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Finally, lower credit card rates, charges

Finally, after allowing the banks and their credit card issuing subsidiaries make piles and piles of money, with untrammeled abandon, at the expense of consumers and the cardholders, the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas has put a stop to their practice of onerous and extortionate charges that cry to high heavens for justice......»»

Category: newsSource: thestandard thestandardSep 30th, 2020

CCAP opposes cap on finance charges

A proposal to impose a cap on finance charges, if applied to all types of interest rates, may kill the credit card industry at a time when the default rate is expected to double due to the impact of the pandemic, according to the Credit Card Association of the Philippines......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 25th, 2020

Meralco rates lower by P0.0623/kwh in Sept. billing

Consumers of Manila Electric Company (Meralco) will benefit from a slight reduction of P0.0623 per kilowatt hour (kwh) in this September billing — summing up five straight months of tariff downtrends for this year. (MANILA BULLETIN) For end-users in the consumption threshold of 200 kilowatt hours (kwh), the average cost savings they will gain in this billing period will be P12, according to the utility firm. The overall rate billed this month is at P8.4288 per kwh versus the previous month’s P8.4911 per kwh. The generation charge, which accounts for the chunk of the cost components being passed on, had been pared by P0.0381 per kwh this month to P4.0860 per kwh from the previous billing cycle’s P4.1241 per kwh. Additionally, the transmission charge was on marginal decline of P0.0112 per kwh and that was mainly attributed to the lower ancillary services (AS) charges of the National Grid Corporation of the Philippines; while taxes and other charges incurred a net decrease of P0.0130 per kwh. Meralco emphasized one key factor that triggered rate reduction this September is its continuing move to invoke force majeure (FM) claims with its power suppliers. “This September, the force majeure claim totaled about P463 million, equivalent to customer savings of P0.1710 per kwh in the generation charge,” the utility firm noted. The company explained that if the FM claims had not been there, “the generation charge and the total rate would have increased by P0.13 and P0.14 per kwh, respectively.” Since March this year when Meralco has been persistently invoking FM claims under its power supply deals, the company was already able to generate P2.4 billion worth of savings that it has been passing on as rate reduction to customers via their electric bills. On supply procurement, Meralco indicated that it secured the lion’s share of 54.8-percent from its power supply agreements (PSAs) and that resulted in a decrease of P0.3032 per kwh on its charges. The fraction of supply sourced from its contracted independent power producers (IPPs) had been at 33.6-percent; and this went up by P0.0601 per kwh; while volume procured from the Wholesale Electricity Spot Market (WESM) stood at 11.6-percent and charges had been down by P0.0147 per kwh.The lower settlement prices in the spot market, it was noted, had been due to decrease in Luzon demand — given the re-enforcement of modified enhanced community quarantine (MECQ) in some areas last month, primarily in Metro Manila and neighboring provinces......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsSep 9th, 2020

Firms back proposed cap on finance charges

The Management Association of the Philippines is supporting the proposal of the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas to cap credit card finance charges as this, along with the 60-day moratorium on loan payments, would help struggling enterprises and consumers cope with the coronavirus disease 2019 or COVID-19 pandemic......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 25th, 2020

Fil-Am UFC veteran Mark Muñoz shares his thoughts on the state of Filipino MMA

Apart from basketball and, as of recent years, volleyball, combat sports like boxing and mixed martial arts have been quite popular among Filipino sports fans.  A lot of credit for that goes to the likes of eight-division boxing world champion Manny Pacquiao, four-division boxing champion Nonito Donaire Jr., Donnie Nietes, and those who came before them like Gabriel “Flash” Elorde, Pancho Villa, and Gerry Peñalosa, all of whom made it big on the world stage.  In recent years, a number of Filipinos are have also made a name for themselves in the global mixed martial arts arena, and one of the early big stars was none other than former UFC veteran Mark “The Filipino Wrecking Machine” Muñoz.  From 2009 to 2015, Muñoz was one of the UFC’s top middleweight contenders and proudly carried the Filipino flag with him each time he stepped inside the Octagon.  In May of 2015, on the UFC’s inaugural fight card in Manila, Muñoz retired in front of his kababayans after a unanimous decision win over Luke Barnatt.  (READ ALSO: Filipino-American MMA star Mark Muñoz recalls retirement bout in Manila) Muñoz’s run in the UFC came at a time when the North American promotion was easily accessible to fans in the Philippines, and he became a household name in terms of Filipino MMA.  Now, five years after Muñoz’s retirement, MMA in the Philippines has never been more popular, thanks in large part to promotions like the Asia-based ONE Championship, which holds around four events in Manila every year, and of course, the URCC, the Philippines’ first-ever MMA promotion.  Today, homegrown Filipino talents like Eduard Folayang, Joshua Pacio, Kevin Belingon, Denice Zamboanga, Chris Hoffman, an many others have also gotten their time to shine on the world stage, and Muñoz believes that it’s because Filipinos are natural fighters.  “I just feel Filipinos in general have that combat mentality. That’s already inside of them,” Muñoz said on The Hitlist vodcast. “I feel that Filipinos, from the days that we have to get our independence from the Spanish, Jose Rizal, he’s a hero in the nation, it’s just embedded in our culture, in our blood, so I just feel like Filipinos in general would be amazing fighters.” Munoz made special mention of guys like former ONE world champions Folayang and Belingon, as well as URCC champions Hoffman, and Ernesto Montilla Jr.  “I mean you just look at the…Filipinos now, it’s growing and getting better. I’ve been following Eduard Folayang. He’s an amazing representative of the Philippines, Kevin Belingon, he’s the man. I think there’s another one that was on the card when I fought, Mark Eddiva is good. I know I’m leaving out a lot of fighters, there’s Ernesto Montilla Jr., when I was there in training, a guy caught my eyes, Chris Hoffman trained with me and helped me out. I know he’s doing big things in the Philippines. I think he’s URCC champion.”  “There’s a lot of good fighters in the Philippines. I know I’m leaving out a lot and I don’t want to do that but there’s a lot of good talents in the Philippines and I wanna come, I wanna be there and help them in wrestling, in MMA wresting, in ground and pound, in everything that was my specialty in MMA,” he added.  While Filipinos have indeed excelled in mixed martial arts, one aspect continues to be perceived as the Filipino fighter’s weakness is the ground game, whether it be wrestling or grappling.  (READ ALSO: Mark Muñoz not ruling out MMA return) Today’s young stars, guys like Team Lakay’s Pacio and Danny Kingad have displayed some exceptional grappling in their past performances, but Muñoz, a former collegiate wrestler and current wrestling coach, made a living off taking guys down and keeping them grounded.  “I think the common thing that everyone says with MMA is wrestling. Wrestling is the ultimate neutralizer. If you don’t have a good understanding of wrestling, you’re gonna have a really hard time becoming one of the, being ranked in the world or even be a champion,” Muñoz explained. “If you look at all the champions now, or the ones that are ranked in the world. A lot of them have background in wrestling. I feel that that’s something that the Philippines needs.” Muñoz has always said that one of the things he would most like to do is to help develop wrestling in the Philippines and hopes to one day be able to finally fulfill that mission.  “I’m the guy to do that for them. I need to make sure I spend time in the Philippines to be able to help that,” he continued......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 19th, 2020

Meralco announces lower power rates in June

Power retailer Manila Electric Co. on Monday announced a third straight month of rate reduction on lower generation charges amid sluggish demand from commercial and industrial customers......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJun 8th, 2020

DOF issues regulations on 30-day grace period

The Finance Department said Wednesday it released the implementing rules and regulations on a provision in the Bayanihan To Heal As One Act directing all lenders to grant a 30-day grace period or extension for the payment of all loans, including credit card payments and pawnshop loans, falling due within the enhanced community quarantine period, without interest or additional charges......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 1st, 2020

Manila Water rates down, Maynilad rates up

Customers of Manila Water Co. Inc. will get lower bills while consumers of Maynilad Water Services Inc. should brace for additional charges starting next month......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 12th, 2020

30 Teams in 30 Days: Nuggets to keep rolling with Nikola Jokic, Jamal Murray

Like most summers in the NBA, the 2019 edition was chock full of trades, free agent news and player movement. From the defending-champion Toronto Raptors to just about every other team in the league, change was the most applicable word when it came to describing team rosters for the 2019-20 season. With the opening of training camps just around the corner, NBA.com's Shaun Powell will evaluate the state of each franchise as it sits today -- in order of regular-season finish from 2018-19 -- as we look at 30 teams in 30 days. * * * Today's team: Denver Nuggets 2018-19 Record: 54-28, lost in the second round of the playoffs Key additions: Jerami Grant (trade), Bol Bol (draft) Key subtractions: Trey Lyles, Isaiah Thomas The lowdown: The steady growth of the Nuggets was evident in a 50-win season and a first-round victory in the playoffs over the more-experienced Spurs, which was clearly a step forward. Then the journey ended with a sour taste after Denver lost a Game 7 at home to a lower seed, the Blazers. In all, the Nuggets received almost everything they’d hoped for from a developing contender, especially in the form of Nikola Jokic. The multi-skilled Serb established himself as the league’s most talented big man, if not the best period, with a stellar performance that attracted some Kia MVP notice. He averaged 20 points, almost 11 rebounds and seven assists in an offense that ran through him, rare in today’s spread-the-floor league where centers are being phased out or pegged as role players and pick-setters. Jokic reminded many of Bill Walton or maybe Vlade Divac for his precise and sometimes entertaining passing skills from the high post. His co-star was Jamal Murray, who made generous strides as a leader and shot-maker and fit well with Jokic. The Nuggets also played some of the best defense in the league for much of the season and had solid backcourt depth with Monte Morris and Malik Beasley averaging a combined 21 points off the bench. There were mixed reviews, however, for Gary Harris. The starting two-guard didn’t improve and in some areas actually regressed as he struggled with injuries in a 57-game season. Same for Will Barton, who shot 40 percent and played 43 games. But those were nit-picks. The Nuggets finally arrived after going a league-leading 34-7 at home, reaching the second round of the playoffs for the first time in a decade, and using the draft and trades to remake the roster over the last few years to stay in the attic in the very competitive West, which was no easy task. Summer summary: When an NBA team reaches a critical stage of the developing process and checks all the necessary boxes, it’s time to keep the continuity. Which means, time to pay up, and the Nuggets did just that this summer with two of their important figures: Murray and GM Tim Connelly, and both were easy calls. Murray went from a rookie who played behind Emmanuel Mudiay to a dependable, sometimes clutch-shooting guard in just three seasons. While he’s obviously the starter at the point for the Nuggets, Murray’s value lies in his flexibility. He can play off the ball and be just as valuable whenever Jokic assumes the “point-center” role. He averaged 18.2 points and 4.8 assists and showed growth despite struggling at times in his first postseason. He also doesn’t turn 23 until February. So the Nuggets gave him $170 million over five years, banking on his continued growth, which appears to be a safe investment. Therefore, Denver’s two most important players, Jokic and Murray, are under contract together for the next three seasons. Connelly replaced Masai Ujiri in 2013 and repaid the Nuggets’ faith by overseeing a basketball operation that has run mostly smoothly ever since. He drafted Jokic at No. 41 and hired Mike Malone as coach. The Nuggets have gone from 33 wins in Malone’s first season to 54. Even better, the meat of the roster is trending in the right direction and there’s no dead weight. This summer, the Wizards, after firing Ernie Grunfeld, chased after Connelly, a Baltimore native who attended college in D.C. Connelly broke into the business as an intern for the Wizards and has family ties to the D.C area, so the prospect of leaving Denver was a real threat. Ultimately, Nuggets boss Josh Kroenke was successful in persuading Connelly to stay. Usually that comes with a promise of a significant raise, but more importantly, Connelly saw what he’s building in Denver and couldn’t leave unfinished business. Denver has a solid mix of youth and vets and is coming off a season where it was the No. 2 seed in the West. Hard to walk away from that. Paul Millsap also cashed in when the Nuggets agreed to pick up his 2019-20 option year for $30 million. There was some question whether the Nuggets would tie that much into a soon-to-be 35-year-old forward who, statistically anyway, is coming off his worst season since 2009-10 and his fewest minutes since 2008. But Millsap still brings a solid defensive mindset and experience, and anyway, the Nuggets were all about maintaining the flow this summer. Plus, Denver will remain under the luxury tax with with Millsap’s option. Millsap’s minutes could be reduced this season because the Nuggets traded for a more athletic option in Grant. With the Thunder, Grant improved his 3-point shooting last season and became more of a well-rounded forward. If used correctly by Malone, he can thrive in Denver, which badly needs his physical gifts. Of course, there’s also the wild card: Michael Porter Jr. The club’s first-round pick two summers ago sat all last season while recovering from a back issue, then was scratched from summer league play in July because of a minor knee issue which was more of a precautionary move. In a best-case scenario, Porter stays healthy and gives the Nuggets three options at power forward. Connelly didn’t have a first-round pick this summer but swung a deal to fetch a second-rounder once Bol Bol dropped to No. 44 in the draft. The son of former NBA player Manute Bol, he suffered a foot injury last season at Oregon and NBA teams were wary of his potential for recovery. Well, Connelly and the Nuggets will essentially treat Bol as they did Porter; Bol will be an injury red-shirt and prepare for 2020-21. And so, the Nuggets’ summer wasn’t about making wholesale changes, but keeping the pace they’ve set over the last three seasons and rewarding some of the key personnel responsible for it. Patience has allowed the Nuggets to get this far and so there was no reason to panic or rush the process this offseason. Shaun Powell has covered the NBA for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here, and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 28th, 2019

30 Teams in 30 Days: Nuggets to keep rolling with Nikola Jokic, Jamal Murray

Like most summers in the NBA, the 2019 edition was chock full of trades, free agent news and player movement. From the defending-champion Toronto Raptors to just about every other team in the league, change was the most applicable word when it came to describing team rosters for the 2019-20 season. With the opening of training camps just around the corner, NBA.com's Shaun Powell will evaluate the state of each franchise as it sits today -- in order of regular-season finish from 2018-19 -- as we look at 30 teams in 30 days. * * * Today's team: Denver Nuggets 2018-19 Record: 54-28, lost in the second round of the playoffs Key additions: Jerami Grant, forward (trade); Bol Bol, forward (draft). Key subtractions: Trey Lyles, forward; Isaiah Thomas, guard. The lowdown: The steady growth of the Nuggets was evident in a 50-win season and a first-round victory in the playoffs over the more-experienced Spurs, which was clearly a step forward; then the journey ended with a sour taste after Denver lost a Game 7 at home to a lower seed, the Blazers. In all, the Nuggets received almost everything they’d hoped for from a developing contender, especially in the form of Nikola Jokic. The multi-skilled Serb established himself as the league’s most talented big man, if not the best period, with a stellar performance that attracted some MVP notice. He averaged 20 points, almost 11 rebounds and seven assists in an offense that ran through him, rare in today’s spread-the-floor league where centers are being phased out or pegged as role players and pick-setters. Jokic reminded many of Bill Walton or maybe Vlade Divac for his precise and sometimes entertaining passing skills from the high post. His co-star was Jamal Murray, who made generous strides as a leader and shot-maker and fit well with Jokic. The Nuggets also played some of the best defense in the league for much of the season and had solid back-court depth with Monte Morris and Malik Beasley averaging a combined 21 points off the bench. There were mixed reviews, however, from Gary Harris; the starting two-guard didn’t improve and in some areas actually regressed as he struggled with injuries in a 57-game season. Same for Will Barton, who shot 40 percent and played 43 games. But those were nit-picks. The Nuggets finally arrived after going a league-leading 34-7 at home, reaching the second round of the playoffs for the first time in a decade, and using the draft and trades to remake the roster over the last few years to stay in the attic in the very competitive West, which was no easy task. Summer summary: When an NBA team reaches a critical stage of the developing process and checks all the necessary boxes, it’s time to keep the continuity. Which means, time to pay up, and the Nuggets did just that this summer with two of their important figures: Murray and GM Tim Connelly, and both were easy calls. Murray went from a rookie who played behind Emmanuel Mudiay to a dependable, sometimes clutch-shooting guard in just three seasons. While he’s obviously the starter at the point for the Nuggets, Murray’s value lies in his flexibility; he can play off the ball and be just as valuable whenever Jokic assumes the “point-center” role. He averaged 18.2 points and 4.8 assists and showed growth despite struggling at times in his first postseason. He also doesn’t turn 23 until February. So the Nuggets gave him $170 million over five years, banking on his continued growth, which appears to be a safe investment. Therefore, Denver’s two most important players, Jokic and Murray, are under contract together for the next three seasons. Connelly replaced Masai Ujiri in 2013 and repaid the Nuggets’ faith by overseeing a basketball operation that has run mostly smoothly ever since. He drafted Jokic at No. 41 and hired Mike Malone as coach. The Nuggets have gone from 33 wins in Malone’s first season to 54. Even better, the meat of the roster is trending in the right direction and there’s no dead weight. This summer, the Wizards, after firing Ernie Grunfeld, chased after Connelly, a Baltimore native who attended college in D.C. Connelly broke into the business as an intern for the Wizards and has family ties to the D.C area, so the prospect of leaving Denver was a real threat. Ultimately, Nuggets boss Josh Kroenke was successful in persuading Connelly to stay. Usually that comes with a promise of a significant raise, but more importantly, Connelly saw what he’s building in Denver and couldn’t leave unfinished business. Denver has solid mix of youth and vets and is coming off a season where it was the No. 2 seed in the West. Hard to walk away from that. Paul Millsap also cashed in when the Nuggets agreed to pick up his 2019-20 option year for $30 million. There was some question whether the Nuggets would tie that much into a soon-to-be 35-year-old forward who, statistically anyway, is coming off his worst season since 2009-10 and his fewest minutes since 2008. But Millsap still brings a solid defensive mindset and experience, and anyway, the Nuggets were all about maintaining the flow this summer. Plus, Denver will remain under the luxury tax with with Millsap’s option. Millsap’s minutes could be reduced this season because the Nuggets traded for a more athletic option in Grant. With the Thunder, Grant improved his 3-point shooting last season and became more of a well-rounded forward. If used correctly by Malone, he can thrive in Denver, which badly needs his physical gifts. Of course, there’s also the wild card: Michael Porter Jr. The club’s first-round pick two summers ago sat all last season while recovering from a back issue, then was scratched from summer league play in July because of a minor knee issue which was more of a precautionary move. In a best-case scenario, Porter stays healthy and gives the Nuggets three options at power forward. Connelly didn’t have a first-round pick this summer but swung a deal to fetch a second-rounder once Bol Bol dropped to No. 44 in the draft. The son of former NBA player Manute Bol, he suffered a foot injury last season at Oregon and NBA teams were wary of his potential for recovery. Well, Connelly and the Nuggets will essentially treat Bol as they did Porter; Bol will be an injury red-shirt and prepare for 2020-21. And so, the Nuggets’ summer wasn’t about making wholesale changes, but keeping the pace they’ve set over the last three seasons and rewarding some of the key personnel responsible for it. Patience has allowed the Nuggets to get this far and so there was no reason to panic or rush the process this offseason. Shaun Powell has covered the NBA for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here, and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 15th, 2019

Meralco lowers rates for 5th straight month

MANILA, Philippines – The Manila Electric Company (Meralco)  will lower power rates for the 5th consecutive month, as generation charges decreased in the Wholesale Electricity Spot Market (WESM). Rates for September were adjusted to P0.526 per kilowatt hour (kWh), which would slash the bill of a typical ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 9th, 2019

Lower Meralco bills this month

Despite the tight supply conditions, customers of Manila Electric Co. (Meralco) will see a decline in electricity bills this month as the lower charges from power producers and power supply agreements (PSA) offset the increase in spot market rates......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 7th, 2019

PCCI: Improved rating to support infra drive

THE recent upgrade in the Philippines’ credit status would support the government’s infrastructure program, with lower interest rates on loans anticipated, according to the Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industry…READ The post PCCI: Improved rating to support infra drive appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsMay 3rd, 2019

Power rates drop anew

MANILA, Philippines - Electricity rates have gone down for the third straight month in October due to lower transmission and generation charges, Manila Elect.....»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 6th, 2016

Meralco rates to go down this month

Manila Electric Co. (Meralco) customers will be charged lower this month because of lower transmission and generation charges, which offset the increase recorded in some of the company’s billing components due to recent peso depreciation and higher.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 6th, 2016

Power rates going down this month

MANILA, Philippines – Electricity rates will go down this month due to lower transmission charges, the Manila Electric Co......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 6th, 2016

Rates down for reissued T-bonds

Reissued five-year securities yesterday fetched lower rates amid benign inflationary expectations and strong demand from investors, according to the Bureau of the Treasury......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 21st, 2020

Cooperation, not competition

SPEAKING OUT Ignacio R. Bunye The Ayala Group is widely recognized in the Philippines and in Asia as a pioneer in ESG (Environment, Social, and Governance) with its formal adoption of the Ayala Sustainability Framework. In a recent webcast conversation with ATR Asset Management’s Julian Tarrobago, Jr., Jaime Augusto Zobel de Ayala (JAZA), Chairman and CEO of Ayala, explained the genesis of this corporate philosophy. In a nutshell, this is about using the economic engine and for-profit discipline of enterprises to address social issues – not as a philanthropy but as an integral part of doing business. This is a new philosophy designed to foster an environment where there is inclusive growth. This is achieved by engaging disenfranchised sectors and going beyond just the financials. This is reflected in how Ayala purposively evolved over the years and how it has operated during the crisis. This explains how and why Ayala Land continues to make urban centers more livable and more friendly, why Ayala Land projects aim to become carbon-neutral a few years down the road, why AC Energy continues to improve its mix of energy sources, consistently increasing reliance on renewables, why Ayala has ventured into health and into education, and why BPI has dramatically upsized its microfinance. This explains why during the crisis, Ayala’s first concern was to ensure both the physical and financial well-being of its stakeholders. This includes Ayala’s employees and those of the various eco-systems (read that as 250,000 SMEs) which support Ayala. This meant P10 billion, to date, of foregone revenue, to help in their recovery and fostering sustainable growth beyond the crisis. Finally, JAZA explains why “this is a time for us to learn to cooperate rather than be at odds with each other. Our modern capitalist system is massively integrated in a way that it wasn’t in the past. And because we have an integrated system, we are tied to each other in ways that we either all succeed together, or not. If one component of that system is allowed to fail, then you start to break up what makes modern capitalism so strong. The supply chain, the integration, the way we work off each other, each person providing their own component of the system. If we don’t help each other, particularly in the public-private sector to reenergize and restart that great engine, then we will fail. Perhaps, this is a period in time where cooperation is being demanded more from all of us both in the private sector alone and in the private-public interaction, to see how we can all work together to address the many pain points that we will face as a nation if we are to get out of this pandemic.” Change your passwords often Even prior to the pandemic, incidents of unauthorized ATM withdrawals by third parties have been reported on the rise. It is perhaps opportune to issue this reminder. Essentially, it is about keeping our User IDs and passwords safe. One normally reads this reminder on our bank’s website. This is what the bank usually tells us. The bank will never ask you to provide your User IDs or Passwords through e-mail or SMS so don’t fall for unsolicited messages that your account has been temporarily disconnected and that you have to change your password. Never click on links from suspicious e-mails and SMS. Hackers can gain access to your account, plant malware, and steal your identity. Monitor your accounts regularly and immediately report any discrepancies. If I may just add, don’t ask anybody to withdraw money from the ATM for you. For added protection, you may want to use Code Red, an RFID and NFC Anti-Scanning Card. It is a smart card that provides protection from identity theft by manipulating the radio signals using E-field technology. Simply put it inside your wallet and it will make your personal data invisible to electronic thieves and hackers. (Thanks BPI EVP Mon Jocson for this last tip.) Note: You may wish to share the foregoing article via Facebook, Twitter and/or Linked-In......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 18th, 2020

Making Purchases Online without a Card via CVV Shops

You could be wondering, is it possible to buy something online without a credit card? One way to get a credit card for online purchases is to buy it via a CVV shop. Carding platforms and similar websites offer dumps, or complete credit card information for a price. Mode of payments have considerably expanded since […] The post Making Purchases Online without a Card via CVV Shops appeared first on Kagay An......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 14th, 2020

Government scraps electronic fare card fees, charges

The Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board on Wednesday issued an order removing the charges and fees on automated fare collection system (AFCS) cards for public utility vehicles......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 8th, 2020

Reissued 3-year bonds fetch lower rates

The continued easing of inflation pushed down the rates fetched by reissued three-year Treasury bonds yesterday, according to the Bureau of the Treasury......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 6th, 2020