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Global group of lawyers to hold accountable red-taggers of Filipino colleagues

IADL President Jeanne Mirer said the attacks on Filipino lawyers are in violation of international law including the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the UN Declaration on Human Rights Defenders, the UN Basic Principles on the Role of Lawyers, the Convention against Torture and even of the Fourth Geneva Convention and the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, among others. The post Global group of lawyers to hold accountable red-taggers of Filipino colleagues appeared first on Bulatlat......»»

Category: newsSource: bulatlat bulatlatFeb 8th, 2021

Rights groups slam MMDA spox for ‘drama serye’ remark on detained activist

Human rights groups slammed Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA) Spokesperson Celine Pialago following her “drama serye” remarks at detained activist Reina Mae Nasino who recently buried her three-month-old daughter River.  Kapatid, a support group for families and friends of political prisoners, said those who downgrade what happened to the political prisoner are only trying to “cover the government’s gross violation of human rights.”  “The story of Reina Mae Nasino and her 3-month-old child who died last week is not ‘drama-serye.’ It is a real story that exposed the countless injustices committed by the government,” it said in a statement released on Sunday.  “MMDA Chair Danny Lim, a former political prisoner himself, should have long shown the door to his spokesperson. It should be obvious by now that sensitivity cannot be taught nor proper manners and right conduct if one is empty-headed,” it added. Meanwhile, National Union of People’s Lawyers (NUPL) President Edre Olalia was more restrained, saying they would “do the same thing if she was in Ina’s position and circumstance. “To start with, we will never ever wish this horrible tragedy and injustice to visit the Asec, her mother, her daughters, her sisters and her aunts,” he said in a Facebook post. Despite having nothing to do with traffic, Pialago felt the need to “use her voice as a Filipino” to share her two cents on Nasino’s case. “Hindi lahat ng inang nakakulong ay nakapunta sa libing ng kanyang anak. Kaya yung mga sumisimpatya kay Reina Mae Nasino, pag aralan niyo mabuti ang dahilan bakit siya nakulong at kilalanin niyong mabuti kung sino siya sa lipunan (Not all jailed mothers get to visit their children’s funeral. So all of those who sympathize with Reina Mae Nasino, study well why she was imprisoned and know who she is and what her role is in society),” she said in a Facebook post on Sunday morning. “Masyado ninyong ginagawang pang drama serye sa hapon ang paghihinagpis niya. Tigilan niyo (You are trying to make her grief like an afternoon drama serye. Stop it)!” she added. Nasino was five months pregnant with River when she was arrested in November 2019 for allegedly being found with firearms and explosives at the Bagong Alyansang Makabayan Manila Office in Tondo, Manila. Her lawyers have insisted that the pieces of evidence were planted and that the charges filed against her are trumped-up. She gave birth to River on July 1 at the Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Medical Hospital on July 1. She and her baby were returned to the Manila City Jail 48 hours later. Before this, she filed a motion before the Manila Regional Trial Court (RTC) to allow her to breastfeed her daughter for a year at the hospital or a prison nursery.  But Manila RTC Branch 20 Judge Marivic Balisi-Umali denied this, saying that the jail has “very limited resources” for the care of her child.  Nasino was also among 22 elderly and medically-compromised detainees who filed a motion for their compassionate release amid the pandemic on April 8 before the Supreme Court. But months later, the High Court ruled that the trial courts will be the ones to decide on their temporary release. On August 13, the activist-mother was ordered to turn her child over to her relatives.  River was admitted at the Philippine General Hospital for fever and diarrhea on September 24. She was placed in the intensive care unit on October 9 where she died a few hours later.  A few hours before her daughter died, Nasino filed a very urgent motion for furlough so she can be with her child in her dying moments. On October 13, Manila RTC Branch 47 Judge Paulino Gallegos granted her three full days from October 14 to 16 to be by her daughter’s side during the wake and burial.  But the next day, he cut Nasino’ furlough down to only six hours from 1 to 4 p.m. on October 14 and 16 after receiving opposition from the Manila City Jail. The Manila City Jail cited lack of personnel, health concerns, and a guideline stating that detainees can only be at their loved ones’ burial and wake for a maximum of three hours. For both the wake and the funeral, Nasino was clad in a full set of personal protective equipment, handcuffed, and flanked by numerous uniformed personnel.  Tensions rose during the wake after her escorts tried to pull her away twice before her time was up, eventually escorting her out with 20 minutes to spare before 4 p.m. On October 16, Marites Asis, Nasino’s mother, had to kneel and beg in front of the police to allow them to hold funeral at 11:30 a.m. The cops wanted to delay it until 1 p.m. Police also sped off with River’s hearse to the Manila North Cemetery, leaving her family behind and thwarting activists’ plan to conduct a caravan around the Supreme Court and the Court of Appeals before burying her at the cemetery. Nasino’s counsels at NUPL earlier said that they will file charges against those involved in the activist’s treatment during her daughter’s wake and burial. .....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 18th, 2020

London bourse sees Philippine office as crucial to operations

The London Stock Exchange Group is hitching a ride on the fast-growing global demand for data as part of its diversification while recognizing the important role of Filipino employees in its global operations......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 6th, 2022

South Korea’s Halloween crowd surge: What we know

SEOUL, South Korea — South Korea is investigating the exact cause of a deadly crowd surge that killed 154 people at a Halloween event, as public outrage grows over perceived policing and crowd control failures. A man offers a flower at a joint memorial altar for victims of the deadly Halloween crowd surge, in Naksopyeong, near the district of Itaewon in Seoul on October 31, 2022. ANTHONY WALLACE / AFP What went wrong and why did so many people die at the first post-pandemic Halloween party in Seoul’s popular Itaewon nightlife district? Here is what we know: What’s going on? The government promised a “thorough and transparent investigation” into the exact causes of the deadly crush in Itaewon, and police said Monday they had launched a task force and started the probe. They’ve deployed forensic experts, seized footage from 50 security cameras in the area, and interviewed scores of witnesses, victims, and workers at nearby stores, according to a senior police officer. How did it happen? Typically, a gathering of over 1,000 people has to submit “safety management plans” to the government in advance for review by police and fire departments. But in the case of the Itaewon Halloween festivities, there is no designated event organiser — individual bars, clubs and restaurants simply hold their own events and people flock to the area. Just weeks before, a “Global Village Festival” was safely staged in the exact same streets — but it was an organised event sponsored by local authorities. As a result, it had “effective crowd control with many police officers and district office staff in charge”, said Kim Min-kyu, who runs a currency exchange shop near the site of the accident and saw both events. Police have admitted to lapses in their real-time management of the event. “Police officers on the scene didn’t detect a sudden surge in the crowd,” Hong Ki-hyun, chief of the National Police Agency’s Public Order Management Bureau, told local reporters. Why was it so bad? Experts say the crowd crush could have been prevented with proper preparation, But they admit things have gotten more difficult after years of pandemic-related lockdowns. “Everywhere in the world event organisers are struggling with the post-Covid crowd,” said Eric Kant, a crowd safety specialist who runs the Phase01 Crowd Management. “A lot of visitors are new with partying, they are indeed very excited, and maybe do not understand risks very much,” he added. Key risk factors for crowd surges are “unrestricted entry” of people into a small space, and “no ticket sales” which means organisers have no exact estimate of demand, experts say — all of which happened at Itaewon. “This is a recipe for disaster in mass gatherings,” crowd safety expert Milad Haghani of the University of New South Wales told AFP. Even for the Halloween event — a public gathering with no tickets — authorities could have been actively managing the situation to prevent overcrowding. “On the day, this would mean monitoring the numbers, at the very least,” said John Drury, an expert on crowd psychology at the University of Sussex. “It would also mean a public information campaign beforehand to discourage such large numbers attending.” He warned that psychology studies show people actually seek out “objectively dangerous levels of density” at events, and organisers need to be aware of this risk. Who is to blame? So far, no one has been held accountable, even as public anger flares at the government and police for their apparent lack of oversight. Top-ranking officials have brushed off questions about taking responsibility, saying the priority is currently on helping the victims and dealing with the aftermath of the accident. Much local criticism has focused on the police — but experts say they are not necessarily at fault. “We should remember that the primary role of the police is generally not crowd management,” said Martyn Amos, a professor at Northumbria University who works on crowd simulation. “It’s possible to manage an event largely using stewards, with the police there to ensure public order and to deal with criminal activity,” he told AFP. What happens next? The government is under immense pressure to resolve this quickly — and properly. The opposition Democratic Party has already slammed the government’s handling of the event, and will likely push for resignations once the national mourning period ends on November 5. The Itaewon crush could deal another blow to President Yoon Suk-yeol’s popularity ratings — already at record lows. There is also a possibility that the disaster, if mishandled, could become a major political liability for the government. In 2014 then president Park Geun-hye was in power during the sinking of the Sewol ferry in which 304 people — mostly school children — died. She was widely criticised for her handling of the incident. The issue lingered over her presidency until she was impeached three years later over a corruption scandal......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 31st, 2022

Lawyers urge Supreme Court to hold Badoy accountable

“We call on the Supreme Court to not let this pass and to take immediate, concrete and firm action to protect justice actors and rule of law. The Court must hold accountable those who threaten and malign our judges and lawyers." The post Lawyers urge Supreme Court to hold Badoy accountable appeared first on Bulatlat......»»

Category: newsSource:  bulatlatRelated NewsOct 1st, 2022

No rest for overworked, underpaid Filipino teachers, group says

The Alliance of Concerned Teachers (ACT) said their colleagues have not had the chance to breathe since classes ended less than a month ago. The post No rest for overworked, underpaid Filipino teachers, group says appeared first on Bulatlat......»»

Category: newsSource:  bulatlatRelated NewsAug 5th, 2021

PNP apologizes, says it means no harm against community pantry organizers

"I will only believe that their intention is to help when they hold officers involved in profiling and harassment accountable," he said partially in Filipino. "They can't fix this with apologies. Hold them accountable.".....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 20th, 2021

Fintech eases fund transfer between Philippines and Australia

Global payment solutions provider Ripple through a partnership with Melbourne-based Novatti Group is helping Filipino-owned iRemit Inc. process remittances between Australia and the Philippines......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 17th, 2021

SB19 to make history with first ever virtual global concert

Filipino boy band SB19 is set to hold their first-ever online concert on November 21......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 19th, 2020

Global rights group condemns state murder of Filipino peace consultant

The International Coalition for Human Rights in the Philippines protests in the very strongest terms the murder of Mr Randall Echanis......»»

Category: newsSource:  samarnewsRelated NewsNov 8th, 2020

Halloween fans go online to keep tradition alive

Dressing up as a character different from yourself attracts the Halloween fans to keep the party going online.It takes a group of performers five hours to put on that Halloween look for the online stage.Malls have also taken the Halloween celebration online. Filipinos who celebrate Halloween are not going to let the COVID-19 pandemic take away the fun of something different, one of them dressing up costume parties. (UNSPLASH / MANILA BULLETIN) From the horror theme to the various characters in video games and movies, dressing up as someone so different from yourself has definitely charmed people of all ages and professions. But with the health and safety protocols prohibiting large gatherings, Halloween fans are taking the parties to another address — online! And the creativity to spark the party mood is amazing! John Paolo Mandac, a Human Resource professional who refuses to let go of years of dressing up for Halloween, has made a Maleficent costume out of recyclable materials. He said that “growing up gay and closeted” required him to dress up as he was told. But on Halloween, he has a chance to dress up the way he likes without displeasing anyone. John Paolo Mandac (Photo courtesy of John Paolo Mandac / MANILA BULLETN) “In the gay world, we call [Halloween] ‘Gay Christmas’,” Mandac said. He said there’s no skipping Halloween this year despite the COVID-19 pandemic, because it’s a holiday that “speaks volumes” to him. What Mandac likes the most about Halloween is being able to dress up. He said he has always liked Halloween since he was a kid but started really preparing to dress up for it in 2015. “Most of my childhood, I remember going to SM Megamall with my mom and sister to Trick-or- Treat. That went on for several years,” he said. “My mom would ask us to think of a character we would like to be that evening. And we had to be creative in making our costumes. It became a yearly bonding experience for us three,” he said. From trick-or-treating in malls, Mandac turned to Halloween parties. This year, he joined several virtual Halloween parties, including one prepared by his office colleagues. Mandac said that although the parties are “less grand” and all virtual, those were still Halloween parties. “No brushing elbows with strangers definitely. No physical interaction, no getting drunk, no appreciating a stranger’s costume. Everything is virtual,” he said, adding that he’ll likely throw in a horror movie marathon on Netflix after the online parties. The show must go on A group of gay performers whose busiest time in a nightclub is Halloween, has prepared their “look” for the new online stage. Since clubs have yet to open, Drag Queens Shewarma, Minty Fresh, Odasha — collectively known as Shemod — have taken their Halloween Drag show online. “Pag Halloween nag re-ready talaga kami or may mga naka resereve na kaming looks (We really prepare for Halloween, our ‘look’ has already been planned),” Odasha told Manila Bulletin. “Halloween is one of the most awaited events of the year in the nightclub,” Odasha said in Pilipino. This year, the challenge of performing for a show online requires more effort to create a look, Minty Fresh said. “Umaabot ng five hours yung preparation, kasi naayos kami, then mag seset up pa ng lighting (It takes us about five hours just to prepare, because we need to put on make-up, and then set up the stage and the lighting),” Minty Fresh said. Friendly Halloween party Meanwhile a group of high school friends have prepared to hold their yearly party online. Lace Azores, 25, a medical intern, said that for the first time in the seven years that they have been holding Halloween parties, this time he has prepared a program. “Every year we would have a Halloween party where we dress up, wear costumes, celebrate, and we also have an award ceremony,” Azores said. (Photo courtesy of Lace Azores / MANILA BULLETIN) But since quarantine restrictions prevent a party, they prepared to meet for an online party. “Usually kasi nag uusap usap lang kami pag mag kakasama kami physically. This time, may program akong prinepare, with games and awards, ‘Best in Costume’ ganyan (Usually, we would just talk to each other and share stories with each other during our physical parties. This time, I prepared a program, with games and awards like Best in Costume,” she said. Although they will not be physically together, Azores said that she and her friends will still have fun. The only thing she will miss though will be the dancing. And how will she dress up this year, we asked. Her reply: “As the coronavirus. Kasi ‘yan ang pinaka nakakatakot na nangyari this year (Because it’s the scariest thing that happened this year).” Annual Halloween fest goes online Meanwhile up north, the biggest Halloween bash in Ilocos Norte has also gone virtual. “Semana Ti Ar-Aria” is a week-long festival in Ilocos Norte which highlights the distinct traditions and superstitions of Ilocanos in remembering their departed loved ones. The festival which started in 2010 was started by former governor and now Senator Imee Marcos. The activities will mostly be online. Among them are the +Halloween TikTok Transformation challenge and a blog-making contest called “Kaba-vloghan,” Provincial Government of Ilocos Norte Information Officer II Rhona Ysabel Daoang said Other events are the “Lilia Cuntapay Short Horror Film Festival,” a film festival in honor of the Ilocana actress dubbed the “Queen of Philippine Horror Movies.” Absent this year will be the Zombie Night Run and the ghost parade. Mall activities go online Shopping malls have also brought the Halloween tradition online. Ayala Malls will host a virtual mall show Oct. 31 featuring characters such as Pinkfong and Baby Shark. The mall also made an online challenge where participants have to dress up in a Halloween costume and record themselves doing the Baby Shark Hand Wash Challenge. (Ayala Malls / MANILA BULLETIN) The challenge winner will get a Prepaid WiFi modem. The challenge promo will run until Oct. 31 and the winner will be announced on the mall’s Facebook page on Nov. 6. Events coordinator Katrina Loreto said most malls went for online promotions instead of staging an event. “Before there were many events, every mall had a Halloween event. Now, it’s mostly online promotions,” Loreto told Manila Bulletin......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 31st, 2020

Alden Richards to hold first virtual reality concert

Asia’s Multimedia Star Alden Richards will hold his first virtual reality concert in a global event never before seen in Philippine entertainment history as GMA Network presents “Alden’s Reality” on Dec. 8 “Alden’s Reality (AR)” gives Alden’s fans a virtual date like no other, combining cutting-edge technology and performances to produce a full-length concert and online interaction with their idol. Alden will take concertgoers to a journey that celebrates his 10 colorful years in the entertainment industry.  From heartfelt songs to adrenaline-filled dance numbers, Alden is sure to indulge everyone across the globe in his first ever virtual concert. A surprise treat also awaits his fans. Shot in 360-degree, concertgoers not only have access to front-row view, but they are also in for an immersive experience from the comforts of their home. Tickets can be purchased by logging on to www.gmanetwork.com/synergy. Philippine buyers are also given a special VIP package option at P1,200 which includes one (1) general admission ticket plus one (1) exclusive VR device to Alden’s Reality show. This special VR device takes the concertgoer to another level of enjoying the show which is set to begin streaming online at 9 pm on December 8 (Philippine time). “Through ‘Alden’s Reality,’ we are bringing you the future of Philippine concert landscape,” shares GMA Regional TV and Synergy Vice President and Head Oliver Amoroso. “We are more than excited that we are featuring Alden for our first virtual concert and that it also falls under the 70th anniversary of GMA Network. This is only the beginning. Synergy: A GMA Collaboration will be producing more events that will not only bring our Kapuso closer to their favorite artists but will also give them a unique concert experience wherever part of the Philippines and the globe they may be. We hope to see you all, virtually, on December 8.” “2020 has been a challenging year for everyone because of the pandemic,” says GMA Entertainment Group Vice President for Business Development Department III Darling de Jesus Bodegon. “We hope that through ‘Alden’s Reality,’ we can bring joy to all our Kapuso not just here in the Philippines but all over the world. We are also happy that we are able to celebrate with Alden his 10 wonderful years in the entertainment industry via this virtual-reality concert. We have been a witness to Alden’s growth as an actor and a celebrity and we are proud that he has remained humble though all these years. Alden’s Reality is his gift to all his fans who continue to support him and his journey as a Kapuso.”  Alden’s Reality (AR) is produced by Synergy: A GMA Collaboration, a group that produces ticketed and non-ticketed events and activities catering to all Filipinos across the globe. This is also GMA Network’s treat to loyal Kapuso as the country’s leading broadcast company marks its 70th anniversary. The concert is directed by Paolo Valenciano......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 18th, 2020

PNP denies ‘overkill’ security for Nasino during baby’s funeral

The Philippine National Police (PNP) denied criticisms of an overkill in the security measures it implemented during the burial of the baby of jailed activist Reina Mae Nasino in Manila on Friday. In a statement, PNP spokesman Col. Ysmael Yu said that the security measures implemented were intended for Nasino who is under government custody after her arrest and subsequent filing of a criminal case for allegedly yielding a grenade during a raid inside the office of an urban poor group in Manila. “It is the subject (Nasino) who we were protecting,” said Yu. Netizens and other groups and personalities criticized the PNP and the Bureau of Jail Management and Penology for what they described as disrespecting Filipino funeral rites. A video that went viral showed the police allegedly speeding off in a vehicle carrying the coffin of Nasino’s baby, which prompted the grandmother and other relatives to chase the vehicle. The funeral parlor and the cemetery were heavily-guarded. Nasino, who was handcuffed, arrived at the cemetery wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) gown and face mask and shield, with BJMP personnel heavily guarding her. The image of Nasino in a PPE gown, handcuffed and surrounded by BJMP personnel while grieving in front of her baby’s coffin triggered sympathy and anger from netizens who criticized the government for the treatment of a grieving mother. “That execution on security is appropriate, considering crowd control,” he added. Nasino was arrested in November last year in Manila during a raid at the office of urban poor group Kadamay. She and two others were charged with illegal possession of explosives, which they claimed had been planted by the police. She gave birth on July 1 but on Aug. 13 had to entrust the baby to the grandmother after the court handling the case denied her lawyers appeal to give Baby River more time with her mother either at the hospital or inside a detention facility where Nasino is jailed. During that time, Baby River was reportedly frail and underweight. The baby died last week at only three months old due to acute respiratory distress syndrome......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 17th, 2020

Blackpink lights up the sky

Filipino Blinks are in for a treat as Netflix brings them Blackpink: Light Up the Sky, a  documentary that serves up the never-before-seen moments the group’s global fandom has been craving for years......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 15th, 2020

Global human rights group decries massacre of five Filipino farmers amid pandemic

The ICHRP, a global network of human rights advocates, has strongly condemned the killing of 5 farmers in Bulan, Sorsogon in this time of the pandemic......»»

Category: newsSource:  samarnewsRelated NewsAug 26th, 2020

Rights lawyers assert: Police no authority to hold Echanis body

Groups of rights lawyers are backing their colleagues facing criminal raps while performing their duty in the wake of the murder of peasant leader Randall Echanis......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 12th, 2020

FIBA: Mighty Jimmy and the shot that introduced Gilas to the World

This story was originally published on Feb. 24, 2019 It’s Saturday night at Mall of Asia and the arena is absolutely rocking. Eternal basketball rivals in the Philippines and South Korea are delivering another classic. Gilas Pilipinas is down to the final minute of regulation against its longtime tormentor in the second of two semifinal games. The national team is up by two, 81-79. The Philippines is hosting the 2013 FIBA-Asia Championships where three tickets to the 2014 World Cup are at stake and the winner of this particular game gets one of those tickets. Given the rich history of both teams and what it would mean to the winner, this pivotal game has gone down the wire as everyone pretty much expected. Also knowing the history of both teams in international play, Gilas’ precarious two-point lead was not safe at all. A ghost was lurking in the background and a dreaded curse felt almost inevitable. Down to the final minute of the crucial grudge match between the Philippines and South Korea, guard Jimmy Alapag has the ball and a two-point lead. What he will do will help define not only his career but the legacy of the Gilas name as a national team.   WAKE-UP CALL Even before the Philippines-Korea game, Gilas Pilipinas already had to go through one emotional game early in its homestand for the Asian Championships. In a preliminary round showdown against Chinese Taipei, the Filipinos collapsed in the fourth quarter, allowing the Taiwanese to steal a morale-boosting 84-79 win. In 2013, the relationship between the two countries hit a rough patch over the death of one Taiwanese fisherman. In an updated May 17 report by CNN’s Jethro Mullen, “Taiwan has reacted angrily after one of its fishermen was killed by a Philippine coast guard vessel.” Taiwan had frozen applications from OFWs seeking jobs in its territory and the government of then President Ma Ying-jeou demanded an apology, among other things, from the Philippines. While the national basketball teams of both countries never really had any prior animosity with each other, tension was naturally present as both teams squared off in Group A action. Gilas Pilipinas and Chinese-Taipei both entered the showdown with identical 2-0 records and the winner would take control of solo Group A lead heading into round 2. Taking a good lead into the fourth quarter, the Philippines was outscored by 18 in the last 10 minutes and the national team took its worst home loss in quite some time. “At the time, it was a huge game for us. We understood what was happening in Taipei during that particular time. We really wanted to win for what our kababayans were going through at that time,” guard Jimmy Alapag said on that first home loss in the 2013 Asian Championships. “We didn’t get the job done, and it was tough especially to lose a game like that, it was a very emotional and it was a game that we knew we needed,” he added. The crushing loss meant that the Philippines had little room for error in round 2. While Gilas didn’t have any world beaters lined up in the second round, anything less than a perfect run would have meant an early clash with Asia’s established powerhouse teams in the knockout stages. On the other side of the bracket, defending champion China, Iran, and South Korea were battling for position and were expected to finish in the top-3. That means if Gilas Pilipinas failed to finish no. 1 in its group, the national team would have faced one of those teams in the quarterfinals. Gilas picked up a crucial win over Qatar in the 6th of August and the day after, the Philippines got some help from those same Qataris as they beat Taipei in a close decision. At the end of round 2, all teams finished with identical win-loss records but Gilas Pilipinas would take over first place after all tiebreaks were considered, barely edging out Taipei. The Philippines ended up avoiding defending champion China, Iran, and South Korea and instead got Kazakhstan in the quarterfinals. No. 2 Taipei drew China and the third-running Qataris were matched up with the South Koreans. “I think that was the moment we grew up and grew closer. I think that was the lowest of the lows, just because of the atmosphere and what was going on between both countries. It kind of felt that we let our end of the bargain down, you know what I mean? We’re on our home soil and we didn’t take care of business. I think that was one of those moments where we had to really check ourselves and find a way to make it right,” forward Gabe Norwood said of the Taipei loss. “But it turned out to be a blessing in disguise. In tournaments like FIBA-Asia it’s important that you have short-term memory whether it was a win or a loss. We needed to let go of that game and continue to stay the course, keep our focus in the tournament,” Alapag added. On August 7, four days after Gilas lost to Taipei, the rift between the Philippines and Taiwan would reach a resolution and the latter country lifted its freeze hiring and other sanctions on the former. The Philippines also did issue on official apology over the death of the Taiwanese fisherman a couple of months prior and the National Bureau of Investigation in Manila recommended the pressing of homicide charges to erring members of the Philippine Coast Guard.   DARK HISTORY If the word “rival” is to be defined as a, “person or group that tries to defeat or be more successful than another person or group” then sure, the Philippines and South Korea are rivals. Both countries are rivals in the Asian basketball scene and they have been going at it for a very long time. But if the word rival can also mean “equal” or “peer,” is the Philippines really a worthy basketball rival to South Korea? The Philippines’ history with South Korea in terms of basketball is dark. Very dark. Consider the most high-profile matches between the two countries and you’ll see that the Philippine national team is just not at the level of South Korea. Or at the very least, Koreans always seem to reach 120 percent of their potential when they play Filipinos and we barely bring out 80 percent of our abilities when matched up against our East Asian neighbors. The 1998 PBA Centennial team, arguably the greatest Philippine team ever assembled, was demolished by South Korea in the Asian Games. A national team set up for gold only settled for bronze. Speaking of a bronze medal game, the original Gilas Pilipinas team lost a podium finish to South Korea in the 2011 FIBA-Asia Championships. That team squandered a double-digit lead and collapsed late. Of course, who can forget the semifinals of the 2002 Asian Games in Busan when Olsen Racela had the chance to put the Philippines up four but missed two free throws. South Korea would win with a booming triple at the buzzer off a broken play and would later take down China to capture the gold medal. South Korea is the Philippines’ basketball nemesis for all intents and purposes. A worthy adversary that always seem to emerge victorious at our expense. Still, all that previous disappointment didn’t seem to bother Gilas Pilipinas six years ago. The team was not scared and instead, they were excited even. One factor to greatly consider was that fact that the game was in Manila. It makes all the difference to play at home. “We understood the bad history that we had with Korea. We haven’t been very successful with them in quite some time but we knew from Day 1 that if ever we got an opportunity to play them at home, then we have a great chance,” Alapag said. “Man, pre-game, it was just the focus. Everybody was up for the challenge, I don’t think anybody was really nervous, I think it was just the anxiety... we wanted to get out there and do it already,” Norwood added. Playing at home had its perks for sure, but it also had its drawbacks. For all the painful losses the Philippines suffered at the hands of South Korea, it would have been devastating if Gilas actually took a beating in Manila. Stakes were extra high in this particular chapter of this long, ongoing saga. “There was always pressure, it was something that we acknowledged early. Playing at home, it’s great having that support but at the same time, there is some added pressure because you wanna make sure that you make our home crowd proud of the team that they watch and ultimately, win games,” Alapag said, making sure to note that the national team knew of the disadvantages of playing at home even before the Korea game. “It was there but it was something that we acknowledged and we wanted to make sure that we took advantage of the opportunity playing at home,” he added.   ALL FILIPINO, ALL HEART Once it was go time, the Philippines-South Korea game went about pretty normal, as you would expect any game from these two national teams. But even before halftime, an injury to Gilas center Marcus Douthit changed the complexion of the semifinals showdown. All of a sudden, the Philippines was without its anchor, without its best player. Sure, there were players on the Gilas bench that can come in and replace Douthit’s size but there was simply no one on the Gilas bench that can come in and replace his talent, production, and just overall presence. June Mar Fajardo was in that Gilas bench but it 2013, the would-be five-time PBA Most Valuable Player was just not at that level yet. It would have been easy for Gilas Pilipinas to fold like cheap furniture and succumb to the overwhelming pressure of trying to overcome South Korea to reach a stage very few Filipinos have reached before. Gilas didn’t fold and instead, the Douthit injury rallied the team even further. “Alam mo sa totoo lang, puso na lang yun eh. Nung nawala si Marcus talaga, sabi ni coach kailangan doble kayod tayo. Dahil sobrang dehado tayo kumbaga, wala na tayong import, wala tayong malaki,” forward Marc Pingris said. With Douthit gone, Ping ate up all of his minutes and worked by committee with guys like Ranidel De Ocampo and Japeth Aguilar to fill in the gaps. “As a player naman, kami nagusap-usap kami na kahit anong mangyari, lalaban kami. Yung time na yun, talagang patay kung patay,” Ping added. Despite losing its best player to an untimely injury, Gilas Pilipinas’ confidence in winning never wavered. With their collective backs against the wall, the Philippine national team played even better. Unlike the later iterations of Gilas Pilipinas, the 2013 team, aptly called Gilas 2.0, had the luxury of having actual preparation before the FIBA-Asia Championships. The amount of work that came before the tournament and the Korea game, the bond built over countless hours of training, all of that helped the national team avoid a monumental meltdown in front of a rabid Manila crowd. “We were such a close-knit team in terms of our chemistry, in terms of the talent that we had, so we felt confident even when Marcus went down early in the game. If you looked at our huddle, you had 11 more very confident guys, not just in themselves but more importantly, in each other,” Alapag said. “That just boiled down to the chemistry that we had. I don’t think any of us panicked, we were all confident in each other. We’ve all been into that situation with our PBA teams, having the ball in our hands and making a play. Knowing that we had five weapons on the floor that could make the winning play, I think it made us very confident and we were able to sustain our composure,” the former Gilas captain added.   THE GHOST AND ITS CURSE Shin Dong Pa, Hur Jae, Lee Sang-min, Oh Se-Keun, TJ Moon, and Cho Sung-min are just some players from the South Korean national team that inflicted incredible damage to the Philippines over the course of decades. The dreaded Ghost of South Korea takes form in these players and its curse is to give Filipinos the most heart-crushing loss possible. In 2013, the Ghost was Kim Min-goo and his curse was to beat Gilas Pilipinas in Manila. Despite losing Marcus Douthit and trailing by three points at the break, the Philippines started to turn the tables in the second half. Gilas Pilipinas unleashed Jayson Castro and the Blur led a blazing offense in the third quarter, finding a way to take a 10-point lead over South Korea, the Philippines’ largest of the night. But as the dust settled and Gilas holding a 65-56 lead entering the final period, an ominous figure would make his presence felt. The Korean Ghost has arrived and his name was Kim Min-goo. His curse? Beat Gilas Pilipinas in Manila. Kim was 22 and a senior in college when he made the South Korean national basketball team as a backup shooter in 2013. In nine games in Manila, Kim would play well enough to make the tournament’s All-Star team, averaging 12.7 points, 4.1 rebounds, and 2.7 assists. He led Asian Championships with 25 three-point field goals, 10 came in the last two games and five came against Gilas Pilipinas. Kim drilled back-to-back triples to open the fourth quarter against the Philippines. Later, his fifth triple — a four-point play at that — pushed the Koreans to within a point, 72-73. South Korea would take over soon after as Lee Seung-jun dunked the basketball on a fastbreak. The Ghost has arrived and his curse is in effect. “Ako pumasok sa isip ko yun nung lumamang Korea, na putek ito na naman,” Pingris said. “Pero ang sabi ko, sayang yung opportunity, kaya naman eh. So sabi ni Jimmy samin, no matter what happens wag kami gi-give up. Pinaghirapan natin to at may goal tayo, this year aalis tayo,” he added, noting the team’s goal to get into Spain and compete with the world’s best national teams. Faced with the possibility of dealing with a devastating defeat, Gilas had enough mental fortitude to keep things going. Trust your system, trust your preparation, trust your crowd, trust your teammates, and more importantly, trust yourselves. “You’re never out of the game if you’re playing at home,” Norwood said as they stared a deficit late against their destined rivals. “I think that was our mindset, keep it close and just find a way,” he added. Jimmy Alapag found a way.   BORN READY Down 73-75, Jimmy Alapag was under heavy duress when he let go of a three-pointer from the left wing just in front of his bench. It was good to go. The Philippines was back on top by one as Alapag somehow managed to get his team to snap out of an initial shock following Korea’s strong fourth-quarter rally. The stage is now set for a wild finish and Jimmy will star in the final act of what has been an incredible show by Gilas and South Korea. “In situations like that, as an athlete and as a pro, that’s the situations that you dream about,” Alapag said.  “Those are shots that you practice when you were a kid. When the shot clock is winding down, to have an opportunity to knock down a shot. It’s a shot that I practiced thousands of times,” he added. After the Philippines and South Korea traded baskets for the lead, Alapag made perhaps the most underrated play in this crazy and emotional encounter between two basketball rivals. Tasked with inbounding the ball just near underneath his own basket, Alapag found his Talk ‘N Text teammate Ranidel De Ocampo for an open look at three. Swish. Gilas leads, 81-77, with 91 seconds to go. “Ranidel was my favorite target for a very, very long time in my career,” Alapag said on the play that most people probably don’t even remember. “Once I saw that he got open, I wanted to make sure that I gave him as great a pass as possible and Ranidel has been known for a long time to take care of the rest,” he added.   THE EXORCIST “Yeah, I was right under the basket,” Gabe Norwood says with a laugh when asked if he remembers the shot that changed the course of Gilas Pilipinas as a national team. Late in the fourth quarter of what was essentially a heavyweight bout, the Philippines just landed two strong haymakers but South Korea would refuse to go down without a fight, beating the count of 10 each time. Down to the final minute of a crucial grudge match with a World Cup berth on the line, Jimmy Alapag had his hands on the basketball as Gilas would go to its halfcourt set. Jimmy will never let go of said basketball. Up two, Jimmy did what Olsen wished he could 11 years prior. Up two against South Korea in a pivotal semifinal game, Alapag received a screen from Marc Pingris, which was enough to momentarily shake off Kim Tae-sul. With some room, Alapag drifted to his left and let a three-point shot fly. Boom. Gilas leads, 84-79, with 54 seconds to go. The shot would later be remembered as the one that ended the Korean Curse, the one that finally exorcised the Ghost. “The first thought that came to my mind was don’t miss,” Jimmy said of the clutch jumper. “That last one, Ping sets a good screen and I got a clean look. It’s a shot that myself, and Jayson [Castro], and Larry [Fonacier], and Gary [David], and Jeff [Chan], all of us, we practice that shot time and time again after practice. So you know, it was a shot that I was confident in but in that moment, all you’re thinking about was don’t miss,” he added. It’s one thing to be confident in yourself and to be confidednt in your preparation. It’s a different thing to actually perform under such pressure. As soon as Alapag managed to shoot his shot, Gabe Norwood did what any other good teammate would do and got in position to get the offensive rebound. You know, just in case. Gabe got the ball alright, but he got it after it swished through the rim. “When he put the shot up, I tried to crash for the rebound but I basically knew that it was going in,” he said. “I had probably the best view, I was right under the basket. I think caught it after it went through too,” Norwood added. Alapag checked out moments later as the Philippines went to its defensive lineup in order to stop another Korean comeback. South Korea turned to its most effective shooter in Kim and as he rose up to try and answer Alapag’s triple, Norwood met him at the apex for the game’s most dramatic stop. Gabe blocked Kim and Gilas would finish things off with a final Marc Pingris basket on the other end. A historic 86-79 win was complete. “I still get chills thinking about it, to look up and see grown men just breaking down. My wife was trying to hold my kids and she was holding back tears. It was just an awesome moment, the bond that we had on that team, the stuff that we did to get prepare, I think we poured it all out in that game,” Norwood said on the monumental victory. “I think it probably didn’t hit me until the final buzzer sounded. Not just for me but for the entire team, when that final buzzer sounded, it was such a special group of guys and the fact that we could share that moment with not just with each other but the entire country, it’s something I’ll remember for the rest of my life,” Alapag added, savoring the moment of a Philippine win over Korea 28 years in the making.   THE INTRODUCTION Gilas Pilipinas would lose to Iran the next day in the Finals of the 2013 FIBA-Asia Championships. The Philippines put up a fight but Hamed Haddadi would prove to be too powerful to stop. It would take another two years for Gilas to beat Iran but that didn’t really matter in the moment. The Philippines is headed to the World Championships for the first time in three decades. The Philippines has beaten South Korea and one singular shot has allowed the Gilas name to be known around the world. Jimmy wouldn’t say that though. At least not directly in that way. “For me, that shot was the biggest for my career. But really, it was our entire team. We’ve gone through so much and that was just one particular play that really culminated the entire game and all the contributions from other guys from Gabe’s defense, to Ping’s rebounding, to Japeth’s rim protecting, to Jayson and LA doing a lot of the legwork,” Alapag said. “Everybody had their part in contribution to the game. After the shot, after the buzzer sounded, it was just a very special moment for us as a team and for Philippine basketball to show that all of the sacrifices, all of the hard work, now it’s given an opportunity to re-introduce ourselves to the world,” he added. Jimmy wouldn’t say it, but his teammates would. That shot of his that beat South Korea in the 2013 FIBA-Asia Championships introduced the Gilas name to the world. It announced that the Philippines has finally arrived. Gilas’ breakthrough overtime win a year later in Spain against Senegal — a game Jimmy pretty much decided late as well — made it known that Filipinos are here to stay on the World stage. “I would say so, it got us to where we wanted to be in the World Cup. I think we shocked some people there as well. But just the work that went in, I think it showed the country that we can get back to where we want to be as long as you work together,” Norwood said. “Yung puso ni Jimmy, grabe naman. Makikita mo maliit pero gusto lang niya talaga manalo. Ang liit pero parang lion pag nagalit eh, nandoon yung tiwala namin sa kanya. Ano pa ba masasabi mo, Jimmy is Jimmy Alapag,” Pingris would add.   [NOTES: At the time of original publishing, Gilas Pilipinas was fighting to make a return trip to the FIBA World Cup, this time in China in 2019. To secure its slot, the the Philippine national team needed to beat Kazakhstan in Astana plus a loss from Japan, Jordan, and/or Lebanon. One of the teams that can help Gilas is South Korea... ironically. Jimmy Alapag retired from national team play in 2014 and retired playing for good in 2016. He has since made himself a champion basketball coach in the ABL. Marc Pingris suffered an ACL injury in 2018 and is in the process of returning for his PBA team in the current 2019 season. Gabe Norwood is still in Gilas. He’s still an effective two-way weapon. He can still dunk and will stop your best player too.]   [Updated Notes: The Philippines beat Kazakhstan to make the 2019 FIBA World Cup in China. Gilas got help from... South Korea. The Koreans beat Lebanon on the road, allowing Gilas to advance to the World Championships outright with a victory over Kazakhstan.]   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 10th, 2020

WHO warns of drawn out pandemic as South Africa cases top 500,000

The UN health agency warned that the coronavirus pandemic would be lengthy and could lead to “response fatigue”, as the case count in South Africa topped half a million. Although many Latin American countries have begun relaxing stay-at-home measures, the virus is still spreading quickly across much of the region Six months after the World Health Organization declared a global emergency, the novel coronavirus has killed more than 680,000 people and infected more than 17.5 million, according to an AFP tally. South Africa is by far the hardest hit country in Africa, accounting for more than half of diagnosed infections, although President Cyril Ramaphosa said the fatality rate is lower than the global average. Health authorities had been expecting a surge in cases after the gradual loosening of a strict lockdown that was imposed at the end of March. Nigeria on Saturday also announced it would ease a lockdown in the commercial capital Lagos, allowing churches and mosques to reopen next week.  An emergency WHO committee reviewing the pandemic “highlighted the anticipated lengthy duration of this COVID-19 outbreak, noting the importance of sustained community, national, regional, and global response efforts”. “WHO continues to assess the global risk level of COVID-19 to be very high,” it said in its latest statement. The agency also said the effects of the pandemic “will be felt for decades to come”. Mexico overtook Britain to become the third hardest hit country in virus deaths — after Brazil and the United States — with more than 46,600 fatal cases. Although many Latin American countries have begun relaxing stay-at-home measures, the virus is still spreading quickly across much of the region, which has now recorded more than four million cases and almost 200,000 deaths. Half of them are in Brazil, where President Jair Bolsonaro said he believes “nearly everyone” will catch the virus eventually, after himself recovering from it. The US, the hardest-hit country in the world, has now tallied more than 4.6 million cases and 154,319 deaths. Vaccine race The outlook was bleak in Asia as well, where India and the Philippines reported record increases in new daily infections. “We are waging a losing battle against COVID-19, and we need to draw up a consolidated, definitive plan of action,” said an open letter signed by 80 Filipino medical associations. Japan’s Okinawa declared a state of emergency after a record jump in cases on the islands — many linked to US military forces stationed there. The pandemic has spurred a race for a vaccine with several Chinese companies at the forefront, while Russia has set a target date of September to roll out its own medicine. However, US infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci said it was unlikely his country would use any vaccine developed in either nation. “I do hope that the Chinese and the Russians are actually testing the vaccine before they are administering the vaccine to anyone,” he said. As part of its “Operation Warp Speed”, the US government will pay pharmaceutical giants Sanofi and GSK up to $2.1 billion for the development of a COVID-19 vaccine, the companies said. ‘Day of freedom’ France, Spain, Portugal and Italy all reported huge contractions in their economies for the April-June quarter, while Europe as a whole saw gross domestic product fall by 12.1 percent.  Daily case numbers in Switzerland have crept up again in recent weeks, while Norway recorded its first virus death in two weeks. At least 36 crew members confined to a Norwegian cruise ship have tested positive for the new coronavirus, the operator Hurtigruten said on Saturday.  Despite the resurgence in cases, there have been demonstrations in Europe against the curbs.  Thousands protested in Berlin on Saturday urging “a day of freedom” from the restrictions, with some demonstrators dubbing the pandemic “the biggest conspiracy theory”. In South Korea, the elderly leader of a secretive sect at the centre of the country’s early coronavirus outbreak was arrested for allegedly hindering the government’s effort to contain the epidemic. People linked to Lee Man-hee’s Shincheonji Church of Jesus accounted for more than half of the South’s coronavirus cases in February and March, but the country has since appeared to have brought the virus under control. The pandemic has also continued to cause mayhem in the travel and tourism sectors, with more airlines announcing mass job cuts. Latin America’s biggest airline, the Brazilian-Chilean group LATAM, said it would lay off least 2,700 crew, and British Airways pilots overwhelmingly voted to accept a deal cutting wages by 20 percent, with 270 jobs lost......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2020

How Pinoy athletes kept winning during the lockdown

Sporting events may be suspended or canceled, but that won't stop your favorite Filipino athletes from inspiring or entertaining people as they spend their extra time off doing worthwhile activities during the lockdown period. From reaching out to affected communities to learning a new skill, here are what your idols are up to during the community quarantine. 1)  Proudly serving the nation as frontliners Some athletes have taken their in-game dedication off the court, as they proudly serve the country as frontliners during the COVID-19 pandemic. MPBL players such as Bacoor City's Eric Acuña and Bacolod-Master Sardines' Jopher Custodio are currently heeding the call as frontliners for the Philippine Army, as well as their fellow soldiers UST women’s volleyball coach Kung Fu Reyes and volleyball star Jovelyn Gonzaga. Pasay Voyager's Dhon Reverente also suited up for the Philippine Navy while his teammate Jesse Bustos is serving in the frontlines in another way, using his camera as a photojournalist for a daily newspaper.  2)  Raising funds and holding donation drives Your beloved players continue to exemplify teamwork in these challenging times as they help the dedicated frontliners and affected households in different parts of the country. UST student-athletes joined former Golden Tigresses star Sisi Rondina in auctioning their jerseys for a cause to donate supplies to the frontliners of Barangay Luz in Cebu City. Meanwhile, volleyball legends Alyssa Valdez and Charo Soriano led a fundraiser called "Volleyball Community Gives Back PH," which aims to supply frontliners in the country with PPEs and other essentials—with celebrities like Kathryn Bernardo and Pia Wurtzbach joining their cause. Former DLSU Lady Spikers standout and Creamline utility spiker Michele Gumabao also provided relief packs and gave them personally to the affected communities in Pampanga with the help of the group Your 200 Pesos. 3)  No days off for training and getting the gains Leagues and competitions may have been put on hold, but athletes won't be stopped from keeping themselves in tiptop shape. Observing quarantine, ONE Championship's heavyweight champion Brandon Vera took his workout to the forest, preparing for his upcoming bout against Arjan Bhullar, while Team Lakay fighters, such as Eduard Folayang, Kevin Belingon, and Joshua Pacio improvised household materials as gym equipment. National athletes, such as karateka Junna Tsukii, wushu artist Agatha Wong, and Olympic medalist Hidilyn Diaz, did rigorous training sessions at home to keep themselves in form for upcoming tournaments. High-flyer Ricci Rivero also taught his fans some basic dribbling drills to improve basketball handles—as seen in an episode of "Upfront" on LIGA cable sports channel. 4) Unlocking new skills and focusing on fave hobbies Your fave sports idols also overcame boredom by learning new skills and focusing on their favorite hobbies. For instance, DLSU Green Archers guard Aljun Melecio learned to cook scrumptious lechon while taking a time-out from the hardwood. UAAP volleyball champion and national team player Rex Intal also reminded us that he is a dedicated painter with his mixed portrait of Kobe Bryant and Michael Jordan, channeling his passion for sports and art into one. And did you know that top local setter Jia Morado is a talented photographer? Check out her Instagram and be amazed by her works. 5)  Taking their talents to TikTok Athletes joined the trending TikTok craze as a source of entertainment during the lockdown. Former UAAP stars Kim Kianna Dy and Jema Galanza posted their dance covers of Young Thug's "Relationship," and Deanna Wong took on "The Weekend" dance challenge. UST Golden Tigresses' rookie Imee Fernandez also wowed the TikTok crowd with a pre-workout dance video, which garnered over 600,000 views online. For Ateneo Blue Eagles guard SJ Belangel, TikTok has also been his avenue to overcome his shyness, doing hilarious skits online.   6)  Becoming stars online No live sports to entertain the audiences? It's not a problem for these athletes who continue to provide fun content to every sports fan, with the help of ABS-CBN Sports. Catch Shaun Ildefonso as he does an entertaining commentary about everything sports on "SRSLY." Also watch Cherry Nunag’s wacky chikahan with famous athletes in "Kalye Confessions: Stay-at-Home Edition." Lastly, the lockdown won't stop the basketball conversation as Beau Belga chats with your favorite hoop idols online, while still chowing down on their fave treats on "Extra Rice with Beau Belga." Watch all of these on ABS-CBN Sports' Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and YouTube channel. Also stay tuned for more new offerings from the sports arm of ABS-CBN.  These athletes have proven they are truly winners in and out of the court. While waiting for live sports to return, you can rewatch the best games of these athletes on LIGA (SD channel 86 and HD channel 183 on SKYCable) and game highlights and special features on ABS-CBN Sports' social media pages and official YouTube account. ABS-CBN Sports will continue its commitment to providing a variety of world-class, exciting, and inspiring content to every Pinoy sports fan. Visit sports.abs-cbn.com and follow @ABSCBNSports on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. For updates, you may also visit www.abs-cbn.com/newsroom or follow @ABSCBNPR on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 8th, 2020

Colleagues raise alarm over arrest of UP professor by undercover cops

"The entire [Departamento ng Filipino at Panitikan ng Pilipinas] is calling on the UP administration for the assistance it can give when teachers like Professor Flores are arrested," her colleagues said.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated News57 min. ago

Jullebee laid to rest tomorrow in Las Piñas

Slain overseas Filipino worker Jullebee Ranara will be laid to rest tomorrow even as a group of women workers expressed support for the call to review the current bilateral labor agreement between the Philippines and Kuwait......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 4th, 2023