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Hot money improved in September

Transactions for the month yielded net outflows of $232 million as a result of the $1.5 billion outflows, which more than offset the $1.3 billion inflows for the month. The post Hot money improved in September appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource: tribune tribuneOct 17th, 2019

WHAT IF... Paul Desiderio missed the Atin To shot

History lesson: The University of the Philippines' rise began even before Kobe Paras, even before Bright Akhuetie, and even before Paul Desiderio. The Fighting Maroons, with Jett Manuel at the helm, were already knocking on the door of the UAAP 79 Final Four. In the end, they fell short, but tying for fifth-place remains a step forward from their so-called "dark days." From there, they improved year-by-year. Technically, that was the origin story of their transformation into the “Winning Maroons.” In essence, however, this new State U, this legitimate contender State U, was born on the day Desiderio claimed victory. "Atin to, papasok to!" -- Paul Desiderio during the timeout. Moments later...#UAAPSeason80 pic.twitter.com/7yafSpldJM — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) September 10, 2017 “Atin ‘to, papasok ‘to,” he yelled in the middle of a timeout with just 5.3 ticks to go in their Season 80 opener opposite University of Sto. Tomas. Not long after, he took a pass from Jun Manzo and then launched a long-range missile over Zach Huang. Game, set, and match for him and his team. UP still fell short of the playoffs that year, but next season, they finally broke through for their first Final Four appearance since 1997 and then their first Finals stint since 1986. From then until now, “Atin ‘To” has been the battlecry of a long-suffering team and fanbase. Sometimes, however, don’t you ever think what if… What if Desiderio missed that shot? That guarantee he made and that game he won was just the jumpstart the Fighting Maroons needed to believe that hey, they could really, really do this. When the proud Cebuano said it, though, there was also a 50 percent chance he was going to disappoint his teammates, his coaches, and their faithful. What if he did? Of course, Desiderio would not be a lifetime legend in Diliman. There is a credible chance he still goes on to make the Mythical Team that year, but wouldn’t have his iconic moment. In turn, State U wouldn’t have a battlecry - two words so simple, yet so strong. “Atin ‘To” was the short and sweet statement that all has changed for UP and it will now stand alongside the best of the best in men’s basketball. And that means that one of the four spots in the playoffs was theirs. In Season 81, the Fighting Maroons would still put an end to their 21-year Final Four drought and 32-year Finals absence - of course they do behind MVP Bright Akhuetie, Mythical selection Juan Gomez de Liano, and team captain Desiderio. They do so, though, with a battlecry with a lot less passion that “Atin ‘To” encapsulated and entailed - think “16-strong” or something to that effect. Without an iconic moment, Desiderio fails to stand out all that much in the 2018 PBA Draft and falls lower than the no. 4 he was picked at. Other players, friends and foes alike, would also have to find a new name for claiming victory. From Matt Nieto. To Akhuetie. To Emilio Aguinaldo College. The ripple effects even reach outside basketball as, without the recent comparison, UST’s “Kami Naman” becomes even more powerful. In terms of on-court results, nothing much would have changed if Paul Desiderio missed the “Atin ‘To” shot. The story, however, would be a lot less colorful. —— Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 27th, 2020

From Hopkinton to Boston, marathon absence is seen and felt

By JIMMY GOLEN AP Sports Writer HOPKINTON, Mass. (AP) — “It All Starts Here.” The motto is bannered on the Hopkinton website, laid into the floor of the Marathon Elementary School, painted on a sign that sends Boston Marathon participants off on their way to Copley Square. Since 1924, this 300-year-old town serendipitously located 26.2 miles west of Boston has been the starting line for the world’s most prestigious road race and, like Marathon and Athens themselves, the two are enduringly linked. “It gets stronger and stronger every year, this relationship,” said Tim Kilduff, a longtime Hopkinton resident and former Boston Marathon race director. “We see it as: The spirit of the marathon resides in Hopkinton, and we lend it out one day a year.” From the starting line in this leafy Colonial town to the finish on Boylston Street, residents and runners are preparing for a spring without the Boston Marathon — the first in 124 years. Organizers and authorities have postponed the race originally scheduled for Monday until Sept. 14 because of the coronavirus pandemic, stripping the streets of brightly colored singlets and opening a gap in the sporting schedule for runners from all over the world. “Tradition’s an overused word. But this really is a rite of spring,” Kilduff said. “So this year it will lead into a beautiful fall season in New England.” ___ On a regular marathon weekend, Hopkinton triples in size from its 16,000 residents to absorb a field of more than 30,000 runners, wheelchair racers and hand cyclists. The Town Common teems with people, along with food carts and other vendors serving both tourists and race participants previewing the course. But while others may think of Hopkinton only on the third Monday in April, the marathon and its essence permeates the town all year. Residents drive over the starting line painted on Main Street on their way to work or to concerts at the gazebo. An International Marathon Center is planned for the town, a sister city of Marathon, Greece, where the long-running tradition was birthed. There are three marathon-related statues in Hopkinton, including “The Starter,” which stands at the starting line, pistol raised, ready to send the field off for another race to Boston’s Back Bay. These days, his face is covered with a cloth mask. “This is not the NBA or baseball or the NFL. This is ours,” said Kilduff, who was the race director in 1983-84, ran the marathon in 1985 and for the last 33 years has been a spotter on the truck that leads the men’s field to the finish line. “Anybody who has run the race, volunteered for the race, supported the race, feels that they own a part of the race. They own just a little bit. So it’s ours,” he said. “The Boston Marathon is almost bigger than itself in the emotion it elicits, and the respect that people have for it.” ___ Training for a marathon can be a solitary endeavor, but the event itself is a social distancing calamity. Participants crowd into corrals to wait for the start, then run in packs to minimize air resistance. Volunteers hand out water on the course and medals at the finish. Fans and family are waiting with high fives or hugs. At Wellesley College, where the cheering is so loud it is known as the Scream Tunnel, students traditionally wave signs encouraging the runners to stop for a kiss. It’s hard to imagine this custom — already a relic of another era — surviving post-pandemic. “A lot of the signs are jokes about kissing. That’s part of the tradition, too,” said Erin Kelly, a senior who returned home to San Diego when the campus closed. “The marathon is just a big part of Wellesley’s culture. I was looking forward to seeing it as a student one last time.” ___ Oncologist Amy Comander decided to run the Boston Marathon in 2013, when colleagues at Massachusetts General Hospital treated many of those injured when two pressure-cooker bombs exploded at the finish line. “I just told myself: You’re running next year. And I did,” she said. And every year since. After starting work at Newton-Wellesley Hospital, right around the Mile 16 marker, Comander has used it as a base for her training runs. During the race itself, the sight of coworkers, friends and even patients out front cheering her on gives her a boost of energy right when she needs it: just before making the turn toward Heartbreak Hill. “I see it as a true privilege that I can go to work and I’m on the marathon course," Comander said. “You’re talking to someone who truly loves everything about the Boston Marathon." Comander is registered to run for her seventh year in a row, this time to raise money for cancer survivors and their families; she is still determined to do so in September. But on Monday, she will be caring for cancer patients, a task more stressful because of the danger the coronavirus poses to their weakened immune systems. “I will be a little sad,” said Comander, who plans to take a break from the clinic to get in an 8-mile run — but not on the course, per the request of authorities concerned about crowds. “I feel like I need to do that for myself.” ___ The daffodils are in bloom now from Hopkinton Green to Copley Square and all along the 26.2-mile route in between. Thousands of the bright yellow flowers were planted after the 2013 bombing as a symbol of rebirth and resilience, and they have the benefit of blossoming in mid-April — right around Patriots' Day — to cheer the runners along. Thousands more potted daffodils have decorated the course each year since the explosions at the finish line that killed three people and wounded more than 180 others. With the state holiday and the race postponed until the fall, the blooms will have long since withered. Instead, many of the flowers grown to decorate the course were placed outside of hospitals to thank health care staffers for working through the pandemic. Outside Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, just down the road from the 1 Mile To Go marker in Kenmore Square, the flowers were arranged in a heart. A sign encouraged workers to take a plant home. ___ Just a few steps from the finish line, the Marathon Sports shoe store on Boylston Street gets especially busy over the weekend leading up to the race, when tens of thousands of runners descend on the Back Bay. Things typically cool off on Monday, giving the staff a chance to pop out and cheer the finishers. "We don’t have any official party," said Dan Darcy, the chain’s marketing director. “It’s really just a celebration of the runners that day." Marathon participants are easily recognizable after the race: There is the medal around their neck, of course, and a mylar warming blanket draped around their shoulders if the weather is cold. Often their bib number is still pinned to their chest. “If we have any runners coming through our doors on Marathon Monday, I can tell you they’ll be recognized and they’ll hear the support from our staff,” Darcy said in a telephone interview from Fairbanks, Alaska, where he is working remotely. Marathon Sports has been a reluctant landmark since the first of the two bombs exploded outside its window at 2:49 p.m. on April 15, 2013. Darcy was watching the race from a different spot that day and tried unsuccessfully for hours to get in touch with his coworkers. A few were injured; others turned the store into a field hospital, treating the wounded until trained first responders could arrive. A memorial stands on the sidewalk outside to the three killed in the explosions and the two police officers who died in the ensuing manhunt, which shut down the city and surrounding area for much of the week. The store reopened about two weeks later. Now it’s closed again. “We are going to be encouraging runners to go out and get a run in on their own, keeping the social distancing, but not to run the race route itself,” Darcy said. “We’re not able to do any sort of celebration.” ___ Last month, as Americans began to isolate indoors and one sporting event after another was canceled, the Boston Athletic Association sacrificed its spring start in the hopes of keeping its 124-year tradition alive. Since the first edition in 1897, the race had always coincided with the state holiday of Patriots' Day that commemorates the first shots in the Revolutionary War. As the snow melts in New England, the course becomes increasingly populated with joggers emerging from a winter indoors to get in their training runs. To Kilduff, this year's fall race will be an opportunity to come out of a different kind of isolation. “You know what happened in the year after the bombing: There’s going to be this huge buildup of pent-up energy. And it’s going to be exhibited on the course,” he said. "It’s going to create a brand new chapter in the history of the Boston Marathon. "I’m excited as hell about this.” ___ Jimmy Golen has covered the Boston Marathon for The Associated Press since 1995......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 20th, 2020

Dirty money

  MORE than P32 billion ($633M), larger than the annual budget of a big department of the government, arrived “unabashed, unabated” through 890 transactions since September 2019. The Anti-Money Laundering Council showed “no enthusiasm,” in Senator Richard Gordon’s words, to stop the flow. Dirty money from drugs, terrorism, human trafficking? In their previous incarnation a […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsMar 11th, 2020

Filipino linked to money laundering indicted in Pasay City

THE Pasay City Prosecutor is indicting a Filipino who was recently linked to the laundering of millions of pesos in foreign currency. He is being charged for not declaring the amount of money he brought into the country last September......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsMar 6th, 2020

P22.7B in ‘dirty money’ laundered in PH — Gordon

SEN. Richard Gordon on Tuesday bared that since September 2018, at least 47 Filipinos and Chinese had laundered over $447 million or P22.69 billion in “dirty money” into the country. The senator, chairman of the Blue Ribbon Committee, said in a privilege speech that he would conduct a public hearing on the matter on Thursday, […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsMar 4th, 2020

POGO workers laundered P10 billion in dirty money, Gordon says

As much as $447 million or P22.69 billion passing through the Bureau of Customs, was laundered into the country by 47 persons, including Filipinos, from September 2019 until February 2020, Senator Richard Gordon said Tuesday......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMar 3rd, 2020

Money laundering? Gordon says $447 million suspiciously entered PH

MANILA, Philippines – Senator Richard Gordon will lead a Senate inquiry into some $447 million (P22.68 billion) that entered the Philippines from September 2019 to February 2020, which he said may be linked to money laundering due to the proliferation of Philippine Offshore Gaming Operators (POGOs) in the country. In a ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMar 3rd, 2020

PH int’l investment position improves in Q3

THE Philippines’ international investment position (IIP) improved as of the third quarter in relative terms, as external assets grew amid lower liabilities, according to the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP). In a report, the central bank said the IIP improved “as the net external liability position in end-September 2019 further declined to $33.9 billion from […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsDec 29th, 2019

E-money transactions up 33% to P1 trillion in 9 months

Digital payments surged by 33 percent to breach the P1 trillion level from January to September on the back of enabling regulatory environment, rising number of providers and aggressive marketing......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 9th, 2019

OFW remittances surge in Sept – BSP

MONEY sent home by overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) climbed in September, data from the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) showed on Friday. In a statement, the central bank said personal remittances — made up of OFWs’ net compensation; personal transfers, whether in cash or kind; and capital transfers between households — reached $24.6 billion in […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsNov 16th, 2019

Wilcon net income jumps 11%

Wilcon Depot Inc. clocked in 11.1 percent net earnings in the January to September period, to P1.54 billion from P1.39 billion in 2018 on the back of improved sales mix favoring higher margin products, adding to net sales growth. The listed home improvement and finishing construction supplies retailer said third quarter net income alone rose […] The post Wilcon net income jumps 11% appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsNov 7th, 2019

M3 growth picks up amid lending expansion

GROWTH in the country’s money supply accelerated in September amid the steady expansion of bank lending, the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) reported on Thursday. In a statement, the central bank said domestic liquidity or M3 expanded by 7.7 percent year-on-year to P12.03 trillion, faster than August’s revised 6.3 percent. Month-on-month and seasonally adjusted, M3 […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsNov 1st, 2019

NG deficit still lower vs program

Collections by the BIR improved by 15.24 percent for the month of September, reaching P150.5 billion. The post NG deficit still lower vs program appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsOct 23rd, 2019

Spain court dismisses fraud case against Messi

MADRID, Spain – Spain's National Court said it had dismissed a complaint against Lionel Messi filed by a former employee of the Argentine footballer's foundation, who had accused him of fraud, embezzlement, and money laundering.  In dismissing the case on Monday, September 30, the judge wrote that the complaint "was based on an ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 30th, 2019

Raptors hungry for another title run, even without Leonard

By Ian Harrison, Associated Press TORONTO (AP) — Kawhi Leonard has moved on and Danny Green is gone, but the Toronto Raptors still have an NBA title to defend. This season, a group led by All-Star guard Kyle Lowry, breakout talent Pascal Siakam and defensive standout Marc Gasol is turning "We the North" into "We Want More." "If I had to express it in one word, I would say 'hungry,'" Gasol said Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) when asked what he expects of the new-look Raptors. "I think it's a very hungry team. We all understand what Kawhi meant to the team and how well he played in the playoffs. But we also understand how good we can be as a team, and we're all going to invest everything in it to be that team." Leonard signed a free-agent deal with the Los Angeles Clippers after leading Toronto to six-game NBA Finals victory over Golden State in his lone season north of the border. Once Leonard passed on returning to the Raptors, Green did the same, signing with the Los Angeles Lakers. General manager Masai Ujiri, who traded franchise icon DeMar DeRozan to San Antonio to acquire Leonard and Green, insisted he had no reason to be upset with the way his big move worked out. "That's just the nature of the business," Ujiri said. "We understand it and we move on as an organization. I think there are many bright spots with our team, whether it's our veteran players, whether it's our players coming up, and the younger group we're developing." Still, even Ujiri couldn't fail to notice what had changed around him since the start of training camp last year, when he sat at the podium in front of a packed crowd, flanked by newcomers Leonard and Green. This year, Ujiri was on stage all by himself. "I'm lonely," he joked. One thing hasn't changed: the Raptors still have talent. Lowry, Toronto's longest-tenured player, has been an All-Star for five straight seasons. Siakam is poised to take another step after running away with the league's Most Improved Player award last season, while Gasol, veteran Serge Ibaka, and youngster OG Anunoby round out an imposing frontcourt. "I think guys are going to step up, I think guys are up for the challenge," Ujiri said. The ultra-competitive Lowry certainly is. His expectation this season? Another title. "It's always the same goal for me," Lowry said. "I'm more motivated than ever." MORE CHANGE COMING? Don't expect this Raptors group to stick together much longer. Lowry, Gasol, Ibaka and guard Fred VanVleet are all eligible for free agency at the end of the season. So is forward Rondae Hollis-Jefferson, who signed with Toronto in free agency. The Raptors will have money to spend next summer and are likely to look at younger players rather than paying to retain veterans. PASCAL'S FUTURE Siakam has two years left on his rookie contract, but the Raptors have already approached the young star about a new deal. "We've had conversations with Pascal's representation and we're excited," Ujiri said. "He's somebody we're definitely going to keep." With Leonard and Green gone, coach Nick Nurse sees room for Siakam to become more of a weapon. "He's going to be given a great chance, a great opportunity here to really expand his role and his game," Nurse said. "There's going to be lots of opportunity for him to have the ball." VanVleet isn't putting a limit on his expectations for Siakam's growth. "There's nothing he can't do," VanVleet said. CONTENDERS TO THE THRONE After another busy summer of free agency, Ujiri sees new balance around the league and no clear-cut challenger to Toronto's title. "If you say who's going to come out of the East, I think it's a question," Ujiri said. "I think, for the first time, it's a question who's going to win the NBA championship. I don't think anybody knows. I don't think anybody knows who's going to come out of the West and there are very, very strong teams there." CHRISTMAS WISH The reigning champs got a Christmas Day game, Toronto's first holiday appearance since visiting the Knicks in 2001. This year, the Raptors are hosting Boston in a noon start. "It means everything," guard Norman Powell said. "I've grown up always looking forward to the Christmas Day games, watching the NBA after opening up gifts and presents. I know everybody's really tied and locked into those games." BANNER MOMENT Toronto opens the season at home to rookie sensation Zion Williamson and the New Orleans Pelicans on Oct. 22. The Raptors will raise their championship banner and hand out rings before tipoff. "I think that's when it's going to finally hit me," Lowry said. "I just feel I haven't let it sink in as much. When the banner rises and the rings come on, that's when you really feel it.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 29th, 2019

DBTC Greywolves ends two-game skid with win over USC Baby Warriors

CEBU CITY, Philippines – The Don Bosco Technical College (DBTC) Greywolves ended a two game skid after thrashing the University of San Carlos (USC) Baby Warriors, 73-53, Thursday, September 26, 2019 at the Cebu Coliseum. Vincent Raymund Escobido who top-scored with 15 points helped the Greywolves improved their win-loss record to 2-2 in the High […] The post DBTC Greywolves ends two-game skid with win over USC Baby Warriors appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 26th, 2019

Dela Rosa: Are outbreaks created so vaccines make money?

Imagine if vaccines were used to generate profit from an intentionally-proliferated disease outbreak. It's a plot hatched in Hollywood dystopia. In a Senate committee hearing  on September 24, Senator Ronald “Bato” dela Rosa asked resource speakers from the Department of Health and other health organizations ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 25th, 2019

Ace Barbers warns POGOs make PH vulnerable to drugs, money laundering

MANILA, Philippines – House committee on dangerous drugs chairperson Robert Ace Barbers warned the rising online gambling industry would make it convenient to launder dirty drug money into the country.  In a privilege speech on Monday night, September 23, Barbers accused Chinese nationals of ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 24th, 2019

UC pulls off upset, downs defending champion UV

CEBU CITY, Philippines – The University of Cebu (UC) Webmasters finally ended its losing skid, pulling off a 72-64 upset over the defending champion University of the Visayas (UV) Green Lancers, 72-64, in the 19th Cesafi men’s basketball tournament senior division on Sunday, September 15, 2019. Leading the Webmasters, who improved to 1-2, was Shane […] The post UC pulls off upset, downs defending champion UV appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 15th, 2019

U.S. rocker Eddie Money dies at 70

NEW YORK, USA – Eddie Money, the prolific American rocker known for a string of hits in the 1970s and 1980s like "Take Me Home Tonight," has died, entertainment outlet Variety said Friday, September 13, citing his family. He was 70. Money – whose smashes included "Two Tickets ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 13th, 2019