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Dottie makes British Open

Dottie Ardina charged back strong from an early stumble and closed out with a four-under 67 to salvage a share of 20th place while Bianca Pagdanganan ended up tied for 59th in the Marathon LPGA Classic won by American Danielle Kang in Sylvania Sunday......»»

Category: sportsSource: philstar philstarAug 11th, 2020

Dottie makes British Open

Dottie Ardina charged back strong from an early stumble and closed out with a four-under 67 to salvage a share of 20th place while Bianca Pagdanganan ended up tied for 59th in the Marathon LPGA Classic won by American Danielle Kang in Sylvania Sunday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 11th, 2020

Pagdanganan makes big leap in world rankings

Bianca Pagdanganan, who came into the Women’s PGA Championship way down at No. 712 in the world rankings, came out of it at No. 234, posting a massive leap of 478 rungs to shatter the previous best of 280 made by German Sophia Popov in her British Women’s Open romp last August......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 15th, 2020

Pinay aces clinch LPGA major berths

Rookie Bianca Pagdanganan gears up for her first Major test while veteran Dottie Ardina seeks to redeem herself from a mediocre finish in the British Women’s Open as they see action in the KPMG Women’s PGA Championship in two weeks time in Pennsylvania......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 25th, 2020

Pinay aces clinch LPGA major berths

Rookie Bianca Pagdanganan gears up for her first Major test while veteran Dottie Ardina seeks to redeem herself from a mediocre finish in the British Women’s Open as they see action in the KPMG Women’s PGA Championship in two weeks time in Pennsylvania......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 25th, 2020

German shines; Ardina fades

Germany’s Sophia Popov dished out an impeccable all-around game to fire an eagle-spiked 67 and storm ahead by three as Dottie Ardina faded with a 76 despite near-ideal conditions at Royal Troon in the third round of the British Women’s Open in Scotland Saturday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2020

Ardina blows birdie start, limps with 78

A stab at spotlight came too brief for Dottie Ardina, who birdied the opening hole then succumbed to Royal Troon’s exacting challenge so typical in a links course and hobbled with a 78 at the start of the British Women’s Open in Scotland Thursday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 21st, 2020

Ardina limps with wind-blown 78

A stab at spotlight came too brief for Dottie Ardina, who birdied the opening hole then succumbed to Royal Troon’s exacting challenge so typical in a links course and hobbled with a 78 at the start of the British Women’s Open in Scotland Thursday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 21st, 2020

Ardina takes on world s best as British Women s Open unwraps

Dottie Ardina made it to Scotland just in time for one practice round at the Royal Troon Old Course Wednesday, not quite enough for a player set to slug it out with the world’s best in the AIG British Women’s Open unfolding Thursday in Troon......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 19th, 2020

Ardina primes up for British Open, vies in Symetra

Dottie Ardina hones for next week’s Women’s British Open, shuttling from midwest to southwest in search of the form she hopes to whip up in time for one of the LPGA Tour’s golfing majors......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 12th, 2020

Dottie Ardina s breakthrough nets British Open spot

She broke through her longest drought due to lockdown and, in the process, locked in a berth in the AIG British Open......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 10th, 2020

Golf makes a conservative return with an eye on the long run

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer PGA Tour Commissioner Jay Monahan went from wondering if any golf would be played this year to a schedule that resumes next week with a calendar filled through Thanksgiving. What hasn't changed is his belief that the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic isn't over just because golf is back. “I don't think it's over," Monahan said Friday in a telephone interview. “I'm really confident in the plan. But you spend a lot of your time, given the uncertainty, thinking through scenarios that could play out. That's what we'll continue to do. We won't be comfortable until we're told we can be comfortable. That will be when we have a vaccine and there's no risk.” Golf is the second major sports league to return behind NASCAR, which began racing three weeks ago and ran nine national series races in a span of 14 days. The Charles Schwab Challenge next week in Fort Worth, Texas, has one of the strongest fields in Colonial's rich history, starting with the top five players from the world ranking. There will be no spectators for at least a month, even though Texas Gov. Greg Abbott this week moved the state to Phase III in the recovery that allows outdoor events at 50% capacity. “We've developed a safety plan that doesn't include spectators. That's what we stand by,” Monahan said. “We want to have a sustained return. If you think about a run to go through the FedEx Cup, we want to make sure week to week we're not taking on unnecessary risk.” Monahan said he is “not the arbiter of confidence,” rather it comes from guidance of health experts at all levels and a plan that involves testing players, caddies and essential personnel as much as twice a week — trying to create a bubble for the traveling circus that is golf. Players were mailed a test kit and were recommended to use it before they travel. They will be tested when they arrive at tournaments and before they leave if they're on charter flights the tour has arranged, and then the process is repeated at the next tournament. Thermal readings and health surveys are required daily, along with sanitizing and social distancing. “It's the only manner we could return,” he said. The tour added another layer this week in a deal with South Dakota-based Sanford Health to have mobile labs at every tournament, with capacity to get results in a matter of hours without taking away resources from the markets where they play. Monahan said CBS Sports is creating its own bubble for the telecast, with Jim Nantz the only person in the booth and other analysts working remotely. Ninety days will have passed from the opening round of The Players Championship, which was canceled the next day, until the first tee shot at Colonial. “We all went home dealing with the same questions,” he said. “How do I get a complete understanding of where we are with the virus and all the elements? How do we recognize that we're turning off (canceling) 11 events? How do you think about resumption and at the same time develop a safety and testing program, not our area of expertise?" The reset began with the majors picking new dates — the British Open was canceled — with the PGA Championship in San Francisco moving to Aug. 6-9, the U.S. Open in New York on Sept. 17-20, and the Masters on Nov. 12-15. “At that time it was very unclear where we would be with safety and testing,” Monahan said. “It could have been earlier than we are, it could have been through points of next year. Information was changing by the minute.” Now that golf is returning, Monahan couldn't predict when spectators would return. He said the tour has worked with tournaments the last several years on building a reserve fund for a crisis such as this. “If you’re not selling tickets, and there’s not hospitality, you don’t have the pro-am experience or the honorary observer program for the sponsor ... that’s a significant financial impact on those tournaments, and the impact on the way tournaments connect with their communities,” he said. Tournaments and their title sponsors still have managed to raise money for their local charities. The Zurich Classic matched last year's donation of $1.5 million to a children's services foundation. The John Deere Classic expects $10 million in donations, even though it canceled its July event. The pandemic is not the only talking point as golf tries to get back on track. The tour on Friday posted Monahan's letter to staff and players on the nation's civil unrest, which the AP first reported on Tuesday. He had a 10-minute video conversation with Harold Varner III, one of three PGA Tour members of black heritage, who wrote passionately on social media on George Floyd, killed when a white police officer held a knee to the back of Floyd's neck while the black man was handcuffed. The conversation was scheduled before the protests began, and Varner was chosen because he's on the Player Advisory Council and golf was ready to resume. “We'll be talking about COVID and civil and social unrest for some time,” Monahan said. “Next week will not be an exception on that front.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 6th, 2020

Masters heartaches walk the fairways with green jackets

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer For every fist pump from Tiger Woods, there are images of Greg Norman's lonely walk across Hogan Bridge as he loses the last of his six-shot lead and heads for more heartache at the Masters. Jack Nicklaus had his famous charge on the back nine. Ed Sneed infamously lost a three-shot lead with bogeys on his last three holes, and then watched Fuzzy Zoeller win the first sudden-death playoff in 1979. “All the condolences in the world wouldn't fix the hurt inside him,” said Tom Watson, who also was in the playoff, as he sat next to a shaken Sneed for an interview when it was over. At the Masters, players who never slipped on a green jacket can be as memorable as those who did. Tom Weiskopf holds a footnote in Masters history with the most runner-up finishes — four — without ever winning. He was tied for the lead on the back nine in 1974. He had the lead with three holes to play in 1975 when he made bogey on the 16th hole as Nicklaus went on to a fifth green jacket. “I know one thing,” Weiskopf said that day. “I will win this tournament one day, and my green coat will be tailor made.” Curtis Strange didn't suffer as much as Norman or Weiskopf, or players like Tom Kite, David Duval and Ken Venturi, all of whom had multiple chances. He still thinks about being tied at the turn with Larry Mize in 1987, the year Mize holed a 140-foot chip in a playoff to beat — who else? — Norman. His Masters memory is more tied to 1985, when he had a four-shot lead on the back nine and twice hit into water on the par 5s as Bernhard Langer won the first of two green jackets. “In my case, and most others, the sting of defeat lasts longer than the thrill of victory,” Strange said Friday. “Is that a sick way to look at it? Maybe for those who have never been there. But it's reality.” That's true at most big golf tournaments. Even so, Strange believes it is amplified at the Masters because it's the one major that returns every year to the course, especially one as dynamic as Augusta National. It takes something spectacular to remember failures at other majors — Jean Van de Velde at Carnoustie, Phil Mickelson at Winged Foot, Mike Reid at Kemper Lakes in the PGA Championship. Jordan Spieth went wire-to-wire and tied the 72-hole record set by Woods. One year later, he lost a five-shot lead on the back nine, highlighted by a quadruple-bogey 7 on the par-3 12th hole. Which one is more memorable? “It goes back to the familiarity every golf fan has with the course," Duval said. “It's not like going to Pebble every 10 years, or Oakmont. I think the continuity has a lot to do with it.” Norman stands out as the face of failure at the Masters, even though Weiskopf has more silver medals. Then again, Weiskopf never lost a six-shot lead as Norman did in 1996. Weiskopf didn't lose in a playoff to an improbable chip. Norman contributed to his own failures. Often forgotten are his four straight birdies to tie for the lead in 1986, only to send a 4-iron into the gallery on the 18th and make bogey. He did the same thing three years later, making three straight birdies only to come up short with a 5-iron and hit a poor chip to bogey No. 18 and finish one out of a playoff. Norman has company, of course. Venturi shot 80 in the final round of 1956 with a chance to become the only amateur in a green jacket. He lost as a pro four years later when Arnold Palmer birdied the last two to win by one shot. Duval was in the mix four straight years and never won the green jacket. He missed out on a playoff in 1998 when Mark O'Meara birdied the 18th hole from 20 feet. “Don't worry, David, nobody ever makes that putt,” chairman Jack Stephens told him as they watched from Jones Cabin. The run ended in 2001 when Duval was the last player to try to stop Woods from a sweep of the majors. But his 7-iron flew the 16th green — he still doesn't know how — and his birdie putts from 12 feet and 5 feet on the last two holes didn't fall. No loss was more painful to watch than Scott Hoch missing a 2-foot par putt on the 10th hole in a playoff in 1989. Faldo beat him with a birdie on the next hole. Mention the name Roberto de Vicenzo, and the first thing that comes to mind is not his two-shot victory over Nicklaus in the 1967 British Open. It's the playoff he missed at the Masters the following spring in the cruelest ruling. The Argentine signed for a 4 on the 17th hole when he made a 3. He had to keep the higher score and lost by one to Bob Goalby. “What a stupid I am,” De Vicenzo said. A simple mistake. The wrong kind of memory. There's no shortage of those at the Masters......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 11th, 2020

Ardina safely makes cut with second 70

Dottie Ardina bucked a late start and hit two birdies, preserving a two-under 70 in tough conditions to make it to the weekend play of the ISPS Handa Vic Open being paced by Swede Madalene Sagstrom in Victoria, Australia yesterday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 7th, 2020

Boxing: Filipino-Emirati boxer Fahad Al Bloushi hopes to make Pinoy community proud at Rotunda Rumble 2 in Dubai

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates – Lightweight prospect Fahad Al Bloushi is in high spirits ahead of his highly-awaited professional debut, determined to make not only the whole Emirati nation proud but the sizeable Filipino community here as well. After all, the 23-year-old Dubai-based starlet is proud of his Filipino heritage as he makes his pro bow on Friday’s huge ‘Rotunda Rumble 2’ event, made possible by D4G Promotions in association with Round 10 Boxing Club and MTK Global at Caesars Palace Bluewaters Dubai. “I really worked hard for this, and I hope to make the Filipino community proud too,” said Al Bloushi, whose mother Winona Bicodo, traces her roots to Dingle in the province of Iloilo, one of the more popular tourist destinations in central Philippines. An accomplished amateur who only took the sport seriously in 2015 and represented United Arab Emirates in the Indonesia Asian Games the following year, Al Bloushi said he has embraced his Filipino lineage with open arms. “I’ve been to the Philippines four times. The first time I went was when I was eight years old. The last time was in 2015. I love it there, they are lovely people,” he said, his eyes glowing while reminiscing wonderful memories. One of three active UAE pro boxers aside from the popular Majid Al Naqbi and fellow debutant Sultan Al-Nuaimi, Al Bloushi has vowed to put his best foot forward in the stacked event headlined by world-ranked star Jack Catterall and aired live on ESPN+ in association with Top Rank and on iFL TV worldwide. “I’m excited to get in that ring,” Al Bloushi said. “I’m thankful that I’m turning pro the right way which is in my hometown. I’m ready to put on a show.” Also in action on the bill are fast-rising British phenom Thomas Patrick Ward, Pakistani hero Muhammad Waseem, Indian star Vijender Singh, Kazakhstan sensation Abilkhaiyr Shegaliyev and Irish favorite Rohan Date in what can be considered as a global boxing party in the Middle East. Al Bloushi, however, is keen on getting a fair share of the spotlight. “My short term goal is to be the first Emirati to win a world title belt. For the long term? To be undisputed in two weight divisions,” he concluded......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 18th, 2019

Miguel Tabuena gains ground; Dottie Ardina makes cut

Miguel Tabuena came out smoking with four birdies in the first six holes and went on to card a 65 and wheel back into contention in the third round of the Volvo China Open in Shenzhen yesterday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 4th, 2019

Phil Mickelson set to return at CareerBuilder Challenge

JOHN NICHOLSON, AP Sports Writer br /> LA QUINTA, Calif. (AP) — Phil Mickelson is set to play in the CareerBuilder Challenge, returning from two sports hernia surgeries a week earlier than he originally expected. 'I feel good and I want to play,' Mickelson said Wednesday in a statement. 'I don't know where my game is, but I figure the only way to find out is to play.' He'll face an unusual wet and chilly start in the desert, with rain expected overnight and Thursday morning and then again Friday. The forecast high for Thursday was 62 degrees, dipping to 59 on Friday. The 46-year-old Mickelson had surgery Oct. 19 — three days after tying for eighth in the season-opening Safeway Open — and again Dec. 12. He has been hitting balls for a week and played a practice round Wednesday. In his first year as the tournament ambassador, Mickelson stuck to his normal routine of playing and practicing at The Madison Club instead of one of the three tournament courses. He wasn't available for comment beyond his short statement. The Hall of Famer was scheduled to open Thursday morning at La Quinta Country Club, then head to PGA West to play the Jack Nicklaus Tournament Course on Friday, the Stadium Course on Saturday and, if he makes the cut, the final round Sunday. Mickelson won the 2002 and 2004 events and tied for third last year. Winless since the 2013 British Open, the 42-time PGA Tour winner plans to play the Farmers Insurance Open next week in his hometown of San Diego and the Waste Management Phoenix Open the following week. Jason Dufner won last year, beating David Lingmerth with a par on the second hole of a playoff. 'Possibly going to have some weather issues this week, which will make it a little bit more challenging,' Dufner said. 'But just excited to be back, excited to be back playing again. Took some time off at the end of the year, so played a couple weeks in Hawaii.' Patrick Reed is the top-ranked player in the field at No. 9. He won the 2014 tournament. 'I never played here when it rained before; it's always sunny and beautiful and perfect,' Reed said. 'The golf courses aren't that long, by the numbers, but if it starts getting cold, now the ball's not traveling. If it gets wet, ball's not going to travel, either. Then also, if it's raining while you're playing, not having that friction on the golf club, the ball's not going to go as far as well. So, it's just going to make it a lot longer.' In 2014, he shot 63-63-63-71 to break the PGA Tour record for relation to par for the first 54 holes at 27 under and become the first player in tour history to open with three rounds of 63 or better. Two other PGA West courses were used that year in the pro-am event. 'These two golf courses are harder than the other two,' Reed said. 'And I don't think it's as much as length as it is you can get away with some golf shots on the other ones. Here, you can get penalized for hitting a poor tee shot or poor iron shot. And the biggest difference I feel like is for the amateurs. The amateurs over there, they could hit some loose shots and they're fine. Over here, when they hit a loose shot, they're really struggling and it just seems to make the rounds a little longer. And now if you're adding weather, some of these amateurs are going to struggle.' Brendan Steele, the Safeway Open winner from nearby Idyllwild, played the PGA West courses as a junior. He also played in a rain-plagued Golden State two-man team event. 'That two-man team event, it actually dumped and we got cut down to 27 holes and barely got in nine holes the second day,' Steele said. 'So, it was really, really bad. So, I have seen them that way. I may be one of the few guys in the field that has seen them that way.' .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 19th, 2017

Eala shocks fancied British rival in Spain

By Kristel Satumbaga     Teen sensation Alex Eala launched her title bid in the $25,000 women’s tournament in style Wednesday, stunning eighth seed Francesca Jones of Great Britain, 6-3, 7-6 (3)  at the Las Palmas de Gran Canaria in Spain. The 15-year-old Australian Open Juniors doubles champion proved more superior and determined as she produced […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsNov 19th, 2020

Princess Diana makes dramatic debut in The Crown

More than two decades after her death, Princess Diana's ill-fated entry into the British royal family is the main storyline in the long-awaited fourth season of the hit Netflix drama "The Crown.".....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 14th, 2020

Johnson& rsquo;s back; Funk makes cut

Hong Kong—With just over a week to go until the strange spectacle of an autumn US Masters, world number one Dustin Johnson will be glad to finally get back on course this week at the Houston Open......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 3rd, 2020

British PM announces new lockdown for England

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson announces a new coronavirus lockdown for England from Thursday to December 2. However, schools will remain open this time around......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 1st, 2020