators threatened to terminate the Phillies’ rights to the Phanatic as of June 15 and “make the Phanatic a free agent” unless the team renegotiated its 1984 agreement to acquire the mascot’s rights. Mascots were lumped in with other baseball traditions that would be weeded out under a 2020 proposal. The traditional exchange of lineup cards would be eliminated, along with high-fives, fist bumps and bat boys and girls. “I don’t know of anybody who bought season tickets to watch the bat boy,” Raymond said. “But you can say that in spades for the mascots. We’d be losing one of the draws that brings in people beyond the statistic nerds.” Plus, any fan who attended a Phillies game in the late 1990s at Veterans Stadium knows the Phanatic can play in an empty ballpark. Mascots just want to honk, honk, honk for the home team and they do care if they ever get back. “I’m just imploring them to value the character brands,” Raymond said. “There is a safe way for you to have fun, and frankly, fun is the most important thing you can invest in right now.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 31st, 2020

Cuba makes concession to protesters, lets travelers bring in food duty-free

Cuba makes concession to protesters, lets travelers bring in food duty-free.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJul 15th, 2021

Megaworld vaccinates 95% of office-based employees

Following the company’s rollout of its free vaccination program for employees and stakeholders last week, Megaworld reports that it has completed the vaccination of 95 percent of its office-based employees, mostly in Metro Manila......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 14th, 2021

TWICE gives details about new Taste of Love album

The summery vibe TWICE did on their "Ellen" show performance of "Alcohol-Free" early this week is just a glimpse of the group's newest album "Taste of Love"......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 26th, 2021

‘No room for hate : Jazz give vandalized Filipino food truck owners tickets to game

The food truck was vandalized with racist slurs earlier this week, which prompted Clarkson to reach out and help the owners by paying for the restoration of the truck, as well as interior cleaning and detailing......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 11th, 2021

Filipino meat lovers seen to dump more rice for pork by 2025

Meat products are expected to corner a bigger chunk of Filipinos’ food budget as families see incomes rise......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 18th, 2021

San Miguel, Bohol helps backyard hog raisers

San Miguel, Bohol Mayor Virgilio Mendez bought pigs from backyard hog producers to be able to distribute free meat to the town residents during the pandemic. In an interview with Network Briefing News on Thursday, May 6, Mayor Mendez said he came up with the idea after hog raisers, who cannot provide feeds for their […] The post San Miguel, Bohol helps backyard hog raisers appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsMay 6th, 2021

Lower tariffs, higher MAV to bring equilibrium pork prices

With meat prices jacking up food inflation in the country, Finance Secretary Carlos Dominguez III defended the move to lower import tariffs for pork while increasing its minimum access volume or MAV. Dominguez explained that while the lower import duties for pork could bring forth an income loss of P13.68 billion for the state, such […] The post Lower tariffs, higher MAV to bring equilibrium pork prices appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 27th, 2021

Peasant advocates pedal for food, jobs and land

SAKA called for PHP10,000 financial aid to public, workers' PHP100 wage relief, a PHP15,000 production subsidy for food security frontliners, free mass testing, protection of community pantries and the assertion of PH sovereignty. The post Peasant advocates pedal for food, jobs and land appeared first on Bulatlat......»»

Category: newsSource:  bulatlatRelated NewsApr 26th, 2021

Angel Locsin gets support from ABS-CBN after tragic community pantry incident

Thousands trooped to Angel Locsin’s community pantry along Holy Spirit Drive in Don Antonio Heights in Quezon City on Friday. They hoped to get free goods from the actress who organized the pantry to mark her 36th birthday......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 26th, 2021

Google further strengthens commitment to sustainability

In line with its longstanding commitment to climate action and environmental stewardship, Google announced several updates and initiatives this Earth Day week including its progress towards its goal to operate entirely on 24/7 carbon-free energy by 2030, a powerful Google and Arts Culture project, and an animated video Google Doodle. .....»»

Category: techSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 25th, 2021

Death at crowded pantry: Officials stress coordination with local gov’t

A death marred the distribution of food aid at a community pantry set up on Friday by actor Angel Locsin to mark her birthday in Barangay Holy Spirit in Quezon City. Barangay resident Rolando dela Cruz, 67, fainted as he waited his turn among thousands of people who flocked to the aid station inspired by […] The post Death at crowded pantry: Officials stress coordination with local gov’t appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsApr 24th, 2021

Community Pantries: ‘Phenomenon of Hunger and Poverty’

The sprout of community pantries has become an indicator of poor government action even in communities located in the economic middle. It also has exposed the reality of the ‘’phenomenon of hunger and poverty’’ when people queue to avail themselves of free food......»»

Category: newsSource:  davaotodayRelated NewsApr 21st, 2021

Bohol opens community pantry, encourages others to donate to help in need

CEBU CITY, Philippines— Plastic Free Bohol is not just raising awareness about plastic pollution in Bohol but is now helping others through their Alona Community Pantry. For their fifth anniversary celebration, instead of doing their regular food bag distributions, Jammy Ungab, founder of Plastic Free Bohol, decided to do the community pantry instead, following the […] The post Bohol opens community pantry, encourages others to donate to help in need appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsApr 20th, 2021