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Lee& rsquo;s mental toughness cited

The leadership of a veteran player like Paul Lee is valuable for the Magnolia Hotshots......»»

Category: sportsSource: thestandard thestandardOct 26th, 2020

UAAP Season 82: There s more in us that is coming -- Okumu

University of the Philippines head coach Godfrey Okumu can point out a dozen things they did wrong in the Fighting Maroons’ disappointing opening day defeat in the UAAP Season 82 women’s volleyball tournament. However, the mentor remains defiant that the fight in UP is alive and well and that his wards just played a fraction of what they are really capable of.   “It is not how I wanted to start. I'll just say that it's a wake-up call,” said Okumu, who spent extra time inside their dugout to talk to his crew following the Fighting Maroons’ 13-25, 17-25, 23-25, black and blue beating at the hands of defending champion Ateneo de Manila University on Wednesday. The third-year coach felt that his team played too tight in the first two sets and drifted away from their game plan. It didn’t help they were committing strings of errors that added to their frustration. UP gave away 29 points to Ateneo off its miscues.   “We did not relax until the third set. We were in a hurry, we were not composed,” said Okumu. UP got buried early in the first two frames, trailing in double digits in some stretches.  The Fighting Maroons did show resistance in the third, giving the Lady Eagles quite a scare only to crumble in the end. “I hope that we will find composure in the next games. If we are, our game would come,” said Okumu. “I believe we only performed at ten-percent of what we are capable of. The scoreline, unforced errors,” he added. “I still believe we can do better. I believe that we just did a fraction of what we are.” After the match, the Fighting Maroons had a long talk inside their locker room.   “We were just telling them just what any coach would say -- what is coming next and how we can adjust,” said Okumu. “Because it's not about the skill, it's about the mental toughness. We only brought it back during the third set. If that was our ten-percent, I believe there's more in us that is coming.” UP’s character will be tested on Saturday when it faces University of the East.     Show your school spirit. Get official UAAP university licensed merchandise from www.uaapstore.com. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 5th, 2020

ONE Championship: Mark Sangiao lauds Eduard Folayang s mental toughness after recent win

Team Lakay pulled off a 3-0 sweep at ONE: Masters of Fate in Manila last November 8th, with ONE Strawweight World Champion Joshua Pacio successfully defending his title against fellow Pinoy Rene Catalan in the main event, and former champs Eduard Folayang and Geje Eustaquio both getting big wins as well.  It was a good way to close out the year for Team Lakay, who had absorbed quite a number of consecutive setbacks prior to ONE’s final card in Manila for 2019.  Pacio was dominant in his title defense, while Eustaquio successfully avenged a 2016 loss to Finland’s Toni Tauru with a spectacular third-round body-kick KO.  Folayang’s win however, didn’t come in the way that they would have hoped, earning a Technical Decision win after being ruled unable to continue due to a cut caused by an accidental headbutt from Mongolian opponent Amarsanaa Tsogookhuu.  Folayang was dominating the opening round with his superior striking, and was well on his way to doing the same in the second round, right before the accidental clash of heads which opened up a nasty gash on the former lightweight king’s right cheek.  With the cut too big to allow Folayang to continue, the match went to the judges’ scorecards, giving the Filipino MMA hero the decision win.  While it was the result they wanted, it was definitely not how they would have wanted to get there.  “Oo siyempre, kasi dino-dominate na niya eh, pero ang lakas nung impact nung sumalubong yung headbutt, pero knowing Eduard kasi, kahit sabihin mong nahilo yun, 'Hindi' ang sasabihin niya pa din,” said Team Lakay head coach Mark Sangiao. “Kilala ko na 'yan, ever since nung bata pa 'yan, nakita ko yung mental toughness nun, kaya sinabi kong hindi na pwede 'yan.” “Mabuti nakita nung doctor. Magaling yung doctor ng ONE, nakita naman nila na talagang hindi pwede, so inistop nila,” Sangiao continued.  The Team Lakay mentor states that he agrees with the decision to stop the fight because the former champion was clearly rocked from the accidental headbutt.  “Agree, kasi nakita ko na rin na nahilo si Eduard,” Sangiao explained. “Nung pumunta na sa gilid, hilo na siya, pero siya, napaka-lakas pa nung isip niya, sabi niya 'Okay pa ako.' pero yung paa niya, wobbly na. Dun mo makikita kung gaano kalakas yung isip ni Eduard. He's really a champion.” Sangiao believes that if it were up to Folayang, the fight would have continued on.  “Yung sa kanya, gusto pa niya eh, pero sabi ko no. Buti si Kevin [Belingon] andun din, pina-upo siya, kasi nakikita niya na wobbly na yung paa niya,” he explained.  Perhaps what exacerbated the situation was that the official didn’t immediately see that it was indeed an accidental headbutt that stunned Folayang. As a result, Tsogookhuu was able to pounce on Folayang and land a few more punches before being halted.  Sanguiao says that he understands the situation, given that the official did not have the perfect vantage point to make a call at the moment.  “Professional naman yung referee, nakita kasi sa video na nasa blind side siya. Nung nakita niya lang yun, doon lang niya sinabi, tapos sinisigaw namin, tapos nung brineak niya, sabi niya sa akin, sinenyas niya na headbutt. Doon niya na-realize siguro.” “Bakit ang laki ng cut? Hindi naman ma-ccut ng ganun kung sa suntok, sobrang laki nung cut,” Sangiao added.  Folayang’s drive to continue fighting, Sangiao explained, comes from a sense of urgency in that, coming off back-to-back losses, a third straight loss would have been a serious setback to his dreams of regaining his spot atop the division.  “Alam na niya yun, at alam ko rin na kapag natalo pa siya dito, bababa yung career niya, I mean lalayo siya sa title shot,” Sangiao detailed. “Siya na mismo, sabi niya, kaya doon sa mga interviews niya, very hungry siya para bumalik. Kaya nga kanina, isa yun, yung isang motivation niya kaya kanina, kahit nag-wowobble na yung paa niya, hindi pa raw siya hilo." “Ako na yung nagsabi na upo ka muna, mag-rest ka, kasi kita mo, pero yung isip niya, ang lakas,” Sangiao concluded. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 21st, 2019

PVL: Tigresses through to the semis

University of Sto. Tomas averted disaster as the Tigresses displayed mental toughness at crunch time to beat Far Eastern University, 25-14, 25-17, 10-25, 23-25, 15-12, and secure a Final Four slot in the Premier Volleyball League Season 3 Collegiate Conference Group B at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan on Sunday. Eya Laure and rookie Imee Hernandez delivered the goods and powered UST to its fourth straight win in as many games. The Tigresses can complete a sweep of pool play on Saturday against NCAA champion Arellano University. Laure registered 18 points with 14 from attacks, three aces and a kill block while Hernandez got 14 markers including two in UST’s closing 6-2 scoring binge in the fifth frame. Rachelle Roldan scored 10 points Grace Vernaiz and Joyce Abueg combined for 15 points for the Espana-based squad, who hammered down 56 attack points. UST flirted with disaster after allowing the Lady Tamaraws to comeback from two sets down. FEU erased a 7-4 UST lead and even went up 10-9 before the Tigresses’ escape. Head coach Kungfu Reyes was just glad that his wards responded well to the challenge and displayed great character under pressure.        “Those things na ginagawa namin sa ensayo lalabas in real game so yun na yun. Yung test of character, yun ang pinakaimportante,” said Reyes.     The Lady Tams took a 10-9 lead after an Abueg attack error but Laure answered with an off the block hit that sparked a 5-0 blitz capped by a kill block by Hernandez to push UST at match point, 14-10. FEU countered with two straight points before Angel Cayuna sent her service short to end the duel. The Lady Tams fell to 2-2 slate tied with Arellano U behind second-running College of St. Benilde (3-1) and are on the brink of missing the semis cut. France Ronquillo finished with 16 points while Czarina Carandang and Jeanette Villareal posted 12 and 10 markers, respectively, for FEU, which will need to win over Lyceum of the Philippines University next week and hope that Arellano and CSB will drop their respective last assignments to force a playoff for the last Final Four seat. Meanwhile, LPU barged in the win column after cruising past TIP, 25-6, 25-15, 25-14, in the other Group B pairing. Alexandra Rafael and Joan Doguna scored 11 points each while mary Joy Onofre had 10 markers for the 1-3 Lady Pirates,who kept the Lady Engineers winless in four games.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 8th, 2019

PVL: Cool Smashers manhandle Red Spikers, win third in a row

Still flawless. Defending champion Creamline annihilated hapless newcomer Chef’s Classics, 25-12, 25-5, 25-15, on Sunday to remain unscathed in the Premier Volleyball League Season 3 Open Conference at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan. Alyssa Valdez showed her steady service game in a long trip at the service line while Jema Galanza had a field day picking her attacks against the Red Spikers' brittle defense to power the Cool Smashers to their third straight victory in as many games without dropping a single set. The Creamline kept a tight hold of the solo lead.   Valdez had 16 points off 8-of-12 attacks, seven aces and a kill block for the Cool Smashers, who finished the game in just 66 minutes. Galanza had 11 markers with all but one off spikes and added four excellent receptions while Michele Gumabao and Celine Domingo posted 10 and seven points, respectively, while combining for seven of Creamline's 11 kill blocks.   “In today’s game, this is the first game din na nakalaban namin Chef’s Classics yung mystery on how to play against them nandoon kami,” said Valdez. “Kasi every time, parang most of the teams na nakalaban namin laging first game nila except Chef’s Classics kasi they had a game yesterday.” “Mas nakapag-aral din kami at mas napaghandaan namin, napanood din namin game nila kahapon so mentally we’re also prepared,” she added. “Nangibabaw mental toughness na tapusin yung game.” Creamline head coach Tai Bundit had the luxury of trying new rotations as the Cool Smashers displayed a volleyball clinic in their short work of Chef’s Classics. Creamline cruised in the third frame much like in their emphatic demolition of the newbie squad in the first two sets. The Cool Smashers started their beat down early with Valdez having a long stay at the service line as Creamline built a 16-1 separation before Jingay Bangad stopped the Red Spikers’ bleeding with a hit. Chef’s Classics was able to reach double-figure output before Galanza closed the frame with a kill block       Valdez continued her long stay at the service line in the second frame, this time serving 20 times in a row as the Cool Smashers opened a 19-1 gap before Nieza Viray gave the Red Spikers a respite with a tip. Chef’s Classics scored two attacks, a kill block and two free points off Creamline’s errors in the Red Spikers’ forgettable second set outing.     Chef’s Classics absorbed its second straight defeat after suffering a sweep at the hands of Motolite on Saturday. Viray scored seven points while Bangad got five markers for the Red Spikers.    --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 18th, 2019

Durant s injury devastates victorious Warriors as they head home

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com TORONTO — When a superstar crumples to the floor like that, after everything he’d been through, after mustering the will to return to action, after giving his team the lift it so desperately needed in a win-or-go-home game, everything that happens next is muted: The flow of a tense game, the pulsating fourth quarter, even the Warriors’ inspired Game 5 victory in the final seconds. All that’s left is a siren blaring and asking … Why? Why did the Warriors clear Kevin Durant to return to the NBA Finals on Monday (Tuesday, PHL time)? Why did he feel compelled to do so after missing nearly a month with a calf strain? Why did a segment of the basketball populace question the severity of his injury -- and, by extension, his heart -- during the lead-up? And why do the basketball Gods seem to have it in for a two-time Finals MVP and all-time great who put his team first, and possibly just put his career in jeopardy? The Raptors fans who lined up 24 hours early in the rain just to watch on TV outside Scotiabank Arena aren’t shook. The citizens who braced for a championship celebration into the wee hours and now must deal with deflation aren’t shook. Not even the Raptors, who coughed up a six-point lead with 3.5 minutes left and now must fly 3,000 miles for another tip. No, it’s the Warriors who were left dazed and confused despite extending the series to another game with the 106-105 victory, and it was all captured in the quivering voice of team president Bob Myers while revealing Durant suffered an Achilles injury early in the second quarter. “He’s a good teammate,” Myers finally managed to say. “He’s a good person … it’s not fair … he just wants to play basketball and right now he can’t.” No, he can’t, and Tuesday's (Wednesday, PHL time) MRI will determine when that can happen again. Slow-motion TV replays that showed Durant executing a dribble move past Serge Ibaka and then dropping quickly to the floor were not positive. When Durant grabbed his leg on May 8 (May 9, PHL time), he reached high on his calf. This time, he reached low. A segment of the fans initially cheered Durant’s misfortune, and when Kyle Lowry and Serge Ibaka put them in check, the reaction quickly flipped from insensitive to respectful. But it didn’t matter in the big picture that they applauded Durant. He was helped to the locker room by director of sports medicine and performance Rick Celebrini and Andre Iguodala. Stephen Curry left the bench and walked behind Durant, consoling him. Durant cursed loudly as he reached the tunnel. Then he disappeared from view and later left the arena by crutches right after halftime. In the history of the NBA Finals, there was no tougher scene to witness, no matter the rooting interest. This was a basketball betrayal, pure and simple, that happened to Kevin Durant. But should it have? Plenty of questions now surround the medical protocol used by the Warriors. Durant took part in what was loosely termed a practice for the first time just a day earlier. Was that enough? Did he pass all the stress tests by then? Did the exams and MRIs give a green light? Were the experts fully apprised? And, perhaps most crucially, how much of this Achilles injury could be directly related to the calf injury and should that have been perhaps a larger concern? “He went through four weeks with a medical team and it was thorough and we felt good about the process," Myers insisted. "He was cleared to play tonight, that was a collaborative decision. I don’t believe there is anyone to blame, but I understand in this world that if you have to, you can blame me.” Beyond that, was there any pressure -- either implied or indirectly placed or discreetly suggested -- within the organization for Durant to return and rescue the Warriors? They were down 3-1 without him. Durant is famously sensitive about how he’s perceived, especially regarding his toughness. Maybe he felt pressure himself to quiet the noise and whispers. Complicating matters is his pending free agency. Durant stood to make hundreds of millions on the market this summer, and a torn Achilles, if that’s what the MRI will show, can require a year to rehab. In the moment, Durant's injury had a temporary bonding effect between the two teams; a handful of Toronto players approached Durant before he checked out and both benches appeared equally stunned. “In this league,” explained Lowry, “we’re all brothers, and it’s a small brotherhood and you never want to see a competitor like him go down.” Before the injury, Durant showed flashes of the next-level skills that helped him lead the Warriors to the last two championships. He hit his first two shots, both from deep. He commanded coverage from Kawhi Leonard, Toronto’s best defender. He had a presence. This injected confidence within the Warriors, who broke out a nine-point lead with Durant on the floor and seized early command. He, Curry and Thompson were 12-for-19 shooting for 36 points through the early second quarter. With their missing star in the fold for the first time this series, Golden State looked whole again. Once Durant left the floor, the game tightened until the fourth. Leonard (26 points), who shot poorly to that point, made his move, with 10 quick points to send a quake through the arena. Curiously, Raptors coach Nick Nurse called a timeout with his team buzzing and up five with three minutes left. Did that kill the momentum? Curry and Thompson answered with consecutive three-pointers to tie and then take the lead with 56 seconds left. Then, on Toronto’s final possession, Thompson and Andre Iguodala trapped Leonard and forced him to surrender the ball. It found its way to Lowry, deep in the corner. But Draymond Green got his fingertips on the ball, Lowry’s shot was harmless and the buzzer sounded. No confetti fell from the ceiling, no bottles were popped in the home locker room, no trophy was ceremoniously awarded. Curry and Thompson combined for 57 points and took 27 three-pointers, making 12. They’ll need to duplicate that production Thursday (Friday, PHL time) in Oakland and beyond if the Warriors force a seventh game. DeMarcus Cousins was helpful post-Durant and had 14 points. “They’ve accomplished so much over the years and that doesn’t happen just with talent,” Kerr said. “There has to be more that goes into it and it’s that fight, that competitive desire and ability to stay poised under pressure. It was brilliant to watch.” And yet: There was little joy. “It’s hard to even celebrate this win,” said Klay Thompson. “I told the team I didn’t know what to say because, on one hand I’m so proud of them for the amazing heart and grit they showed, and on the other I’m just devastated for Kevin," Kerr said. "So it’s a bizarre feeling that we all have right now.” It’s a reflex to say the Warriors were inspired by Durant and perhaps they were. When he fell, they had their excuse, yet thought otherwise. For them to play the final 2.5 quarters while dealing with a fractured state of mind says plenty about their mental toughness. “It had made it difficult, especially with the start we got off to and Kevin was playing so well, so it was a real shock when he went down,” said Kerr. “So I give our guys credit.” Durant at times became a magnet for his personality quirks and especially his non-commitment regarding free agency; it was even raised by Green when the two infamously clashed on the bench earlier this season. If nothing else, the injury further endeared Durant to the locker room and, in particular, to his fellow MVP. “Everybody gets so wrapped up in chasing championships, but life is more important in terms of caring about an individual and what they’re going through,” Curry said. “And you see the commitment and the challenges and just what has been thrown at KD this whole year, really. He gave us what he had, he went out there and sacrificed his body and we know how that turned out. “When you get to know somebody and see how genuine they are and how committed they are to basketball, you root for those type of guys. All those emotions come into play when you see him go down like that. It’s not even about this series; it’s about long term, his mindset and being able to get back to being the player and the person he has shown consistently over the course of his career.” The Warriors return to Oracle Arena for the final game in the old barn before moving to San Francisco next season, so there is motivation to shut it down in style. Of course, there’s the goal of forcing a seventh game, and finally, to win a title so Durant’s injury won’t be in vain. “We do it for Kevin,” said Thompson. “He wants us to compete and the highest level, and we’ll think of him every time we step on the hardwood. You think of him every time you dive for a loose ball or go for a rebound, because I know him and I know how bad he wants to be out there. I’m going to miss him, man. It’s not the same being out there without him.” Shaun Powell has covered the NBA for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here, and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 11th, 2019

UAAP Season 81 Finals: Heartstrong, mental toughness keys in Ateneo’s quest for the crown

Ateneo de Manila University will cling on to one aspect of its game that brought the Lady Eagles to glory before: their heartstrong mantra. The Katipunan-based squad was pushed to the brink of missing the Finals but Ateneo rallied to boot out Far Eastern University in the semifinals do-or-die match for a chance to reclaim the crown it last held in Season 77 in the last of the squad’s back-to-back reign. Now, the Lady Eagles are just two wins away from realizing their ultimate goal when they face University of Sto. Tomas in the best-of-three UAAP Season 81 women’s volleyball Finals at the Big Dome on Saturday. Game 1 is slated at 4:00 p.m. and will air live on ABS-CBN S+A Channel 23, ABS-CBN S+A HD Channel 166, LIGA SkyCable Channel 86, LIGA HD SkyCable Channel 183, iWant and via livestream. The top-seeded Lady Eagles came back from a five-set loss in the Final Four opener against the Lady Tamaraws that forced them to use their twice-to-beat advantage. Seniors Maddie Madayag, Bea De Leon and Kat Tolentino conspired in the rubber match for the last championship seat last Wednesday to bring Ateneo back on the biggest stage of the season after losing to FEU in the Season 80 semis. That crucial Final Four stretch according to head coach Oliver Almadro sharpened his wards heading into the Finals.   “’Yung toughness namin, heart and will medyo tumibay because nandun na kami sa edge ng mawala ‘yung advantage namin,” he said. “’Yun sigurong mentality namin yung heart and will (ang key) lalo na sa Finals. The Lady Eagles will have the psychological advantage against the Tigresses as Ateneo swept UST in their elims head-to-head. The Lady Eagles have a 14-game winning streak over the Tigresses dating back from the semis of Season 74. Aside from the trio of Tolentino, Madayag and De Leon, Almadro will also pin his hopes on Jules Samonte, Ponggay Gaston and setter Deanna Wong.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles     .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 10th, 2019

& lsquo;Urban Ring Road& rsquo; in the works

Earlier this week, the Supreme Court ordered Manila Times reporter Jomar Canlas to explain why he should not be cited in contempt for writing an article regarding a leaked document emanating from Associate Justice Marvic Leonen which supposedly tackled his position on the Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos, Jr. protest against Ma. Leonora “Leni” Robredo......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 21st, 2020

Smart delivers best-rated broadband coverage, download speed, latency -umlaut

Mobile services provider Smart Communications, Inc. (Smart), wireless arm of the country’s largest integrated telco PLDT, has again been cited for providing the best mobile internet service in the country, according to a crowdsourcing-based survey by an international internet testing organization......»»

Category: techSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 6th, 2020

Fine-tuning your tech habits on TikTok

In today’s new normal set-up where most day-to-day activities happen online, digital wellbeing has now emerged as a new category in the health and wellness space. Digital wellbeing is defined as the measure for how technology use can impact the physical and mental health of a person......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 3rd, 2020

Mental health in the time of COVID

The unheralded COVID-19 pandemic, which forced millions of Filipinos quarantined at home for much of nearly seven months since March 17, has taken its toll on the population’s psychological resilience......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 12th, 2020

Contemporary dance performance highlights social media& rsquo;s beauty standards

Witness how social media and its depiction of today’s concept of beauty affects the mental health of youth in Ang Natutulog na si Byuti, a contemporary dance performance that brings light to self-acceptance and self-love......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 24th, 2020

Inspiring Filipinos to stay strong

Most health advice can be summed up to staying physically active—even while at home—or doing simple but essential activities that also benefit one’s mental state......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 8th, 2020

Heart encourages Filipinas to elevate standard of self-love

Maintaining one’s own physical, mental, and spiritual health can be a struggle with more overwhelming conditions happening here and abroad......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 31st, 2020

Rahm channels frustrations into big win with big moments

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer OLYMPIA FIELDS, Ill. (AP) — Jon Rahm is no stranger to wild shifts in emotions, whether it was irritation from an absent-minded penalty that led to his only bogey of the weekend or his 65-foot birdie putt that capped an amazing victory at the BMW Championship. The difference now is he enjoyed it. All of it. The shot that will be remembered at Olympia Fields was a putt in the playoff Sunday that was just over 65 feet from the hole and had to travel even farther to get there, across the 18th green toward a ridge and then down the slope toward the cup, 11 seconds of watching, hoping and celebrating. Rahm wonders how different it might have been if not for his mental blunder. That happened on the fifth hole Saturday, when he was five shots behind. He might never be able to explain how he could walk up to his golf ball on the green, pick it up and freeze upon realizing he never marked it. He feared even after a 66 to get back in the mix that one shot could cost him. “I just hope I don't lose by one,” Rahm said that day. “I'm just going to say that. I just hope. And if I do, well, my fault.” He allowed his mind to think back to the penalty while on the range Sunday afternoon after a 64, the best score of the week, and hearing that Dustin Johnson was one shot behind facing a birdie putt just inside 45 feet. “I was like, that extra-shot cushion would be extremely nice right now, I'm not going to lie,” Rahm said. "But at the same time, it happened. I don't know if I would have won had it not happened. It kind of made me mad at myself, and I just went on with my focus after that and was able to play amazing golf. “I can tell you after making that 6-footer for bogey, I was like, ‘OK, that’s it. No playing around. Go.' That's kind of what mentally did it for me.” Rahm has always said he needs time to process success and failure, and this one could take a while. Even after it was over, and he posed with the BMW Championship and Western Golf Association trophies, part of him still felt like he was on the golf course in a playoff. He looked like a winner when his tee shot on the par-5 15th sailed into the trees and ricocheted out into the rough, avoiding a penalty, and his third shot was a 6-iron from 218 yards to 10 feet for birdie. He followed that with a 30-foot birdie putt across the 16th green for a two-shot lead. He feared for the worse when Johnson, down to his last shot, rolled in his improbable birdie putt down the slope on the 18th green for a 67 to force the playoff. That penalty shot looked as though it might be the difference when Johnson's drive on the 18th in the playoff hit a tree and came back to the fairway, and Rahm's shot from deep rough rolled out to the back of the green, leaving a putt so difficult that Rahm was hopeful of making par. “Honestly, I hoped it would be a decent putt for par coming back and have a chance to keep the playoff going,” he said. It was better than decent. It was perfect. The heart rate never eased up as Rahm watched Johnson's 30-foot birdie putt track toward the cup until it peeled away by inches and Rahm was the winner. “I still can’t believe what just happened,” Rahm said. "That stretch of waiting for DJ, him making the putt, going in the playoff, me making the putt, then trying to stay mentally in it just in case he made the last putt, it’s been a roller coaster. But so much fun. ... I set out to enjoy even the uncomfortable moments we had out there. “And man, it was fun.” Johnson took plenty away, too. He twice beat Rahm in 2017 in the span of a month at World Golf Championships, holding off a Rahm rally in the Mexico Championship and withstanding another ferocious comeback attempt in the Match Play. For Johnson, it was his third straight tournament with the 54-hole lead. He shot 68 in the PGA Championship and was beaten by a 65 from Collin Morikawa, which featured the driver onto the 16th green at Harding Park for eagle. Johnson shot 67 at the BMW Championship and lost to a 65-foot birdie putt in a playoff. Johnson held onto No. 1 in the world ranking and in the FedEx Cup, the latter meaning he will start the Tour Championship with a two-shot advantage. Rahm now has multiple victories worldwide for the fourth straight year. What stands out from this year is winning on the two toughest tests — Memorial, where the greens were allowed to bake out because they were being replaced after the tournament, and Olympia Fields, which played as hard as a U.S. Open. Rahm will get another U.S. Open test in three weeks at Winged Foot. The U.S. Open is billed as the ultimate test, most of that between the ears. Rahm looks more capable of that with each victory......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 31st, 2020

FIBA: Mighty Jimmy and the shot that introduced Gilas to the World

This story was originally published on Feb. 24, 2019 It’s Saturday night at Mall of Asia and the arena is absolutely rocking. Eternal basketball rivals in the Philippines and South Korea are delivering another classic. Gilas Pilipinas is down to the final minute of regulation against its longtime tormentor in the second of two semifinal games. The national team is up by two, 81-79. The Philippines is hosting the 2013 FIBA-Asia Championships where three tickets to the 2014 World Cup are at stake and the winner of this particular game gets one of those tickets. Given the rich history of both teams and what it would mean to the winner, this pivotal game has gone down the wire as everyone pretty much expected. Also knowing the history of both teams in international play, Gilas’ precarious two-point lead was not safe at all. A ghost was lurking in the background and a dreaded curse felt almost inevitable. Down to the final minute of the crucial grudge match between the Philippines and South Korea, guard Jimmy Alapag has the ball and a two-point lead. What he will do will help define not only his career but the legacy of the Gilas name as a national team.   WAKE-UP CALL Even before the Philippines-Korea game, Gilas Pilipinas already had to go through one emotional game early in its homestand for the Asian Championships. In a preliminary round showdown against Chinese Taipei, the Filipinos collapsed in the fourth quarter, allowing the Taiwanese to steal a morale-boosting 84-79 win. In 2013, the relationship between the two countries hit a rough patch over the death of one Taiwanese fisherman. In an updated May 17 report by CNN’s Jethro Mullen, “Taiwan has reacted angrily after one of its fishermen was killed by a Philippine coast guard vessel.” Taiwan had frozen applications from OFWs seeking jobs in its territory and the government of then President Ma Ying-jeou demanded an apology, among other things, from the Philippines. While the national basketball teams of both countries never really had any prior animosity with each other, tension was naturally present as both teams squared off in Group A action. Gilas Pilipinas and Chinese-Taipei both entered the showdown with identical 2-0 records and the winner would take control of solo Group A lead heading into round 2. Taking a good lead into the fourth quarter, the Philippines was outscored by 18 in the last 10 minutes and the national team took its worst home loss in quite some time. “At the time, it was a huge game for us. We understood what was happening in Taipei during that particular time. We really wanted to win for what our kababayans were going through at that time,” guard Jimmy Alapag said on that first home loss in the 2013 Asian Championships. “We didn’t get the job done, and it was tough especially to lose a game like that, it was a very emotional and it was a game that we knew we needed,” he added. The crushing loss meant that the Philippines had little room for error in round 2. While Gilas didn’t have any world beaters lined up in the second round, anything less than a perfect run would have meant an early clash with Asia’s established powerhouse teams in the knockout stages. On the other side of the bracket, defending champion China, Iran, and South Korea were battling for position and were expected to finish in the top-3. That means if Gilas Pilipinas failed to finish no. 1 in its group, the national team would have faced one of those teams in the quarterfinals. Gilas picked up a crucial win over Qatar in the 6th of August and the day after, the Philippines got some help from those same Qataris as they beat Taipei in a close decision. At the end of round 2, all teams finished with identical win-loss records but Gilas Pilipinas would take over first place after all tiebreaks were considered, barely edging out Taipei. The Philippines ended up avoiding defending champion China, Iran, and South Korea and instead got Kazakhstan in the quarterfinals. No. 2 Taipei drew China and the third-running Qataris were matched up with the South Koreans. “I think that was the moment we grew up and grew closer. I think that was the lowest of the lows, just because of the atmosphere and what was going on between both countries. It kind of felt that we let our end of the bargain down, you know what I mean? We’re on our home soil and we didn’t take care of business. I think that was one of those moments where we had to really check ourselves and find a way to make it right,” forward Gabe Norwood said of the Taipei loss. “But it turned out to be a blessing in disguise. In tournaments like FIBA-Asia it’s important that you have short-term memory whether it was a win or a loss. We needed to let go of that game and continue to stay the course, keep our focus in the tournament,” Alapag added. On August 7, four days after Gilas lost to Taipei, the rift between the Philippines and Taiwan would reach a resolution and the latter country lifted its freeze hiring and other sanctions on the former. The Philippines also did issue on official apology over the death of the Taiwanese fisherman a couple of months prior and the National Bureau of Investigation in Manila recommended the pressing of homicide charges to erring members of the Philippine Coast Guard.   DARK HISTORY If the word “rival” is to be defined as a, “person or group that tries to defeat or be more successful than another person or group” then sure, the Philippines and South Korea are rivals. Both countries are rivals in the Asian basketball scene and they have been going at it for a very long time. But if the word rival can also mean “equal” or “peer,” is the Philippines really a worthy basketball rival to South Korea? The Philippines’ history with South Korea in terms of basketball is dark. Very dark. Consider the most high-profile matches between the two countries and you’ll see that the Philippine national team is just not at the level of South Korea. Or at the very least, Koreans always seem to reach 120 percent of their potential when they play Filipinos and we barely bring out 80 percent of our abilities when matched up against our East Asian neighbors. The 1998 PBA Centennial team, arguably the greatest Philippine team ever assembled, was demolished by South Korea in the Asian Games. A national team set up for gold only settled for bronze. Speaking of a bronze medal game, the original Gilas Pilipinas team lost a podium finish to South Korea in the 2011 FIBA-Asia Championships. That team squandered a double-digit lead and collapsed late. Of course, who can forget the semifinals of the 2002 Asian Games in Busan when Olsen Racela had the chance to put the Philippines up four but missed two free throws. South Korea would win with a booming triple at the buzzer off a broken play and would later take down China to capture the gold medal. South Korea is the Philippines’ basketball nemesis for all intents and purposes. A worthy adversary that always seem to emerge victorious at our expense. Still, all that previous disappointment didn’t seem to bother Gilas Pilipinas six years ago. The team was not scared and instead, they were excited even. One factor to greatly consider was that fact that the game was in Manila. It makes all the difference to play at home. “We understood the bad history that we had with Korea. We haven’t been very successful with them in quite some time but we knew from Day 1 that if ever we got an opportunity to play them at home, then we have a great chance,” Alapag said. “Man, pre-game, it was just the focus. Everybody was up for the challenge, I don’t think anybody was really nervous, I think it was just the anxiety... we wanted to get out there and do it already,” Norwood added. Playing at home had its perks for sure, but it also had its drawbacks. For all the painful losses the Philippines suffered at the hands of South Korea, it would have been devastating if Gilas actually took a beating in Manila. Stakes were extra high in this particular chapter of this long, ongoing saga. “There was always pressure, it was something that we acknowledged early. Playing at home, it’s great having that support but at the same time, there is some added pressure because you wanna make sure that you make our home crowd proud of the team that they watch and ultimately, win games,” Alapag said, making sure to note that the national team knew of the disadvantages of playing at home even before the Korea game. “It was there but it was something that we acknowledged and we wanted to make sure that we took advantage of the opportunity playing at home,” he added.   ALL FILIPINO, ALL HEART Once it was go time, the Philippines-South Korea game went about pretty normal, as you would expect any game from these two national teams. But even before halftime, an injury to Gilas center Marcus Douthit changed the complexion of the semifinals showdown. All of a sudden, the Philippines was without its anchor, without its best player. Sure, there were players on the Gilas bench that can come in and replace Douthit’s size but there was simply no one on the Gilas bench that can come in and replace his talent, production, and just overall presence. June Mar Fajardo was in that Gilas bench but it 2013, the would-be five-time PBA Most Valuable Player was just not at that level yet. It would have been easy for Gilas Pilipinas to fold like cheap furniture and succumb to the overwhelming pressure of trying to overcome South Korea to reach a stage very few Filipinos have reached before. Gilas didn’t fold and instead, the Douthit injury rallied the team even further. “Alam mo sa totoo lang, puso na lang yun eh. Nung nawala si Marcus talaga, sabi ni coach kailangan doble kayod tayo. Dahil sobrang dehado tayo kumbaga, wala na tayong import, wala tayong malaki,” forward Marc Pingris said. With Douthit gone, Ping ate up all of his minutes and worked by committee with guys like Ranidel De Ocampo and Japeth Aguilar to fill in the gaps. “As a player naman, kami nagusap-usap kami na kahit anong mangyari, lalaban kami. Yung time na yun, talagang patay kung patay,” Ping added. Despite losing its best player to an untimely injury, Gilas Pilipinas’ confidence in winning never wavered. With their collective backs against the wall, the Philippine national team played even better. Unlike the later iterations of Gilas Pilipinas, the 2013 team, aptly called Gilas 2.0, had the luxury of having actual preparation before the FIBA-Asia Championships. The amount of work that came before the tournament and the Korea game, the bond built over countless hours of training, all of that helped the national team avoid a monumental meltdown in front of a rabid Manila crowd. “We were such a close-knit team in terms of our chemistry, in terms of the talent that we had, so we felt confident even when Marcus went down early in the game. If you looked at our huddle, you had 11 more very confident guys, not just in themselves but more importantly, in each other,” Alapag said. “That just boiled down to the chemistry that we had. I don’t think any of us panicked, we were all confident in each other. We’ve all been into that situation with our PBA teams, having the ball in our hands and making a play. Knowing that we had five weapons on the floor that could make the winning play, I think it made us very confident and we were able to sustain our composure,” the former Gilas captain added.   THE GHOST AND ITS CURSE Shin Dong Pa, Hur Jae, Lee Sang-min, Oh Se-Keun, TJ Moon, and Cho Sung-min are just some players from the South Korean national team that inflicted incredible damage to the Philippines over the course of decades. The dreaded Ghost of South Korea takes form in these players and its curse is to give Filipinos the most heart-crushing loss possible. In 2013, the Ghost was Kim Min-goo and his curse was to beat Gilas Pilipinas in Manila. Despite losing Marcus Douthit and trailing by three points at the break, the Philippines started to turn the tables in the second half. Gilas Pilipinas unleashed Jayson Castro and the Blur led a blazing offense in the third quarter, finding a way to take a 10-point lead over South Korea, the Philippines’ largest of the night. But as the dust settled and Gilas holding a 65-56 lead entering the final period, an ominous figure would make his presence felt. The Korean Ghost has arrived and his name was Kim Min-goo. His curse? Beat Gilas Pilipinas in Manila. Kim was 22 and a senior in college when he made the South Korean national basketball team as a backup shooter in 2013. In nine games in Manila, Kim would play well enough to make the tournament’s All-Star team, averaging 12.7 points, 4.1 rebounds, and 2.7 assists. He led Asian Championships with 25 three-point field goals, 10 came in the last two games and five came against Gilas Pilipinas. Kim drilled back-to-back triples to open the fourth quarter against the Philippines. Later, his fifth triple — a four-point play at that — pushed the Koreans to within a point, 72-73. South Korea would take over soon after as Lee Seung-jun dunked the basketball on a fastbreak. The Ghost has arrived and his curse is in effect. “Ako pumasok sa isip ko yun nung lumamang Korea, na putek ito na naman,” Pingris said. “Pero ang sabi ko, sayang yung opportunity, kaya naman eh. So sabi ni Jimmy samin, no matter what happens wag kami gi-give up. Pinaghirapan natin to at may goal tayo, this year aalis tayo,” he added, noting the team’s goal to get into Spain and compete with the world’s best national teams. Faced with the possibility of dealing with a devastating defeat, Gilas had enough mental fortitude to keep things going. Trust your system, trust your preparation, trust your crowd, trust your teammates, and more importantly, trust yourselves. “You’re never out of the game if you’re playing at home,” Norwood said as they stared a deficit late against their destined rivals. “I think that was our mindset, keep it close and just find a way,” he added. Jimmy Alapag found a way.   BORN READY Down 73-75, Jimmy Alapag was under heavy duress when he let go of a three-pointer from the left wing just in front of his bench. It was good to go. The Philippines was back on top by one as Alapag somehow managed to get his team to snap out of an initial shock following Korea’s strong fourth-quarter rally. The stage is now set for a wild finish and Jimmy will star in the final act of what has been an incredible show by Gilas and South Korea. “In situations like that, as an athlete and as a pro, that’s the situations that you dream about,” Alapag said.  “Those are shots that you practice when you were a kid. When the shot clock is winding down, to have an opportunity to knock down a shot. It’s a shot that I practiced thousands of times,” he added. After the Philippines and South Korea traded baskets for the lead, Alapag made perhaps the most underrated play in this crazy and emotional encounter between two basketball rivals. Tasked with inbounding the ball just near underneath his own basket, Alapag found his Talk ‘N Text teammate Ranidel De Ocampo for an open look at three. Swish. Gilas leads, 81-77, with 91 seconds to go. “Ranidel was my favorite target for a very, very long time in my career,” Alapag said on the play that most people probably don’t even remember. “Once I saw that he got open, I wanted to make sure that I gave him as great a pass as possible and Ranidel has been known for a long time to take care of the rest,” he added.   THE EXORCIST “Yeah, I was right under the basket,” Gabe Norwood says with a laugh when asked if he remembers the shot that changed the course of Gilas Pilipinas as a national team. Late in the fourth quarter of what was essentially a heavyweight bout, the Philippines just landed two strong haymakers but South Korea would refuse to go down without a fight, beating the count of 10 each time. Down to the final minute of a crucial grudge match with a World Cup berth on the line, Jimmy Alapag had his hands on the basketball as Gilas would go to its halfcourt set. Jimmy will never let go of said basketball. Up two, Jimmy did what Olsen wished he could 11 years prior. Up two against South Korea in a pivotal semifinal game, Alapag received a screen from Marc Pingris, which was enough to momentarily shake off Kim Tae-sul. With some room, Alapag drifted to his left and let a three-point shot fly. Boom. Gilas leads, 84-79, with 54 seconds to go. The shot would later be remembered as the one that ended the Korean Curse, the one that finally exorcised the Ghost. “The first thought that came to my mind was don’t miss,” Jimmy said of the clutch jumper. “That last one, Ping sets a good screen and I got a clean look. It’s a shot that myself, and Jayson [Castro], and Larry [Fonacier], and Gary [David], and Jeff [Chan], all of us, we practice that shot time and time again after practice. So you know, it was a shot that I was confident in but in that moment, all you’re thinking about was don’t miss,” he added. It’s one thing to be confident in yourself and to be confidednt in your preparation. It’s a different thing to actually perform under such pressure. As soon as Alapag managed to shoot his shot, Gabe Norwood did what any other good teammate would do and got in position to get the offensive rebound. You know, just in case. Gabe got the ball alright, but he got it after it swished through the rim. “When he put the shot up, I tried to crash for the rebound but I basically knew that it was going in,” he said. “I had probably the best view, I was right under the basket. I think caught it after it went through too,” Norwood added. Alapag checked out moments later as the Philippines went to its defensive lineup in order to stop another Korean comeback. South Korea turned to its most effective shooter in Kim and as he rose up to try and answer Alapag’s triple, Norwood met him at the apex for the game’s most dramatic stop. Gabe blocked Kim and Gilas would finish things off with a final Marc Pingris basket on the other end. A historic 86-79 win was complete. “I still get chills thinking about it, to look up and see grown men just breaking down. My wife was trying to hold my kids and she was holding back tears. It was just an awesome moment, the bond that we had on that team, the stuff that we did to get prepare, I think we poured it all out in that game,” Norwood said on the monumental victory. “I think it probably didn’t hit me until the final buzzer sounded. Not just for me but for the entire team, when that final buzzer sounded, it was such a special group of guys and the fact that we could share that moment with not just with each other but the entire country, it’s something I’ll remember for the rest of my life,” Alapag added, savoring the moment of a Philippine win over Korea 28 years in the making.   THE INTRODUCTION Gilas Pilipinas would lose to Iran the next day in the Finals of the 2013 FIBA-Asia Championships. The Philippines put up a fight but Hamed Haddadi would prove to be too powerful to stop. It would take another two years for Gilas to beat Iran but that didn’t really matter in the moment. The Philippines is headed to the World Championships for the first time in three decades. The Philippines has beaten South Korea and one singular shot has allowed the Gilas name to be known around the world. Jimmy wouldn’t say that though. At least not directly in that way. “For me, that shot was the biggest for my career. But really, it was our entire team. We’ve gone through so much and that was just one particular play that really culminated the entire game and all the contributions from other guys from Gabe’s defense, to Ping’s rebounding, to Japeth’s rim protecting, to Jayson and LA doing a lot of the legwork,” Alapag said. “Everybody had their part in contribution to the game. After the shot, after the buzzer sounded, it was just a very special moment for us as a team and for Philippine basketball to show that all of the sacrifices, all of the hard work, now it’s given an opportunity to re-introduce ourselves to the world,” he added. Jimmy wouldn’t say it, but his teammates would. That shot of his that beat South Korea in the 2013 FIBA-Asia Championships introduced the Gilas name to the world. It announced that the Philippines has finally arrived. Gilas’ breakthrough overtime win a year later in Spain against Senegal — a game Jimmy pretty much decided late as well — made it known that Filipinos are here to stay on the World stage. “I would say so, it got us to where we wanted to be in the World Cup. I think we shocked some people there as well. But just the work that went in, I think it showed the country that we can get back to where we want to be as long as you work together,” Norwood said. “Yung puso ni Jimmy, grabe naman. Makikita mo maliit pero gusto lang niya talaga manalo. Ang liit pero parang lion pag nagalit eh, nandoon yung tiwala namin sa kanya. Ano pa ba masasabi mo, Jimmy is Jimmy Alapag,” Pingris would add.   [NOTES: At the time of original publishing, Gilas Pilipinas was fighting to make a return trip to the FIBA World Cup, this time in China in 2019. To secure its slot, the the Philippine national team needed to beat Kazakhstan in Astana plus a loss from Japan, Jordan, and/or Lebanon. One of the teams that can help Gilas is South Korea... ironically. Jimmy Alapag retired from national team play in 2014 and retired playing for good in 2016. He has since made himself a champion basketball coach in the ABL. Marc Pingris suffered an ACL injury in 2018 and is in the process of returning for his PBA team in the current 2019 season. Gabe Norwood is still in Gilas. He’s still an effective two-way weapon. He can still dunk and will stop your best player too.]   [Updated Notes: The Philippines beat Kazakhstan to make the 2019 FIBA World Cup in China. Gilas got help from... South Korea. The Koreans beat Lebanon on the road, allowing Gilas to advance to the World Championships outright with a victory over Kazakhstan.]   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 10th, 2020

Volley star prepares for beauty pageant

It’s not a strange setting for volleyball star Michele Gumabao but preparing for the coming Miss Universe Philippines pageant is a more difficult challenge that she’s facing with mental toughness in this pandemic, thanks to her sports background......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 3rd, 2020

Rodtang retains title in ONE Championship’s return to action

31 July 2020 – Bangkok, Thailand: The largest global sports media property in Asian history, ONE Championship™ (ONE), made a successful return to its flagship event schedule, starting off with ONE: NO SURRENDER last Friday night, 31 July in Bangkok. The event was broadcast live around the world from a closed-door, audience-free venue. Once again, the absolute best in local and international martial arts talent showcased their skills in the ONE Championship ring. In the main event, reigning and defending ONE Flyweight Muay Thai World Champion Rodtang “The Iron Man” Jitmuangnon successfully defended his title against former ONE Flyweight Kickboxing World Champion “The Baby Shark” Petchdam Petchyindee Academy after five action-packed rounds. Petchdam established his jab early in the first round, setting up his vaunted left kick. Rodtang was slow to start, as he instead opted to get reads on his opponent from a distance. Rodtang turned up the pressure towards the end of the second round, hunting Petchdam with his trademark boxing combinations and thunderous elbows. In the third round, Rodtang began walking Petchdam down with his punches. The champion caught Petchdam with a left hook, testing the challenger’s chin on wobbly legs, but the latter recovered well. In the fourth round, Rodtang resumed his onslaught, rolling forward like a tank as Petchdam fired away with kicks to the body. In the fifth round, Petchdam again found success with his left roundhouse kick, but it wasn’t enough to thwart Rodtang’s forward pressure. After five fiery rounds, two of three judges scored the bout in favor of Rodtang to win by majority decision, who retaind his title. Reigning ONE Featherweight Muay Thai World Champion Petchmorakot Petchyindee Academy turned in perhaps the most important victory of his career, outlasting legendary Thai striker “The Boxing Computer” Yodsanklai IWE Fairtex to retain his title in the co-main event. The first round saw the legendary Yodsanklai connect on his patented triple uppercut, while Petchmorakot tried to shake off the cobwebs. Petchmorakot upped the aggression in the second round, catching Yodsanklai’s kick as he uncorked a myriad of straight punches to the head. Yodsanklai answered back with slicing elbows, creating a cut on the defending champion’s eyelid. In the third round, Petchmorakot opened up the action with a left elbow, while Yodsanklai countered with a straight left hand down the middle. Petchmorakot increased his punch output in the fourth, tagging Yodsanklai with elbows and straights, but the legend would not surrender. In the fifth and final round, Yodsanklai ambushed Petchmorakot with combinations, while the champion danced away to keep himself safe from range. In the end, Petchmorakot did just enough to earn the victory by a close majority decision. In a ONE Super Series Kickboxing Super-Bout, Thai featherweight talents Superbon and Sitthichai “Killer Kid” Sitsongpeenong figured in a thrilling three-round war of attrition. The first round was close, as both Sitthichai and Superbon traded their best offense at the center of the ONE Championship ring. The second round saw much of the same action, with both men winding up on their kicks and doubling up on their punches, but it was Superbon who started to pull away with a higher output and more impactful strikes. In the third and final round, Sitthichai and Superbon turned on the aggression, attacking each other from multiple angles with neither man willing to take a step backward. In the end, Superbon recorded a hard-earned victory, getting the better of his trilogy with Sitthichai via unanimous decision on the judges’ scorecards. In the mixed martial arts women’s atomweight division, reigning ONE Atomweight Muay Thai World Champion Stamp Fairtex continued her rise through the ranks with another exciting victory. Stamp put together another masterful striking performance, dominating fellow Thai warrior Sunisa “Thunderstorm” Srisen to earn win number five in her young career. At the sound of the first round bell, Stamp came out aggressively, looking for the Thai clinch. Once she had Srisen secured in close quarters, Stamp began unloading on a plethora of hard knees to the midsection. Srisen showed incredible toughness in enduring Stamp’s offensive barrage, but the end came shortly after. Stamp capitalized on a botched takedown from Srisen, winding up on her opponent’s back where she finished the bout with a series of punches. In a mixed martial arts catchweight contest, Brazilian newcomer Fabricio “Wonder Boy” Andrade made an impressive ONE Championship debut, dominating Mark “Tyson” Fairtex Abelardo of New Zealand and the Philippines en route to a spectacular finish within two rounds. Action started off on the feet in the first round, with each man landing significant power shots. Abelardo stalked and chased Andrade across the ring, but the Brazilian showed poise and was able to pick the Filipino-Kiwi apart from the outside. In the second round, Andrade continued his elusive movement, peppering Abelardo from range before swiftly taking his back when the opportunity presented itself. From there, Andrade latched onto in a deep rear-naked choke. Abelardo faded rapidly, and was effectively put to sleep as the referee called a halt to the contest. Kicking off the action at ONE: NO SURRENDER were Thai striking superstars “The Angel Warrior” Panpayak Jitmuangnon and "The Kicking Machine" Superlek Kiatmoo9, who squared off in a three-round ONE Super Series Muay Thai contest. This was the first time the two flyweights met inside the ONE Championship ring, after having faced each other multiple instances before in Thailand’s biggest arenas. Superlek was aggressive to start the bout, connecting on a series of combinations in the opening round. Panpayak scored with a handful of solid counter shots in the second frame, as Superlek continued his onslaught. In the third and final round, Superlek repeatedly found a home for his right kick on Panpayak’s body, as he ran away with a unanimous decision victory on the judges’ scorecards. Official results for ONE: NO SURRENDER ONE Flyweight Muay Thai World Championship: Rodtang Jitmuangnon defeats Petchdam Petchyindee Academy by Majority Decision (MD) after 5 rounds ONE Featherweight Muay Thai World Championship: Petchmorakot Petchyindee Academy defeats Yodsanklai IWE Fairtex by Majority Decision (MD) after 5 rounds Kickboxing Featherweight bout: Superbon defeats Sitthichai Sitsongpeenong by Unanimous Decision (UD) after 3 rounds Mixed Martial Arts Atomweight bout: Stamp Fairtex defeats Sunisa Srisen by TKO (Strikes) at 3:59 minutes of round 1 Mixed Martial Arts Catch Weight (67.0 KG) bout: Fabricio Andrade defeats Mark Fairtex Abelardo by Submission (Rear Naked Choke) at 1:11 minutes of round 2 Muay Thai Flyweight bout: Superlek Kiatmoo9 defeats Panpayak Jitmuangnon by Unanimous Decision (UD) after 3 rounds.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 1st, 2020

PHISGOC cited for notable hosting of & lsquo;19 SEA Games

President Rodrigo Duterte bannered the country’s achievements in sports in his fifth State of the Nation Address on Monday, saying Filipino athletes not only prevailed in the 30th Southeast Asian Games Games held in the Philippines last year but, more importantly, fostered genuine sportsmanship among all participants......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJul 29th, 2020

DID YOU KNOW… Maddie Madayag started off as a wushu artist

Maddie Madayag is poetry in motion when it comes to her blocking. Her defense at the net is an art form. But before the Davaoena flexed her muscles into becoming one of this generation’s notable middle blockers, she excelled in a different art - martial arts that is. Madayag already donned the tricolors performing on the mat as a wushu artist long before the former Ateneo de Manila University hammered her way into winning two UAAP titles and landing a spot in the national women’s volleyball team. Before pounding the volleyball or putting up a great wall at the net to stop an opponent’s attack, Madayag wowed judges with her routines with weapons especially with the long spear or quiang. However, her love affair with the Chinese martial arts started with a little nudge from her mother, Donna. “I actually tried taekwondo and ballet but then it didn’t work for me. Nag-wushu ako noong elementary but then only because my mom forced me. Para lang matuto ako mag-self defense,” said Madayag during her appearance in Volleyball DNA.      “I don’t know. I was kind of lazy siguro back then. I wanted to watch TV, cartoons, I just wanted to chill. But then my mom wanted me to learn other things din naman. She didn’t want me to stay at home,” added Madayag. It didn’t take long for Madayag to appreciate the sport.   “After nu’ng summer I learned to love the sport so I told my mom I wanted to continue,” she said. Showing talent, athleticism and being naturally competitive, Madayag landed a spot in the junior team. She even competed in the 2009 Asian Junior Wushu Championship in Macau where she won a medal.   Her wushu stint, however, ended when she entered high school. Madayag cited conflict of schedule as the reason for leaving the sport. Then came her interest in volleyball.     “My friends (in Davao Christian High School) told me na, ‘Tara Madz tryout tayo sa volleyball’. After ng tryout na yun ako lang na-recruit because I was the tall one,” said Madayag, who added that she was around 5-foot-8 that time. It was volleyball that opened an opportunity for the Southern lass to fly to the Big City and eventually land on the Lady Eagles’ nest in Katipunan. Madayag accomplished great things after fully embracing the team sport. But what if Madayag pursued her first love? For sure with her talent she’ll get a spot in the national team alongside wushu star Agatha Wong.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 24th, 2020

Team Lakay s Geje Eustaquio open to testing himself in ONE Super Series

Team Lakay flyweight star Geje "Gravity" Eustaquio has reached the mountaintop of the division after having held the ONE Flyweight World Championship from mid-2018 to early-2019.  For the 31-year old former world champion, getting his belt back remains a top priority, but he's open to trying his hand at ONE Championship's striking-only platform, the ONE Super Series.  Home to some of the world's best strikers, ONE Super Series has been a successful addition to ONE's brand of martial arts action, and it's also giving their athletes a chance to shift from sport to sport.  For Eustaquio, who's considered as one of the best strikers in the division, competing in kickboxing or muay thai is a welcome challenge.  “It would be a privilege for me to compete in ONE Super Series among legends, but right now, I’m just focused on my MMA career and looking to get back on track," Eustaquio told ONE Championship. "It’s been a rough couple of years, but I still consider myself among the top in my division. My mind is still on the flyweight title, and that’s what I’m working towards." “But yes definitely, I want to test my striking against the best in the world," he continued.  In the flyweight division, ONE's best striker is arguably reigning ONE Flyweight Muay Thai World Champion Rodtang "The Iron Man" Jitmuangnon of Thailand, who's known for his unparalleled toughness inside the circle.  "Gravity" has nothing but the utmost respect for Rodtang because of his abilities inside the ring and his personality out of it.  “I think Rodtang is a tremendous athlete, and a big inspiration to many. Even though he’s the champion, he never forgets where he came from. You can still find humility in him, and I have so much respect for him,” said Eustaquio.   “I think his greatest strength is his durability. His ability to walk through the line of fire, and just goad his opponents into a fight, it’s admirable. At the same time, it’s his biggest weakness. Fighters with that kind of style tend to underestimate things. In this sport, you can never predict what is coming, or how heavy or dangerous a strike could be. We’re only humans, after all, and he’s just a man," Eustaquio continued.  Rodtang is scheduled to defend his title against countryman Petchdam Petchyindee Academy when ONE returns to action at ONE: No Surrender this coming July 31st.  If Rodtang can remain the champion, it's definitely not outside the realm of possiblity that Eustaquio be tapped as the next challenger.  “One day it would be an honor for me to share the ONE Super Series ring with this legend,” Eustaquiao said. “Or maybe, if he wants to shift over to MMA, I can put together a welcome party," he concluded.   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 20th, 2020