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Filipinos to spend less this Christmas — BSP

Filipinos are expected to spend less in the fourth quarter including the Christmas season as they focus their resources on essentials including basic goods and services, according to the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas......»»

Category: financeSource: philstar philstarSep 27th, 2020

Consumer spending seen to spike for holidays

Consumers will remain eager to spend in the Christmas season – although differently – as Filipinos adjust their shopping habits to economic challenges spawned by the COVID-19 pandemic, Facebook Philippines said, citing results of its recent survey......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 29th, 2020

Five things most Filipinos abroad miss about Christmas in the Philippines

CEBU CITY, Philippines— Christmas in the Philippines is one of the merriest celebrations in the entire world. So it’s really normal for some of our friends or relatives who are overseas Filipino workers (OFW) to feel sad when they can’t spend the holidays in the country. Here are some five of the things that Filipinos […] The post Five things most Filipinos abroad miss about Christmas in the Philippines appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 16th, 2019

Filipinos brace for party-less Christmas amid COVID-19 pandemic

Visitors wearing protective masks take a stroll inside the Enchanted Kingdom amusement park in Laguna Province, the Philippines, on Oct. 18, 2020. (Xinhua/Rouelle Umali)Filipinos.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated News17 hr. 28 min. ago

Feature: Filipinos brace for party-less Christmas amid COVID-19 pandemic

MANILA, Oct. 24 (Xinhua) -- To 24-year-old college student Migs Refran, the decision to ban Christmas parties in the Philippines amid COVID-19 dampens the Christmas spirit. "It's a downer. I.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsOct 24th, 2020

Feature: Filipinos brace for party-less Christmas amid COVID-19 pandemic

MANILA, Oct. 24 (Xinhua) -- To 24-year-old college student Migs Refran, the decision to ban Christmas parties in the Philippines amid COVID-19 dampens the Christmas spirit. "It's a downer. I.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsOct 24th, 2020

Digital Walker Offers Up To 5K Discount on OnePlus Phones

It is an early Christmas gift for tech-savvy Filipinos out there! Digital Walker is offering discounted prices and freebies for One Plus flagship smartphones from October 16 to October 31. Techies can enjoy an up to P5,000 discount on selected OnePlus 7T Pro and OnePlus 8 units for cash transactions and up to three months […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsOct 18th, 2020

Customs issues reminders for duty-free shipments of balikbayan boxes ahead of Christmas season

The Bureau of Customs on Friday issued fresh reminders to Filipinos abroad who are planning to send home "Balikbayan" boxes, in anticipation of the typical influx of shipments during the Holiday season......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 16th, 2020

Christmas 2020 for workers and farmers

HOTSPOT Tonyo Cruz Two things workers are looking forward to at the end of each year are the 13th month pay and the Christmas bonus. And it seems about two million workers may not get any 13th month pay at all, if the Duterte government would have its way. The reason? Because of the pandemic. In reaction, Kilusang Mayo Uno chairperson Elmer Labog  issued his shortest statement yet this year, unable to hide labor’s frustration: “It is the government’s responsibility to bail out MSMEs in times of emergencies.” Indeed, it is the state’s obligation to support and prop up micro, small and medium-scale enterprises especially now in the time of pandemic. By saying MSMEs could dispense with the 13th month pay, the government is practically passing on its responsibility to MSMEs. Workers continue to give their share through the cheap, underpaid and overstressed labor power that makes sure MSMEs continue to function and perform their role as main engines of the economy. The government must do its job: Bail out the MSMEs. It is quite surprising that the Duterte government seems disinterested in bailing out MSMEs, considering the avalanche of news about the borrowings here and there. According to Sonny Africa, executive director of the think-tank Ibon Foundation, the borrowings has reached a historic high: “It took 118 years for the country’s debt to reach P6.1-trillion in 2016. President Duterte is taking just six years to more than than double that to P13.7-trillion in 2022.” Again, the reason for the borrowing has been “because of the pandemic.” Regardless of where the money goes, and whether or not MSMEs and workers received only a drop from it, they would pay the entire debt through more and higher taxes for years to come. Workers are not asking for something they have not earned through hard work. They earned that 13th month pay. It is not an optional thing. It is part of the law. The pandemic should oblige the state to bail out our MSMEs to enable them to fully function, and to give the workers’ their due under the law. Workers have given and lost a lot because of the pandemic. Workers have not asked for free rides to work, but the government fails to provide adequate and safe mass transport. Workers have asked for free mass testing in their companies and communities, but the government has other ideas. Workers and their families would have fared better with unemployment benefits amid the dismal pandemic response of government, but it seems the same government wishes to push them instead to pawnshops and loan sharks. We haven’t even factored in the laid-off, underemployed and unemployed workers, as well as the undetermined number of overseas Filipino healthcare workers stranded in the country since April. They all don’t wish to be “patay-gutom” and “pala-asa”.  They don’t wish to stay unemployed and be dependent on aid. They are ready to work and earn their keep. But since the president made policy decisions affecting their ability to obtain work, it is the government’s obligation to bail them out as well. The situation of our nation’s farmers is no different. For instance, rice farmers continue to produce our national staple. The pandemic made even worse the effects on them of the combined power of policies such as rice tarrification, the stranglehold of Big Landlords, the vast influence of rice cartels, and the continued operation of illegal rice importers. Price monitoring by Bantay Bigas and the Kilusang Magbubukid ng Pilipinas reveals the outrageously low palay prices nationwide, which means ruin to our nation’s rice farmers: Negros Occidental and Bicol region P10; Capiz P10-P11; Caraga P11; Tarlac P11-12; Ilocos Sur and Nueva Ecija P11-13; Camarines Sur P11.50-14; Bulacan and Mindoro P12; Isabela P12-P13.50; Pangasinan P12-P12.30; Antique P12.50; Agusan del Sur P13; Davao de Oro P13.14; Davao del Norte, Surigao del Sur and South Cotabato P13.50; North Cotabato P14; and Lanao del Norte P15. If you look at it, plantitos and plantitas today pay 20 to 50 times more for ornamental plants, compared to the prices traders and the NFA offer to our farmers. According to Bantay Bigas and KMP, the government procures way less than 20 percent of the produce of rice farmers.  And then we hear that the NFA would rather import rice from other countries, at pandemic-affected prices at that. Without any state intervention, by way of NFA buying rice farmers’ produce at P20 per kilo, and providing loans to farmers, there could be worse rural poverty in the coming months and years. Between our workers and farmers, their families have been made to sacrifice a lot since March, with prices of basic goods spiking, with new and higher expenses arising from online classes for the children. There cannot be no aid for them.  Neither should workers and farmers shoulder the burden of the failure or refusal of government to provide funding for bailouts sorely needed by MSMEs, and be forced to accept new national debts to pay for policies such as rice tarrification and importation. The government knows the scale of the problem. The Department of Labor and Employment says 13,127 companies have either laid off workers or permanently closed. The response cannot be “pass the burden to workers”. The answer should be: “the state must do everything to rescue the companies and the workers.” OFWs across the world should be familiar with bailouts and economic protections because of the pandemic. Many countries that host OFWs enacted huge bailouts and stimulus to their economies, partly so that migrant labor could continue to be employed. They enjoy health insurance, and special COVID19 coverage. Governments handed out checks to both citizens and companies. Is it too much to ask that the same be done in our own country? Or do Filipinos have to go abroad to experience such social and economic protections?.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 9th, 2020

Shelved parties bring no good tidings for Filipinos Christmas

With no end in sight yet for the pandemic, the coronavirus is transforming into the Grinch that will steal Christmas in the consumption-driven Philippine economy......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 8th, 2020

2 million employees may lose Christmas bonus

About 2 million employees of micro, small and medium enterprises may have to spend Christmas without bonuses, the Employers Confederation of the Philippines said Tuesday......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 6th, 2020

The humility and compassion of Pres. DU30

Today is the first day of the so-called “Ber” months that tell Filipinos that we are just less than four months to Christmas......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 1st, 2020

Month-long realme Fan Fest ends strong with new realme C12, Buds Classic and Music Fan Fest

The Ber months are almost here. For most Filipinos, this means taking out the old Christmas tree, putting up the lights and playing Christmas songs......»»

Category: techSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 28th, 2020

Fil-Am UFC veteran Mark Muñoz shares his thoughts on the state of Filipino MMA

Apart from basketball and, as of recent years, volleyball, combat sports like boxing and mixed martial arts have been quite popular among Filipino sports fans.  A lot of credit for that goes to the likes of eight-division boxing world champion Manny Pacquiao, four-division boxing champion Nonito Donaire Jr., Donnie Nietes, and those who came before them like Gabriel “Flash” Elorde, Pancho Villa, and Gerry Peñalosa, all of whom made it big on the world stage.  In recent years, a number of Filipinos are have also made a name for themselves in the global mixed martial arts arena, and one of the early big stars was none other than former UFC veteran Mark “The Filipino Wrecking Machine” Muñoz.  From 2009 to 2015, Muñoz was one of the UFC’s top middleweight contenders and proudly carried the Filipino flag with him each time he stepped inside the Octagon.  In May of 2015, on the UFC’s inaugural fight card in Manila, Muñoz retired in front of his kababayans after a unanimous decision win over Luke Barnatt.  (READ ALSO: Filipino-American MMA star Mark Muñoz recalls retirement bout in Manila) Muñoz’s run in the UFC came at a time when the North American promotion was easily accessible to fans in the Philippines, and he became a household name in terms of Filipino MMA.  Now, five years after Muñoz’s retirement, MMA in the Philippines has never been more popular, thanks in large part to promotions like the Asia-based ONE Championship, which holds around four events in Manila every year, and of course, the URCC, the Philippines’ first-ever MMA promotion.  Today, homegrown Filipino talents like Eduard Folayang, Joshua Pacio, Kevin Belingon, Denice Zamboanga, Chris Hoffman, an many others have also gotten their time to shine on the world stage, and Muñoz believes that it’s because Filipinos are natural fighters.  “I just feel Filipinos in general have that combat mentality. That’s already inside of them,” Muñoz said on The Hitlist vodcast. “I feel that Filipinos, from the days that we have to get our independence from the Spanish, Jose Rizal, he’s a hero in the nation, it’s just embedded in our culture, in our blood, so I just feel like Filipinos in general would be amazing fighters.” Munoz made special mention of guys like former ONE world champions Folayang and Belingon, as well as URCC champions Hoffman, and Ernesto Montilla Jr.  “I mean you just look at the…Filipinos now, it’s growing and getting better. I’ve been following Eduard Folayang. He’s an amazing representative of the Philippines, Kevin Belingon, he’s the man. I think there’s another one that was on the card when I fought, Mark Eddiva is good. I know I’m leaving out a lot of fighters, there’s Ernesto Montilla Jr., when I was there in training, a guy caught my eyes, Chris Hoffman trained with me and helped me out. I know he’s doing big things in the Philippines. I think he’s URCC champion.”  “There’s a lot of good fighters in the Philippines. I know I’m leaving out a lot and I don’t want to do that but there’s a lot of good talents in the Philippines and I wanna come, I wanna be there and help them in wrestling, in MMA wresting, in ground and pound, in everything that was my specialty in MMA,” he added.  While Filipinos have indeed excelled in mixed martial arts, one aspect continues to be perceived as the Filipino fighter’s weakness is the ground game, whether it be wrestling or grappling.  (READ ALSO: Mark Muñoz not ruling out MMA return) Today’s young stars, guys like Team Lakay’s Pacio and Danny Kingad have displayed some exceptional grappling in their past performances, but Muñoz, a former collegiate wrestler and current wrestling coach, made a living off taking guys down and keeping them grounded.  “I think the common thing that everyone says with MMA is wrestling. Wrestling is the ultimate neutralizer. If you don’t have a good understanding of wrestling, you’re gonna have a really hard time becoming one of the, being ranked in the world or even be a champion,” Muñoz explained. “If you look at all the champions now, or the ones that are ranked in the world. A lot of them have background in wrestling. I feel that that’s something that the Philippines needs.” Muñoz has always said that one of the things he would most like to do is to help develop wrestling in the Philippines and hopes to one day be able to finally fulfill that mission.  “I’m the guy to do that for them. I need to make sure I spend time in the Philippines to be able to help that,” he continued......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 19th, 2020

Filipino-American MMA star Mark Muñoz recalls retirement bout in Manila

In 2015, Filipino mixed martial arts fans’ prayers were answered when the UFC, finally brought the legendary Octagon to the Philippines.  UFC Fight Night Manila was headlined by Frankie Edgar and Urijah Faber, two former world champions and two of the world’s best at the time.  But while the main event was indeed on worthy of a pay-per-view card, Pinoy fans flocked to the Mall of Asia Arena to see one of their own compete in the Octagon for the very last time.  The UFC’s inaugural card in Manila also featured the retirement bout of Filipino-American Mark “The Filipino Wrecking Machine” Muñoz.  (READ ALSO: Mark Muñoz ends career on the highest of notes) Muñoz was 37 at the time, and was already a veteran in the UFC, having fought 14 times for the North American promotion. During his peak in the UFC, the California-native won seven out of eight fights and came within a win away from becoming a title contender, before losing to eventual middleweight titleholder Chris Weidman.  Following the loss to Weidman, Munoz went on to drop three of his next four bouts.  In the final fight of his MMA career, Muñoz had the chance to go out on top and retire in front of his fellow Filipinos. In front of over 13,000 strong, Muñoz did just that, beating Luke Barnatt via unanimous decision and announcing his retirement durung the post-fight speech.  (READ ALSO: The MMA community reacts to Mark Munoz's final fight and retirement) On an episode of The Hit List Vodcast, Muñoz recalled that night and what it meant for him to end his career that way.  “Oh man. I would cherish that night forever,” Muñoz said. “Even when I came to the Philippines early and I visited my family, I still have four generations of my family still there and it was so cool to see my whole family and just to have the support there from everybody. It was amazing and for me, you know, I just felt the love.” “I loved it. And when I walked out, I heard just people cheering and as I was walking out, I slapped somebody’s hand and I started crying you know. Like, whoah, that’s crazy, I’m getting ready to fight and you know like, dude that’s nuts. For me to be able to have that impact on people because they love the sport I love and I’m able to do it in a high level, it made me just wanna give,” he continued.  Following the hard-fought three-round victory, Muñoz addressed the Pinoy crowd and gave a heartfelt message, thanking his fans and then expressing his desire to help the Philippines out in terms of wrestling, an aspect that has long been deemed lacking or inadequate among Filipino mixed martial artists.  “Like I said before, when I got on the microphone, they handed the microphone to me and they never do that, so when they handed the mic to me, I told everybody that I wanna go back to the Philippines and I wanna help in any way I can and so, right now I’m actually building a website that people could access from all around the world, so it’s a wrestling website and I have the best people on there.  Muñoz’s commitment to helping Filipino wrestlers remains to this day, saying that he would gladly fly out to the motherland if he was asked to do so.  “I have my wrestling room where you could have the capability of getting on there and learning from me, and if someone wants to bring me for a seminar out there, I’ll come. In a heartbeat. I’d love to go back to the Philippines and help my kababayan. Just be able to support and help everybody I can,” he said.  While Muñoz did decide to call it a career that night, the former collegiate wrestling star believed that he could still compete at a high level, especially since he was working with world champions and elite-level talent on a daily basis.  “I honestly felt that I was still in my prime,” Muñoz admitted. “I honestly felt that I could have fought more and I felt like I could beat still the guys that beat me. I trained with all the best guys. I trained with Lyoto Machida and fought him and I do very well with him inside the gym. Michael Bisping was a training partner of mine. Anderson Silva I trained with him for a very long time. I know that level and I can be at that level. I felt like I could still compete at that level.” The reason why he left the sport, Muñoz explained, is to be able to spend more time with his family.  “To answer your question, the reason why I stepped away from the sport was not because my body wasn’t able to do it. I stepped away because my family needed me more than me being in the sport. Because, I’m telling you it was hard for my wife, she was a single mom with all the kids for a long time so it was hard. Things at home was pretty rough for us and I didn’t like that at all. All the while I was coaching and travelling all the time so something has to give. I felt like yes, it was a storybook ending but a the same time, I can still compete with the best guys in the division.” Check out the full interview HERE .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 15th, 2020

The underground world

Last December, I remember seeing posts on social media urging Filipinos to buy handcrafted items or even edible goodies from their friends, neighbors, other people in their community, cooperatives and other small groups, as Christmas gifts......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 23rd, 2020

Easter Sunday Frolickers, Beachgoers to Face Arrest

As Cebu joins the nation in celebrating Easter Sunday, Gov. Gwendolyn Garcia orders the deployment of police in beaches and to arrest beachgoers. “Tidlum nalang mo didto sa (dagat), ayaw namo’g haw-as. Kay kon mohaw-as mo, ipadakop ta gyud mo,” Garcia said on Saturday in a press conference. The warning came as most Filipinos spend […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsApr 12th, 2020

4 Valentines Gift Ideas for the Entrepreneur in Your Life

When it comes to giving gifts during hearts day, Filipinos pay a premium to show their love and affection. According to a survey conducted by Picodi, Filipinos are willing to spend up to P1,759 for a Valentine’s gift. While chocolates, flowers, and staycations are quite the norm for most, change it up for the entrepreneur […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsFeb 8th, 2020

Pinoys spend 10 hours online, 4 hours on socmed

Filipinos lead the world in spending nearly 10 hours a day online and are also the most active on social media, averaging almost four hours on Facebook and similar platforms, an annual report on global Internet use and digital trends revealed Friday......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsFeb 1st, 2020

PRRD’s Christmas message: Be kind, helpful to others

A day before the entire nation celebrates Christmas, President Rodrigo R. Duterte encourages Filipinos to be an inspiration to others by showing kindness to everyone, especially the needy and disadvantaged members of the society. Duterte made the call as he joined the Christian faithful in observing the “joyous occasion” of Christmas.  The Chief Executive said […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  bicolperyodikoRelated NewsJan 12th, 2020

“Pasko Sa Kadalanan: How The Homeless Spend Their Christmas”

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to spend Christmas on a dark alley and cold concrete? Have you ever imagined to enjoy “corned beef” and “mamon” for Noche Buena? I walked the streets of Cebu City to check homeless people who celebrated their Christmas on the streets. As of the first semester of 2018, […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsDec 29th, 2019