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FIBA By the Numbers: The future is now for Gilas

Gilas Pilipinas' new era is off to a fine start thanks to the national team's impressive road win against Indonesia to open the 2021 FIBA Asia Cup qualifiers. With a relatively younger group than that previous iterations, Gilas took a while to get going but got the job done without too much trouble in the fourth quarter nonetheless. Pending new announcements for their cancelled home game against Thailand, the Indonesia road win is Gilas' last game and we'll have to wait a good nine months before the national team takes the court again. [Related: FIBA: Thirdy stars as Gilas pulls away late in win over Indonesia] With that, here's a nice ol' By the Numbers to help ease us through a much-needed Gilas break.   23 Total points for Thirdy Ravena in his first game back in Gilas Pilipinas. Thirdy just added to his stock as the most coveted Pinoy prospect outside of Kai Sotto with this performance with the national team. Ravena led Gilas with 23 points, all in the first three quarters of the win against Indonesia. Up until the national team opened the floodgates in the fourth quarter, it was Thirdy that was getting buckets for Gilas, keeping Indonesia at bay. On top of his 23 points, Thirdy also had eight rebounds, three assists, and two blocks. The future is now for the former Blue Eagle.   11 Total players in the scoring column for Gilas Pilipinas in the win against Indonesia. Thirdy's scoring outburst kept the Philippines ahead, but Gilas' balanced attack eventually overwhelmed the hosts in Sunday's 30-point win. RR Pogoy got hot in the fourth and finished with 16 points while CJ Perez, Kiefer Ravena, and Juan Gomez de Liano all scored in double figures as well. Only Isaac Go didn't score for Gilas but he did have seven rebounds in almost eight minutes of action.   15 Total steals for Gilas Pilipinas against Indonesia. Interim head coach Mark Dickel likes his team to play defense and that was pretty evident in the way Gilas was aggressive in their first game to start the Asia Cup qualifiers. Gilas recorded 15 steals in a game where Indonesia had 16 turnovers. Seven players had at least one takeaway with CJ Perez and Kiefer Ravena leading the national team with four steals each. Dwight Ramos and Poy Erram had two apiece.   32 Largest lead of the night for Gilas Pilipinas. Indonesia was within four, 51-55, late in the third before Gilas ended the quarter with a 12-2 blitz for a 67-53 lead. Come the fourth quarter, RR Pogoy started out hot and Kiefer Ravena and CJ Perez helped add the finishing touches as the national team cruised to a big road win in the Asia Cup qualifiers.   26 Total fouls on Gilas Pilipinas. It wasn't all smooth sailing for Gilas as the Pinoys were called for a grand total of 26 fouls Sunday. Early penalty situation in the second and third quarters allowed Indonesia to stick around as they connected on 20 out of 23 free throws. Eight Gilas players had at least two fouls though no player fouled out.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnFeb 24th, 2020

Whatever happened to Gilas Pilipinas 2.0?

Since program’s inception, Gilas Pilipinas has been the name associated with the Philippine men’s basketball team. It gave the national team the identity it has used for a decade already. Gilas has gone through many iterations, but the current lineup, regardless of who the players are, only go by the general “Gilas” term. But early in the program’s history, each team went by a specific number, unofficially used by pretty much everyone to distinguish the teams that competed in different tournaments. It made sense too, since each team had a completely different identity. In later years, Gilas has improved in using the program as a way to ensure national basketball continuity. Nevertheless, each of the earlier Gilas versions had their success and failures. Here’s what happened to each of them.   Whatever happened to Gilas 2.0? Main tournament: 2013 FIBA-Asia Championships @ Manila, Philippines Prize: 3 tickets to the 2014 FIBA World Cup Result: Silver medal + World Cup berth (beat South Korea in semis, lost to Iran in gold medal game) Head coach: Chot Reyes Gilas 2.0 was the second time Chot Reyes handled the Philippine national team. The first time he did it, Coach Chot’s squad only managed 9th in the 2007 FIBA-Asia Championships in Japan. Six years later in Manila, Reyes is back at it again, and with some players from his 2007 team joining him too. Gilas’ silver-medal finish in the 2013 FIBA-Asia Championships and ensuing FIBA World Cup appearance in 2014 is Coach Chot’s best run as national team coach. Reyes would return to coach the national team in late 2016 before resigning for good in 2018. The Players: #4 Jimmy Alapag Alapag is back for a second straight stint with Gilas Pilipinas and this is the team where Jimmy carves out his legacy as one of the best national team players ever. In the semifinals against long-time nemesis South Korea, Alapag would hit the biggest shot in program history, pushing the Philippines to its first World Cup appearance in years. [Related: FIBA: Mighty Jimmy and the shot that introduced Gilas to the World] Once in the World Cup, Jimmy would once again hit the big shot to give Gilas its first World Cup win in four decades with an overtime decision against Senegal. Jimmy has since retired twice from basketball. He won the ABL title as head coach for San Miguel-Alab Pilipinas in the 2018 season. #5 LA Tenorio Tenorio already gave a glimpse of what he can do in the national team one-year prior, leading Gilas Pilipinas to the Jones Cup championship while winning MVP honors. In his first Gilas experience, LA started most games at point guard and was the Philippines’ best two-way option at the position. Together with Alapag and Jayson Castro, Tenorio formed perhaps the best point guard rotation in program history. After Gilas 2.0, it would be years for LA to make it back to Gilas, but once he did, he got a 2019 SEA Games gold medal to show for it. Tenorio just won another title with Barangay Ginebra, their fourth since 2016. #6 Jeff Chan Gilas 2.0 was flanked by shooters all over and the best one in Manila was Jeff Chan without a doubt. It’s not like Chan was a complete unknown when he was selected to Gilas, he did win Finals MVP for Rain or Shine in 2012. However, Chan wasn’t exactly tested when it comes to national team play. He got tested, and he passed with flying colors. Chan was the best shooter for Gilas both in total 3-point field goals made and percentage, shooting an insane 47.6 percent from deep. Chan won another title with ROS in 2016, before he was moved to Phoenix and eventually, Ginebra.  #7 Jayson Castro Gilas 2.0 was Jayson Castro’s coming out party for the Philippine national team. Sharing minutes with Jimmy Alapag and LA Tenorio, Castro was the weapon unleashed by Gilas when the going got tough. And as the tournament got deeper, it got more and more evident that The Blur was the national team’s best local. After the tournament, Castro was named in the All-Star team, and his reign as the best point guard in Asia also started his journey as a Gilas legend. While he’s already retired twice from Gilas, we’ll believe Castro is done when he doesn’t actually play. #8 Gary David Even as the PBA’s best scorer at the time, Gary David readily accepted his diminished role with Gilas 2.0. Out of all players, David finished second to last in scoring, beating out only June Mar Fajardo, who played seven games and only saw 31 minutes of total court action. Nevertheless, David was a key piece that made the Gilas 2.0 machine work, his explosive performance in the quarterfinals against Kazakhstan set up the South Korea game quite nicely too. Post-PBA, Gary David is seeing action in the MPBL, even being crowned as the league’s 3-point king in 2019. #9 Ranidel De Ocampo RDO was even better in Gilas 2.0 than he was in the original Gilas. Much like Castro, De Ocampo was a reliable weapon for coach Chot’s national team, his outside shooting ultimately proving crucial for Gilas. Ranidel was behind only Chan in 3-point field goals made and percentage for Gilas, he also hit the forgotten triple that help bury South Korea in the semifinals. RDO is technically still not retired, but injuries have forced him to slow way down in his later years in the PBA as a Meralco Bolt. #10 Gabe Norwood Norwood was one of the players from Coach Chot’s 2007 Philippine team that was present for Gilas 2.0 in Manila. Gabe didn’t do much scoring, but he played the most minutes out of everyone and was easily Gilas Pilipinas’ best defender all tournament long. Norwood’s clutch block on Kim Min-goo helped secure Gilas’ win over South Korea in the semifinals. Gabe is one of the longest-tenured players not just in the Gilas program but in Philippine national team history. In 2019, he made the World Cup for the second straight time. #11 Marcus Douthit Douthit was back for Gilas 2.0 and while his production was lowered compared to the original Gilas, he was still the rock and foundation of the national team. [Related: Whatever happened to Gilas Pilipinas 1.0?] Kuya Marcus’ stint ended early, as his tournament essentially ended before halftime of the semifinals of the game against South Korea due to injury, forcing Gilas to go true All-Filipino the rest of the way. Much like in Gilas 1.0, Douthit led Gilas in scoring and rebounding with 11.9 points and 9.4 rebounds. #12 Larry Fonacier The second designated shooter for the national team in 2013, Larry Fonacier was the classic 3-and-D player for Gilas 2.0. Gilas 2.0 was Fonacier’s only Gilas stint, and winning a silver medal is not a bad result for being one-and-done.  After Gilas 2.0, Larry would continue to play for TNT for a couple more seasons, before moving on to join the NLEX Road Warriors as one of the team’s veterans. #13 June Mar Fajardo June Mar Fajardo was a very raw prospect when Gilas 2.0 won silver in the 2013 FIBA-Asia Championships. The future six-time PBA MVP only played in seven games and scored a grand total of three points. Nevertheless, Fajardo was a completely different player following his stint with Gilas 2.0. After he came out of his initial stint with the national team, Fajardo proceeded to dominate the PBA for half a decade and counting, and his consistent Gilas stints in the future also slowly helped him be a consistent contributor in international play. For all intents and purposes, Fajardo could still be a key piece with the country co-hosts the 2023 World Cup, 10 years after Gilas 2.0. #14 Japeth Aguilar While still limited, Japeth was an improved version of himself by the time he played for Gilas 2.0.  He was the explosive reliever for the frontline, and was a crucial part of the rotation when Douthit suffered an injury during the South Korea game. Just like Norwood, Japeth has reached the 10-year mark in service of Gilas Pilipinas program and the national team as a whole, and Gilas 2.0 was just one of his many stops. #15 Marc Pingris The heart and soul of Gilas 2.0, Marc Pingris personified the national team’s famous battle cry. Gilas 2.0’s emotional leader, Ping had his teammates dig deep when they faced the greatest adversity of their World Cup bid in the semifinals against South Korea that eventually led to an iconic breakthrough. While his numbers won’t wow anyone, Ping’s leadership and influence in the national team resonates to this day, and it all started in Gilas 2.0.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 9th, 2020

Whatever happened to Gilas Pilipinas 1.0?

Since program’s inception, Gilas Pilipinas has been the name associated with the Philippine men’s basketball team. It gave the national team the identity it has used for a decade already. Gilas has gone through many iterations, but the current lineup, regardless of who the players are, only go by the general “Gilas” term. But early in the program’s history, each team went by a specific number, unofficially used by pretty much everyone to distinguish the teams that competed in different tournaments. It made sense too, since each team had a completely different identity. In later years, Gilas has improved in using the program as a way to ensure national basketball continuity. Nevertheless, each of the earlier Gilas versions had their success and failures. Here’s what happened to each of them.   Whatever happened to Gilas 1.0? Main tournament: 2011 FIBA-Asia Championships @ Wuhan, China Prize: 1 automatic ticket to the 2012 London Olympics Result: 4th place (lost to Jordan in semis, lost to South Korea in bronze medal game) Head coach: Rajko Toroman Coach Rajko’s previous history before becoming the first coach of the Gilas program was leading Iran to its first-ever Olympics appearance in Beijing just four years prior. Toroman was tasked to lead another national team to the Olympics, but his Philippine team mostly made up of amateur stars fell two wins short of London. Coach Rajko’s Gilas stint ended after the 2011 Asian Championships. He’s still recently connected to the Philippine team, albeit this time as an opponent. He now coaches Indonesia and his national team took on Gilas last December in the SEA Games in in the 2021 FIBA Asia Cup qualifiers last February.   The Players: #4 Mark Barroca After his unceremonious exit from FEU, Mark Barroca was selected into the original Gilas team and was a major revelation especially during the national team’s earlier tune-up games against PBA teams and when they actually went to the semifinals of the 2011 Commissioner’s Cup. After their semifinals stint in Wuhan, Barroca was part of the loaded 2011 Gilas Draft, picked 5th by Shopinas before being shipped to B-Meg. Barroca has stayed with the Purefoods franchise since, a 6-time PBA champion and two-time Finals MVP. He won the Grand Slam with the team in 2014. #5 Asi Taulava Asi was one of the PBA players chosen to reinforce a mostly-amateur Gilas team in 2011. At the time, Taulava was a Meralco Bolt but would become an ABL MVP and champion with San Miguel Beer in the ABL two years later. The 2011 FIBA-Asia Championships was Asi’s third straight appearance in the tournament. He was with the 2007 team in Tokushima and was also part of the 2009 team that competed in Tianjin. While Taulava was already almost 40 here, it won’t be his last stint with Gilas Pilipinas just yet. #6 Jvee Casio The former La Salle star was one of the main pillars of the original Gilas team, putting off the PBA Draft for two years in order to play for the national team. Proof of Casio’s standing in the original Gilas team was him being selected first overall during the 2011 Draft. With the Powerade Tigers, Casio, with Gilas teammate Marcio Lassiter, made the Philippine Cup Finals as a no. 8 seed in 2012. In 2013, Casio won his first and so far, only title in the Commissioner’s Cup with the Alaska Aces. #7 Jimmy Alapag Alapag was one of the three TNT players in the original Gilas team. It was Jimmy’s first stint in the national team since 2007. He was not chosen for the 2009 FIBA-Asia Championships. Jimmy didn’t see heavy minutes with the original Gilas, but he was the national team’s most reliable marksman and shot 40 percent from deep. Seeing action in 2011 means that Alapag is a Gilas original, and his first appearance with the program would not be his last, it’s also not his best. #8 Chris Tiu Arguably the face of Gilas Pilipinas when the program first started, Chris Tiu went from a successful UAAP career in Ateneo to being captain of the national team. Tiu didn’t play the most minutes and didn’t have the best numbers, but he probably put in the most work out of everyone for the original Gilas team. After Gilas, Tiu joined the PBA Draft in 2012 and was selected by Rain or Shine. He won the Commissioner’s Cup title in 2016 and retired from basketball after the 2018 season. #9 Japeth Aguilar Japeth Aguilar was still pretty raw during 2011 for the original Gilas team. In Wuhan, he played the least out of all the players, appearing in only five games. Nevertheless, Aguilar would become a constant for the national team after his first stint in 2009. Aguilar would find his way to Ginebra in the PBA and won four of his five titles with the team. He’s the league’s most recent Finals MVP and is still playing for Gilas Pilipinas. #10 Mac Baracael Mac Baracael making the original Gilas team was a miracle all in itself. After being shot in the back as an FEU Tamaraw, Baracael made a full recovery and was selected into the national team and was a role player in the 2011 Asian Championships. Baracael was taken 6th by Alaska in the 2011 Draft and had a short but mostly solid but forgettable career in the league. #11 Marcus Douthit Marcus Douthit was the solid rock that formed the foundation of the original Gilas Pilipinas team. After a long search, the national team tapped the former Providence center as naturalized player and in his first Asian Championships, Douthit didn’t disappoint. “Kuya Marcus” led the tournament in both points and rebounds, averaging 21.9 points per game and 12.2 rebounds. He was also tied for third in blocks with 1.7 rejections per outing. Douthit was already 31 at the time, but he most definitely proved that the Gilas program can work and the national team can be successful if you put a solid anchor around the country’s most skilled players. #12 Kelly Williams In his first and only stint with Gilas Pilipinas, Kelly Williams started at power forward. At this point in his career, Williams wasn’t exactly the player that took the PBA by storm and won MVP in his second season, but he was still explosive enough to give the national team quality minutes. Kelly’s role with the original Gilas has mostly mirrored his career in his later years, being the scrappy veteran at forward for teams with younger, faster players. #13 Marcio Lassiter Despite not playing in Gilas’ first two games of the 2011 FIBA-Asia Championships due to eligibility issues, Lassiter ended up as the national team’s second leading scorer behind Douthit. Marcio actually struggled shooting in his Gilas Pilipinas debut, shooting less than 40 percent from the field and a woeful 21 percent from deep. Regardless, he was seen as the future of the national team, and it’s quite unfortunate that it took him a while to get back after his initial stint in Wuhan. In the PBA, Lassiter was picked 4th in the 2011 Draft by Powerade, joining Gilas teammate and no. 1 pick Jvee Casrio. Marcio was later traded to San Miguel and is now an 8-time champion. #14 Chris Lutz Like Lassiter, Chris Lutz missed two games in Wuhan due to eligibility issues. Like Lassiter, Lutz also struggled shooting the ball once he did play and wound up with the least total points for the original Gilas Pilipinas in 2011. Regardless, Lutz was a highly-touted recruit and was picked 3rd by San Miguel (then known as Petron) in the 2011 Draft and went on to average 15.4 points and 3.5 assists in his rookie year. However, Lutz’ career in the PBA ended up being short, as injuries ended up being his downfall. He was officially traded to Meralco in 2017, but is yet to resurface. #15 Ranidel De Ocampo RDO partnered with TNT teammate Kelly Williams to for a reliable power forward duo for the original Gilas Pilipinas. Never the flashy one, De Ocampo would become a reliable contributor for Gilas for years to come, and the 2011 FIBA-Asia Championships was first proof of that. RDO was top-5 in points, rebounds, and assists for Gilas Pilipinas in 2011.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8 .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 6th, 2020

FIBA By the Numbers: The future is now for Gilas

Gilas Pilipinas' new era is off to a fine start thanks to the national team's impressive road win against Indonesia to open the 2021 FIBA Asia Cup qualifiers. With a relatively younger group than that previous iterations, Gilas took a while to get going but got the job done without too much trouble in the fourth quarter nonetheless. Pending new announcements for their cancelled home game against Thailand, the Indonesia road win is Gilas' last game and we'll have to wait a good nine months before the national team takes the court again. [Related: FIBA: Thirdy stars as Gilas pulls away late in win over Indonesia] With that, here's a nice ol' By the Numbers to help ease us through a much-needed Gilas break.   23 Total points for Thirdy Ravena in his first game back in Gilas Pilipinas. Thirdy just added to his stock as the most coveted Pinoy prospect outside of Kai Sotto with this performance with the national team. Ravena led Gilas with 23 points, all in the first three quarters of the win against Indonesia. Up until the national team opened the floodgates in the fourth quarter, it was Thirdy that was getting buckets for Gilas, keeping Indonesia at bay. On top of his 23 points, Thirdy also had eight rebounds, three assists, and two blocks. The future is now for the former Blue Eagle.   11 Total players in the scoring column for Gilas Pilipinas in the win against Indonesia. Thirdy's scoring outburst kept the Philippines ahead, but Gilas' balanced attack eventually overwhelmed the hosts in Sunday's 30-point win. RR Pogoy got hot in the fourth and finished with 16 points while CJ Perez, Kiefer Ravena, and Juan Gomez de Liano all scored in double figures as well. Only Isaac Go didn't score for Gilas but he did have seven rebounds in almost eight minutes of action.   15 Total steals for Gilas Pilipinas against Indonesia. Interim head coach Mark Dickel likes his team to play defense and that was pretty evident in the way Gilas was aggressive in their first game to start the Asia Cup qualifiers. Gilas recorded 15 steals in a game where Indonesia had 16 turnovers. Seven players had at least one takeaway with CJ Perez and Kiefer Ravena leading the national team with four steals each. Dwight Ramos and Poy Erram had two apiece.   32 Largest lead of the night for Gilas Pilipinas. Indonesia was within four, 51-55, late in the third before Gilas ended the quarter with a 12-2 blitz for a 67-53 lead. Come the fourth quarter, RR Pogoy started out hot and Kiefer Ravena and CJ Perez helped add the finishing touches as the national team cruised to a big road win in the Asia Cup qualifiers.   26 Total fouls on Gilas Pilipinas. It wasn't all smooth sailing for Gilas as the Pinoys were called for a grand total of 26 fouls Sunday. Early penalty situation in the second and third quarters allowed Indonesia to stick around as they connected on 20 out of 23 free throws. Eight Gilas players had at least two fouls though no player fouled out.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 24th, 2020

Future is bright for Gilas

Three things stood out in Gilas’ twin wins over Thailand in the recent FIBA Asia Cup second qualifying window in Bahrain......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 1st, 2020

Carl Tamayo made it a point to play with the big boys in Gilas 23 for 23

Carl Tamayo had been a stalwart of Batang Gilas. Alongside 7-foot-2, 17-year-old Kai Sotto, he was a big part of the biggest-ever Philippine national youth team. Even more, though, Tamayo is also being eyed to be a big part of the future of Gilas Pilipinas itself. In fact, the 6-foot-7 modern big man was included in the 23 for 23 - a list of youngsters who were looked at as national team mainstays once the 2023 FIBA World Cup comes around. That list was concretized on 2018, when Tamayo was just 17-years-old. Still, even then, he was already standing out. So much so that the talented teen had already wowed Gilas and NLEX guard Kiefer Ravena. "Nakasama ko si Carl nung unang practice na magkakasama yung matatanda pati yung mga bata sa 23 for 23. Nun, siyempre, wala pa namang team, wala pa namang first five," he shared in The Prospects Pod. He then continued, "Pero si Carl, laging sumasama doon sa unang lima. Sinasabayan niya lagi sila June Mar [Fajardo], sila Japeth [Aguilar], sila Jayson [Castro]. Dun niya laging gustong sumabay." Yes, apparently in the very first training session of the supposed future national team, Tamayo made it a point to play with the likes of eight-time champion six-time MVP Fajardo, one-time best point guard in Asia Castro, and fan favorite Aguilar. And in Ravena's eyes, that in itself is nothing but impressive. "Ako, nasa isip ko nun, 'Okay, matapang 'tong batang 'to ha.' Kasi wala namang sinasabi, pero nag-volunteer siya agad," he shared. He then continued, "First impression ko talaga, malayo mararating ng batang 'to kasi wala siyang paki kung bago siya. Unang practice pa lang yun, kakasalang pa lang niya sa Gilas, pero ganun na kaagad yung approach niya." That even allowed the Road Warriors' lead guard to poke fun at his good friend. "Nung nakita ko yun, sinisiko ko si Troy Rosario. Sabi ko sa kanya, 'Troy, may papalit na sayo, Troy," he said, through chuckles. Of course, Tamayo isn't Rosario's replacement. Rather, hopefully, the two will join forces in a national team frontcourt ready and raring for modern basketball. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 30th, 2020

Jordan Clarkson debuts for Gilas Pilipinas 2 years ago today

Jordan Clarkson to Gilas Pilipinas will be one of those storylines that will persist until it gets a definitive resolution. It’s either JC plays for the national team as a local or not. Time may be running out to really have him play for the national team at his peak too as Clarkson is not exactly getting any younger. JC will be in his early 30s in the next FIBA World Cup co-hosted by the Philippines. Nevertheless, it’s not like JC to Gilas has been a totally fruitless endeavor. Clarkson earned a national team spot and played his first game for Gilas exactly two years ago today. In the 2018 Asian Games in Jakarta, Indonesia, Clarkson debuted for the Philippine national team against China. [Related: ASIAN GAMES: Did Clarkson pass the China test?] Clarkson poured 28 points, 16 in a sensational third-quarter rally for the Philippines. Unfortunately, Gilas lost the game, 80-82. JC with Gilas also lost their next game to South Korea, ending the team’s medal hopes. Fortunately, Clarkson maintained a strong performance for the Gilas Pilipinas and he did lead the Philippines to a respectable 5th place finish, the highest Asian Games finish for the country in 16 years. [Related: By the Numbers: Jordan Clarkson's first Gilas Pilipinas stint] Whether or not Clarkson makes it back to Gilas Pilipinas will be a question that will be continually asked until the powers that be can provide a definite resolution. Still, Clarkson at least got to play one tournament for Gilas, and it all started on this day two years ago.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 21st, 2020

Alapag: Bolick, Perez future stars

PBA legend Jimmy Alapag singled out NorthPort’s Robert Bolick and Terra Firma’s CJ Perez as players with a bright future in the pro league during The Philippine STAR sports talk show “Beyond The Game With The Dean,” adding that he’s a big fan of the young bucks who suited up for Gilas at the FIBA World Cup in China last year......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 14th, 2020

2013 Gilas Pilipinas team truly a special family says LA Tenorio

Seven years ago today, Gilas Pilipinas scored arguably its most famous win in program history. In 2013, Gilas took down South Korea in the semifinals of the FIBA-Asia Championship, sending the Philippines all the way to the FIBA World Cup. Members of that fateful team became instant legends and more than the talent present, the incredible bond by that Gilas iteration proved to be one of their keys to incredible success. "That group was really special," guard LA Tenorio said. "The whole process of going to the World Cup was an experience in itself. We've gotten to know each other kahit magkaka-laban kami," LA added. Aside from Tenorio, members of the 2013 Gilas Pilipinas team, or Gilas 2.0, were Jimmy Alapag, Jeff Chan, Jayson Castro, Gary David, Ranidel De Ocampo, Gabe Norwood, Marcus Douthit, Larry Fonacier, June Mar Fajardo, Japeth Aguilar, and Marc Pingris. For LA, that group turned into a family, and future Gilas teams can make a great example of them to achieve and even surpass what they did almost a decade ago. "I think if the next group would really want to go to the next level like the World Cup or the Olympics, the team really has to be special hindi lang sa basketball," Tenorio said. "The relationship outside basketball is really important. It wasn't just like being teammates, we really became a family," LA added.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 10th, 2020

Philippines-Korea are 'new and old school' basketball says Ratliffe

For someone who is neither Filipino or South Korean — by birth that is — Ricardo Ratfliffe sure has a pretty unique relationship with the two eternal Asian basketball rivals. After more than half a decade of playing as an import for the Korean Basketball League, Ratfliffe found himself in the PBA, playing a couple of stints for the Star Hotshots in back-to-back Commissioner's Cups. Ratliffe's PBA stints ended up being short, as he eventually got naturalized to play for the South Korean national team. Exposed to the basketball style of two different countries, Ratliffe says that there's a distinct contrast between the Philippines and South Korea. "I think the style of play in the Philippines is more like American style. It's more flashy and entertaining. I feel like you guys are going with the evolution," Ratliffe said on a recent appearance on 2OT with PBA broadcasters Magoo Marjon and Carlo Pamintuan. "In Korea, I think it's more of an old school style. People don't go out of their element. The Philippines is more like new school and I think Korea is more old school," he added. In about three years as a national team member, Ratliffe has become part of the ongoing Philippines-South Korea basketball saga. Ratliffe has two signature moments so far, the first was in the 2018 Asian Games when his squad took down a Gilas Pilipinas team led by Jordan Clarkson. [Related: Before 2018 Asiad meeting, Clarkson and Ratliffe actually go way back] The second came on the final day of the 2019 FIBA World Cup Asian Qualifiers. Ratliffe willed Korea to win a non-bearing road game against Lebanon, with the victory becoming the help the Philippines needed to advance to the World Championships. As if he wasn't popular enough among Filipino fans, that Korea win made Ratliffe all the more appreciated in the Philippines. "I think I had like about a thousand DMs [on Instagram]," Ratliffe recalled. "Right after the game I posted the Philippine flag with a heart on my story, so that everyone knew I was going out there to give it my all and I did. I thought I played decent, I didn't play my best game but I gave it my best," he added. [Related: Gilas has nemesis Korea to thank for FIBA World Cup berth] While he's become a legend in his own right in South Korea, Ratliffe says he won't hesitate to take his talents back to the PBA if given the chance in the future. Ratliffe never played a full conference with the Hotshots, but his arrivals always did boost the team. "I think it was a match made in heaven [with the Hotshots]," Ratliffe said. "I'm appreciative of the organization, the fans, and the whole country. If I didn't get the [Korean] passport, I'm going to the Philippines every season after I'm done with Korea until I retire. That was my plan," he added.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 16th, 2020

Future-proofing Gilas is the best way to go says Toroman

Rajko Toroman sure had a thing going with his original Gilas Pilipinas team about a decade ago. Made up of mostly the top collegiate players, the original Gilas Pilipinas, reinforced by a naturalized player in Marcus Douthit and a few PBA players, came two wins away from a breakthrough Olympics stint. In the 2011 FIBA-Asia Championships, Toroman's Gilas lost in the semifinals to Tab Baldwin's Jordan team. Coach Rajko says that that set up could totally work for Gilas Pilipinas and it seems like the current brains of the national team program have realized it as well, forming a core group of young players headlined by Thirdy Ravena and Isaac Go. "I think that the program was great that time. I think in this moment, there is a mix. They have to make some young players play tournaments, take some international exposure," Toroman said on the Coaches Unfiltered podcast. "But also when it comes time for the results, you need to have the best 5-6 players from the collegiate and the best 5-6 players from the PBA. I think this mix will be the best thing," he added. Sending an all-amateur team to top international tournaments may be impossible for a country like the Philippines, especially if the national team will be looking to win medals in Asia and be competitive against the world. However, a national team featuring battle-tested young guys reinforced by the current best looks to be the best set up. That way, the next versions of the Gilas team will still have its best players all while being future-proof. A better relationship now between the PBA and SBP can certainly make that happen. "I think in this period, it's easier to make it like this because of the connection of the PBA and SBP is much better than in my time," coach Rajko said. "I think this is the best way to make some younger players get exsposure and then make the best team possible," Toroman added.     — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 22nd, 2020

Gilas goal in 2023 is second round of FIBA World Cup

Tab Baldwin is not resting on his laurels as Gilas Pilipinas program director even during the continuing COVID-19 crisis. Despite the pause in play in all of the Philippines, the seasoned mentor reiterated that plans remain in place for the future of the national team. "First of all, we have decided, as the SBP (Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas), on the direction we're going to go to," he said in the inaugural episode of Coaches Unfiltered. He then continued, "That is to build this program with an injection of youth looking forward to 2023 and ultimately, to 2027." Earlier in the year, the Gilas pool was announced and it had young stars such as Nieto twins Mike and Matt, Gomez de Liano brothers Javi and Juan, Allyn Bulanadi, Isaac Go, Dwight Ramos, Thirdy Ravena, Rey Suerte, and Jaydee Tungcab. The 2019 PBA Draft even had the Nietos, Bulanadi, Go, and Suerte be part of a so-called "special" selection process after which, in essence, they have been loaned by their mother teams to Gilas. The national team's close ties with the PBA would remain under Coach Tab's watch as program director. At the same time, though, the goal is for Gilas to not have to depend on the PBA too much. "Maybe in the early days, we'll be looking for the younger players to complement the PBA player injection, but as time goes by, the roles will reverse," he said. He then continued, "We'll be looking for PBA players to complement what we're trying to do with the young players that we're bringing in to be, basically, full-time Gilas players." The architect of Ateneo de Manila University's three-peat then said further that in the same light, change must come as well in terms of the national team's style of play and preparation. As he put it, "The other big umbrella that will govern what we will do is the philosophy that a smaller nation in basketball terms, an underdog nation, a nation that doesn't compete in the elite (level), but wants to compete in the elite (level), in my opinion, must develop a playing point of difference." For Coach Tab, Philippine basketball just could not do anymore what it had been doing since time immemorial. "What is insanity? Insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result so insanity in terms of trying to compete at the elite level is trying to do what your opponents do with them having superior talent and experience and expecting to be able to beat them," he shared. He then continued, "With that, it means we're truly trying to look for something that will be a point of difference in terms of how we play." All things considered, the brilliant tactician remains upbeat about the Filipinos chances in the 2023 FIBA World Cup - and even in the 2027 edition of the world meet. "I think that in 2023, we want to be a team that will make a very, very strong run at the second round and, I think, even achieves that. Then by 2027, I think we want to be a team that has aspirations to be in the medal round," he said. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 12th, 2020

PB(A)BL: Like a Dragon, Matthew Wright brought fire in Malaysia s dream season

Not all players take the same route going to the PBA, each player will have his own story to tell. This series will be about those who chose a different path, those who had to hustle overseas at one point in their careers before eventually landing in the PBA. Here, we take a look at current big-name PBA players who spent some time in the other major basketball league with Philippine teams in the region: the Asean Basketball League. They don’t have to play for a Filipino team, after all, the ABL is a great place where Filipino talents can shine even while playing for other countries. [Related: PB(A)BL: Chris Banchero's hot streak with San Miguel Beer] Today, we focus on Matthew Wright and his incredible one-and-done season with the Westports Malaysia Dragons.   Enter the Dragon Long before he ended up being a regular to Gilas Pilipinas, Matthew Wright actually already suited up for the national team via the U-18 squad in 2008. The Fil-Canadian then went home to Toronto and played in the NCAA tournament via St. Bonaventure. As a 25-year-old shooter, Wright got close to his other home when he suited up in the ABL for the Wesports Malaysia Dragons with his future Phoenix head coach Ariel Vanguardia and another prospect in Fil-Am Jason Brickman. With the Dragons, Wright set the ABL on fire with his scoring exploits. In his lone stint during the 2015-2016 season, Wright set the league record for most three-point shots made in one game at 10. He also set the record for most three-point shots made in a single season at 71 and his total points of 461 were the 4th highest of all-time and most by a non-World Import. Wright ended up being the ABL’s first-ever Heritage MVP, leading the league with an average of 23.1 points on 41.8 percent shooting from deep. He also added 4.2 rebounds and 3.4 assists. More importantly, Wright helped the Dragons to the no. 1 seed in the 2016 season with a strong 16-4 record. The crowning achievement was Malaysia winning its first, and so far, only ABL title by taking out the Singapore Slingers in the Finals, 3-2.   ABL to Gilas to PBA After leading the Westports Malaysia Dragons to the ABL championship, Wright was added to a Gilas Pilipinas pool that included guys like then amateurs Kiefer Ravena, Mac Belo, Ray Parks Jr., Kevin Ferrer, and Jio Jalalon. Wright was later named to the actual Gilas Pilipinas Cadets team and entered the PBA through the 2016 Draft. While no order was revealed, Wright joined the Phoenix Fuel Masters, reuniting with Dragons coach Ariel Vanguardia. Once in the PBA, Wright’s scoring exploits continued, in one game scoring 42 points, which was the most for a rookie since Eric Menk scored 43 for Tanduay since 1999. He finished second in the Rookie of the Year race and was part of the All-Rookie Team. The Fil-Canadian sniper also became a regular for Gilas Pilipinas since, consistently making the final team for tournaments like the SEABA Championship, the FIBA Asia Cup, and the FIBA World Cup Asian Qualifiers. In the 2019 season, his third with Phoenix, Matthew Wright led the Fuel Masters to a breakthrough semifinals appearance in the Philippine Cup as the no. 1 seed. He also ended the year as the league’s no. 2 scorer.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8 .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 6th, 2020

Kai Sotto-led biggest-ever Batang Gilas, where are they now?

The Philippines paraded its biggest-ever national youth team in the 2018 FIBA Under-17 World Championships. In 6-foot-7 Raven Cortez, 6-foot-7 Carl Tamayo, 6-foot-8 Geo Chiu, and 7-foot-1 (back then, because he's 7-foot-2 now) Kai Sotto, Batang Gilas had twin towers times two to go toe-to-toe with the rest of the world. Add to that forwards Yukien Andrada and Josh Lazaro at 6-foot-5 and 6-foot-4, respectively, and without a doubt, that Filipino frontline was formidable. In all, the Philippines stood with an average height of 6-foot-5 in the world meet. Ultimately, however, they still fell short and went winless through the group stages against Croatia (75-97), France (54-95), and Argentina (71-74) before being officially ousted by Canada in the Round of 16 by a score of 102-62. In the end, Batang Gilas still salvaged wins in their last two games, both classification matches, at the expense of Egypt (70-69) and then New Zealand (73-51). And in the end, while they still fell short of making any headway in the tournament itself, they still improved on a one-win and 15th-place finish the last time around. Now, the Filipinos sported an overall slate of 2-5 stood 13th out of 16 teams. Moving forward, they remain upbeat about their chances as they now had the size that holds nothing but promise for the future - and all that's left to do is keeping at the skills themselves. Two years later, have the country's most promising prospects done just that? Let's look at where they've gone after the 2018 FIBA Under-17 World Championships and where they are going to even farther: FORTHSKY PADRIGAO, 5-11 G Still playing for Ateneo. Won championship and made Mythical Team as Blue Eaglet. TERRENCE FORTEA, 5-11 G Still playing for National U. Won back-to-back championships as Bullpup. GERRY ABADIANO, 5-11 G Played for National U. Won back-to-back championships as Bullpup. Commitment to college yet to be decided. MAC GUADANA, 5-11 G Played for LPU and led them to first-ever Final Four and Finals. Made Mythical Team as Jr. Pirate. Committed to LPU. MIGS PASCUAL, 5-11 G Played for DLSZ. Transferred to and still playing for San Beda. Won championship as Red Cub. RC CALIMAG, 6-1 G/F Transferred to and played for LSGH. Committed to UP. YUKIEN ANDRADA, 6-5 F Played for San Beda. Won championship and made Mythical Team as Red Cub. Committed to San Beda. CARL TAMAYO, 6-7 F/C Played for National U. Won back-to-back championships and Finals MVPs as Bullpup. Commitment to college yet to be decided. JOSH LAZARO, 6-4 F Played for San Beda. Transferred to and still playing for Ateneo. Made Mythical Team as Blue Eaglet. GEO CHIU, 6-8 C Played for Ateneo. Won championship as Blue Eaglet. Committed to and still playing for Ateneo. Won championship as Blue Eagle. RAVEN CORTEZ, 6-7 F/C Still playing for DLSZ. KAI SOTTO, 7-1 C Played for Ateneo. Won championship and MVP as Blue Eaglet. Took talents to US to train with Atlanta-based The Skills Factory. Played in 2020 Basketball Without Borders Global Camp. Featured by Bleacher Report. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 6th, 2020

Jamike Jarin s 2014 Batang Gilas, where are they now?

Slowly but surely, the Philippines has returned to legitimate contention in international basketball. That also goes for the national youth team - what with Kai Sotto lifting Filipinos to greater and greater heights. It wasn't that long ago, however, that the blue, red, and white had just played its first game in the FIBA Under-17 World Championships. After missing the first two editions of the world meet in 2010 and 2012, Batang Gilas barged onto the scene in 2014 - and they did so all while boasting an average height of 6-feet. First, the Filipinos re-asserted their mastery over Southeast Asia and swept the 2013 SEA Basketball Association (SEABA) Under-16 Championship before just falling short in the gold medal game against China in the 2013 FIBA Asia Under-17 Championship. Still, that second-place finish booked them a ticket to the 2014 FIBA U17 World Championship. Once in Dubai, head coach Jamike Jarin and his boys gave their all only to fall victim to the likes of Angola, 72-82; Greece, 65-85; and eventual champion USA, 64-124, in the group stages. The Philippines was officially booted out of contention by France, 57-86, in the Round of 16 and then lost classification matches opposite Argentina and Egypt. By then, they had faced off with future NBA All-Star Jayson Tatum and NBA players Harry Giles, Josh Jackson, and Giorgios Papagiannis. Up against United Arab Emirates in the last classification match, Batang Gilas finally scored a win and finished 15th out of 16 teams. Even so, getting back to the world stage remains a momentous milestone for Philippine youth basketball - and it was all thanks to coach Jamike and his 2014 Batang Gilas. The question is, all of them, where are they now? JOLLO GO, 5-10 G Finished high school in Hope Christian. Committed to and played for La Salle. Now playing for Manila Stars in MPBL. MATT NIETO, 6-1 G Finished high school in Ateneo. Won championship as Blue Eaglet. Committed to and played for Ateneo. Won three championships as Blue Eagle. Named to Gilas Pilipinas pool. Drafted by NLEX. Now playing for Gilas Pilipinas. DIEGO DARIO, 5-7 G Finished high school in UPIS. Committed to and played for UP. Drafted by and now playing for Blackwater. MIKE NIETO, 6-2 F Finished high school in Ateneo. Won championship as Blue Eaglet. Committed to and played for Ateneo. Won three championships as Blue Eagle. Named to Gilas Pilipinas pool. Drafted by Rain or Shine. Now playing for Gilas Pilipinas pool. RENZO NAVARRO, 5-8 G Finished high school in San Sebastian. Committed to and played for La Salle. Transferred to and played for San Sebastian. Transferred to and now playing for LPU. ARNIE PADILLA, 6-1 F Finished high school in FEU-Diliman. Committed to and played for Enderun. JOLO MENDOZA. 5-9 G Finished high school in Ateneo. Won championship as Blue Eaglet. Committed to and played for Ateneo. Won two championships as Blue Eagle. Now playing for Ateneo. MIKE PANLILIO, 5-11 G Finished high school in International School Manila. Migrated to USA. Committed to and played for Fordham. MIKE DELA CRUZ, 6-0 F Finished high school in LSGH. Migrated to USA. CARLO ABADEZA, 6-3 C Transferred to and finished high school in Arellano. Committed to San Beda. Transferred to La Salle. Transferred to and now playing for LPU. RICHARD ESCOTO, 6-3 C Finished high school in FEU-Diliman. Committed to and played for FEU. Played for Iloilo United Royals in MPBL. Drafted by and now playing for Blackwater. PAUL DESIDERIO, 6-1 F Finished high school in UV. Committed to and played for UP. Became "Mr. Atin 'To." Drafted by and now playing for Blackwater. JAMIKE JARIN, HEAD COACH Assistant in Ateneo and Meralco. Head coach in San Beda. Head coach in National U. Now coaching as assistant in UE. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 30th, 2020

Thirdy Ravena most likely headed to Japan s B.League

Thirdy Ravena had a pretty strong 2019 in his last year as a Blue Eagle for the Ateneo. His 2020 is already off to a good start too, topscoring for Gilas Pilipinas in the national team's first-ever win of the decade. With all that being said, Thirdy has been recognized for his great work, being named Mr. Basketball by the Philippine Sports Association for its 2020 annual awards. Ravena ended the reign of San Miguel's June Mar Fajardo, who was Mr. Basketball for the last three years. "I'd like to thank PSA for the award," Thirdy said Friday during the award's night at Manila Hotel. "Laking motivation na naman to para sakin and this honor is for my family, friends, and everyone who stuck with me," he added. What's next for Mr. Basketball? Well nothing is quite official just yet. For the meantime, Thirdy will be training with Gilas Pilipinas and when the new season comes, Ravena might be seen taking flight in Japan. Thirdy says he has a number of teams from the B.League, both in Division 1 and Division 2, that are taking an interest in him. He will mull all offers and make a decision when the time is right. The current B.League season is currently ongoing and a new calendar year typically starts around October. "As to my journey, I'm most likely headed to Japan. I think right now there are 4-5 offers na from different teams," Ravena said. "We'll wait for other offers and see which is the best decision possible," he added. With a few months to spare though, Thirdy is 100 percent with Gilas Pilipinas. The national team, not counting the cancelled game against Thailand, won't play in the 2021 FIBA Asia Cup qualifiers until November of this year. The cadets will train with multiple stops abroad as the Gilas program continues with its development aimed for the future. "Right now I'm focusing with Gilas, now that we're here," he said. "We'll have an out-of-the-country trip para sa training lang. Right now that's my focus," Thirdy added.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 7th, 2020

Thirdy Ravena most likely headed to Japan s B.League

Thirdy Ravena had a pretty strong 2019 in his last year as a Blue Eagle for the Ateneo. His 2020 is already off to a good start too, topscoring for Gilas Pilipinas in the national team's first-ever win of the decade. With all that being said, Thirdy has been recognized for his great work, being named Mr. Basketball by the Philippine Sports Association for its 2020 annual awards. Ravena ended the reign of San Miguel's June Mar Fajardo, who was Mr. Basketball for the last three years. "I'd like to thank PSA for the award," Thirdy said Friday during the award's night at Manila Hotel. "Laking motivation na naman to para sakin and this honor is for my family, friends, and everyone who stuck with me," he added. What's next for Mr. Basketball? Well nothing is quite official just yet. For the meantime, Thirdy will be training with Gilas Pilipinas and when the new season comes, Ravena might be seen taking flight in Japan. Thirdy says he has a number of teams from the B.League, both in Division 1 and Division 2, that are taking an interest in him. He will mull all offers and make a decision when the time is right. The current B.League season is currently ongoing and a new calendar year typically starts around October. "As to my journey, I'm most likely headed to Japan. I think right now there are 4-5 offers na from different teams," Ravena said. "We'll wait for other offers and see which is the best decision possible," he added. With a few months to spare though, Thirdy is 100 percent with Gilas Pilipinas. The national team, not counting the cancelled game against Thailand, won't play in the 2021 FIBA Asia Cup qualifiers until November of this year. The cadets will train with multiple stops abroad as the Gilas program continues with its development aimed for the future. "Right now I'm focusing with Gilas, now that we're here," he said. "We'll have an out-of-the-country trip para sa training lang. Right now that's my focus," Thirdy added.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 6th, 2020

FIBA: Search is on for Gilas Pilipinas next naturalized player

As of right now, Gilas Pilipinas has no naturalized player on deck. The hope for the national team is to have more than a couple now moving forward. Ateneo's Angelo Kouame, the Blue Eagles' young 6'10" behemoth out of Ivory Coast, is one of the main priority players for Gilas Pilipinas. "We've just put the name of Angelo Kouame in the [naturalization] process, Ideally for me, I think if we can have three names, so that you have also options," SBP President Al Panlilio said. "So that's a work in progress," he added. Other names in consideration are PBA players Chris McCullough of San Miguel and Justin Brownlee of Barangay Ginebra. However, in the case of McCullough, the talks with him are in the very early stages of development. "We reached out to him. He's committed to be part of it. I guess at the end of the day, commitment and an agreement on a commercial term is different. We're in the early stages of talking to him," Panlilio said on McCullough. "Angelo pa lang so far. And I think, I heard Congressman Mikee Romero put Justin Brownlee's name in the process, so we'll see," he added. While Gilas' search for its next naturalized player is important, finding a head coach also takes priority. Said future head coach might want an input for a naturalized player, after all. "We're also looking into really a full time coach, right? So, parang we're trying to balance. It depends also on the coach. Baka mamaya ibang player ang gusto niya, di ba. So we wanna make sure lang that we don't get somebody that might not fit the program," Panlilio said. "It's quite a difficult time to decide. So my first task in fact is to really maybe start the search for a full time coach for the national team. It starts from there," he added. — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 28th, 2020

Mocon the unlucky cut in Gilas Pilipinas lineup

MANILA, Philippines – Javee Mocon failed to make the cut in Gilas Pilipinas' lineup for the FIBA Asia Cup 2021 Qualifiers as the coaching staff decided to inject youth into the roster as foundation for the future.  Interim head coach Mark Dickel explained that they felt amateur standouts Thirdy Ravena ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 20th, 2020

SBP bares Gilas Final 12 for 2021 FIBA Asia Cup qualifiers

Kiefer Ravena bannered the list of players who made the final Gilas lineup set to play in a road game against Indonesia on Feb. 23 to start the 2021 FIBA Asia Cup qualifiers. Gilas head coach Mark Dickel bared the composition of the 12-man squad on Wednesday night after the team’s training. Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas formally announced the composition of the team through their Twitter account. Our #GilasPilipinas Men’s Team versus Indonesia for the FIBA Asia Cup Qualifier game this February 23 ! ???????? #LabanPilipinas #ParaSaBayan #SBP pic.twitter.com/FKKZ6V91AA — SBP (@officialSBPinc) February 19, 2020 PBA players CJ Perez, Troy Rosario, Poy Erram, RR Pogoy, Abu Tratter and Justin Chua made the cut together with Dwight Ramos, Matt Nieto, Isaac Go, Juan Gomez de Liano and Thirdy Ravena. “Look, it was not an easy team to pick,” said Dickel. “We had numerous combinations that we could have gone with, and in a few positions we felt like we had covered it with some young players, so, they had an advantage thinking towards the future.” Javee Mocon, Jaydee Tungcab and Rey Suerte were listed as reserves. Gilas is set to fly to Indonesia on Friday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 19th, 2020

FIBA: Young guns to step up in post-Blatche era Gilas

The plan is to get a pool of naturalized players eventually, but to start the 2021 FIBA Asia Cup qualifiers, Gilas Pilipinas is going full All-Filipino. The Philippines has no naturalized player listed in its original 24-man lineup for the pair of games against Thailand and Indonesia this month. It's a different kind of challenge as Gilas has relied on naturalized players like Marcus Douthit and Andray Blatche — even Christian Standhardinger if we're being technical about it — through the years. "Tulung-tulong na lang talaga," veteran Marc Pingris said. Pingris has some experience in pushing Gilas to key victories in the absence of naturalized players. The Philippines got its ticket to the 2014 FIBA World Cup with an All-Filipino crew. "Kahit wala kaming naturalized player, ang dami naman okay na player na bata," Pingris added. For this brand-new Gilas team, Pingris sees a different approach for the FIBA Asia Cup qualifiers. All the fresh legs in the national team pool will be utilized accordingly says Pingris. The future is certainly bright. "More running game itong team ngayon," Pingris said. "But kailangan nila ng guide, kailangan nila ma-absorb kung paano maglaro sa FIBA, ito future natin eh. Nandito lang kami para i-guide sila," he added.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 10th, 2020