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Former UST coach succumbs to heart attack

Aric del Rosario, former head coach of the University of Santo Tomas Growling Tigers and the University of Perpetual Help Altas, passed away at the age of 80......»»

Category: sportsSource: thestandard thestandardMar 26th, 2020

UP Men s Basketball players stay fighting amidst COVID-19

The whole world of sports has come to a halt because of the COVID-19 pandemic, but the University of the Philippines Fighting Maroons Men’s Basketball Team (UP MBT) stay fighting. Every member of the team is optimistic that Filipinos and the Philippines will get through the difficult challenges they are facing and are staying positive in words and deeds. Fighting Maroons head coach Bo Perasol has reminded his players to put in the same heart and passion they show in the game into their response to the pandemic, encouraging them to practice teamwork and find ways to help those who are affected by the scourge of the coronavirus. “During these trying times, our “never give up” attitude on court should be evident in how we battle this pandemic together as a team. We are optimistic that we can bounce back and come out stronger. While we face our own personal battles, let’s not forget our fellow Filipinos who are greatly affected by this virus. Let’s do our share, no matter how big or small,” said Perasol. The ongoing Enhanced Community Quarantine (ECQ) and the General Community Quarantine (GCQ) have prohibited sports-related mass gatherings like training, competitions and tournaments. Holed up in their respective homes, the Maroons still find ways to stay competitive and in shape, both physically and mentally. UAAP Season 82 team captain Noah Webb says they “try our best to stay in shape by doing our workouts at home since we can't go to the gym. Our coaches are always guiding us and giving us programs to follow. It’s also very important for us to stay mentally tough since this is a different opponent we are facing.” UP MBT team manager Atty. Agaton Uvero said it is also important for the team and the players to be resilient since a lot of things will change and new protocols will be implemented even after the ECQ is lifted. “Our primary concern will always be the safety of each and every one. But we will stay committed to keeping the team intact so we can still give our best performance with or without games in the near future,” Atty. Uvero said. He reiterated his gratitude to all the team’s fans, supporters, and sponsors who continue to support the Fighting Maroons and their various initiatives. “We will always stay thankful to our fans who never tire of supporting us whether we are in active competition or not. And we will always be indebted to our partners and sponsors -- Robinsons Retail Group, STATS Performance Apparel, Palawan Express Pera Padala, and PayMaya -- for remaining committed to the team despite difficult times like these. Their support and their various efforts to provide assistance and relief to the frontliners and those most affected by the ECQ inspire us and buoy up our spirits,” Atty. Uvero added.   UPMBT players and alumni along with various UP teams and organizations sprang to action soon after the ECQ was declared. They initiated efforts to provide frontliners with necessary items like personal protective equipment (PPEs) and meals. They also reached out to affected communities with rice and other daily necessities.   Among those who raised funds and donated in kind are Fighting Maroons Paul Desiderio, Jett Manuel, Ricci Rivero, Diego Dario, Kyles Lao, Jarrell Lim, Ibrahim Ouattara, Jaybie Mantilla, and the Gomez de Liaño brothers, Joe, Javi, and Juan. NowheretogobutUP Foundation, the UP College of Human Kinetics (CHK), and the Salamat PH Healthcare Heroes also conducted fundraisers to help the frontliners, stranded UP students and staff, and various communities.   “There is so much uncertainty right now and these are extremely difficult times for many Filipinos. That’s why this is the time to be one with our people as we all go through these hardships together. Let’s all do our share in helping one another. Resilience is all about being able to overcome the unexpected. The goal of resilience is to thrive,” said NowheretogobutUP Foundation founding chairman Renan Dalisay......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 3rd, 2020

FIBA: Mighty Jimmy and the shot that introduced Gilas to the World

This story was originally published on Feb. 24, 2019 It’s Saturday night at Mall of Asia and the arena is absolutely rocking. Eternal basketball rivals in the Philippines and South Korea are delivering another classic. Gilas Pilipinas is down to the final minute of regulation against its longtime tormentor in the second of two semifinal games. The national team is up by two, 81-79. The Philippines is hosting the 2013 FIBA-Asia Championships where three tickets to the 2014 World Cup are at stake and the winner of this particular game gets one of those tickets. Given the rich history of both teams and what it would mean to the winner, this pivotal game has gone down the wire as everyone pretty much expected. Also knowing the history of both teams in international play, Gilas’ precarious two-point lead was not safe at all. A ghost was lurking in the background and a dreaded curse felt almost inevitable. Down to the final minute of the crucial grudge match between the Philippines and South Korea, guard Jimmy Alapag has the ball and a two-point lead. What he will do will help define not only his career but the legacy of the Gilas name as a national team.   WAKE-UP CALL Even before the Philippines-Korea game, Gilas Pilipinas already had to go through one emotional game early in its homestand for the Asian Championships. In a preliminary round showdown against Chinese Taipei, the Filipinos collapsed in the fourth quarter, allowing the Taiwanese to steal a morale-boosting 84-79 win. In 2013, the relationship between the two countries hit a rough patch over the death of one Taiwanese fisherman. In an updated May 17 report by CNN’s Jethro Mullen, “Taiwan has reacted angrily after one of its fishermen was killed by a Philippine coast guard vessel.” Taiwan had frozen applications from OFWs seeking jobs in its territory and the government of then President Ma Ying-jeou demanded an apology, among other things, from the Philippines. While the national basketball teams of both countries never really had any prior animosity with each other, tension was naturally present as both teams squared off in Group A action. Gilas Pilipinas and Chinese-Taipei both entered the showdown with identical 2-0 records and the winner would take control of solo Group A lead heading into round 2. Taking a good lead into the fourth quarter, the Philippines was outscored by 18 in the last 10 minutes and the national team took its worst home loss in quite some time. “At the time, it was a huge game for us. We understood what was happening in Taipei during that particular time. We really wanted to win for what our kababayans were going through at that time,” guard Jimmy Alapag said on that first home loss in the 2013 Asian Championships. “We didn’t get the job done, and it was tough especially to lose a game like that, it was a very emotional and it was a game that we knew we needed,” he added. The crushing loss meant that the Philippines had little room for error in round 2. While Gilas didn’t have any world beaters lined up in the second round, anything less than a perfect run would have meant an early clash with Asia’s established powerhouse teams in the knockout stages. On the other side of the bracket, defending champion China, Iran, and South Korea were battling for position and were expected to finish in the top-3. That means if Gilas Pilipinas failed to finish no. 1 in its group, the national team would have faced one of those teams in the quarterfinals. Gilas picked up a crucial win over Qatar in the 6th of August and the day after, the Philippines got some help from those same Qataris as they beat Taipei in a close decision. At the end of round 2, all teams finished with identical win-loss records but Gilas Pilipinas would take over first place after all tiebreaks were considered, barely edging out Taipei. The Philippines ended up avoiding defending champion China, Iran, and South Korea and instead got Kazakhstan in the quarterfinals. No. 2 Taipei drew China and the third-running Qataris were matched up with the South Koreans. “I think that was the moment we grew up and grew closer. I think that was the lowest of the lows, just because of the atmosphere and what was going on between both countries. It kind of felt that we let our end of the bargain down, you know what I mean? We’re on our home soil and we didn’t take care of business. I think that was one of those moments where we had to really check ourselves and find a way to make it right,” forward Gabe Norwood said of the Taipei loss. “But it turned out to be a blessing in disguise. In tournaments like FIBA-Asia it’s important that you have short-term memory whether it was a win or a loss. We needed to let go of that game and continue to stay the course, keep our focus in the tournament,” Alapag added. On August 7, four days after Gilas lost to Taipei, the rift between the Philippines and Taiwan would reach a resolution and the latter country lifted its freeze hiring and other sanctions on the former. The Philippines also did issue on official apology over the death of the Taiwanese fisherman a couple of months prior and the National Bureau of Investigation in Manila recommended the pressing of homicide charges to erring members of the Philippine Coast Guard.   DARK HISTORY If the word “rival” is to be defined as a, “person or group that tries to defeat or be more successful than another person or group” then sure, the Philippines and South Korea are rivals. Both countries are rivals in the Asian basketball scene and they have been going at it for a very long time. But if the word rival can also mean “equal” or “peer,” is the Philippines really a worthy basketball rival to South Korea? The Philippines’ history with South Korea in terms of basketball is dark. Very dark. Consider the most high-profile matches between the two countries and you’ll see that the Philippine national team is just not at the level of South Korea. Or at the very least, Koreans always seem to reach 120 percent when the play Filipinos and we barely bring out 80 percent of our abilities when matched up against our East Asian neighbors. The 1998 PBA Centennial team, arguably the greatest Philippine team ever assembled, was demolished by South Korea in the Asian Games. A national team set up for gold only settled for bronze. Speaking of a bronze medal game, the original Gilas Pilipinas team lost to South Korea in the 2011 FIBA-Asia Championships. That team squandered a double-digit lead and collapsed late. Of course, who can forget the semifinals of the 2002 Asian Games in Busan when Olsen Racela had the chance to put the Philippines up four but missed two free throws. South Korea would win with a booming triple at the buzzer off a broken play and would later take down China to capture the gold medal. South Korea is the Philippines’ basketball nemesis for all intents and purposes. A worthy adversary that always seem to emerge victorious at our expense. Still, all that previous disappointment didn’t seem to bother Gilas Pilipinas six years ago. The team was not scared and instead, they were excited even. One factor to greatly consider was that fact that the game was in Manila. It makes all the difference to play at home. “We understood the bad history that we had with Korea. We haven’t been very successful with them in quite some time but we knew from Day 1 that if ever we got an opportunity to play them at home, then we have a great chance,” Alapag said. “Man, pre-game, it was just the focus. Everybody was up for the challenge, I don’t think anybody was really nervous, I think it was just the anxiety... we wanted to get out there and do it already,” Norwood added. Playing at home had its perks for sure but it also had its drawbacks. For all the painful losses the Philippines suffered at the hands of South Korea, it would have been devastating if Gilas actually took a beating in Manila. Stakes were extra high in this particular chapter of this long, ongoing saga. “There was always pressure, it was something that we acknowledged early. Playing at home, it’s great having that support but at the same time, there is some added pressure because you wanna make sure that you make our home crowd proud of the team that they watch and ultimately, win games,” Alapag said, making sure to note that the national team knew of the disadvantages of playing at home even before the Korea game. “It was there but it was something that we acknowledged and we wanted to make sure that we took advantage of the opportunity playing at home,” he added.   ALL FILIPINO, ALL HEART Once it was go time, the Philippines-South Korea game went about pretty normal, as you would expect any game from these two national teams. But even before halftime, an injury to Gilas center Marcus Douthit changed the complexion of the semifinals showdown. All of a sudden, the Philippines was without its anchor, without its best player. Sure, there were players on the Gilas bench that can come in and replace Douthit’s size but there was simply no one on the Gilas bench that can come in and replace his talent, production, and just overall presence. June Mar Fajardo was in that Gilas bench but it 2013, the would-be five-time PBA Most Valuable Player was just not at that level yet. It would have been easy for Gilas Pilipinas to fold like cheap furniture and succumb to the overwhelming pressure of trying to overcome South Korea to reach a stage very few Filipinos have reached before. Gilas didn’t fold and instead, the Douthit injury rallied the team even further. “Alam mo sa totoo lang, puso na lang yun eh. Nung nawala si Marcus talaga, sabi ni coach kailangan doble kayod tayo. Dahil sobrang dehado tayo kumbaga, wala na tayong import, wala tayong malaki,” forward Marc Pingris said. With Douthit gone, Ping ate up all of his minutes and worked by committee with guys like Ranidel De Ocampo and Japeth Aguilar to fill in the gaps. “As a player naman, kami nagusap-usap kami na kahit anong mangyari, lalaban kami. Yung time na yun, talagang patay kung patay,” Ping added. Despite losing its best player to an untimely injury, Gilas Pilipinas’ confidence in winning never wavered. With their collective backs against the wall, the Philippine national team played even better. Unlike the later iterations of Gilas Pilipinas, the 2013 team, aptly called Gilas 2.0, had the luxury of having actual preparation before the FIBA-Asia Championships. The amount of work that came before the tournament and the Korea game, the bond built over countless hours of training, all of that helped the national team avoid a monumental meltdown in front of a rabid Manila crowd. “We were such a close-knit team in terms of our chemistry, in terms of the talent that we had, so we felt confident even when Marcus went down early in the game. If you looked at our huddle, you had 11 more very confident guys, not just in themselves but more importantly, in each other,” Alapag said. “That just boiled down to the chemistry that we had. I don’t think any of us panicked, we were all confident in each other. We’ve all been into that situation with our PBA teams, having the ball in our hands and making a play. Knowing that we had five weapons on the floor that could make the winning play, I think it made us very confident and we were able to sustain our composure,” the former Gilas captain added.   THE GHOST AND ITS CURSE Shin Dong Pa, Hur Jae, Lee Sang-min, Oh Se-Keun, TJ Moon, and Cho Sung-min are just some players from the South Korean national team that inflicted incredible damage to the Philippines over the course of decades. The dreaded Ghost of South Korea takes form in these players and its curse is to give Filipinos the most heart-crushing loss possible. In 2013, the Ghost was Kim Min-goo and his curse was to beat Gilas Pilipinas in Manila. Despite losing Marcus Douthit and trailing by three points at the break, the Philippines started to turn the tables in the second half. Gilas Pilipinas unleashed Jayson Castro and the Blur led a blazing offense in the third quarter, finding a way to take a 10-point lead over South Korea, the Philippines’ largest of the night. But as the dust settled and Gilas holding a 65-56 lead entering the final period, an ominous figure would make his presence felt. The Korean Ghost has arrived and his name was Kim Min-goo. His curse? Beat Gilas Pilipinas in Manila. Kim was 22 and a senior in college when he made the South Korean national basketball team as a backup shooter in 2013. In nine games in Manila, Kim would play well enough to make the tournament’s All-Star team, averaging 12.7 points, 4.1 rebounds, and 2.7 assists. He led Asian Championships with 25 three-point field goals, 10 came in the last two games and five came against Gilas Pilipinas. Kim drilled back-to-back triples to open the fourth quarter against the Philippines. Later, his fifth triple — a four-point play at that — pushed the Koreans to within a point, 72-73. South Korea would take over soon after as Lee Seung-jun dunked the basketball on a fastbreak. The Ghost has arrived and his curse is in effect. “Ako pumasok sa isip ko yun nung lumamang Korea, na putek ito na naman,” Pingris said. “Pero ang sabi ko, sayang yung opportunity, kaya naman eh. So sabi ni Jimmy samin, no matter what happens wag kami gi-give up. Pinaghirapan natin to at may goal tayo, this year aalis tayo,” he added, noting the team’s goal to get into Spain and compete with the world’s best national teams. Faced with the possibility of dealing with a devastating defeat, Gilas had enough mental fortitude to keep things going. Trust your system, trust your preparation, trust your crowd, trust your teammates, and more importantly, trust yourselves. “You’re never out of the game if you’re playing at home,” Norwood said as they stared a deficit late against their destined rivals. “I think that was our mindset, keep it close and just find a way,” he added. Jimmy Alapag found a way.   BORN READY Down 73-75, Jimmy Alapag was under heavy duress when he let go of a three-pointer from the left wing just in front of his bench. It was good to go. The Philippines was back on top by one as Alapag somehow managed to get his team to snap out of an initial shock following Korea’s strong fourth-quarter rally. The stage is now set for a wild finish and Jimmy will star in the final act of what has been an incredible show by Gilas and South Korea. “In situations like that, as an athlete and as a pro, that’s the situations that you dream about,” Alapag said.  “Those are shots that you practice when you were a kid. When the shot clock is winding down, to have an opportunity to knock down a shot. It’s a shot that I practiced thousands of times,” he added. After the Philippines and South Korea traded baskets for the lead, Alapag made perhaps the most underrated play in this crazy and emotional encounter between two basketball rivals. Tasked with inbounding the ball just near underneath his own basket, Alapag found his Talk ‘N Text teammate Ranidel De Ocampo for an open look at three. Swish. Gilas leads, 81-77, with 91 seconds to go. “Ranidel was my favorite target for a very, very long time in my career,” Alapag said on the play that most people probably don’t even remember. “Once I saw that he got open, I wanted to make sure that I gave him as great a pass as possible and Ranidel has been known for a long time to take care of the rest,” he added.   THE EXORCIST “Yeah, I was right under the basket,” Gabe Norwood says with a laugh when asked if he remembers the shot that changed the course of Gilas Pilipinas as a national team. Late in the fourth quarter of what was essentially a heavyweight bout, the Philippines just landed two strong haymakers but South Korea would refuse to go down without a fight, beating the count of 10 each time. Down to the final minute of a crucial grudge match with a World Cup berth on the line, Jimmy Alapag had his hands on the basketball as Gilas would go to its halfcourt set. Jimmy will never let go of said basketball. Up two, Jimmy did what Olsen wished he could 11 years prior. Up two against South Korea in a pivotal semifinal game, Alapag received a screen from Marc Pingris, which was enough to momentarily shake off Kim Tae-sul. With some room, Alapag drifted to his left and let a three-point shot fly. Boom. Gilas leads, 84-79, with 54 seconds to go. The shot would later be remembered as the one that ended the Korean Curse, the one that finally exorcised the Ghost. “The first thought that came to my mind was don’t miss,” Jimmy said of the clutch jumper. “That last one, Ping sets a good screen and I got a clean look. It’s a shot that myself, and Jayson [Castro], and Larry [Fonacier], and Gary [David], and Jeff [Chan], all of us, we practice that shot time and time again after practice. So you know, it was a shot that I was confident in but in that moment, all you’re thinking about was don’t miss,” he added. It’s one thing to be confident in yourself and to be confidednt in your preparation. It’s a different thing to actually perform under such pressure. As soon as Alapag managed to shoot his shot, Gabe Norwood did what any other good teammate would do and got in position to get the offensive rebound. You know, just in case. Gabe got the ball alright, but he got it after it swished through the rim. “When he put the shot up, I tried to crash for the rebound but I basically knew that it was going in,” he said. “I had probably the best view, I was right under the basket. I think caught it after it went through too,” Norwood added. Alapag checked out moments later as the Philippines went to its defensive lineup in order to stop another Korean comeback. South Korea turned to its most effective shooter in Kim and as he rose up to try and answer Alapag’s triple, Norwood met him at the apex for the game’s most dramatic stop. Gabe blocked Kim and Gilas would finish things off with a final Marc Pingris basket on the other end. A historic 86-79 win was complete. “I still get chills thinking about it, to look up and see grown men just breaking down. My wife was trying to hold my kids and she was holding back tears. It was just an awesome moment, the bond that we had on that team, the stuff that we did to get prepare, I think we poured it all out in that game,” Norwood said on the monumental victory. “I think it probably didn’t hit me until the final buzzer sounded. Not just for me but for the entire team, when that final buzzer sounded, it was such a special group of guys and the fact that we could share that moment with not just with each other but the entire country, it’s something I’ll remember for the rest of my life,” Alapag added, savoring the moment of a Philippine win over Korea 28 years in the making.   THE INTRODUCTION Gilas Pilipinas would lose to Iran the next day in the Finals of the 2013 FIBA-Asia Championships. The Philippines put up a fight but Hamed Haddadi would prove to be too powerful to stop. It would take another two years for Gilas to beat Iran but that didn’t really matter in the moment. The Philippines is headed to the World Championships for the first time in three decades. The Philippines has beaten South Korea and one singular shot has allowed the Gilas name to be known around the world. Jimmy wouldn’t say that though. At least not directly in that way. “For me, that shot was the biggest for my career. But really, it was our entire team. We’ve gone through so much and that was just one particular play that really culminated the entire game and all the contributions from other guys from Gabe’s defense, to Ping’s rebounding, to Japeth’s rim protecting, to Jayson and LA doing a lot of the legwork,” Alapag said. “Everybody had their part in contribution to the game. After the shot, after the buzzer sounded, it was just a very special moment for us as a team and for Philippine basketball to show that all of the sacrifices, all of the hard work, now it’s given an opportunity to re-introduce ourselves to the world,” he added. Jimmy wouldn’t say it, but his teammates would. That shot of his that beat South Korea in the 2013 FIBA-Asia Championships introduced the Gilas name to the world. It announced that the Philippines has finally arrived. Gilas’ breakthrough overtime win a year later in Spain against Senegal — a game Jimmy pretty much decided late as well — made it known that Filipinos are here to stay on the World stage. “I would say so, it got us to where we wanted to be in the World Cup. I think we shocked some people there as well. But just the work that went in, I think it showed the country that we can get back to where we want to be as long as you work together,” Norwood said. “Yung puso ni Jimmy, grabe naman. Makikita mo maliit pero gusto lang niya talaga manalo. Ang liit pero parang lion pag nagalit eh, nandoon yung tiwala namin sa kanya. Ano pa ba masasabi mo, Jimmy is Jimmy Alapag,” Pingris would add.   [NOTES: At the time of original publishing, Gilas Pilipinas was fighting to make a return trip to the FIBA World Cup, this time in China in 2019. To secure its slot, the the Philippine national team needed to beat Kazakhstan in Astana plus a loss from Japan, Jordan, and/or Lebanon. One of the teams that can help Gilas is South Korea... ironically. Jimmy Alapag retired from national team play in 2014 and retired playing for good in 2016. He has since made himself a champion basketball coach in the ABL. Marc Pingris suffered an ACL injury in 2018 and is in the process of returning for his PBA team in the current 2019 season. Gabe Norwood is still in Gilas. He’s still an effective two-way weapon. He can still dunk and will stop your best player too.] The Philippines beat Kazakhstan to make the 2019 FIBA World Cup in China. Gilas got help from... South Korea. The Koreans beat Lebanon on the road, allowing Gilas to advance to the World Championships outright with a victory over Kazakhstan.]   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 2nd, 2020

MPBL: Sarangani and GenSan team up to extend help

Besides being busy with their respective squads for the next Chooks-to-Go Maharlika Pilipinas Basketball League season, Sarangani head coach John Kallos and GenSan team manager Mermann Flores have joined hands for a bigger purpose. The newly-minted Marlins tactician felt the need of the referees, who are gravely affected by the pandemic, as they are paid on a per-game basis. "Hindi kasi gaano napapansin ang mga referee kaya nagtulong-tulong kami ng coaching staff ko at players sa Sarangani," said the 37-year-old mentor. "Alam din kasi namin na day-to-day basis lang ang salary ng referees, kaya gusto rin namin silang mabigyan ng tulong." The two distributed more than 300 relief packs to groups of referees,and also to the military frontliners in Quezon City, Marikina, and Antipolo. Warriors manager Flores led the relief operations in Antipolo. And they will continue their drive next week in Sarangani and General Santos. "Aabot pa itong mga nalikom natin sa GenSan at Sarangani. Magkakaroon pa ng second at third wave," said Kallos. Sen. Manny Pacquiao, founder of the Chooks-to-Go sponsored league, also donated face masks while lawyer Bong Gacal gave 30 sacks of rice. Aside from relief packs, Sarangani mentor also donated some 20 aerosol boxes to Philippine Children's Medical Center, Philippine Heart Center, and to the local governments of Pasig and Manila. Sarangani finished dead last in the Chooks-to-Go Lakan Season with a 1-29 record while GenSan was swept by Bacoor in the South Division Quarterfinals......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 2nd, 2020

UST s Cherry Rondina: from Central Visayas in the Palarong Pambansa to España in the UAAP

This story was originally published on April 11, 2016 For UST sparkplug Cherry Rondina, her multiple stints in the Palarong Pambansa definitely paved her way to what is now a successful young career in the UAAP. The pride of Compostela National High School suited up for Central Visayas three times in the Palarong Pambansa, losing to NCR in the finals of girls' volleyball back in 2013. Rondina was also the best attacker in that edition of the Palaro in Dumaguete where she played with current UST teammate Rica Rivera and against La Salle's Kim Dy among others. "Nakapag-Palarong Pambansa ako tatlong beses and parang attitude yun sakin, ako kasi pag naglaro, everytime kasi na may makikita akong bola ng volleyball parang 'uy that's my favorite sport' kaya kapag maglalaro na, ganado talaga," she said on how the Palarong Pambansa helped her in her transition to UST. "Feel ko talaga sobrang liksi ko kapag nakikita ko yung may nagvo-volleyball," she added. And a couple of years after making her mark in the biggest stage for secondary players, Rondina has evolved into a UAAP household name in her first true full season with the UST Golden Tigresses. Breaking out only during the latter part of Season 77, Rondina made a big statement to start Season 78, dropping a career-high 30 points in UST's opening game against Adamson. 13 games later of playing at 150 percent, she's now an integral part of the present and future of the Tigresses with head coach Emilio "Kung Fu" Reyes describing her and team captain EJ Laure as the "heart and soul" of the team. While UST ultimately missed the Final Four for a fourth straight season, Rondina has nothing but good things to say in their campaign, especially since Season 78 is the year which she finally got her big break. "Ang masasabi ko sa season na ito is one of my best experience kasi in every opportunity na maka-laro, maipapakita yung skills namin," she said. "Sobrang blessed na kahit ganito yung nangyayari, sama-sama pa rin kami. Lumalabas pa din yung pagiging pamilya namin sa team," Rondina added. Being a crowd favorite both at the arenas and online, Rondina is making sure her new-found fame is not going to her head, but she appreciates it nonetheless. Now the mission is to end UST's playoff drought, maybe even Espana's championship drought as she was responsible in giving the Tigresses their last volleyball title back in season 77, winning the beach volleyball crown via sweep with Rivera. Both were rookies during that time. "Yun talaga ang goal [to win an indoor title], yun yung gusto kong maitulong na magka-championship kami. Siguro this is not our time and iwo-work namin as a team. Maniwala lang," she said. Also, the former UAAP beach volleyball MVP finally addressed a particular interview she had with former UST courtside reporter Kristelle Batchelor back in season 77. "Saan mo nakukuha yung energy mo?" Rondina: Sa mangga po. ???????????????????????????????? — UST WVT (@The_Tigresses) January 28, 2015 Turns out she was only joking when she said she gets energy from eating green mangoes although she did say she bought mangoes the night before. "Honestly po talaga the night before bumili po ako ng mangga, promise," she said. "Pero joke lang yung mangga ko, syempre sa utak yun [energy during games]. Kumain lang po ako ng mangga nung gabing yun [before the game]." --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 2nd, 2020

Bayno left heart in Manila

Indiana Pacers assistant coach Bill Bayno said the other day his love affair with the Philippines over a three-year period was a highlight in his basketball career and if ever there’s a book on his basketball journey, a chapter will be devoted to “that great time in my life.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 26th, 2020

Now they ve met, RK Ilagan knows he can t let down idol Jimmy Alapag

RK Ilagan is one of the best point guards in all of collegiate basketball. As San Sebastian College-Recoletos' lead guard in NCAA 95, he put up per game counts of 15.8 points, 4.0 assists, and 4.0 rebounds while also posting a total of 48 threes. When asked to be part of an online learning session with legendary Jimmy Alapag, however, he actually doubted if he deserved to be there. "Sobrang nahihiya po talaga ako. Nagsabi pa nga ako kay kuya Mikee [Reyes] na parang ayoko kasi po, siyempre, UAAP players kasama ko dun," he shared. Ilagan, alongside Ateneo de Manila University's SJ Belangel, De La Salle University's Aljun Melecio, and Mapua University's Laurenz Victoria were the four collegiate stars who got to talk with Alapag last Monday through a Zoom meeting initiated by GOAT Academy. The fledgling program has organized several online learning sessions that aim to connect pros with collegiate stars and let the former enrich the minds of the latter. Humble as always, however, the Golden Stags' primetime playmaker thought he was yet to be on that level. Once he was conversing with his idol, though, all his fears were allayed. "Sobrang nakaka-amaze kasi sobrang down-to-earth ni Coach Jimmy. Sobrang excited ko nun kasi alam kong marami akong matututunan sa kanya," he said of his first-ever meeting with Alapag. For Ilagan, the big heart is what defines the six-time champion and one-time MVP in the PBA. As he put it, "Idol ko po si Coach Jimmy kasi nakita ko sa kanya yung competitiveness every game. Kahit maliit siya, gusto niyang i-prove na kaya niyang gawin kung ano yung mga nagagawa ng mga mas matangkad sa kanya." Interestingly enough, big heart, big game could also be used to describe Baste's star. With that, Ilagan is only ready and raring to keep following the footsteps of Alapag. "Sobrang nakaka-inspire po kasi yung makakuha ka ng advice galing sa legend katulad niya. Sino ba naman ako para hindi sundan yung ginawa niya para maging successful din," he said. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 24th, 2020

UAAP volleyball’s most memorable Finals five-setters (2010-19)

UAAP volleyball fans just love to see matches go the full five sets. It means more action, more suspense and more drama as the game goes to an exciting climax. What more if it happens in the Finals? We’ve listed down some of the exciting five-set championship games in the past decade.     SEASON 74: FEU-UST Men’s Finals Game 2 (Feb. 29, 2012) For the past four years prior to Season 74, University of Sto. Tomas dominated the men’s competition. For two straight seasons, the Emil Lontoc-mentored Tigers had Far Eastern University’s number in the Finals.    In Season 74, the Tamaraws finally got their long-awaited revenge but not after surviving a war of attrition in Game 2. FEU went down, 1-2, in the match with the Mark Alfafara and Salvador Depante-led Tigers determined to keep UST’s five-peat bid alive following a stinging straight-set defeat in the series opener. The Tamaraws, who topped the eliminations, but was forced by De La Salle University to a do-or-die in the Final Four, fought back in the fourth behind JR Labrador and Arvin Avila to drag the match to a dramatic decider. The fifth set went as close at it could get with FEU just keeping a slim lead heading into the final stretch. The Tams moved at championship point off a Labrador off the block hit only to see the Tigers save two match points on a middle attack by Season Most Valuable Player Jayson Ramos and a Depante crosscourt hit. FEU coach George Pascua called time to stop the bleeding before setter Pitrus De Ocampo set up the then graduating Kirk Beliran for the finishing blow off a combination attack to complete the 25-27, 25-15, 19-25, 25-21, 15-13, victory. The Tams ended a four-year title drought for their 25th title overall.              SEASON 76: Ateneo-DLSU Women's Finals Game 3 (March 12, 2014) We all know how great Ateneo de Manila University was when they toppled the then four-peat-seeking and thrice-to-beat De La Salle University in the women’s Finals of UAAP Season 76. But in the four games that two proud teams fought, Game 3 decided the fate of the series. Yes, the series didn’t end here, but it definitely shifted the momentum to the eventual champion Lady Eagles and broke the Lady Spikers’ will. The Finals protagonists split the first two games with DLSU moving just a win away from extending its reign. Ateneo took control of the first two sets, but the Lady Spikers were able to mount a comeback to claim the next two to set up a decisive fifth frame. The race to the finish became thrilling as well as controversial.       It started out as a nip-and-tuck battle before DLSU built a 12-8 separation to move within three points from the crown. Drawing energy from crowd, the Alyssa Valdez-led Lady Eagles answered with a 6-1 blitz to move at match point. Ara Galang answered with a hit and a kill block to put the Taft-based squad at championship point. Valdez delivered at crunch time with a kill followed by a through the block kill by Michelle Morente for a 16-15 match point advantage. Then came the controversial call in the last play. DLSU setter Kim Fajardo was whistled for a double-contact as she tried to setup a play close to the net after a poor reception that ended the game, 25-21, 25-23, 18-25, 16-25, 17-15, as the shocked DLSU side held their hands in the air in disbelief.      It was the series’ backbreaker as Ateneo, with momentum on its side, finished off the Lady Spikers in straight sets in the series decider for the Lady Eagles’ breakthrough title and first of back-to-back crowns.   SEASON 78:  Ateneo-DLSU Women's Finals Game 2 (April 27, 2016) The then grand slam-seeking Ateneo Lady Eagles and DLSU Lady Spikers faced off in the Finals for the fifth straight time in Season 78. Eyeing redemption after finishing second for two straights seasons, DLSU shocked favored Ateneo led by its graduating hero Valdez in the series opener. The Lady Spikers were looking to finish off the Lady Eagles in Game 2. DLSU seemed to be on the right track when they took the first two sets. But Valdez, the Season Most Valuable Player, carried Ateneo on her back as the Lady Eagles rallied in the next two frames to force a deciding frame. With Valdez leading the way and momentum shifting on their side, the Lady Eagles were able to create a 10-7 separation. DLSU closed the gap, 11-13, only to see Ateneo hammer down the final blows. Jho Maraguinot scored an off the block kill before Amy Ahomiro turned back Majoy Baron to seal Ateneo’s 18-25, 26-28, 25-17, 25-16, 15-11. Valdez registered her then second-best scoring performance of 34 points including 32 kills. But the feat just delayed DLSU’s redemption season as the Lady Spikers took Game 3 and knocked the crown off the Lady Eagles’ heads for a victorious sendoff to graduating stars Mika Reyes, Ara Galang and Cyd Demecillo.     SEASON 79: Ateneo-DLSU Women's Finals Game 2 (May 6, 2017) Just like the previous year, DLSU stared at an Ateneo squad determined to drag the Season 79 Finals series to a deciding battle. The Lady Eagles were able take a 1-2 match advantage. The Lady Spikers regrouped in the fourth to put the match in another wild wind up. Riding the momentum of its fourth set win, DLSU raced to an early 6-2 advantage and looked poised to go for the kill as the Lady Spikers stretched their advantage to 10-4. Ateneo fought back, chipping away DLSU’s lead to close in, 9-12. Tin Tiamzon gave the Lady Spikers more breathing room only for Jho Maraguinot to cut DLSU’s lead to three once again. A Majoy Baron quick attack pushed the Lady Spikers at championship point before Maraguinot threw in the white towel after sending her attack long as DLSU walked away with a 19-25, 25-14, 18-25, 25-18, 15-10, victory and a 10th overall title.       SEASON 79: Ateneo-NU Men's Finals series (May 2 and May 6, 2017) It was the Ateneo Blue Eagles perfect season. The Marck Espejo, Rex Intal, Josh Villanueva and Tony Koyfman bannered Blue Eagles completed a rare 16-0 season sweep. But the Ateneo had to go through the proverbial eye of the needle to achieve the feat especially in the Finals series where the Blue Eagles needed stave off the gritty Bryan Bagunas and Fauzi Ismail-led NU Bulldogs in five sets twice. And in both games, Ateneo had to comeback from a 1-2 match deficit. Espejo dropped 29 points to lead the Blue Eagles to a 25-22, 21-25, 22-25, 25-18, 15-13, Game 1 win. The Season MVP again went firing on all cylinders in Game 2 as he scored 27 points including a 25-of-49 attacking clip in Ateneo’s 18-25, 25-16, 20-25, 25-18, 15-13, title-clincher. Ateneo claimed its third straight crown.    WORTH MENTIONING SEASON 70: FEU-Adamson Women's Finals Game 3 (March 2, 2008) When we talk about dramatic five-set finishes, the meeting between FEU and Adamson in Game 3 of Season 70 women’s will always be included in the classic list.   Yes, it happened 12 years ago. But hey, it deserves recognition. The Lady Tams boasted of a deep roster of talents in Rachel Anne Daquis, Maica Morada, Season MVP Wendy Semana, Majo Cafranca, Anna Abanto and rookie Shaira Gonzales. On the other hand, the Lady Falcons had Sang Laguilles, Angela Benting, Jill Gustillo, Michelle Segodine, prized libero Lizlee Ann Gata and Janet Serafica. After splitting the first two games, Adamson came a set close to its first-ever crown in Game 3 after taking a 2-1 match lead. But Daquis came alive in the fourth helping breathe new life to the Nes Pamilar-mentored Lady Tams. The fifth frame started out close before FEU unleashed five unanswered points to turn a 2-4 deficit to a 7-4 lead. Adamson responded with two straight points to move within one, 7-6, only to allow the Lady Tams to again pull away. Shirt-tugging Morada pushed FEU at match point, 14-8, off a kill before Benting saved a point for Adamson. But a late substitution on Segodine, who was supposed to take serve, by service specialist Jennifer Hiponia proved to be fatal. Hiponia under tremendous pressure put too much power on her serve as FEU escaped with a 14-25, 25-19, 23-25, 25-21, 15-9, victory and its 29th title overall.             SEASON 80: Ateneo-FEU men’s Final Four (April 21, 2018) It wasn’t a Finals game but the performance of Marck Espejo in this historic Final Four battle against FEU in Season 80 made this five-set clash worth mentioning. The then four-peat-seeking Ateneo was pitted against twice-to-beat Tamaraws. Espejo rewrote history as he carried the Blue Eagles on his back with a 55-point game to escape with a 18-25, 25-13, 24-26, 25-23, 15-9, win that forced a do-or-die match. The five-time MVP had a monster production of 47 attacks, six kill blocks and two aces. He scored 11 of Ateneo’s fifth set output. The Blue Eagles eventually clinched the last Finals spot but were dethroned by the Bulldogs.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles    .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 22nd, 2020

SUPER SHOWDOWN: Ayo s Mayhem Letran vs Tan s Big, Bad Letran

In the last decade, only one school has stood between San Beda University and its complete and utter dominance of NCAA Men's Basketball. That school? The Red Lions' archrival Colegio de San Juan de Letran. In 2015, the Knights came from out of nowhere to put a stop to San Beda's search for a sixth straight title. Four years later, the Red Lions were going for a fourth consecutive championship and, more impressively, a season sweep only to be resoundingly rejected, yet again, by their archrivals. And so, Mendiola is home to 80 percent of total trophies since 2010. The other 20 percent, though? They are proudly presented in Intramuros. Come to think about it, though, which triumph over its fierce foe was sweeter for Letran? Here in ABS-CBN Sports Super Showdown, that is what we aim to answer. To determine who comes out on top between the blue and red's proud champions, we will be judging them in five categories (frontcourt, backcourt, coaching, level of competition, and shock factor) with a boxing-style 10-point must system determining the decision. FRONTCOURT The trademark of Aldin Ayo's very first championship team was that of playing much bigger than its expectations, its own size, and its, more often than not, bigger opponents. Ayo's nominal center was 6-foot-5 Jom Sollano while his regular 4-man was 6-foot-4 Kevin Racal. Off the bench, his first quote-unquote big was 6-foot-3 Felix Apreku. Still, those three played their roles to a tee and, along with the rest of the team, assembled a well-oiled machine that made the most of its speed advantage. Fast forward four years and "undersized" could no longer be used to describe Letran. In 6-7 Christian Balagasay, 6-6 Jeo Ambohot, 6-6 Pao Javillonar, 6-5 Larry Muyang, 6-4 Ato Ular, and 6-4 Mark Sangalang, Bonnie Tan finally had big, bad weapons in his arsenal. And for sure, those big, bad weapons flipped what was once a chink in the armor of the Knights into a super strength. And for sure, this department would be dominated by that rotation of ready and raring big men. Advantage 2019 Letran, 10-8 BACKCOURT The two teams' Finals MVP both come from the backcourt. Mark Cruz, like he has always done, came up big for Letran and averaged 17.3 points, 6.3 rebounds, 4.3 assists, and 3.0 steals Fran Yu, meanwhile, used the big stage and bright lights to break out to the tune of norms of 13.7 points, 6.0 assists, 3.3 rebounds, and 2.0 steals. In those two, the Knights had capable and confident counters to San Beda's own primetime playmakers in Baser Amer and Evan Nelle. The edge here, however, would have to go to Cruz whose signature play in the winner-take-all Game 3 was not a shot. Rather, it was a setup - after driving through the lane and drawing defenders with under a minute left, he found Sollano open at the baseline. Sollano only made good on the assist and his shot proved to be the go-ahead basket for the title. Add Rey Nambatac's offense and Mcjour Luib's defense here and Ayo's Letran just had a more well-rounded backcourt compared to Tan's which also included Jerrick Balanza and Bonbon Batiller. Advantage 2015 Letran, 10-9 COACHING Ayo is one of the best collegiate coaches in all of the Philippines. He has seen Tab Baldwin win the last three titles in the UAAP, but it still wasn't that long ago when he won back-to-back championships with different teams and in different leagues. Time and time again, the youthful mentor has proven to get the most out of his players - from the Cruz-Nambatac-Racal triumvirate in Letran to Ben Mbala-Jeron Teng De La Salle University and now, University of Sto. Tomas with Soulemane Chabi Yo, Rhenz Abando, CJ Cansino, and Mark Nonoy. What he doesn't have, however, are the so-called "super friends" of Tan. Through the NCAA 95 Finals, NorthPort head coach Pido Jarencio and assistant Jeff Napa were sharing their mind with the Knights themselves during timeouts. They were informal additions to regular assistants Rensy Bajar, Lou Gatumbato, Raymond Tiongco, and Ginebra point guard LA Tenorio. Even more were behind the bench in Letran special assistant to the rector for sports development and San Miguel Corporation sports director Alfrancis Chua, NorthPort team manager Erick Arejola, Columbian governor Bobby Rosales and head coach Johnedel Cardel, and Magnolia governor Rene Pardo. Asked about all those behind his back, Tan answered then, "In business, you need partners to be successful and in sports naman, we need friends lalo na yung mga may alam kung paano manalo. Friends ko yan lahat so welcome sila - brainstorm and synergy kami." Still, it's already a given by this point that competition only fuels the already burning fire inside Ayo. With that, there is just no doubt that he would only push himself harder and farther in the face of Tan and his so-called "super friends." And the one-time NCAA and one-time UAAP champion coach much more motivated than ever is nothing but a scary thought. Advantage 2015 Letran, 10-9 LEVEL OF COMPETITION NCAA 91 was the year of "Kagulo sa NCAA." Then, six squads out of 10 had a legitimate claim to a playoff berth. So competitive was the field that Jiovani Jalalon and Kent Salado's Arellano University as well as a University of Perpetual Help side that had Scottie Thompson, Prince Eze, and Bright Akhuetie fell short of the Final Four. Illustrating the competition even further, the season's Finalists only had one member of the Mythical Team between them - San Beda's Art Dela Cruz. On the other hand, NCAA 95's playoff cast was completed a week before the end of the elimination round. Yes, there was a Red Lion team that automatically advanced to the Finals and had three out of five Mythical selections. Still, that tournament's fourth-seed was San Sebastian College-Recoletos who had an 11-7 standing. Comparing that to NCAA 91's fourth-seed in Mapua University who sported a 12-6 slate and the 2019 Golden Stags wouldn't even make the 2015 playoffs. Advantage 2015 Letran, 10-9 SHOCK FACTOR It was a shock to see Letran upset San Beda in Game 1 of the NCAA 95 Finals after the latter won each and every game in the elimination round, It was even more of a shock to see the Knights actually topple the dynastic and season sweep-seeking Red Lions. Still, there was always an outside shot of that happening. "Letran is one of three shoo-ins for the Final Four – as well as a strong contender to wage war in the Finals and even possibly, hoist the trophy," ABS-CBN Sports stated in its preseason preview for the blue and red then. "This fully loaded lineup has the makings of a dynasty-ender – what’s only up in the air is if it would be motivated enough to do just that." On the other hand, nobody, nobody at all aside from Ayo had Letran contending in NCAA 91 - much more, winning it all. As ABS-CBN Sports stated in its preseason preview then, "It remains to be seen if the Knights' fortified defense and added offensive firepower can overcome their lack of size especially against the Final Four teams, all of whom have only gotten bigger." Even when the Knights finally charged to the championship round, not that many gave them a chance. In fact, all that doubt became tattooed on the mind of Ayo whose first words in the post-game conference when they finally claimed the crown was, "Joey, follow your heart!" The fiery mentor was referring to the Philippine Star's Joey Villar who said in the leadup to the Finals that his heart wants to root for Letran, but his mind knows San Beda would win. He wasn't alone. Even Ayo had to admit that his players themselves didn't believe until the season was already underway. "Sa totoo lang, nung team-building namin nung preseason, nung tinanong ko kung naniniwala ba silang magcha-champion tayo, they laughed. Nung natalo lang namin yung JRU nung (second game of the season), dun lang sila naniwala.," he said then. Advantage 2015 Letran, 10-9 FINAL SCORE: 48-46 for 2015 Letran.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 21st, 2020

MPBL: San Juan s Ayonayon believes ECQ levels the playing field

After overwhelming Makati in the series opener of the 2020 Chooks-to-Go MPBL Lakan North Division Finals, San Juan-Go for Gold was supposed to go for the jugular come Game Two. However, disaster struck for the Knights, shifting the momentum they once had to Makati's side. The third-ranked Super Crunch-backed squad was able to live to fight another day, outlasting the defending Datu Cup champions in a heart-stopping 91-88 victory to force a deciding Game Three. But with the Enhanced Community Quarantine (ECQ) implemented in Luzon extended due to the country's ongoing war against the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the entire sporting world, including the MPBL, has been on pause for over a month now. And San Juan star shooting guard Mike Ayonayon believes that this development will only level the playing field for both sides. "Sa akin may advantage at disadvantage yung lockdown. Advantage kasi galing sa panalo yung Makati, so nasa kanila yung momentum kaya nung nagkaroon ng quarantine, nahinto yung momentum nila," shared the reigning Datu Cup Finals MVP, who is averaging 12.0 points, 4.4 rebounds, 3.6 assists, and 1.4 steals per game. "Sa tingin ko patas lang kami ng Makati ngayon, kasi parehas nakapahinga parehas wala sa timing, so parang back to zero ulit." The 27-year-old also stressed that the extra break will give his teammates, especially injured players like Larry Rodriguez, more time to recuperate from their respective injuries. "Saka sa amin, si Kuya Larry galing injury so makakapahinga din siya. Hopefully, makalaro na siya sa Game Three," said Ayonayon. Now wary of Makati, Ayonayon bared that the Knights must stick to the coaching staff's schemes for them to be able to take out a hungry Makati squad. "Sa tingin ko yung team defense namin at ball movement namin magpapanalo sa amin at yung kagustuhan manalo," said the 6-foot guard out of Rizal. "Ang palagi naman nireremind sa amin ni Coach Randy [Alcantara] ay kung sino malaki ang puso yun ang mananalo." With a cloud of uncertainty shadowing the division finals' return, Ayonayon vows to stay in shape and be ready for San Juan's do-or-die clash......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 16th, 2020

Ex-Zambales gov Vic Magsaysay dies at 79

FORMER Zambales governor Vicente “GoVic” Magsaysay died from a heart attack on Monday evening, his family has confirmed. The late governor served the province of Zambales for 28 years. He just turned 79 years old on January 21. “He led a life of unimaginable selfless public service,” Mary Rose Magsaysay, daughter, said on a Facebook […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsApr 14th, 2020

PBA lends hand to recovering Nelson Asaytono

MANILA, Philippines – Nelson Asaytono will receive assistance from the very league he once dominated as he recuperates from a heart attack. In a report on the PBA website, the league pledged to help Asaytono after he was discharged from a hospital in General Trias, Cavite on Saturday, ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsApr 13th, 2020

Asaytono recovering from heart attack

PBA commissioner Willie Marcial promised assistance to league great Nelson Asaytono as he recovers from a heart attack he suffered during the Holy Week......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 12th, 2020

BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 3

In case you missed it: BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 1 BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 2 --- Pingoy Rule: Never settle. --- Jerie Pingoy was one of the best players to play in UAAP Jrs. - in recent history, at the very least. "One of the best players I've ever seen," Far Eastern University-Diliman head coach Mike Oliver said about his former prized ward. "He was the complete package - maganda ang range, can slice through defenses, can create his own shot or for his teammates, and also a good defender." If you don't want to believe in the mentor he won a championship with, believe in the fact that in the last two decades, the 5-foot-11 point guard was one of only two players to have hoisted the MVP trophy in back-to-back years. And it's not like he wasn't a winner either as he capped off his high school career by besting defending champion Nazareth School of National University and bringing the Baby Tamaraws to the promised land for the first time since the late '80s. If that still isn't enough for you, then know that the then-mentor of those Bullpups still has not forgotten about the playmaker who dethroned them. "Magaling talaga. Mataas ang basketball IQ. Very smart point guard," Jeff Napa answered when asked about Pingoy. Actually, that was why Napa took a chance on the now-forgotten 25-year-old in the 2020 PBA D-League Draft and the former signed up the latter for Karate Kid-CEU. Pingoy may have strayed far from the promising path he had been on, but deep down, the player who once put up per game counts of 21 points on top of 5.1 assists, 4.2 rebounds, and 2.1 steals as a graduating guard in high school is still there. WELL-DESERVED There was no question back then that Pingoy was special. Everybody thought so and that was why he also got to wear the flag for the national youth team. There's no question as well that after all that had happened since then, FEU still holds a special place in Pingoy's heart. "I was happy nung nandun ako sa FEU. Mga teammates ko, mga Bisaya rin kaya masaya kaming lahat," he shared in a phone interview. He then continued, "Actually, kung iisipin ko ngayon, yung high school yung pinaka-close ako sa teammates ko." When it came to the next step in his young career, though, he had more than just basketball to think about. With the decision ultimately coming down to either moving up to FEU's Srs. squad or moving on to Ateneo de Manila University, Pingoy kept his family in mind. "Ateneo gave me an opportunity na matulungan yung family ko. I wasn't thinking of myself lang that time," he shared. "Kami, coming from nothing, as in wala talaga, poorest of the poor kami sa Cebu. The opportunity was there e, why not grab it?" Years later, the Cebuano admitted that alongside the prospect of playing for the dynastic Blue Eagles and studying in Ateneo, his would-be allowance was more noteworthy compared to if he would have stayed. "May pagkakaiba sa allowance talaga. Ako naman, wala akong idea at all nun kundi to help my family," he said. He then continued, "Sa Cebu, wala kaming bahay, nakikitulog lang kami sa lola ko. Kaya naisip ko lang na basta, at least, maiangat ko man lang kahit konti ang pamilya ko through my allowance." WORTH IT Make no mistake, though, it wasn't all about allowances. Pingoy believed that his future in terms of basketball shone brightest with Ateneo. That's because the one-time champion and back-to-back MVP in the UAAP Jrs. had the full faith of the Blue Eagles' main men. Then-King Eagle Kiefer Ravena, undoubtedly a big influence on the blue and white's recruits, said that Pingoy was to be the cornerstone of their new era. As he put it, "It was a transition from Coach Norman [Black] to Coach Bo [Perasol] and we were trying to rebuild the program. He was one of the first recruits talaga that Coach Bo wanted." He then continued, "We saw what he was capable of and we wanted that sa team." Perasol, who spent three years in Katipunan before moving to neighboring University of the Philippines, himself shared the same sentiment. "He was one of the best talents of his batch. The best point guard and a proven winner, hands down," he said. He also added, "He was worth it despite any complication." WHAT IF Unfortunately, it wasn't meant to be. With his momentum stopped dead in its tracks by a two-year residency, Pingoy had a tough time transitioning to the Srs. level and, ultimately, officially only played one year for Ateneo. And yet, he has no what ifs. Asked if he ever thinks about what would have happened if he had decided otherwise, he answered, "Hindi e, hindi ko talaga naisip yung ganun. I never put in my mind na sana, nag-stay na lang ako. As in wala. 'Di ko naisip yun. Never." Until now, Pingoy is proud to say that Ateneo is a big part of the more well-rounded player he has become. "Scoring machine ako nung high school, pero naging mature lang ako maglaro nung natuto akong maging point guard talaga. Sa Ateneo ko lang talaga natutunan yung how to be a facilitator, how to be a leader," he said. While, of course, he has been humbled by all that had happened, he had already learned humility from the very first time he donned the blue and white. "Hindi pwede sa Ateneo na gusto mong star player ka agad," he said before mentioning the Blue Eagles' backcourt filled by Ravena, Nico Elorde, Juami Tiongson when he arrived and then later included the likes of Anton Asistio, Hubert Cani, and Matt Nieto. He also added, "Dahil dun, tinanggap at naging masaya akong maging role player muna." If only Pingoy had also learned how to play his role off the court just as much as he did on it. NEXT ON BEST-OF-5 SERIES: THE PINGOY RULES: "Yung laro ko nung last year ko sa Adamson, medyo bitin. 'Di naman ganun laro ko. Ang laking factor na naoperahan akong hindi successful." --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 10th, 2020

UAAP Season 82 volleyball tidbits

The UAAP cancelled Season 82 after the government extended the enhanced community quarantine amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic putting an abrupt end to centerpiece second semester sport volleyball. The crowd-drawing tournament ran for just a week or a total of four playdates. It was disappointingly short but the season proved to be an exciting one with memorable matches, performances and moments. Here are some of them:   DELAYED OPENING The tournament was supposed to open February 15, but was pushed back two weeks after the government confirmed cases of coronavirus infection in the country.  Interestingly, the UAAP on its first-ever second semester press conference on February 11 announced the original schedule to push through only to call a postponement of all sporting events a day after.      FIRST SEASON 82 MATCH The men’s match of University of East and Far Eastern University opened the season on March 3 with a gate attendance of 908 spectators. It was a one-sided affair with the Tamaraws scoring a 25-10, 25-22, 25-23, win. Rookie JJ Javelona made a great introduction, finishing with 11 points with all but one coming off attacks, while senior Peter Quiel had 10 markers.       LAST MATCH University of Sto. Tomas and FEU played what turned out to be the last game of the season on March 8. The Tigresses swept the Lady Tamaraws, 25-20, 25-16, 25-18, with sisters Eya and EJ Laure scoring 16 and 12 points, respectively.   RESULTS  The NU Lady Bulldogs defeated the UST Tigresses in the lone five-set match in the women’s division. Four games were decided in straight sets while two were concluded in four frames. Adamson U played only one match and was the only team which failed to win a set.  In men’s play, FEU beat UST in five sets in the only match that went the full distance. There were four matches that ended in straight sets and two in four frames. DLSU and Adamson played only one game each and both lost in straight sets.    HIGHEST SINGLE-GAME SCORING OUTPUT University of the Philippines senior Isa Molde scored the most points in a single game in the women’s division this year with 24. Molde had 18 kills, four kill blocks and a couple of aces in a four-set victory over the UE Lady Warriors.  Red Warrior Lloyd Josafat held the highest single-game scoring output in men’s play with 32 points in a four-set win over UP. The sophomore hammered 28 attacks with three kill blocks and an ace     CROWD-DARLING Fighting Maroon Louis Gamban became the talk of the town after an inspired debut for UP. The recruit from University of Perpetual Help powered the Fighting Maroons to a straight sets upset win over Ateneo de Manila University. He backed his court sass and swag with an amazing performance both on offense and defense   BIGGEST GATE ATTENDANCE As expected, the first meeting between reigning women’s champion Ateneo and DLSU drew the biggest live audience in Season 82. A 12,907-strong crowd filled the MOA Arena forming a sea of blue and green despite the then rising threat of the COVID-19 outbreak.     FIRST VIDEO CHALLENGE The UAAP introduced the use of video challenge in Season 82. However, the technology was unavailable during the first playdate of the season because of technical problems. The NU Bulldogs had the honor of calling the first-ever video challenge on March 8 in their game against UST. NU head coach Dante Alinsunurin called for a net violation challenge in the first set with the Bulldogs protecting a 20-19 advantage. The challenge was unsuccessful but NU went on to claim the win in four sets.          LAST POINT Tigresses hitter Blove Barbon pounded the last point of the season in UST’s dominating win over the Lady Tamaraws. Barbon hammered a backrow attack off a Maji Mangulabnan set to break the FEU’s three-woman wall to cap off the match.        --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 10th, 2020

BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 3

In case you missed it: BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 1 BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 2 --- Pingoy Rule: Never settle. --- Jerie Pingoy was one of the best players to play in UAAP Jrs. - in recent history, at the very least. "One of the best players I've ever seen," Far Eastern University-Diliman head coach Mike Oliver said about his former prized ward. "He was the complete package - maganda ang range, can slice through defenses, can create his own shot or for his teammates, and also a good defender." If you don't want to believe in the mentor he won a championship with, believe in the fact that in the last two decades, the 5-foot-11 point guard was one of only two players to have hoisted the MVP trophy in back-to-back years. And it's not like he wasn't a winner either as he capped off his high school career by besting defending champion Nazareth School of National University and bringing the Baby Tamaraws to the promised land for the first time since the late '80s. If that still isn't enough for you, then know that the then-mentor of those Bullpups still has not forgotten about the playmaker who dethroned them. "Magaling talaga. Mataas ang basketball IQ. Very smart point guard," Jeff Napa answered when asked about Pingoy. Actually, that was why Napa took a chance on the now-forgotten 25-year-old in the 2020 PBA D-League Draft and the former signed up the latter for Karate Kid-CEU. Pingoy may have strayed far from the promising path he had been on, but deep down, the player who once put up per game counts of 21 points on top of 5.1 assists, 4.2 rebounds, and 2.1 steals as a graduating guard in high school is still there. WELL-DESERVED There was no question back then that Pingoy was special. Everybody thought so and that was why he also got to wear the flag for the national youth team. There's no question as well that after all that had happened since then, FEU still holds a special place in Pingoy's heart. "I was happy nung nandun ako sa FEU. Mga teammates ko, mga Bisaya rin kaya masaya kaming lahat," he shared in a phone interview. He then continued, "Actually, kung iisipin ko ngayon, yung high school yung pinaka-close ako sa teammates ko." When it came to the next step in his young career, though, he had more than just basketball to think about. With the decision ultimately coming down to either moving up to FEU's Srs. squad or moving on to Ateneo de Manila University, Pingoy kept his family in mind. "Ateneo gave me an opportunity na matulungan yung family ko. I wasn't thinking of myself lang that time," he shared. "Kami, coming from nothing, as in wala talaga, poorest of the poor kami sa Cebu. The opportunity was there e, why not grab it?" Years later, the Cebuano admitted that alongside the prospect of playing for the dynastic Blue Eagles and studying in Ateneo, his would-be allowance was more noteworthy compared to if he would have stayed. "May pagkakaiba sa allowance talaga. Ako naman, wala akong idea at all nun kundi to help my family," he said. He then continued, "Sa Cebu, wala kaming bahay, nakikitulog lang kami sa lola ko. Kaya naisip ko lang na basta, at least, maiangat ko man lang kahit konti ang pamilya ko through my allowance." WORTH IT Make no mistake, though, it wasn't all about allowances. Pingoy believed that his future in terms of basketball shone brightest with Ateneo. That's because the one-time champion and back-to-back MVP in the UAAP Jrs. had the full faith of the Blue Eagles' main men. Then-King Eagle Kiefer Ravena, undoubtedly a big influence on the blue and white's recruits, said that Pingoy was to be the cornerstone of their new era. As he put it, "It was a transition from Coach Norman [Black] to Coach Bo [Perasol] and we were trying to rebuild the program. He was one of the first recruits talaga that Coach Bo wanted." He then continued, "We saw what he was capable of and we wanted that sa team." Perasol, who spent three years in Katipunan before moving to neighboring University of the Philippines, himself shared the same sentiment. "He was one of the best talents of his batch. The best point guard and a proven winner, hands down," he said. He also added, "He was worth it despite any complication." WHAT IF Unfortunately, it wasn't meant to be. With his momentum stopped dead in its tracks by a two-year residency, Pingoy had a tough time transitioning to the Srs. level and, ultimately, officially only played one year for Ateneo. And yet, he has no what ifs. Asked if he ever thinks about what would have happened if he had decided otherwise, he answered, "Hindi e, hindi ko talaga naisip yung ganun. I never put in my mind na sana, nag-stay na lang ako. As in wala. 'Di ko naisip yun. Never." Until now, Pingoy is proud to say that Ateneo is a big part of the more well-rounded player he has become. "Scoring machine ako nung high school, pero naging mature lang ako maglaro nung natuto akong maging point guard talaga. Sa Ateneo ko lang talaga natutunan yung how to be a facilitator, how to be a leader," he said. While, of course, he has been humbled by all that had happened, he had already learned humility from the very first time he donned the blue and white. "Hindi pwede sa Ateneo na gusto mong star player ka agad," he said before mentioning the Blue Eagles' backcourt filled by Ravena, Nico Elorde, Juami Tiongson when he arrived and then later included the likes of Anton Asistio, Hubert Cani, and Matt Nieto. He also added, "Dahil dun, tinanggap at naging masaya akong maging role player muna." If only Pingoy had also learned how to play his role off the court just as much as he did on it. NEXT ON BEST-OF-5 SERIES: THE PINGOY RULES: "Yung laro ko nung last year ko sa Adamson, medyo bitin. 'Di naman ganun laro ko. Ang laking factor na naoperahan akong hindi successful." --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 10th, 2020

UAAP Season 82 volleyball tidbits

The UAAP cancelled Season 82 after the government extended the enhanced community quarantine amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic putting an abrupt end to centerpiece second semester sport volleyball. The crowd-drawing tournament ran for just a week or a total of four playdates. It was disappointingly short but the season proved to be an exciting one with memorable matches, performances and moments. Here are some of them:   DELAYED OPENING The tournament was supposed to open February 15, but was pushed back two weeks after the government confirmed cases of coronavirus infection in the country.  Interestingly, the UAAP on its first-ever second semester press conference on February 11 announced the original schedule to push through only to call a postponement of all sporting events a day after.      FIRST SEASON 82 MATCH The men’s match of University of East and Far Eastern University opened the season on March 3 with a gate attendance of 908 spectators. It was a one-sided affair with the Tamaraws scoring a 25-10, 25-22, 25-23, win. Rookie JJ Javelona made a great introduction, finishing with 11 points with all but one coming off attacks, while senior Peter Quiel had 10 markers.       LAST MATCH University of Sto. Tomas and FEU played what turned out to be the last game of the season on March 8. The Tigresses swept the Lady Tamaraws, 25-20, 25-16, 25-18, with sisters Eya and EJ Laure scoring 16 and 12 points, respectively.   RESULTS  The NU Lady Bulldogs defeated the UST Tigresses in the lone five-set match in the women’s division. Four games were decided in straight sets while two were concluded in four frames. Adamson U played only one match and was the only team which failed to win a set.  In men’s play, FEU beat UST in five sets in the only match that went the full distance. There were four matches that ended in straight sets and two in four frames. DLSU and Adamson played only one game each and both lost in straight sets.    HIGHEST SINGLE-GAME SCORING OUTPUT University of the Philippines senior Isa Molde scored the most points in a single game in the women’s division this year with 24. Molde had 18 kills, four kill blocks and a couple of aces in a four-set victory over the UE Lady Warriors.  Red Warrior Lloyd Josafat held the highest single-game scoring output in men’s play with 32 points in a four-set win over UP. The sophomore hammered 28 attacks with three kill blocks and an ace     CROWD-DARLING Fighting Maroon Louis Gamban became the talk of the town after an inspired debut for UP. The recruit from University of Perpetual Help powered the Fighting Maroons to a straight sets upset win over Ateneo de Manila University. He backed his court sass and swag with an amazing performance both on offense and defense   BIGGEST GATE ATTENDANCE As expected, the first meeting between reigning women’s champion Ateneo and DLSU drew the biggest live audience in Season 82. A 12,907-strong crowd filled the MOA Arena forming a sea of blue and green despite the then rising threat of the COVID-19 outbreak.     FIRST VIDEO CHALLENGE The UAAP introduced the use of video challenge in Season 82. However, the technology was unavailable during the first playdate of the season because of technical problems. The NU Bulldogs had the honor of calling the first-ever video challenge on March 8 in their game against UST. NU head coach Dante Alinsunurin called for a net violation challenge in the first set with the Bulldogs protecting a 20-19 advantage. The challenge was unsuccessful but NU went on to claim the win in four sets.          LAST POINT Tigresses hitter Blove Barbon pounded the last point of the season in UST’s dominating win over the Lady Tamaraws. Barbon hammered a backrow attack off a Maji Mangulabnan set to break the FEU’s three-woman wall to cap off the match.        --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 10th, 2020

BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 3

In case you missed it: BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 1 BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 2 --- Pingoy Rule: Never settle. --- Jerie Pingoy was one of the best players to play in UAAP Jrs. - in recent history, at the very least. "One of the best players I've ever seen," Far Eastern University-Diliman head coach Mike Oliver said about his former prized ward. "He was the complete package - maganda ang range, can slice through defenses, can create his own shot or for his teammates, and also a good defender." If you don't want to believe in the mentor he won a championship with, believe in the fact that in the last two decades, the 5-foot-11 point guard was one of only two players to have hoisted the MVP trophy in back-to-back years. And it's not like he wasn't a winner either as he capped off his high school career by besting defending champion Nazareth School of National University and bringing the Baby Tamaraws to the promised land for the first time since the late '80s. If that still isn't enough for you, then know that the then-mentor of those Bullpups still has not forgotten about the playmaker who dethroned them. "Magaling talaga. Mataas ang basketball IQ. Very smart point guard," Jeff Napa answered when asked about Pingoy. Actually, that was why Napa took a chance on the now-forgotten 25-year-old in the 2020 PBA D-League Draft and the former signed up the latter for Karate Kid-CEU. Pingoy may have strayed far from the promising path he had been on, but deep down, the player who once put up per game counts of 21 points on top of 5.1 assists, 4.2 rebounds, and 2.1 steals as a graduating guard in high school is still there. WELL-DESERVED There was no question back then that Pingoy was special. Everybody thought so and that was why he also got to wear the flag for the national youth team. There's no question as well that after all that had happened since then, FEU still holds a special place in Pingoy's heart. "I was happy nung nandun ako sa FEU. Mga teammates ko, mga Bisaya rin kaya masaya kaming lahat," he shared in a phone interview. He then continued, "Actually, kung iisipin ko ngayon, yung high school yung pinaka-close ako sa teammates ko." When it came to the next step in his young career, though, he had more than just basketball to think about. With the decision ultimately coming down to either moving up to FEU's Srs. squad or moving on to Ateneo de Manila University, Pingoy kept his family in mind. "Ateneo gave me an opportunity na matulungan yung family ko. I wasn't thinking of myself lang that time," he shared. "Kami, coming from nothing, as in wala talaga, poorest of the poor kami sa Cebu. The opportunity was there e, why not grab it?" Years later, the Cebuano admitted that alongside the prospect of playing for the dynastic Blue Eagles and studying in Ateneo, his would-be allowance was more noteworthy compared to if he would have stayed. "May pagkakaiba sa allowance talaga. Ako naman, wala akong idea at all nun kundi to help my family," he said. He then continued, "Sa Cebu, wala kaming bahay, nakikitulog lang kami sa lola ko. Kaya naisip ko lang na basta, at least, maiangat ko man lang kahit konti ang pamilya ko through my allowance." WORTH IT Make no mistake, though, it wasn't all about allowances. Pingoy believed that his future in terms of basketball shone brightest with Ateneo. That's because the one-time champion and back-to-back MVP in the UAAP Jrs. had the full faith of the Blue Eagles' main men. Then-King Eagle Kiefer Ravena, undoubtedly a big influence on the blue and white's recruits, said that Pingoy was to be the cornerstone of their new era. As he put it, "It was a transition from Coach Norman [Black] to Coach Bo [Perasol] and we were trying to rebuild the program. He was one of the first recruits talaga that Coach Bo wanted." He then continued, "We saw what he was capable of and we wanted that sa team." Perasol, who spent three years in Katipunan before moving to neighboring University of the Philippines, himself shared the same sentiment. "He was one of the best talents of his batch. The best point guard and a proven winner, hands down," he said. He also added, "He was worth it despite any complication." WHAT IF Unfortunately, it wasn't meant to be. With his momentum stopped dead in its tracks by a two-year residency, Pingoy had a tough time transitioning to the Srs. level and, ultimately, officially only played one year for Ateneo. And yet, he has no what ifs. Asked if he ever thinks about what would have happened if he had decided otherwise, he answered, "Hindi e, hindi ko talaga naisip yung ganun. I never put in my mind na sana, nag-stay na lang ako. As in wala. 'Di ko naisip yun. Never." Until now, Pingoy is proud to say that Ateneo is a big part of the more well-rounded player he has become. "Scoring machine ako nung high school, pero naging mature lang ako maglaro nung natuto akong maging point guard talaga. Sa Ateneo ko lang talaga natutunan yung how to be a facilitator, how to be a leader," he said. While, of course, he has been humbled by all that had happened, he had already learned humility from the very first time he donned the blue and white. "Hindi pwede sa Ateneo na gusto mong star player ka agad," he said before mentioning the Blue Eagles' backcourt filled by Ravena, Nico Elorde, Juami Tiongson when he arrived and then later included the likes of Anton Asistio, Hubert Cani, and Matt Nieto. He also added, "Dahil dun, tinanggap at naging masaya akong maging role player muna." If only Pingoy had also learned how to play his role off the court just as much as he did on it. NEXT ON BEST-OF-5 SERIES: THE PINGOY RULES: "Yung laro ko nung last year ko sa Adamson, medyo bitin. 'Di naman ganun laro ko. Ang laking factor na naoperahan akong hindi successful." --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 10th, 2020

UAAP Season 82 volleyball tidbits

The UAAP cancelled Season 82 after the government extended the enhanced community quarantine amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic putting an abrupt end to centerpiece second semester sport volleyball. The crowd-drawing tournament ran for just a week or a total of four playdates. It was disappointingly short but the season proved to be an exciting one with memorable matches, performances and moments. Here are some of them:   DELAYED OPENING The tournament was supposed to open February 15, but was pushed back two weeks after the government confirmed cases of coronavirus infection in the country.  Interestingly, the UAAP on its first-ever second semester press conference on February 11 announced the original schedule to push through only to call a postponement of all sporting events a day after.      FIRST SEASON 82 MATCH The men’s match of University of East and Far Eastern University opened the season on March 3 with a gate attendance of 908 spectators. It was a one-sided affair with the Tamaraws scoring a 25-10, 25-22, 25-23, win. Rookie JJ Javelona made a great introduction, finishing with 11 points with all but one coming off attacks, while senior Peter Quiel had 10 markers.       LAST MATCH University of Sto. Tomas and FEU played what turned out to be the last game of the season on March 8. The Tigresses swept the Lady Tamaraws, 25-20, 25-16, 25-18, with sisters Eya and EJ Laure scoring 16 and 12 points, respectively.   RESULTS  The NU Lady Bulldogs defeated the UST Tigresses in the lone five-set match in the women’s division. Four games were decided in straight sets while two were concluded in four frames. Adamson U played only one match and was the only team which failed to win a set.  In men’s play, FEU beat UST in five sets in the only match that went the full distance. There were four matches that ended in straight sets and two in four frames. DLSU and Adamson played only one game each and both lost in straight sets.    HIGHEST SINGLE-GAME SCORING OUTPUT University of the Philippines senior Isa Molde scored the most points in a single game in the women’s division this year with 24. Molde had 18 kills, four kill blocks and a couple of aces in a four-set victory over the UE Lady Warriors.  Red Warrior Lloyd Josafat held the highest single-game scoring output in men’s play with 32 points in a four-set win over UP. The sophomore hammered 28 attacks with three kill blocks and an ace     CROWD-DARLING Fighting Maroon Louis Gamban became the talk of the town after an inspired debut for UP. The recruit from University of Perpetual Help powered the Fighting Maroons to a straight sets upset win over Ateneo de Manila University. He backed his court sass and swag with an amazing performance both on offense and defense   BIGGEST GATE ATTENDANCE As expected, the first meeting between reigning women’s champion Ateneo and DLSU drew the biggest live audience in Season 82. A 12,907-strong crowd filled the MOA Arena forming a sea of blue and green despite the then rising threat of the COVID-19 outbreak.     FIRST VIDEO CHALLENGE The UAAP introduced the use of video challenge in Season 82. However, the technology was unavailable during the first playdate of the season because of technical problems. The NU Bulldogs had the honor of calling the first-ever video challenge on March 8 in their game against UST. NU head coach Dante Alinsunurin called for a net violation challenge in the first set with the Bulldogs protecting a 20-19 advantage. The challenge was unsuccessful but NU went on to claim the win in four sets.          LAST POINT Tigresses hitter Blove Barbon pounded the last point of the season in UST’s dominating win over the Lady Tamaraws. Barbon hammered a backrow attack off a Maji Mangulabnan set to break the FEU’s three-woman wall to cap off the match.        --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 10th, 2020

BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 3

In case you missed it: BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 1 BEST-OF-5 SERIES: The Pingoy Rules Part 2 --- Pingoy Rule: Never settle. --- Jerie Pingoy was one of the best players to play in UAAP Jrs. - in recent history, at the very least. "One of the best players I've ever seen," Far Eastern University-Diliman head coach Mike Oliver said about his former prized ward. "He was the complete package - maganda ang range, can slice through defenses, can create his own shot or for his teammates, and also a good defender." If you don't want to believe in the mentor he won a championship with, believe in the fact that in the last two decades, the 5-foot-11 point guard was one of only two players to have hoisted the MVP trophy in back-to-back years. And it's not like he wasn't a winner either as he capped off his high school career by besting defending champion Nazareth School of National University and bringing the Baby Tamaraws to the promised land for the first time since the late '80s. If that still isn't enough for you, then know that the then-mentor of those Bullpups still has not forgotten about the playmaker who dethroned them. "Magaling talaga. Mataas ang basketball IQ. Very smart point guard," Jeff Napa answered when asked about Pingoy. Actually, that was why Napa took a chance on the now-forgotten 25-year-old in the 2020 PBA D-League Draft and the former signed up the latter for Karate Kid-CEU. Pingoy may have strayed far from the promising path he had been on, but deep down, the player who once put up per game counts of 21 points on top of 5.1 assists, 4.2 rebounds, and 2.1 steals as a graduating guard in high school is still there. WELL-DESERVED There was no question back then that Pingoy was special. Everybody thought so and that was why he also got to wear the flag for the national youth team. There's no question as well that after all that had happened since then, FEU still holds a special place in Pingoy's heart. "I was happy nung nandun ako sa FEU. Mga teammates ko, mga Bisaya rin kaya masaya kaming lahat," he shared in a phone interview. He then continued, "Actually, kung iisipin ko ngayon, yung high school yung pinaka-close ako sa teammates ko." When it came to the next step in his young career, though, he had more than just basketball to think about. With the decision ultimately coming down to either moving up to FEU's Srs. squad or moving on to Ateneo de Manila University, Pingoy kept his family in mind. "Ateneo gave me an opportunity na matulungan yung family ko. I wasn't thinking of myself lang that time," he shared. "Kami, coming from nothing, as in wala talaga, poorest of the poor kami sa Cebu. The opportunity was there e, why not grab it?" Years later, the Cebuano admitted that alongside the prospect of playing for the dynastic Blue Eagles and studying in Ateneo, his would-be allowance was more noteworthy compared to if he would have stayed. "May pagkakaiba sa allowance talaga. Ako naman, wala akong idea at all nun kundi to help my family," he said. He then continued, "Sa Cebu, wala kaming bahay, nakikitulog lang kami sa lola ko. Kaya naisip ko lang na basta, at least, maiangat ko man lang kahit konti ang pamilya ko through my allowance." WORTH IT Make no mistake, though, it wasn't all about allowances. Pingoy believed that his future in terms of basketball shone brightest with Ateneo. That's because the one-time champion and back-to-back MVP in the UAAP Jrs. had the full faith of the Blue Eagles' main men. Then-King Eagle Kiefer Ravena, undoubtedly a big influence on the blue and white's recruits, said that Pingoy was to be the cornerstone of their new era. As he put it, "It was a transition from Coach Norman [Black] to Coach Bo [Perasol] and we were trying to rebuild the program. He was one of the first recruits talaga that Coach Bo wanted." He then continued, "We saw what he was capable of and we wanted that sa team." Perasol, who spent three years in Katipunan before moving to neighboring University of the Philippines, himself shared the same sentiment. "He was one of the best talents of his batch. The best point guard and a proven winner, hands down," he said. He also added, "He was worth it despite any complication." WHAT IF Unfortunately, it wasn't meant to be. With his momentum stopped dead in its tracks by a two-year residency, Pingoy had a tough time transitioning to the Srs. level and, ultimately, officially only played one year for Ateneo. And yet, he has no what ifs. Asked if he ever thinks about what would have happened if he had decided otherwise, he answered, "Hindi e, hindi ko talaga naisip yung ganun. I never put in my mind na sana, nag-stay na lang ako. As in wala. 'Di ko naisip yun. Never." Until now, Pingoy is proud to say that Ateneo is a big part of the more well-rounded player he has become. "Scoring machine ako nung high school, pero naging mature lang ako maglaro nung natuto akong maging point guard talaga. Sa Ateneo ko lang talaga natutunan yung how to be a facilitator, how to be a leader," he said. While, of course, he has been humbled by all that had happened, he had already learned humility from the very first time he donned the blue and white. "Hindi pwede sa Ateneo na gusto mong star player ka agad," he said before mentioning the Blue Eagles' backcourt filled by Ravena, Nico Elorde, Juami Tiongson when he arrived and then later included the likes of Anton Asistio, Hubert Cani, and Matt Nieto. He also added, "Dahil dun, tinanggap at naging masaya akong maging role player muna." If only Pingoy had also learned how to play his role off the court just as much as he did on it. NEXT ON BEST-OF-5 SERIES: THE PINGOY RULES: "Yung laro ko nung last year ko sa Adamson, medyo bitin. 'Di naman ganun laro ko. Ang laking factor na naoperahan akong hindi successful." --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 10th, 2020

UAAP Season 82 volleyball tidbits

The UAAP cancelled Season 82 after the government extended the enhanced community quarantine amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic putting an abrupt end to centerpiece second semester sport volleyball. The crowd-drawing tournament ran for just a week or a total of four playdates. It was disappointingly short but the season proved to be an exciting one with memorable matches, performances and moments. Here are some of them:   DELAYED OPENING The tournament was supposed to open February 15, but was pushed back two weeks after the government confirmed cases of coronavirus infection in the country.  Interestingly, the UAAP on its first-ever second semester press conference on February 11 announced the original schedule to push through only to call a postponement of all sporting events a day after.      FIRST SEASON 82 MATCH The men’s match of University of East and Far Eastern University opened the season on March 3 with a gate attendance of 908 spectators. It was a one-sided affair with the Tamaraws scoring a 25-10, 25-22, 25-23, win. Rookie JJ Javelona made a great introduction, finishing with 11 points with all but one coming off attacks, while senior Peter Quiel had 10 markers.       LAST MATCH University of Sto. Tomas and FEU played what turned out to be the last game of the season on March 8. The Tigresses swept the Lady Tamaraws, 25-20, 25-16, 25-18, with sisters Eya and EJ Laure scoring 16 and 12 points, respectively.   RESULTS  The NU Lady Bulldogs defeated the UST Tigresses in the lone five-set match in the women’s division. Four games were decided in straight sets while two were concluded in four frames. Adamson U played only one match and was the only team which failed to win a set.  In men’s play, FEU beat UST in five sets in the only match that went the full distance. There were four matches that ended in straight sets and two in four frames. DLSU and Adamson played only one game each and both lost in straight sets.    HIGHEST SINGLE-GAME SCORING OUTPUT University of the Philippines senior Isa Molde scored the most points in a single game in the women’s division this year with 24. Molde had 18 kills, four kill blocks and a couple of aces in a four-set victory over the UE Lady Warriors.  Red Warrior Lloyd Josafat held the highest single-game scoring output in men’s play with 32 points in a four-set win over UP. The sophomore hammered 28 attacks with three kill blocks and an ace     CROWD-DARLING Fighting Maroon Louis Gamban became the talk of the town after an inspired debut for UP. The recruit from University of Perpetual Help powered the Fighting Maroons to a straight sets upset win over Ateneo de Manila University. He backed his court sass and swag with an amazing performance both on offense and defense   BIGGEST GATE ATTENDANCE As expected, the first meeting between reigning women’s champion Ateneo and DLSU drew the biggest live audience in Season 82. A 12,907-strong crowd filled the MOA Arena forming a sea of blue and green despite the then rising threat of the COVID-19 outbreak.     FIRST VIDEO CHALLENGE The UAAP introduced the use of video challenge in Season 82. However, the technology was unavailable during the first playdate of the season because of technical problems. The NU Bulldogs had the honor of calling the first-ever video challenge on March 8 in their game against UST. NU head coach Dante Alinsunurin called for a net violation challenge in the first set with the Bulldogs protecting a 20-19 advantage. The challenge was unsuccessful but NU went on to claim the win in four sets.          LAST POINT Tigresses hitter Blove Barbon pounded the last point of the season in UST’s dominating win over the Lady Tamaraws. Barbon hammered a backrow attack off a Maji Mangulabnan set to break the FEU’s three-woman wall to cap off the match.        --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 10th, 2020