Advertisements


LG Electronics receives AHRI Performance Award for 3rd straight year

LG Electronics continues its winning ways as the South Korean technology brand was recently recognized by the Air-Conditioning, Heating & Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) with the Performance Award for the third straight year, with all 73 tested models passing the performance evaluation......»»

Category: techSource: thestandard thestandardSep 21st, 2020

LG wins coveted AHRI Performance Award for 2nd straight year

South Korean technology giant and global innovator, LG Electronics, remains steadfast in their commitment to excellence as they were recently honored with the Air-Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute Performance Award for the second straight year......»»

Category: techSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMar 17th, 2020

UAAP Season 82: UE dominates collegiate fencing anew

University of the East reigned supreme in the men's division for the eighth straight year while its women's squad regained the throne Friday in the UAAP Season 82 collegiate fencing tournament at the Paco Arena. The Red Warriors bested Ateneo de Manila University, 45-42, in the men's team foil finals to complete a five-gold, one-silver medal haul for their 14th title overall. Sammuel Tranquilan exited UE as a winner, capturing his third straight MVP award.. "Marami naman tayong mga rising stars na parating. Tuloy-tuloy naman kaming nagte-training mula sa ilalim. Yung transition talaga namin, malalim," said UE coach Amatov Canlas. A good example is Rookie-MVP winner Queendenise Dalmacio, who led the Lady Warriors in collecting four golds, one silver, and three bronze medals to claim a league-best 13th crown. "Actually, magkaka-batch iyan. Sina Queen at Sam (Catantan). Sabay-sabay iyan noong time na ni-recruit ko sila noong mga bata pa talaga ang mga iyan," said Canlas, who also handled the national team that won two gold medals in the 30th Southeast Asian Games. "Tumaas din ang level ni Queen magmula noong nakapasok siya sa national team. Naglaro siya ng SEA Games kaya iba na ang mental toughness niya," he added. The 20-year old Dalmacio was impressive, especially in ruling the women's individual saber event on the second day of competition. "Hindi ko nga inaasahan na magiging Rookie-MVP siya. Deserved naman niya talaga iyan," said Canlas. UE topped De La Salle University, 45-36, in the women's team epee Finals and returned in the afternoon with a 45-19 conquest of University of Santo Tomas in the women's team saber gold medal match. "Happy ako sa performance ng team. Taon-taon naman ganito ang nangyari," said Canlas. The Blue Eagles finished second in the men's side with a 1-3-2 haul, while the Green Archers had a 0-1-5 tally in third place. De La Salle took the runner-up honors with 1-2-1, while last season's champion Ateneo settled for third with 1-1-2......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 14th, 2020

Kobe Bryant left deep legacy in LA sports, basketball world

By GREG BEACHAM AP Sports Writer LOS ANGELES (AP) — Kobe Bryant inspired a generation of basketball players worldwide with both his sublime skills and his unquenchable competitive fire. He also earned Los Angeles’ eternal adoration during his two decades as the fierce soul of the city’s beloved Lakers. Less than four years into his retirement from the NBA, Bryant was seeking new challenges and working to inspire his daughters’ generation through sports and storytelling when his next act ended shockingly early. Bryant, the 18-time All-Star who won five championships and became one of the greatest basketball players of his generation during a 20-year career with the Los Angeles Lakers, died in a helicopter crash Sunday. He was 41. The crash occurred in the foggy hills above Calabasas, California, about 30 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles, a person familiar with the situation told The Associated Press. A different person familiar with the case confirmed Bryant's 13-year-old daughter Gianna also was killed. Both of the AP's unnamed sources spoke on condition of anonymity because few details of the crash had been released publicly. Authorities said nine people were on the helicopter, and all were presumed dead. No names were released. Bryant lived south of Los Angeles in coastal Orange County for much of his adult life, and he often used helicopters to save time and avoid Southern California's notorious traffic. He often traveled to practices and games by helicopter before his playing career ended in 2016, and he kept up the practice after retirement as he attended to his many new ventures, which included a burgeoning entertainment company that recently produced an Academy Award-winning animated short film. The crash occurred about 20 miles from Mamba Sports Academy, Bryant’s basketball training complex in Thousand Oaks, California. A girls basketball tournament was scheduled for Sunday at the facility. Bryant, who had four daughters with his wife, Vanessa, dedicated himself to boosting women’s sports in recent years, coaching and mentoring basketball players around the world. Gianna, better known as Gigi, had a promising youth career. Bryant sat with her courtside at a Brooklyn Nets game late last year, clearly passing along his wisdom to his daughter. Bryant told Jimmy Kimmel in 2018 that Gianna wanted to play in the WNBA and recalled how fans would often approach him saying “you gotta have a boy, you gotta someone to carry on the tradition, the legacy.” Gianna took exception: “She’s like, 'Oy, I got this,’” Bryant recalled. Bryant retired nearly four years ago as the third-leading scorer in NBA history, finishing two decades in Lakers purple and gold as a prolific shooter with a sublime all-around game and a relentless competitive ethic that inspired strong reactions from fans and opponents alike. He held that No. 3 spot in the league scoring ranks until Saturday night, when the Lakers’ LeBron James passed him during a game in Philadelphia, Bryant’s hometown. “Continuing to move the game forward @KingJames,” Bryant wrote in his last tweet. “Much respect my brother.” On Saturday night, James said he was "happy just to be in any conversation with Kobe Bean Bryant, one of the all-time greatest basketball player to ever play. One of the all-time greatest Lakers.” News of Bryant’s death inspired an outpouring of grief around the sports world and beyond, but it was felt particularly painfully in Los Angeles, where Bryant was unquestionably the sprawling city's most popular athlete and one of its most beloved public figures. The Lakers’ next game isn’t until Tuesday night against the crosstown rival Clippers, but hundreds of fans — many in Bryant jerseys and Lakers gear — spontaneously gathered at Staples Center and in the surrounding LA Live entertainment complex on Sunday, weeping and staring at video boards with Bryant’s image before the Grammy awards ceremony. “I thought he was going to live forever,” Lakers great Magic Johnson told KCBS-TV. “I thought he was invincible. ... There was nobody who took more pride in putting on that Laker uniform than Kobe. Nobody. He was just special. We will miss him and we’ll remember him for his greatness, but let’s not forget how he impacted the world, too.” The NBA kept its games on as scheduled when the news broke, but the San Antonio Spurs and Toronto Raptors both took voluntary 24-second shot clock violations at the start of their game in honor of Bryant, who wore No. 24 for the second half of his career. Several other teams followed up by deliberately taking delays of 24 and 8 seconds, honoring both of his jersey numbers. Many players were seen crying before their games, and James looked emotional on the tarmac when he got off the Lakers’ team plane from Philadelphia. Bryant’s future appeared to be limitless in retirement, whether in sports or entertainment. He opened a production company shortly after leaving the Lakers, saying he was just as passionate about storytelling as he had been about his sport. He won an Oscar in 2018 for his contributions to “Dear Basketball,” an animated short about his relationship to the game. He also produced content for ESPN. In 2003, Bryant was charged with attacking a 19-year-old employee at a Colorado resort. He had said the two had consensual sex, and the charge was eventually dropped. The woman later filed a civil suit against Bryant that was settled out of court. Bryant's adulation remained strong in Los Angeles even during the sexual assault allegations. Bryant became one of the game’s most popular players as the face of the 16-time NBA champion Lakers franchise. He was the league MVP in 2008 and a two-time NBA scoring champion, but he also earned 12 selections to the NBA’s All-Defensive teams. He teamed with Shaquille O’Neal in a combustible partnership to lead the Lakers to NBA titles in 2000, 2001 and 2002. He later teamed with Pau Gasol to win two more titles in 2009 and 2010. A two-time Olympic gold medalist with the dominant U.S. team, Bryant retired in 2016 after scoring 60 points in his final NBA game. In December 2017, the Lakers hung banners retiring his No. 8 and No. 24 jerseys in the Staples Center rafters in an unprecedented double honor. Bryant looms large over the current generation of NBA players, most of whom grew up either idolizing Bryant or absorbing his work ethic and competitive spirit in the same way Bryant's generation learned from Michael Jordan. After James passed Bryant on Saturday, he remembered listening in awe to Bryant when the superstar came to speak at a childhood basketball camp. “I remember one thing he said: If you want to be great at it, or want to be one of the greats, you’ve got to put the work in,” James said. James later teamed up with Bryant on the 2008 U.S. Olympic team in Beijing. “He had zero flaws offensively,” James said. “Zero. You backed off of him, he could shoot the 3. You body him up a little bit, he could go around you. He could shoot from mid-range. He could post. He could make free throws. ... He was just immortal offensively because of his skill set and his work ethic.” Bryant was a basketball superstar for his entire adult life, and he grew up from a teenager to a respected veteran in the unforgiving Hollywood spotlight. He entered the NBA draft straight out of high school in 1996 after a childhood spent partly in Italy, where his father, former NBA player Joe “Jellybean” Bryant, played professionally. He spoke four languages and played a major role in the NBA's international growth over his two decades in the league, traveling the world and connecting with athletes in other sports and celebrities. The Lakers acquired the 17-year-old Bryant in a trade shortly after Charlotte drafted him, and he immediately became one of the most exciting and intriguing players in the sport alongside O’Neal, who had signed with the Lakers as a free agent. Bryant won the Slam Dunk Contest as a rookie, and the Lakers gradually grew into a team that won three consecutive championships. Bryant and Gasol, the Spanish star, formed the nucleus of another championship team in 2008, reaching three straight NBA Finals and winning two more titles. Between those title runs and before the quiet final years of his career, Bryant accomplished innumerable feats including an 81-point game against Toronto in January 2006. Bryant's final NBA seasons were dogged by injuries, but he still went into retirement with that jaw-dropping 60-point performance against Utah. ___ AP Basketball Writer Tim Reynolds contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 27th, 2020

20 for 20: Pinoy Sports Personalities to Watch in 2020

As we enter a new decade, ABS-CBN Sports takes a look at 20 Pinoy sports personalities destined to shine in 2020.    Kiefer Ravena After an 18-month wait, Kiefer Ravena is finally back in basketball. Despite only playing in the PBA’s third conference, his impact was immediate, leading NLEX to the number 1 seed in the Governors’ Cup. The Road Warriors didn’t advance sure, but if Kiefer can impact a team that way in limited time, wait until you see what he can do with a full offseason.   Alex Eala At just 14 years old, Filipina tennister Alex Eala is already turning heads, and she’s yet to turn pro. With a runner-up finish at the ITF Mayor’s Cup in Osaka, Japan and her first ITF Juniors title in Cape Town, South Africa, Alex has had quite the fruitful year, leading to a career-best 11th-place ranking in the ITF Juniors table to finish the year.  Heading into 2020, Eala now has her sights set on turning pro as she plans to join more professional tournaments to raise her ranking even more. Expect the young tennis star to make even more headlines in the coming year.     Bryan Bagunas A vital cog in the national team’s silver medal finish in the 30th Southeast Asian Games, Bagunas is considered as one of the best Filipino volleyball players in this generation. Eyes will be on his blossoming international career playing as an import in the Japan V. Premier League.         Margielyn Didal While already a household name in Philippine skateboarding due to her success in the 2018 Asian Games in Jakarta, Margielyn Didal made even more waves in 2019. The 20-year old Cebuana reached the semifinals of the 2019 SLS World Championships in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and captured gold in the 2019 National Championships and the 2019 Southeast Asian Games.  Didal is currently looking to qualify for the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo, and if she can do so, it’s highly likely that the Pinay skater can become an even bigger star in the industry.    Marck Espejo After his spectacular collegiate career with the Ateneo Blue Eagles, Marck Espejo's colorful career as part of the men's national volleyball team and in the club league continues to blossom. Just like Bryan Bagunas, Espejo will be showing his skills internationally with a stint in Thailand following a historic silver medal finish at the 30th SEA Games.   Yuka Saso After a decorated amateur career that saw her  participate in major tournaments such as the Ladies’ European Tour, the Summer Youth Olympics and claim top honors in the 2018 Asian Games, 2018 and 2019 Philippine Ladies Open, and the 2019 Girls’ Junior PGA Championship, 18-year old Pinay golfer Yuka Saso finally made the jump to pro in November of 2019.  With even more competitions in store plus a 2020 Tokyo Olympics berth in her crosshairs, it’s quite likely that we hear more about Saso in the coming months.  Carlos Yulo Perhaps no other young athlete in the Philippines shot to stardom faster than gymnastics phenomenon Carlos Edriel Yulo. After a gold medal finish in the floor exercise at the 2019 World Championships in Stuttgart, Yulo hauled in even more hardware in the 2019 Southeast Asian Games, taking home two more gold medals and five silvers.  Yulo’s spectacular 2019 earned him a spot in the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, and if his SEA Games and World Championships performances are any indication, Caloy is bound for another podium finish on the biggest stage there is.   Eya Laure Last UAAP season’s rookie of the year will return as the heir apparent of Season 81 MVP Sisi Rondina. With her national team stint, all eyes will be on the younger Laure as she reunites with older sister EJ as they try to bring University of Sto. Tomas back in the Finals after falling short last year. Hidilyn Diaz 2019 was another big year for Olympic silver medalist weightlifter Hidilyn Diaz, highlighted by her first ever gold medal in the 2019 Southeast Asian Games. Diaz also finished with silver medals in the 2019 Asian Championships and a bronze in the 2019 World Championships.  All those podium finishes are crucial in Diaz’s quest for another Olympics berth in 2020. Should the 28-year lock up another spot in the Summer Games in Tokyo, we could see another Olympic medal coming home.    Kat Tolentino  After initially announcing that she would not come back for her final season in the UAAP, Kat Tolentino changed her decision and will suit up for the Ateneo Lady Eagles once last time, providing a great morale-booster in their bid for back-to-back titles. Tolentino’s leadership will be tested as she will be leading a young team.      Joshua Pacio 23-year old Joshua “The Passion” Pacio proved to be the brightest spot for Philippine MMA stable Team Lakay in 2019. After opening the year with a questionnable decision loss to Yosuke Saruta, Pacio silenced any doubts in the rematch and regained the ONE Strawweight World Championship with a highlight-reel headkick knockout. Pacio would follow that up with another masterful performance, this time with a second-round submission win over top contender Rene Catalan before the end of the year.  2020 is shaping up to become another banner year for the rising Pinoy star, as he’s scheduled for another title defense on January 31st in Manila, this time against former champ Alex Silva of Brazil. A win for Pacio will solidify his claim of being the best strawweight ever in ONE Championship history.     Louie Romero The Adamson University freshman displayed great potential during the pre-season when she piloted the Lady Falcons to title win in the PVL Season 3 Collegiate Conference. Romero is expected to be a gem of a setter for the young Adamson squad hoping make a return in the UAAP Final Four. Manny Pacquiao While eight-division world champion Manny Pacquiao is certainly in the twilight of his professional boxing career, 2019 showed that he is still one of the best around. A successful title defense over Adrien Broner followed by an impressive dismantling of the previously-undefeated Keith Thurman to capture the WBA’s primary world title proved that even at 40, Manny Pacquiao is still a big name in the sport.  With Pacquiao targeting an early return in 2020, more big names are lined up to fight “the People’s Champ”, including names like Danny Garcia, Shawn Porter, and even a title-unification bout against Errol Spence. Still, the biggest fight that is out there proves to be a rematch against Floyd Mayweather Jr, granted that “Money” finally bites.    Faith Nisperos A key addition for the repeat-seeking Ateneo de Manila University. The highly-touted rookie hitter will add height and firepower for the Lady Eagles in UAAP Season 82 women’s volleyball. In the previous PVL Collegiate Conference, Nisperos flashed her scoring prowess, exploding for 35 points in one outing.   Robert Bolick The two best rookies of 2019 were CJ Perez and Robert Bolick. We know what we can expect from CJ, but Bolick is an interesting case as 2020 will be his return from knee injury. Bolick could still win Rookie of the Year, but even if he doesn’t, his return to Northport could push the reloaded Batang Pier from a Cinderella team to full-on PBA title contender.   Joshua Retamar His playmaking skills as well as his efficiency on net defense during the national team’s silver medal finish in the 30th Southeast Asian Games makes him a setter to watch out for come UAAP. Retamar is an asset for National University’s three-peat bid.       Kai Sotto The Philippines' 7-foot-2, 17-year-old is opening eyes as he suits up for Atlanta-based The Skills Factory - so much so that he has already gotten interest from quite a few US NCAA schools. Before Sotto continues breaking the glass ceiling for Filipinos, though, he will go home for a while to wear the flag with Mighty Sports-Pilipinas in the 2020 Dubai International Basketball Tournament.   Jema Galanza Coming off a great outing to close the PVL Season 3 highlighted by copping the Open Conference MVP award, expectations are high for Jema Galanza as Creamline aims to reclaim the PVL Reinforced Conference crown and complete an Open Conference three-peat.      Kobe Paras Many questioned just what the 6-foot-6 tantalizing talent would bring to the table for UP - but more often than not, he had all the answers as he led the Fighting Maroons to their second straight Final Four. In the end, Paras was actually the steadying force State U needed in what was a hyped up season. They may not have made it back to the Finals, but they still got much more motivation as they run it back for next year.   Pat Aquino What's next for the most decorated mentor in women's basketball? Pat Aquino followed up a six-peat for National U with the Philippines' first-ever gold medal in women's basketball in the SEA Games. Without a doubt, he will only continue steering the sport forward especially as the likes of UST and FEU are already gearing up to put up greater challenges in the new year.   Isaac Go Isaac Go is technically not the no. 1 pick of the 2019 PBA Draft but he is without a doubt, the no. 1 prospect of the year. His top selection from the special Gilas Pilipinas Draft is proof of that. Gilas Pilipinas has the FIBA Asia Cup Qualifiers on deck in 2020 and as a new era dawns on the national team, all eyes will be on the biggest piece for the future that’s already drafted into the new Philippine squad......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 1st, 2020

Barcelona wins with Messi hat trick, Suarez backheel goal

By Tales Azzoni, Associated Press MADRID (AP) — It was showtime for Barcelona at Camp Nou Stadium. Lionel Messi had a hat trick. Luis Suárez scored with a superb backheel goal. There was even an assist by goalkeeper Marc-André ter Stegen to Antoine Griezmann's first goal in six Spanish league matches. With one of its best performances of the season, Barcelona cruised to a 5-2 win over promoted Mallorca on Saturday, keeping pace with Real Madrid and regaining the league lead. Madrid had beaten Espanyol 2-0 earlier Saturday to provisionally move to the top, but Barcelona's win left the teams tied on points and the Catalan club ahead on goal difference. The highlight of Barcelona's win was Suárez's 43rd-minute backheel goal, which came after a smart exchange of passes between Frenkie de Jong and Sergi Roberto. De Jong made the final pass to Suárez who was near the corner of the six-meter (yard) box, and the Uruguay striker hit the ball with the back of his right foot, pressing it down and making it bounce off the ground over goalkeeper Manolo Reina. “I knew I had a difficult angle, my only option was to backheel the ball firmly so it would bounce and make it harder for the goalkeeper,” Suárez said. “It wouldn’t be impossible for the ball to go through if it didn’t bounce. Luckily it worked and it was a beautiful goal.” Barcelona's dominant performance had started with Griezmann's seventh-minute goal off a long pass by Ter Stegen, who quickly took a goal kick to set up the Frenchman's run from behind the midfield line. Griezmann entered the area and niftly tapped the ball over Reina. It was the second assist for Ter Stegen this season. He had also set up Suárez's goal against Getafe in September. Messi was at his best, scoring in the 17th with a superb curling left-footed shot into the top corner and then with another well-placed strike from outside the area in the 41st. He completed his record 35th league hat trick from inside the area in the 83rd after Suárez's pass. The goal also allowed Messi to take the league's scoring lead with 12 goals, one more than Real Madrid's Karim Benzema. Before the match, Messi was presented with the Ballon d'Or award which he won for best player of the year on Monday. Messi's three young sons carried the trophy out to him as the Camp Nou crowd chanted his name. Ante Budimir scored Mallorca's goals in the 35th and 64th minutes. Barcelona has won nine of its last 10 league matches, including four in a row. It has lost only once in its last 14 games in all competitions. It was the seventh consecutive away loss for Mallorca, which stayed in 17th place, one point from the relegation zone. MADRID STAYS CLOSE Raphael Varane and Karim Benzema scored a goal in each half to give Madrid its win over second-to-last-place Espanyol at the Santiago Bernabéu Stadium. The result extended Madrid's unbeaten run in all competitions to nine matches. It was the team's fourth straight league win, and the 14th in the last 15 games against Espanyol across all competitions. Varane opened the scoring with a low left-foot shot from inside the area in the 37th after a pass by Benzema, who sealed the victory with a shot from close range in the 79th after being set up by midfielder Federico Valverde. Madrid played the final minutes with 10 men as left-back Ferland Mendy was sent off with a second yellow card for a hard foul in the 83rd. Madrid played without several regular starters because of injuries, including Gareth Bale, Eden Hazard, James Rodríguez and Marcelo. VALENCIA DERBY It was a three-goal night for Levante striker Roger Martí, but only two counted for his team in a 4-2 loss to city rival Valencia. Martí put the hosts ahead with a pair of goals by the 20th minute, but then netted an own-goal just before halftime while trying to clear a cross from inside the area. The ball hit his right knee and went backward into his own net. Valencia came back with two goals in two minutes by Kevin Gameiro in second-half breakaways, one in the 57th and another in the 59th. Ferran Torres closed the scoring in the 88th to give Valencia its fourth win in its last five league games. “It was a shame that own-goal just before the break,” Martí said. “It was an unlucky play.” Levante played with 10 men after defender Eliseo Falcón was sent off with a second yellow card in the 74th. Levante hasn't won the Valencia derby since 2016, having lost three of the last five. The result left Valencia in seventh place and Levante stayed in 11th. GRANADA WINS AGAIN Promoted Granada ended a five-match winless streak with a 3-0 rout of Alavés, moving to eighth with 24 points. Carlos Fernández, Roberto Soldado and Yangel Herrera scored second-half goals for Granada, which had lost four of its last five matches. Alavés, sitting in 15th place, had two players sent off — Wakaso Mubarak in the 67th and Víctor Laguardia in stoppage time......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 8th, 2019

Pangasinan receives 5th SGLG award

LINGAYEN,Pangasinan, Nov 7. (PIA) -- For the fifth straight year, the provincial government of Pangasinan was awarded the Seal of Good Local Governance (SGLG) by the Department of the Interior and.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsNov 9th, 2019

Pangasinan receives 5th SGLG award

LINGAYEN,Pangasinan, Nov 7. (PIA) -- For the fifth straight year, the provincial government of Pangasinan was awarded the Seal of Good Local Governance (SGLG) by the Department of the Interior and.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsNov 8th, 2019

Conley breaks out, Jazz beat Clippers as Leonard rests

By Matthew Coles, Associated Press SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Mike Conley snapped an early season slump with 29 points and the Utah Jazz beat the Los Angeles Clippers 110-96 on Wednesday night (Thursday, PHL time) with Kawhi Leonard sitting out. "I just wanted to get back to who I am," Conley said. Conley had 18 points in the third quarter as the Jazz scored 40 in the period and took a 90-71 lead. Utah (4-1) has won three in a row. Leonard missed the game for scheduled rest, though coach Doc Rivers has said his star forward has been healthy and energized. The Clippers play the second half of a back-to-back Thursday (Friday, PHL time) against San Antonio in Los Angeles. Donovan Mitchell scored 24 points, Bojan Bogdanovic had 14 and Rudy Gobert 13. Lou Williams paced the Clippers (3-2) with 24 points, 16 before halftime. The matchup of one of the league's top defenses against one of the top offenses lost some its luster without Leonard, but the Jazz showed how potent they could be with 55 percent shooting while holding their opponents below 100 points for the fifth straight game. JaMychal Green, who had 23 points, led his fellow Clipper reserves in a fourth-quarter rally, cutting a 23-point edge to 99-89. Conley responded with a 3-pointer and a lob to Gobert for a dunk. Conley struggled in his first four games with Utah after playing 12 years in Memphis, including a 1-for-16 shooting performance in the opener and an 0-for-7 outing in the last game. In recent days, he admitted it has taken more time than he expected to feel comfortable with the Jazz plays and terminology. When Conley hit a 3-pointer and followed it with a tough layup high off the backboard in third quarter, he pumped his fist and yelled to the rafters. When Los Angeles called timeout, the entire Jazz bench leaped off the bench and ran onto the court to greet the point guard. A few minutes later, Conley hit a high-arcing 3-pointer and motioned for the crowd to get louder. Cheers rang out and then turned into chants of "Con-ley, Con-ley, Con-ley". Conley made 11 of 17 shots, including five 3-pointers, and had five assists with a season-low two turnovers. The Jazz were hot from the start and led by 14 points early in the second quarter. The Clippers trimmed the advantage to 52-51 at halftime. TIP-INS Clippers: Williams, who has won the Sixth Man of the Year award a record three times, started the game. "Lou has no problem starting or coming off the bench," Rivers said. ... LA had 20 turnovers. Jazz: Dante Exum is still inactive as he recovers from knee surgery. . Utah had a season-high 13 steals. UP NEXT Clippers host the San Antonio Spurs on Thursday night (Friday, PHL time). Jazz visit Sacramento Kings on Friday night (Saturday, PHL time)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 31st, 2019

UAAP 82: Daos leads Ateneo to third-straight Women s Swimming title

LOS BAÑOS, LAGUNA – Chloe Daos and Ateneo capped another dominant campaign by securing the school's third straight UAAP Women's Swimming Championship, Sunday at Trace Aquatics Center here. Ateneo added 115 more points to end up on top in the four-day, four-team meet with 458 points to win the school's sixth overall crown in the competition. But besides another flawless campaign by Daos, Ateneo swimming program director Archie Lim credited the school's rookies for delivering. "We were lucky na madami pumasok din na freshmen, at the same time yung mga MVP and leader swimmers namin are still there, so it's just a matter of maintaining the culture and hoping the new swimmers catch the spirit," Lim said. Daos clocked in a UAAP record time of 2:19.03 in the 200m Butterfly to reset the five-year-old 2:19.71 mark of Hannah Dato and complete her third straight flawless, seven-gold-medal haul season. The Lady Eagles displayed their depth and dominance of the league with a sweep of the said event after Suzanne Himor (2:27.26), Raegan Gavino (2:28.57) and Kristine Santos (2:32.24) occupied the second to fourth positions. UP’s Cindy Fernandez (31.51 seconds) and La Salle’s Nikki Pamintuan (31.70 seconds) rounded out the podium in the 50m Backstroke while Ateneo’s Andrea Ngui (27.65 seconds) and UP’s Angela Villamil (27.89 seconds) did the same for the 50m Freestyle. On the other hand, University of the Philippines’ prized recruit Erin Castrillo ended her maiden season with a golden double, claiming the 50m Backstroke (30.98 seconds) and 50m Freestyle (27.23 seconds) titles. The sprint queen thus captured the Rookie of the Year award with 96 points. The Lady Eagles had a rookie ace of their own in Nirel Ibarra who produced a golden performance in the 200m Breaststroke by finishing in 2:50.63 ahead of teammate Jazmin Chua (2:51.72) and Lady Maroons’ Pricila Aquino (2:52.16). In the tournament’s final event, Courtney Gray, Chua, Himor, and Marjorie Manguiat teamed up for Ateneo to capture the 400m Medley Relay gold in 4:41.08. UP was a distant second in 4:46.33 while UST took the bronze in 4:50.38. "Yun na, naging challenge for the MVP swimmers namin, to inspire the new ones by showing them to never stop improvement and setting higher goals in spite sa achievements nila or ng team," added Lim. UP tallied 395 points for second while La Salle completed the podium with 203. UST had 96 points......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 21st, 2019

UAAP 82: Ateneo turns things around to capture 6th-straight Men s Swimming Championship

LOS BAÑOS, LAGUNA – Just when everyone thought that Ateneo’s dominant reign in the UAAP Season 82 Men’s Swimming Championships has reached its end, it pulled off a remarkable turnaround to sneak past erstwhile leader La Salle, Sunday at Trace Aquatics Center here. This is Ateneo’s sixth straight championship in the competition. Despite losing to graduation key cogs Jessie Lacuna and Aldo Batungbacal, the Blue Eagles were able to keep DLSU from pulling away for three days before unleashing a fourth-day storm like no other to emerge a mere 10 points ahead of La Salle and celebrate another UAAP title. Ateneo was able to amass 353 points against La Salle’s 343 points while University of Santo Tomas (322 points) and University of the Philippines (193 points) completed the cast. "It was really one of our best championships. Sobrang daming naging roadblocks talaga, not just our MVPs graduating, but also meron kami swimmer nag ka-appendicitis, meron went into depression, and other problems na for a time we almost lost that belief na we could still win,” shared Ateneo swimming program director Archie Lim. Ianiko Limfilipino led the way for Ateneo registering a time of 17:27.56 in the 1500m Freestyle to bring home the gold medal. La Salle’s Antoine Mendoza surprised everyone with a silver medal finish in 17:30.91 while UP’s Keane Ting finished third in 17:36.54. While everyone expected Limfilipino to swim and rule the 200m Breaststroke, he sacrificed participating in the said event to better help his team in the 200m Butterfly which he finished in 2:13.51 and an all-important third place. The favorite to win the 200m Butterfly was none other than La Salle ace Sacho Ilustre who did not disappoint with his dominant swim of 2:05.65 en route to his seventh gold medal. UST’s Reynald Cullentas took the silver in 2:12.50. La Salle also ruled the 200m Breaststroke with their rookie EJ Jayme (2:27.31) keeping Ateneo rookie Jiron Rotoni (2:27.89) and UST’s Dyrham Palfry (2:27.92) at bay. UST also produced a gold medal in the 50m Backstroke as Christian Anor ruled the event in 27.81 seconds, topping Ateneo’s Miguel Barlisan (28.36 seconds) and DLSU’s Christian Sy (28.41 seconds). The Blue Eagles ultimately turned things around when they completed a 1-2 finish in the 50m Freestyle behind Drei Buhain’s 24.06-second and Barlisan’s 24.11-second performance. UST’s Renz Gawidan rounded out the podium with his time of 24.92 seconds. Entering the 400m Medley Relay, the final event of the tournament, Ateneo was already sporting a six-point lead and only needed a bronze medal finish to secure another championship. La Salle, on the other hand, needed a golden finish to have a shot at dethroning the defending champions. UST’s Kevin Dagum, Jay Cabulit, Reynald Cullentas, and Renz Gawidan played spoilers to the Green Tankers, topping the event in UAAP record fashion erasing Ateneo’s old mark of 4:03.49 with their own time of 4:01.13. Ateneo finished second in 4:04.93 while UP took third in 4:06.33. "Obviously, the swimmers stepped up big time. So, super happy and satisfying not only for winning the championship, but more importantly lumabas or na-build yung championship character nila," said Lim. It was also a down-the-wire race for the Rookie of the Year award as Rotoni’s 47 points squeaked past Ting’s 46 points. La Salle did not go home empty-handed with Ilustre securing his first UAAP Men’s Most Valuable Player award, sporting a flawless seven for seven performance......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 21st, 2019

Cole fans 15, Bregman homers as Astros top Rays 3-1

By Kristie Rieken, Associated Press HOUSTON (AP) — Houston's pair of aces dealt the Astros a pair of wins. Gerrit Cole carried his splendid September into an outstanding October with a 15-strikeout performance and Alex Bregman handed fans chanting MVP the mighty swing they craved. The Astros survived a wild ninth inning to beat the Tampa Bay Rays 3-1 on Saturday night for a 2-0 lead in their AL Division Series. Houston is one win from reaching the AL Championship Series for the third straight year. "We've got a lot more work to take care of," Cole said. "There's a few months this winter that maybe we can sit back and have a drink about it. Right now, it's on to the next one." Cole, 5-0 with a 1.07 ERA in six starts last month, set an Astros postseason strikeouts record over 7 2/3 scoreless innings to win his franchise-record 17th straight decision. The strikeouts tied for third-most in a postseason game, behind only Bob Gibson's 17 in the 1968 World Series and Kevin Brown's 16 in a 1998 NL Division Series. "He was incredible," manager AJ Hinch said. "He had complete command of the entire game." Cole's performance came after fellow ace and Cy Young Award contender Justin Verlander pitched seven scoreless innings to lead the Astros to a 6-2 win in Friday's opener. Throwback performances from another era. "Whether it's about the new-age opener or pulling guys third time through, most of the people that support that haven't had Verlander or Cole on their team," Hinch said. "It's hard for me to relate to having to pull guys early or wanting to pull guys early when these guys are putting up these kinds of performances. ... I'm going to roll with these boys while we have them." Cole (1-0), who led the majors with 326 strikeouts in the regular season, extended his big league record with his 10th straight game with at least 10 Ks. The Rays were unable to string anything together off of him on a night he induced 33 swings and misses — the most in a postseason game since MLB started tracking the stat in 2008 — and threw a career-high 118 pitches. "I don't think anything he did was surprising," Rays manager Kevin Cash said. "He's just that good." "He was majestic," the Rays' Willy Adames said. Kevin Kiemaier doubled with two outs in the eighth and Cole was lifted after putting on Adames with Tampa Bay's first walk. The right-hander received a standing ovation as he walked off the mound and waved to the crowd just before he reached the dugout. Roberto Osuna took over and struck out Yandy Díaz to end the inning before loading the bases with no outs in the ninth. Austin Meadows and Tommy Pham hit consecutive singles, Ji-Man Choi walked and Avisaíl Garcia grounded into a forceout that scored Meadows. Osuna walked Brandon Lowe, reloading the bases, and Hinch brought in Will Harris. Travis d'Arnaud worked the count full, then struck out on a high cutter. Kiermaier grounded to first baseman Yuli Gurriel, who flipped to Harris, who stepped on first for the save. Tampa Bay is hitting .177 with two extra-base hits. Game 3 of the best-of five series is Monday in Florida. "I don't think there's a real message," Rays manager Kevin Cash said. "They know what's at stake." Bregman, who hit a career-best 41 home runs in the regular season, homered off Blake Snell (0-1) leading off the fourth. "It's just lack of a pitch," Snell said. "I'm still finding it, still trying to get there. I know I can, so that's why it's frustrating." All seven of Bregman's homers have come off All-Stars, including two against Chris Sale and one each vs. Trevor Bauer, Clayton Kershaw, Corey Kluber and Kenley Jansen. His shot gave the Astros a home run in 27 straight games, extending a franchise record. After Lowe's error at second gifted Houston two runs in the opener, another error on helped in the seventh. Adames bobbled Gurriel's leadoff grounder to shortstop, then bounced the throw to first. Carlos Correa doubled and Martín Maldonado blooped a run-scoring single to left. Correa added a two-out RBI single off Nick Anderson in the eighth for a 3-0 lead. Snell, the 2018 AL Cy Young Award winner, sat out from July 22-Sept. 17 after arthroscopic surgery to remove bone chips in his left elbow. He didn't get out of the third inning in any of his three September starts, but said he hoped to give the Rays five innings on Saturday. Instead he was lifted one batter after Bregman's homer, finishing with four hits and a strikeout in 3 1/3 innings. "I wish I would have gone deeper," Snell said. "When you face a guy like that, you want to be out there as long as him."    DAZZLING DEFENSE Correa helped Cole out with a fantastic defensive play to start the game. Díaz led off with a grounder toward Correa, who grabbed the ball backhanded while on the run and spun around for the throw to Gurriel that just beat a sliding Díaz. "It's stuff that people don't see, but for me I always say that if you are going to win championships you have to pitch and you have to play defense, and then the offense comes," Correa said. UP NEXT Former Astro Charlie Morton, who got the win in the Rays wild-card victory, will start against Zack Greinke. Morton pitched for the Astros from 2017-18 and played a big role in their 2017 World Series title. He won Game 7 of AL Championship Series against the Yankees and Game 7 of the World Series at Dodger Stadium to give Houston its first championship. Morton had a tough time in his last start against Houston when he gave up a season-high six runs in four innings, which tied his shortest start of season, in a 15-1 win by Astros on Aug. 27. Greinke, acquired from Arizona at the trade deadline, went 8-1 with a 3.02 ERA in 10 starts after the trade capped by a gem in his last start when he came two outs shy of his first no-hitter on Sept. 25 against Seattle......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 6th, 2019

Blame it on the juice: Pitchers set for homer-filled October

By Jake Seiner, Associated Press Justin Verlander didn't intend to alter his pitching strategy, not after 14 seasons as a major league ace. But then the home runs stopped making sense. A long drive by Yankees slugger Aaron Judge? The Houston Astros ace can live with that. This season, though, was full of surprises. Like when spindly utility man Ehire Adrianza drove a fastball into the right field party deck in Minnesota. Or the time light-hitting Angels infielder David Fletcher nearly put one into a parking lot beyond left field during a series in Monterrey, Mexico. Routine fly balls had become wall-scraping homers, and every hitter was suddenly strong enough to reach the second deck. "The game has changed completely," Verlander said. Expect more of the same this October. Hitters smashed a record 6,776 home runs in 2019, soaring past the previous high of 6,105 from two years earlier. It's a rise of over 60% from 2014, a year before a seismic home run spike attributed to tweaks in the baseballs. Major League Baseball commissioned a study in 2018 that concluded there was less drag on the ball causing all those extra homers, but Commissioner Rob Manfred has insisted MLB doesn't know why. He has also denied accusations from Verlander and other pitchers that the balls have been deliberately altered. Manfred told Forbes last week he has reconvened the scientists from the 2018 study and expects to issue another report after the World Series. His goal: "predictable, consistent performance from the baseball." First, though, may come the juiciest postseason yet. Across the 10 playoff rosters, only three qualified hitters connected for fewer than 15 home runs this season — St. Louis' Kolten Wong (11), Milwaukee's Lorenzo Cain (11) and Houston's Josh Reddick (14). There were 21 such hitters on postseason teams in 2014. Verlander has been critical of structural changes to the baseball since 2017, when pitchers and coaches from the Astros and Dodgers complained that World Series balls were slicker than ones used in the regular season. They moaned and groaned while the clubs combined for a Series-record 25 homers, but fans largely oohed and awed — especially during Game 5, a topsy-turvy classic featuring seven home runs. Verlander has called this year's balls a "joke." He's given up a career-most 36 homers, yet he's neck-and-neck with teammate Gerrit Cole for the AL Cy Young Award. How'd he do that? "I used to pitch to weak contact," he said. "I no longer try to miss barrels. I try to miss bats." After years of seeking quick outs to keep his pitch count low, Verlander has gone whole hog on punchouts. The 36-year-old totaled 300 of them in a season for the first time and surpassed 3,000 for his career in his final start. He avoided the middle of the plate at all costs, especially with runners on base — 28 of his homers were solo shots. Of course, strikeouts have surged everywhere — the majors set a record for the 12th consecutive season with 42,823 of them in 2019. There are varied reasons for that, including stronger arms and aggressive bullpen management, but pitchers say distrust in the baseball is a factor. "There's been an adaptation in the way I pitch that correlates with the ball, I just didn't necessarily realize I was doing it because of the ball," Verlander said. "You can no longer give in to a fastball away because 99% of players in Major League Baseball now can take an away fastball and hit a homer opposite field. "So what's my defense to that? My defense is I have to have you swing and miss." In the clubhouse of the NL East-champion Braves, every pitcher seems to remember at least one home run this year that looked like a pop fly off the bat. "(Christian) Yelich, he went straight-center off me," starter Mike Foltynewicz said. "(Pete) Alonso, on a changeup," added rotation-mate Mike Soroka. "You just know sometimes you might make your pitch and it's not going to matter," All-Star reliever Shane Greene said. Those pitchers aren't as concerned about strategizing around the homers as they are with steeling themselves against the frustration of it all. Soroka had the lowest home run rate of any qualified NL starter, and he credits that to an effective sinker and a willingness to be "stubborn." "The way guys are hitting them out now, every time the ball goes in the air you think it has a chance," Braves manager Brian Snitker said. "They experience all that on a daily basis over the course of the season. The ones that are successful are the ones who can handle that adversity." The postseason is a different game though, and not just because of the extra scrutiny and pressure. There are 26 hitters on postseason rosters who hit at least 30 home runs this season — not including Yelich, the Brewers' NL MVP contender who will miss the postseason with a broken kneecap. Four teams bypassed the previous season record for homers, with the Twins (307) and Yankees (306) becoming the first clubs to reach 300. "There's certain ballparks and certain times that you have to be patient," Oakland manager Bob Melvin said. "Because you know there are going to be a few more runs scored and balls are going to leave the ballpark." Stressful stuff for pitchers and managers, no doubt, but if the 2017 World Series is an indication, it could be wild fun for fans, too. This year's postseason participants combined to win 73 times in the regular season when trailing after seven innings. When no lead is safe, no game can be boring, right? Maybe. Some are concerned that this year's big fly bonanza might have been too much even for the thrill-seekers in the seats. "Before, it was like the big wreck at a NASCAR race," Greene said. "You might see one, and everybody showed up to see that one homer. Now, you're going to see six." Managers have learned to live with all that carnage. Snitker maintained the baseball won't affect his decision-making, a sentiment echoed by Astros manager AJ Hinch. Yankees skipper Aaron Boone isn't sure what to anticipate, except he's pretty sure hitters will keep finding ways to connect. "The team that ends up winning the World Series," Boone said, "will do a good job of holding offenses down and will probably hit a lot of balls in the seats when they have traffic to create some big innings off of elite pitchers. "What it ends up looking like, I don't know how to predict that." ___ AP freelancer Chris Talbott contributed from Seattle......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 1st, 2019

Lowry s British Open win caps off big year in majors

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press PORTRUSH, Northern Ireland (AP) — Winning the British Open didn't sink in right away for Shane Lowry. It apparently didn't take long. A celebration that began on the 18th fairway of Royal Portrush extended well into the night in Dublin. The European Tour posted a video on Twitter of Lowry, still dressed in all black from his final round with his cap flipped back. He was holding the claret jug in his right hand and a beer in his left as he belted out "The Fields of Athenry," an Irish folk ballad that has become popular for Irish sports fans. About last night...@ShaneLowryGolf #TheOpen pic.twitter.com/zdXW66yetz — The European Tour (@EuropeanTour) July 22, 2019 It might as well have been a celebration for all the majors this year. Nothing could top Tiger Woods in the Masters, which dwarfed an otherwise four-month stretch of compelling outcomes. Brooks Koepka had a major season not seen since before Woods began having surgeries, and the run is not over. He joined Woods as the only back-to-back PGA Championship winners in stroke play. He had chances in the final hour at the Masters and U.S. Open. And he was three strokes behind going into the weekend at the British Open, where he wound up in a distant tie for fourth. Thanks to the PGA Championship moving from August to May, all Koepka has done in the last 12 months is win two majors, finish runner-up in two others and tie for fourth. Along the way, he joined some elite company. Koepka, Woods, Jordan Spieth and Jack Nicklaus are the only players to finish no worse than fourth in all four majors in the same year. "This week is disappointing, but the rest of them ... it's been great," Koepka said Sunday. "I'm not going to lie. It's been fun." Lowry and Gary Woodland were first-time major champions, making it five straight years of at least two players winning majors for the first time. Their victories were special in their own right. Already popular with his peers, Woodland won over golf fans around the world with his gracious support of Amy Bockerstette, the 20-year-old with Down syndrome who played one hole with him in the Phoenix Open pro-am and made par from a bunker on the 16th hole. She also inspired him with three words that he kept thinking about in the final round of the U.S. Open at Pebble Beach: "You got this." Lowry wrote the perfect ending to the return of the British Open to Northern Ireland after 68 years. Sure, the focus of a sellout crowd at Royal Portrush was on Rory McIlroy, Graeme McDowell and Darren Clarke at the start. But as Lowry so beautifully and simply said when his name was on the claret jug, "Everyone knows we're all one country when it comes to golf." Woods should win anyone's award for best performance, even in the year of a World Cup when England's victory in cricket was amazing. It just doesn't seem that way. Rewind to April and find Woods trailing by two shots going into the final round of the Masters, a position from which he has never won. It had been two years since he suggested at the Champions Dinner he was done, only to fly across the Atlantic in a desperate search for help before realizing fusion surgery — the fourth procedure on his lower back — was the only route to a healthy life. Then he capped off his comeback with a flawless back nine to win a fifth green jacket and a 15th major, three short of the record set by Nicklaus. And then he took a month off and missed the cut at the PGA Championship. He tied for 21st in the U.S. Open at Pebble Beach, but only because of six birdies on his last 12 holes. He took a vacation to Thailand, spent a month away from golf and then missed the cut in the British Open. It was a reminder that while Woods is able to win on the biggest stage — none bigger than Augusta National — he also has weeks where his back or his game, and sometimes both, don't allow him to contend. "Things are different," he said before leaving Portrush. "And I'm going to have my hot weeks. I'm going to be there in contention with a chance to win, and I will win tournaments. But there are times when I'm just not going to be there." It doesn't look great now. It will later. Golf now waits nearly nine months until the next major. The longer the year goes on, the stronger memories will be of what he did at the Masters far more than the other three. If there was disappointment, look no further than McIlroy, who finished a combined 25 shots behind in the Masters, PGA Championship and U.S. Open, and lasted only two days at Royal Portrush. Ditto for Dustin Johnson, still stuck on one major, which stings even more considering he had a pair of runner-up finishes. A generation ago, Colin Montgomerie said it was tough to win majors because of Woods, which meant fewer opportunities for everyone else. That's truer now than it was then. Spieth has gone two years without winning anything. Justin Thomas was slowed by injury. It's tough to win. Tougher still is waiting 263 days from the end of the British Open to the start of the Masters......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 23rd, 2019

PVL: Valdez claims third MVP award

Creamline star Alyssa Valdez added another feather to her cap after bagging the Premier Volleyball League Reinforced Conference Most Valuable Player award. The prized hitter collected her third conference MVP hardware on Saturday before the Cool Smashers’ Game 2 match against PetroGazz in the best-of-three Finals at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. Valdez averaged 12 points per game, tallied a 35.77% success rate in attacks and led the rest of the field at the service line with 0.68 aces per set during the 10-game elimination round. The national team member also landed at the 10th spot in digging with 2.24 digs per frame for a consistent all-around performance that fueled Creamline’s return to the championship round for the third straight tournament. The Cool Smashers’ skipper, who won the inaugural import-laden conference and last year’s Open Conference MVP recognitions, was also named 2nd Best Open Spiker. BanKo’s Nicole Tiamzon won the 1st Best Open Spiker award. The Perlas Spikers hitter averaged 13 points per game, the highest scoring norm from a local player.      Tiamzon’s teammates Dzi Gervacio and Kathy Bersola won the Best Opposite Hitter and 1st Best Middle Blocker, respectively, Angela Nunag was named Best Libero while Jia Morado pocketed her fourth straight Best Setter award. Morado, who averaged 5.94 excellent sets per frame, ruled the playmaking position since joining the league in the inaugural Open Conference two years ago.               Rounding up the award winners were PetroGazz players Cherry Nunag (2nd Best Middle Blocker) and Cuban Wilma Salas (Best Foreign Guest Player).   ---    Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 13th, 2019

Five things we learned from Game 4 of the 2019 Finals

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com OAKLAND, Calif. – Five things we learned from the Toronto Raptors’ 105-92 victory over the Golden State Warriors in Game 4 of the 2019 NBA Finals on Friday at Oracle Arena: 1. Dynasties eventually become ‘die-nastys’ Will we get one more game at Oracle Arena? The scene of so much Golden State wonderfulness the past five seasons? A building about to be abandoned when the Warriors move from Oakland to a state-of-the-art arena across the Bay? Hold up. Asking one more game out of the Warriors seems a lot at the moment. These guys just suffered their second consecutive home playoff loss by 10 points or more, something that hasn’t happened to this franchise in 50 years. After three straight games scoring precisely 109 points, the Warriors came up 15 short Friday (Saturday, PHL time). They are 0-9 overall this season when held to double digits, and 0-11 in the playoffs during the Steve Kerr era, when they score 94 or fewer. And now they’re on the wrong side of a 3-1 deficit, lacking everything from certain healthy bodies to an edge, a sharpness that was missing in the second half. Granted, Golden State once held a 3-1 edge in a Finals, all the way back in 2016 … when LeBron James, Kyrie Irving and the Cavaliers chased them down and became the only Finals team to claw out of such a chasm. The Warriors did the same to Oklahoma City in the 2016 Western Conference finals. So they not only have a blueprint, they have the know-how and an opportunity to do it again. Like Kerr before him on Friday's (Saturday, PHL time) postgame podium, Warriors forward Draymond Green spoke of simply trying to win one basketball game, the next game, as the proper way to dig out of this series hole. But then he dropped his guard and mentioned winning three in a row, something the Warriors have done often. But they’re a whole year removed from doing that in a Finals (last year’s sweep of the Cavs) with a healthy Kevin Durant. This is a more worn-down, tired team. In fact, Game 4 was more than Golden State’s 102nd game of 2018-19, regular and postseason combined. It was the 102nd playoff game of their five consecutive Finals runs, which means they have crammed an extra season-plus into their schedules compared to the underachievers on lottery teams sitting at home. From the looks of it Friday (Saturday, PHL time), these guys are ready to be toppled, like the Lakers in 1989 and again in 2004, like the Heat in 2014 and the Cavaliers last June. The boisterous Raptors fans who staged their takeover of the Warriors’ building after Game 4 were merely mirroring what their favorite team did on the court from halftime on. Golden State could not stop it. Rudy Tomjanovich might still be inclined to scream into the darkness. (“Never underestimate the heart of a champion!”) But pride only takes you so far, and that’s mostly what the Warriors have left. 2. Third quarter? That’s Toronto’s now It took the Raptors more than 18 minutes to score 30 points Friday night (Saturday, PHL time), stymied by the pace of the game and particularly Golden State’s scrappy, hustling defense. Immediately after halftime, it took Toronto only 12 minutes to put up 37. The time of death for Golden State on Friday was immediately after Kawhi Leonard drained consecutive three-pointers – “F-you” shots, teammate Fred VanVleet memorably coined them – that boosted Toronto from a four-point deficit to a 12-point advantage. The Warriors already had played well enough to rightly feel they should have had a bigger cushion; falling behind so rudely seemed to buckle the defending champs. That they feel third quarters are their birthright made the switcheroo intolerable. “We had a big problem with the third quarter in Game 2,” Toronto coach Nick Nurse said. “We had to make some adjustment there to try to combat the way they come out of the half. We made the decision to put Fred in, [first] in Game 3 and then Game 4 again. Mostly it's to try to keep up pace of our offense going. It gives us two point guards out there that can push the ball, get it in and get it going, and it kind of paid off. “I know Kawhi's two big three's to start the half really changed the whole feel of everybody. Everybody was like, ‘Okay, man, we know we are here, let's go,’ and we just kind of kept going from those two three's.” For the Warriors, who have done that to so many others, turnabout was a pain in the rump. “Oh, this sucks,” Draymond Green recalled thinking as Toronto took control of the quarter. “It sucks really bad. You just try and do whatever you can to change it. Get a stop, get a bucket, get some momentum.  Every time we did, they answered.” Green was asked about the difficulty of rattling the stone-faced Leonard with whatever defensive tactic Golden State could muster, and brushed the question aside. “I don't think you're ever going to rattle Kawhi. Not sure we used that word one time in our scouting report, ‘We're going to rattle him,’” Green said. But it’s not just Leonard now. It’s the Raptors. Time after time, whenever Golden State revved up with a couple of scoring possessions, signaling to their fans they ready to make a run, Toronto snuffed it with a three-pointer or a well-executed pick and roll. They’ve got a team of Kawhis-in-training, unflappable lately if not as inscrutable. “Most teams will take cues from their leaders or their star players, so I think that spreads around a little bit,” Nurse said. But he also praised vets such as Marc Gasol, Danny Green, Kyle Lowry and VanVleet for how steady they’ve been. Now, with the temptation to imagine hoisting a championship trophy, the Raptors might be expected to buy into the stat that, of the 34 teams in The Finals who have led 3-1, 33 of them got their rings. But this team is so focused, so resolute in taking care of business down to the smallest and most mundane task, that all Nurse might have to do is remind them how many aspiring champs won three games in a Finals and still headed into summer empty-handed. (It's 19.) No trophy, no rings. 3. A surge from Serge The chemistry between Serge Ibaka and Kyle Lowry was evident in their playful banter on the podium Friday night. Each slipped into his role, Lowry as the instigator, Ibaka as the target of his playful jibes. “You joining me?” Lowry asked, as Ibaka got to the podium a half minute after him. “Serge Ibaka, everybody. You all know him. Nice outfit. Worth a lot of money. Is that jacket real leather?” “Yes, it’s real leather,” Ibaka said. "Pants too tight, he can't even sit down,” Lowry said. On court, Ibaka’s defensive impact and 20 points in reserve dampened a lot of Warrior enthusiasm. There are nights when Ibaka comes across like Chief in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” a large, lumbering and rather stiff option near the rim with very little to say. Some nights, he even seems to be asleep. But still waters often run deep, too deep for the Warriors in Game 4, it turned out. Ibaka’s here-today, gone-tomorrow shooting touch had him playing in a way that none of Golden State’s three centers – DeMarcus Cousins, Kevon Looney or Andrew Bogut – could match. “Once he gets into the series," Nurse said, "which he did in Game 3 with the blocked shots and the rebounding and stuff, he seems to stay in the series. He usually gives you all of it.” Said Lowry, about knowing when a Serge surge is coming: “He doesn't say anything. When Serge is effective defensively is when he's at his best. I think the scoring just comes. We're going to make sure he gets that pick-and-pop jump shot, he's rolling … When he brings that intensity and that fierceness, it's kind of tough to stop him on both ends of the floor.” 4. Stephen Curry had a bad game One of the most famous pieces of magazine journalism ever was entitled, “Frank Sinatra Has a Cold,” by Gay Talese, a profile written when Sinatra obviously was ill of body and temper, and didn’t even grant Talese an interview. So our headline kind of tells the story as his did: Curry, one of the top five players in the NBA and probably the greatest overall shooter of all time, was not his two-time MVP self. He wasn’t even the Game 3 version (47 points). The Warriors point guard scored 20 fewer points in this one, and was 2-of-9 from three-point range. He missed all five of his shots from the arc in the first half and he picked up some obvious frustration fouls. Curry played 43 of the 48 minutes, and Golden State was outscored by 11 points when he was on the court. “It wasn’t his best game,” Kerr said. Evaluating Curry, for the Warriors, was going to come down to breaking down video and keeping the faith. Evaluating him, for the rest of us, is getting complicated these days by a sense that Curry did not get his due in past Finals – at least in terms of winning the Bill Russell Award as Finals MVP. But that’s no excuse to don rose-colored glasses every time he hits the floor. As scintillating as his performance was in defeat Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time) as the Warriors’ only healthy threat, his Game 4 work was raggedy and unproductive. “They have been aggressive all series and trying to take space away from me and Klay,” Curry said. “I missed some shots early that I usually make, especially from the three-point line. But overall, I thought I got good looks.” Every game doesn’t need to be a referendum on the level of Curry appreciation. He might have deserved more consideration as Finals MVP in 2015, when Andre Iguodala snagged it with a strong performance in the clinching game. And even though Kevin Durant was an easy choice in 2017, there were some who felt Curry was more essential (including this voter). In some cosmic and just way, Curry probably should have been recognized with hardware somewhere among the three. But all signs are pointing to Leonard now, so Curry might have to muddle along with "only" those two Maurice Podoloff trophies for regular-season MVP, along with his All-NBA berths and assorted accolades, his ginormous contract and bounty of commercial endorsements, three rings (unless this series turns around) and a better life than most people who’ve ever walked the planet. 5. Durant to play in Game … 8? It’s possible that Durant will come walking through Rick Pitino’s proverbial door and seize what’s left of the championship series by the throat, playing like the two-time Finals MVP he is. Failing that, if there’s a Game 6, maybe that’s the night Durant at least does a Willis Reed impersonation, limping through the Oracle tunnel to a thunderous roar and hitting a couple of early shots to inspire his teammates to something special. (There still, alas, would be a pesky Game 7 for which to account, back in Toronto, likely muddying the drama.) Then again, maybe Durant doesn’t come back at all. For The Finals or with the Warriors, period. Speculation at this point is all over the map. Some think the Warriors planned to hold him out until things got really dire, to buy extra healing time and maybe not use him at all. Others now believe Durant’s rehab process of his strained right calf back-slid to some degree on Thursday, when he participated in a checkpoint workout with the training staff. A few folks think he never was going to return, regardless. After all, the All-NBA forward hasn’t played since May 8 (May 9, PHL time), missing nine fairly important games. This is a league where injuries typically face an “If this were a playoff game, would he play?” threshold. Durant has been nearly as absent from this NBA postseason as LeBron James. Look, all injuries are different, and even the same type of injury can have different timelines with different sufferers. Klay Thompson rushing back from his hamstring issue after skipping only Game 3 is at the crazy-resilient end of the durability scale. Kevon Looney basically rose from the ashes, giving the Warriors a rim runner and 10 points with six rebounds in 20 minutes off the bench. He had been ruled out for the rest of the series after suffering a rib cartilage fracture in his crash to the floor in Game 2. After anticipation of Durant’s availability got out in front of his reality for a few days, the chatter is more tempered now. There’s a shrug and a whiff of uncertainty folded into every mention. If Durant had his Thursday workout, he would have played Friday (Saturday, PHL time). If he had a setback … Heck, at this point it might be more pragmatic for the medical peeps to declare him out and let the Warriors who’ve come this far see this through, yea or nay. “As far as KD, there's been hope that he will come back the whole series,” Draymond Green said. “So that's not going to change now. Obviously we hope to have him, but we'll see what happens. We don't make that final call, he don't really even make that final call.  His body will tell him if he can get out there or not. And if he can, great. And if not, you still got to try to find a way to win the next game.” The Warriors had been holding out hope for Durant’s return as if he was their ace in the hole, imagining him with zero rust or rhythm issues once back and no limitations on his gait. But he has passed the “In case of emergency, break glass” point of urgent help possibilities. Now Durant resembles more the keg hanging from a Saint Bernard dog’s collar. It’s a nice idea, but when was the last time one of those dogs saved somebody who literally drank from the little barrel? Toronto is in a foreign land, by NBA standards. But it ain’t the Alps. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 9th, 2019

Cantlay s past shows why the future of golf is promising

By Doug Ferguson, Associated Press DUBLIN, Ohio (AP) — To the victor go the social media requests. This proved far more difficult for Patrick Cantlay than his 64 at Muirfield Village, the lowest final round by a winner in 44 years of the Memorial and a performance that suggested his move to No. 8 in the world was about more than any mathematical formula. Cantlay looked at the phone as the PGA Tour social media team tried to explain what it wanted — a short video saying what this victory meant to him. He stretched his arm and struggled to get the right angle while still being able to start the video. Finally, a tour employee held it for him. Cantlay smiled and said all the right things. "First selfie?" someone cracked as he walked off the stage. Cantlay rolled his eyes. He doesn't do social media. Cantlay appears to be anti-social on the golf course, which is misleading. In the absence of cameras and microphones, the 27-year-old from California is smart, honest and insightful with an occasional needle. On the golf course, he has a cold focus with no apologies. He knows how he comes across because when he arrived at Muirfield Village on Sunday, someone jokingly said, "It can't be that bad, can it?" Cantlay could easily fit the description of an old soul on young shoulders — except for his back. It was a stress fracture in his back that kept him out of golf for the better part of three years — two straight years without playing one tournament — and kept him from the pace set by others from his own age group. Jordan Spieth saw it coming. Neither of them had PGA Tour status when Spieth and Cantlay were paired together in the opening two rounds of the 2013 Puerto Rico Open. Spieth got him by one shot each round and went on to tie for second, the important step that led to a PGA Tour card — and victory — later that year. Cantlay, who had won the week before in Colombia on the Web.com Tour, was two months away from one swing that nearly ended his career, a pain he described as a knife in his back. That was the start of back trouble so severe there was no guarantee he would ever return. He was 20 when he turned pro. He was 25 for his official rookie season in 2017 on the PGA Tour. Trying to manage his schedule after not having competed for two straight years, Cantlay played 11 times and still made it to the Tour Championship. "If he had the full year this year, I would imagine he'd have been on the Presidents Cup team, no question," Spieth said at the TPC Boston that year. "He's extremely talented, and he's going to work his way up into the top 10 in the world, in my opinion." And here he is. Predictions are never easy in golf — Cantlay knows that better than anyone — and so where he goes remains a work in progress. It's where he has been that explains why his victory Sunday got so much attention, even if it wasn't worthy of the front of sports pages. Anyone who saw Cantlay play in Ohio eight years ago would have expected a performance like this. His time at Muirfield Village was short. Cantlay received the Jack Nicklaus Award as the best player in college — as a freshman at UCLA — and posed for photos with Nicklaus, then got ready for U.S. Open qualifying at the sectional site filled with PGA Tour players. Cantlay was the only amateur to get one of the 16 spots. Two weeks later, he was low amateur in the 2011 U.S. Open at Congressional, his first tournament against the best in the world. The following week, he set a PGA Tour record for amateurs with a 60 in the second round of the Travelers Championship. He was low amateur at the Masters in 2012. He made the cut at the U.S. Open again at Olympic Club (Spieth was low amateur that year). Much like Spieth, he had a knack for delivering. It was a tournament Cantlay did not win that might be the most revealing. After the stabbing pain he felt at Colonial in 2013, he didn't play for three months as his status on the Web.com Tour money list kept dropping. Cantlay tried to play two more events to stay in the top 25 to earn a PGA Tour card and missed the cut in both, finishing 29th. His last chance was a four-tournament series with a special money list. Cantlay played the first one and finished one shot behind Trevor Immelman. It was enough to get his card, and then he couldn't play again for nearly nine months. Cantlay has been through a lot, but he is still relatively new considering he had to start over. "It really is my third year on tour," he said. "It's just taken me seven years to do it." He ended that first full year with a victory in Las Vegas, and Cantlay was mildly irritated that more wins didn't follow. "Being out for so long and to come back and play really well and win within a year ... I didn't think it would take me this long," he said. "But I've played a lot of really good golf, a lot of really solid golf. And so I think I was closer than it seems. So maybe this one will do it.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 5th, 2019

No rest for the weary: Nuggets, Blazers back at it

By Brian Mahoney, Associated Press Nikola Jokic and the Denver Nuggets could use the kind of break everybody else is getting in the second round of the NBA playoffs. If anybody deserved some time off, it’s the All-Star center who just played 65 minutes in a game. But there’s no rest for the weary now. The Nuggets and Trail Blazers will be back on the court Sunday (Monday, PHL time) for Game 4, surely a little low on fuel after they tied an NBA record by playing four overtimes Friday night (Saturday, PHL time) in Portland’s 140-137 victory. [Watch the Playoffs on NBA League Pass for 30% less with this limited time offer! Select Annual package and use code SAVE30 at checkout to redeem] “Both teams are exhausted, so it’s the same for them as it is for us,” Denver coach Michael Malone said. “We will not use that as an excuse. We haven’t used it all year long and we won’t start using it now.” The conference semifinal round is a series of starts and stops, where it’s difficult for any team to build much momentum because there have been so many gaps between games. Philadelphia and Toronto, who have Game 4 of their series Sunday (Monday, PHL time), play just twice in a seven-day span. In the other Eastern Conference semifinal, Milwaukee and Boston had two days off in between both Games 2 and 3, and Games 3 and 4. When Golden State and Houston played Game 3 of their series Saturday night (Sunday, PHL time), it was their first time back on the court since Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). Then there’s Denver and Portland, who barely had time to catch their breath after the Trail Blazers’ victory in Friday’s marathon gave them a 2-1 lead. They are playing every other day to start their series, and would only have an extra day between games if it’s extended to a seventh game. So while Philadelphia’s Joel Embiid has ample opportunity for treatment on his sore left knee that was such a problem when the postseason began, Portland’s Enes Kanter’s left shoulder has little time to heal before he’d have to get back on the court to resume tussling with Jokic. “As far as the minutes, everybody’s tired. Were built for what’s happening right now. That’s what we had to do to win the game,” Portland’s Damian Lillard said. “Now we’ve got to go do our jobs away from the floor to make sure that at 4 o’clock Sunday we’re ready.” At least Portland wrapped up its first-round series against Oklahoma City quickly, earning some down time after Lillard’s long three-pointer ended the series in five games. But the Nuggets had to go the distance against San Antonio, meaning they had only one day off between ending one series and starting the next. Recover quickly and win Sunday (Monday, PHL time), and they’ve evened the series and regained home-court advantage. But if not, the No. 2 seeds are facing a 3-1 hole, which is a tough spot no matter their energy level. The seven-foot, 250-pound Jokic insists he’ll be ready. “They always talking about I’m not in shape. I’m in really good shape. I don’t know what they’re talking about,” Jokic said. “When I came here I was maybe a little bit chubby, but there’s really no difference in me now. I’m feeling good.” A look at Sunday’s (Monday, PHL time) games: RAPTORS AT 76ERS Philadelphia leads 2-1. Game 4, 3:30 p.m. EDT (3:30am, PHL time) NEED TO KNOW: The 76ers have won the last two games after Toronto’s Game 1 victory. The Raptors have not lost three straight since Nov. 12-16. Kawhi Leonard’s 31.5 points per game rank second to Kevin Durant so far, but Toronto has averaged just 91 per game in the last two games. INJURY WATCH: Toronto is listing forward Pascal Siakam, one of the leading candidates for the Most Improved Player award, as doubtful because of a bruised right calf. Siakam, averaging 22.9 points, was called for a flagrant foul when he stuck his right leg in the path of Embiid during the fourth quarter of Game 3. Embiid’s knee appeared to strike Siakam’s calf. Siakam left the game moments later and did not return. KEEP AN EYE ON: The score at halftime. The 76ers had 64 at the break in Game 3, the fourth time they’ve reached 60 in the first half this postseason, and Leonard noted that was an area the Raptors had to improve. PRESSURE IS ON: Kyle Lowry. All Toronto’s players need to step up more in support of Leonard but the point guard in particular acknowledged he needed to be better after a dismal 2-for-10, seven-point performance in Game 3. NUGGETS AT TRAIL BLAZERS Portland leads, 2-1. Game 4, 7 p.m. EDT (7am, PHL time) NEED TO KNOW: CJ McCollum, who scored 41 points in 60 minutes, along with Lillard (58 minutes) and Kanter (56) are the Blazers who went the longest in Game 3. So there might be an opportunity for Rodney Hood, who scored seven points in the fourth OT, or one of Portland’s big men to get a little more time Sunday (Monday, PHL time). INJURY WATCH: Kanter posted a photo of himself on the training table getting treatment soon after Game 3. He finished with 18 points and 15 rebounds and said afterward he didn’t know if he’d be able to play in Game 4. Whatever it freaking takes #RipCity pic.twitter.com/ok9l0Mf5I8 — Enes Kanter (@Enes_Kanter) May 4, 2019 KEEP AN EYE ON: The energy levels. Game 4 might be one of those that isn’t determined by who plays better, but rather by who has the most left in the tank. PRESSURE IS ON: Jokic’s supporting cast. The Serbian has three triple-doubles and ranks second among all players in both rebounds (12.6) and assists (9.1) per game in his first postseason. But the Nuggets probably can’t count on him staying at that level Sunday after he played the fourth-most minutes in NBA playoff history in Game 3, falling just two short of the record, so other players have to take on some of his usual load. ___ AP Sports Writer Anne Peterson in Portland, Oregon contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 5th, 2019

The 51st GMMSF-BOEA: List of winners for movies and TV categories

The 51st Guillermo Mendoza Memorial Scholarship Foundation Box-Office Entertainment Awards announced on Sunday, Oct. 18, the winners for this year’s annual show simulcast on YouTube and TV 5. The prestigious award-giving body honors Filipino actors, actresses and commercial success. Here are the winners: FILM Phenomenal Box Office Star – Kathryn Bernardo and Alden Richards (Hello, Love, Goodbye)Box Office King – Aga Muhlach (Miracle in Cell No. 7)Box Office Queen – Xia Vigor (Miracle in Cell No. 7)Film Actor of the Year – Alden Richards, Aga Muhlach (Hello, Love, Goodbye)Film Actress of the Year – Kathryn Bernardo (Hello, Love, Goodbye)Prince of Philippine Movies and Television – Enrique Gil (Alone / Together)Princess of Philippine Movies and Television – Liza Soberano (Alone / Together)Movie Supporting Actor of the Year – Joel Torre (Miracle in Cell No. 7)Movie Supporting Actress of the Year – Bella Padilla (Miracle in Cell No. 7)Most Popular Loveteam of Movies – Enrique Gil and Liza Soberano (Alone / Together)Most Promising Actor – JC Santos (Open Film, 2019)Most Promising Actress – Kim Molina (Jowable)Most Popular Film Producers – Olivia Lamasan and Carlo Katigbak (Star Cinema (ABS-CBN Film Productions, Inc.)Most Popular Film Screenwriter – Carmi Raymundo /Rona Go/Cathy Garcia-Molina (Hello, Love, Goodbye)Most Popular Film Director – Cathy Garcia-Molina (Hello, Love, Goodbye)Comedy Actor of the Year – Paolo Ballesteros (The Panti Sisters)Best Acting Ensemble in a Movie – Miracle in Cell No. 7 (VIVA Films) TELEVISION TV Actor of the Year for Primetime – Coco Martin (Ang Probinsyano)TV Actor of the Year for Daytime – JM De Guzman (Pamilya Ko)TV Actress of the Year for Primetime – Angel Locsin (The General’s Daughter)TV Actress of the Year for Daytime TV – Dimples Romana (Kadenang Ginto)Prince of Philippine Television – Joshua Garcia (The Killer Bride)Princess of Philippine Television – Janella Salvadaor (The Killer Bride)TV Supporting Actor of the Year – Tirso Cruz III (The General’s Daughter)TV Supporting Actress of the Year – Yassi Pressman (Ang Probinsyano)Most Popular Male Child Performer – Kenken Nuyad (Parasite Island)Most Popular Female Child Performer – Sophia Reola (Nang Ngumiti ang Langit)Most Popular Loveteam for Television – Miguel Tanfelix and Bianca Umali (Sahaya)Most Promising Loveteam for Television – Andrea Brillantes & Seth Fedelin (Kadenang Ginto)Most Promising Male Star for Television – Kyle Echarri (Kadenang Ginto)Most Promising Female Star for Television – Francine Diaz (Kadenang Ginto)Most Popular TV Program for News & Public Affairs – 24 ORAS (GMA Network)Most Popular TV Program for Primetime Drama – Ang Probinsyano (ABS-CBN)Most Popular TV Program for Daytime Drama – Kadenang Ginto (ABS-CBN)Most Popular TV Program for Talent Search, Reality, Talk and Game Show – Magandang Buhay (ABS-CBN)Most Popular TV Program for Musical-Variety – ASAP Natin ‘To (ABS-CBN)Male TV Host of the Year – Jose Manalo, Wally Bayola, Paolo Ballesteros (Eat Bulaga!)Female TV Host of the Year – Toni Gonzaga (Pinoy Big Brother Otso, The Voice Kids)Best Ensemble Performance – The General’s Daughter (ABS-CBN).....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 19th, 2020

Trade deficit dips to $14.61 B in 8 months

The country’s trade deficit dropped in August as imports slowed at much faster pace than exports, data from the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) showed. The gap in the trade balance, which is the difference between the value of export and import, reached $2.07 billion in August, lower by 31 percent from $3 billion in the same month last year. The August performance brought the country’s first eight-month trade deficit to $14.61 billion, lower by 46 percent compared with P27.07 billion in same period last year. Meanwhile, total export sales in declined anew, marking its sixth consecutive month of negative growth, to $5.1 billion from $6.3 billion last year. Of the top 10 major exports of the country, eight posted an annual declines, with gold (-31.3 percent); electronic products (-20.1 percent); and fresh bananas (-19.4 percent). Despite the double-digit decline, electronic products remained the country’s top export with $2.93 billion, accounting for 57.1 percent of the total. It was followed by other manufactured goods with $267.14 million, and other mineral products with $218.65 million. Exports to Japan comprised the highest value at $887.38 million, or 17.3 percent of the total, followed by the United States with $751.68 million, People’s Republic of China with $732.57 million, Hong Kong with $724.27 million and Singapore with $330.67 million. In January to August, the total export earnings amounted to $39.29 billion, down by 16.6 percent from $41.3 billion in the same period in 2019. For 16th straight month in August, the country’s imports remained at the downtrend, registering  an annual decline of 22.67 percent to $7.2 billion from $9.31 billion a year ago. All major imports of the country contracted during the month. The fastest deceleration was in transport equipment (-50.5 percent), mineral fuels, lubricants and related materials (-47.7 percent); and miscellaneous manufactured articles (-28.3 percent). In August, China was the country’s biggest supplier of imported goods at $1.82 billion, followed by Japan with $623.69 million, US at $517.77 million, Singapore at $495.11 million, and South Korea at $493.11 million. At end-August, the total imports reached $53.9 billion, down by 27 percent compared with P74.2 billion in the same period last year......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 9th, 2020

Si Coach Boc ang game-changer ko -- Dawn Macandili

If there is one person that multi-awarded libero Dawn Macandili would give credit to for all that she has achieved in her career aside from college coach Ramil de Jesus it would be assistant coach Benson Bocboc. The quiet and soft-spoken De La Salle University deputy has been De Jesus’ numbers guy on the Lady Spikers bench, his reliable scout and a trusted strategist. [Related story:  DLSU's weapon against Ateneo: Clipboard and tablet] But for Macandili he is more than just DLSU’s man who crunches numbers or the one who prepares scouting reports.   “Si Coach Boc ang game-changer ko,” Macandili said in her appearance on Volleyball DNA hosted by Anton Roxas and Denden Lazaro. Macandili said that when Bocboc went on board as the Lady Spikers prepared for Season 78 – the start of DLSU’s third three-peat – he immediately went down to work to help strengthen DLSU’s floor defense particularly focusing on liberos Macandili and CJ Saga.     “Nu’ng dumating si Coach Boc, sobrang na-focus niya ang mga libero kasi ang style niya is Japanese training,” Macandili shared. “In-introduce niya kami sa mga drills na pang-Japanese. Sobrang na-amaze ako, ‘Wow Japanese style na defense.’” Macandili added that it was the first time since she joined the Lady Spikers that a practice session solely dedicated for liberos was added into their training schedule.    “Ang daming drills na pinapagawa sa amin. Natutuwa ako kasi I’m always looking forward to learning something new,” she said. Bocboc according to Macandili was very technical, correcting them down to the smallest details. “Lagi niya kaming ini-introduce sa techniques. Gusto ko siyang ma-master. So every training may pinapagawa siya sa amin. Iba rin kasi talaga siyang mag-correct, to the slightest detail,” said the Tanauan, Batangas pride. “Dun ko na-realize na volleyball is very technical. Di lang basta na marunong kang mag-receive, marunong kang mag-dig pass. Hindi, kung marunong kang mag-receive kailangan ganito ang form mo, kailangan ganito kababa, mga ganoon.” He came into the team at the most critical time as DLSU was then shifting to a new approach to its system following two straight heartbreaking championship losses to the powerhouse Alyssa Valdez-led archrival Ateneo de Manila University Lady Eagles. “[Up to the] smallest details ang itinuturo niya sa amin and makikita mo talaga ang effect niya sa training and sa game,” said Macandili. Under Bocboc’s guidance, Macandili had her breakout season in 2016 as she played a key role in the Lady Spikers’ ascent back to the UAAP throne. Macandili in Season 78 was named Best Receiver, which she would win again the following year, and Best Digger while helping DLSU begin another three-year reign. Macandili would continue to rack in individual accolades, winning the Most Valuable Player award in the Philippine Superliga in 2016, being named the 2nd Best Libero in the 2017 AVC Asian Women’s Senior Championship as a member of the national team before wrapping up her UAAP career by bagging the Finals MVP in Season 80 - the first defense specialist to receive the honor. All thanks to the DLSU assistant coach. “Nag-iba talaga ang mindset ko nun sa volleyball na parang ang lawak niya na ang dami ko pang di alam. Doon ako na-engganyo na I want to learn more, more, more. I want to learn more talaga,” she said.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 24th, 2020