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DID YOU KNOW?: Rex Intal is into painting

Rex Intal is an accomplished volleyball player. He won three straight titles in the UAAP while playing for Ateneo de Manila University. He also collected championships in the commercial league and made history when he helped the national team capture a silver medal in the 2019 Southeast Asian Games. But did you know that Rex is also a talented painter?      “Growing up siguro I didn’t know I had talent in art,” Intal told ABS-CBN Sports. “I kept drawing lang and thought my works were normal and anyone could do that.” He likes to draw, but didn’t realize then that he’s actually good at it.    “I compared my artworks with my classmates’ and I thought na baka tinatamad lang sila, haha!” he said. Rex shared that it was during grade school that people started to recognize his talents.    “I think I was Grade 2 ata when I copied and drew Spiderman from the newspaper, then everyone got impressed,” he recalled. “Since then I was hailed as the class artist, haha!” got to squeeze in some time to paint before i go to sleep! #wip pic.twitter.com/xzqqtVgynl — Rex Intal (@rexintal) May 2, 2020 The interest in the arts according to Rex runs in his family. Actually, his brother Phoenix Fuel Masters forward JC launched his first solo exhibit last February after rekindling his interest in the arts recently. “My mother, and two of my brothers, JC and JR have talent in art but they never pursued it,” said Rex. “Well, except for Kuya JC who rekindled his passion two years ago and ventured the art world.” But back then, just like other kids his age, Rex had other interests.   “Growing up I never wanted to be an artist,” he admitted. “I wanted what the other kids dreamed of, a businessman, a doctor, an NBA player, an astronaut,” Rex continued. “I knew so little growing up and I just fixated my mindset na I wanted a lucrative job in the future.” It didn’t help that no one in his family, although gifted in the art, seriously pursued it. “And I knew na I had no one to lean on kasi growing up, ako na lang ‘yung nagdo-drawing,” said Rex. “So I knew I had talent but didn’t wanna pursue it like what they did.” His artistic side had to take a backseat further more when Rex discovered his athletic talent. Following the footsteps of his high-flying and athletic brother JC when he donned the blue and white as part of the Ateneo basketball team, Rex landed a spot on the Blue Eagles volleyball squad. Quick abstract portrait exercise with @MasonNjigha as my model pic.twitter.com/409VYZRJH4 — Rex Intal (@rexintal) May 3, 2020 pic.twitter.com/I0AjHNpo8n — Rex Intal (@rexintal) May 3, 2020 pic.twitter.com/Ca8XgWWxPj — Rex Intal (@rexintal) May 3, 2020 But like soulmates destined for each other, Rex and his love for art crossed paths once again. “Entering college, I took up BS Management in my first year. Latter part of my first year, I was so focused on my course, but I thought it was too broad for me,” he said. “That’s when I saw the BFA Information Design students,” Rex added. “I took a look at their curriculum and saw Drawing, Painting, and Graphic Design classes and I felt that urge and passion again.” He felt his heart beat once again. “I felt na this was more fit for me,” he said. “So in my second year I shifted to BFA Information Design and that’s when I made my first painting.” His first artwork? “It was a dog lang and my brother, JC, wanted to buy it,” said Rex.    “I never really painted ‘til after college. My teammate asked me to paint for his thesis so I painted another piece and my brother wanted to buy it again.” JC, who like his younger brother, found his way back into painting, gave Rex the confidence to pursue his artistic craft.   “Then around a year and a half ago, my brother got inspired to paint. His works are abstract so we have different styles but that gave me the confidence to paint,” he said. “Before kasi I thought I was alone lang in this field but my brother paved the way in the art world and I wanted to follow his footsteps, just like how I followed his footsteps in being an athlete,” Rex continued. “We both represented the country in sports and we also entered the arts industry but different fields. He plays basketball I play volleyball. He paints abstract I paint portraits.” Art also serves as a way for the Intal brothers to bond. “Sometimes we would paint together in his house and my other brothers would either watch or join in so nagiging bonding na rin,” said Rex, who also found a way to help the frontliners battling the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic through his art.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnMay 4th, 2020

National men s volleyball team standout Rex Intal uses art to help frontliners

The local volleyball community is doing its share to help the frontliners and vulnerable communities amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. From jersey auctions to fund-raising drives, volleyball stars and fans have been working together to extend help to those in need in this time of crisis.   National men’s volleyball team member Rex Intal is no different. But the 2019 Southeast Asian Games silver medalist used his artistic side, his personal touch in his effort to help. The middle blocker posted on his Twitter account his yet to be finished art piece which he intends to sell to raise funds for medical frontliners. got to squeeze in some time to paint before i go to sleep! #wip pic.twitter.com/xzqqtVgynl — Rex Intal (@rexintal) May 2, 2020 The Ateneo de Manila University product shared that the heroic effort of medical frontliners in the fight against the contagion was his inspiration in creating his oil painting.                            “Got inspired while I was watching news and videos online,” said the three-time UAAP champion. “I saw and felt the frontliners sacrifice and dedication.” “So, in this artwork I hope I could help and support their ongoing battle because they are the real heroes in this pandemic,” he added. The amount the painting will raise, according to Intal, will be used to buy personal protective equipment and other essentials for medical frontliners. “Once finished I will put it up for sale or for auction and 100% of the proceeds will go to the frontliners’ essential needs like PPE’s, etc.,” he said. “Haven’t put that much thought pa which foundation, hospital, or wherever ko ido-donate.” Intal posted a sketch of his painting on his Twitter account last month. “I take like two to three hours per session while painting this one,” he said. “And siguro mga two to three days interval din kasi I’m letting it dry pa kaya natatagalan. In those 2-3 days that’s where I squeeze in some time to exercise painting and paint other stuff.”    --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 4th, 2020

Biden, Trump duel for Florida state

TAMPA (AFP) — Donald Trump and Joe Biden dueled Thursday over the crucial state of Florida, painting radically different visions of the United States as big new GDP figures showed an improving economy even as Covid-19 infections reached record highs. With Trump touting an early end to the health crisis, while warning of rampaging “socialists,” […] The post Biden, Trump duel for Florida state appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsOct 30th, 2020

Colors of the Earth: Rodelio “Waway” Saway holds CGM Talk on Talaandig soil painting

In celebration of National Indigenous People’s Month, Casa Gorordo Museum (CGM) will hold an online talk titled “Colors of the Earth: The Talaandig Soil Painters”, a discourse on the Talaandig culture and their soil paintings, on October 30, 2020, 1pm to be streamed on Facebook. Resource speaker Rodelio Saway, also known as Datu Salakup and […] The post Colors of the Earth: Rodelio “Waway” Saway holds CGM Talk on Talaandig soil painting appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 27th, 2020

Actors, artists put on red lipstick as Angel Locsin calls for 'notoredtagging

  Actors and artists showed solidarity with Angel Locsin and female celebrities vocal about social causes by painting their lips red. Locsin denounced the red-tagging aimed at her and her family members in an Instagram post last Friday, Oct. 23, where she used the hashtags #NoToRedTagging and #YesToRedLipstick. She declared that she, her sister Ella Colmenares and […] The post Actors, artists put on red lipstick as Angel Locsin calls for #notoredtagging appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 25th, 2020

Literary Fiesta

Filipino dining in Philippine literature Pahiyas festival, illustration by Manuel Baldemor It’s not Pinoy dining if it’s not a feast. And our Philippine literature has told many stories that illustrate our healthy appetite, traditional palayok (clay pot) cooking, siesta, fiesta, flavors, and fusions.  Doña Victorina fans herself amid the smoke of a roasting pig. Her guests are coming, their noses up in the air sniffing the flavors. On the table, adorned with gilded copa de vino (wine glass) and plato, are sinigang na dalag with alibambang leaves, callos, adobo, tinola, and pochero. Everybody was in high spirits. Never mind if the doña is broke (to begin with). At least her guests are full. Jose Rizal drew a perfect picture of the Pinoy fiesta and salu-salo (gathering) culture. Our national hero himself loves to eat. He prefers a hefty serving of champorado and tuyo for breakfast. For dessert, he likes minatamis na santol (sweetened santol) made from boiled santol slices soaked for three days in hugas bigas (water used to wash rice). Before starving in Europe, where he published El Filibusterismo, Rizal would feast in carneng asada (beefsteak with sauce), made from lean meat marinated in olive oil, lime juice, and parsley and served with fried potatoes. Gabriela Silang loved pinakbet. Emilio Aguinaldo listed sardines with tomatoes among his favorites. Marcelo H. del Pilar would die (pun intended) for his apparent favorite, pochero, the local version of the Spanish cocido. Andres Bonifacio got his strength and protein source in nilitsong manok sa zaha (grilled chicken wrapped in sampaloc and banana leaves). The Filipino salu-salo Never mind if some of our celebrated dishes are not “purely” Pinoy. “What is Filipino food and how does food become Filipino?” asks the late food critic Doreen Fernandez. She argued that food only became Pinoy by process of indigenization, like patis (fish sauce) put in a foreign dish. And this is how Pinoy fusion came to life. What we have on our modern plates are many fusions, crazy or ingenious, like paella with lechon, sinigang na steak, adobong tapa, pancit with kangkong. Yes, you get the picture.  Could their favorite Filipino flavors be the reason behind the intelligence and nationalism of our heroes Rizal and Bonifacio? Too bad, many young Pinoys nowadays barely know what minatamis na santol is, or any Pinoy traditional merienda for that matter. What replaced maruya, nilagang kamote, turon, kutsinta, and ginataang mais are French fries, burger, pizza, and pasta. You know what they say: You are what you eat.   In another table setting, Padre Damaso looks across the dining table. Everybody’s enjoying tinola, a stew of chicken and green papaya, but not him. Who wants chicken neck for lunch? He didn’t finish his plate. And this, people, was how the concepts of degustation and small plates were born. They’re not, after all, a French discovery or New York’s. We can blame our mañaña habit. We’re too slow to grab the credit. And oh, we are pioneers of the culture of not finishing plates, too. Blame these all to Padre Damaso (or Jose Rizal?). The tinola brouhaha scene in Noli Me Tangere started it all.  Lechon haus mural by boonsai While it’s rude in other cultures not to devour all the food served on the plate, in the Philippines, it’s not. Pinoy eating tradition tells you it’s okay to have leftovers. Telenovela , movies, and literature are great examples. When a family fights over the dining table, the father (or any member) walks away with an unfinished plate. In Ibong Adarna, over a scrumptious dinner, the brothers were all too busy planning how to catch the elusive bird that they forgot to finish their plate.       Besides books, paintings also tell our delicious food experience. Fernando Amorsolo captured Pinoy eating habits in his painting Afternoon Meal of the Rice Workers. It shows Pinoy families cooking meals in a palayok and eating under the shade of a tree, seemingly ready to sleep after an afternoon feast. With all the food trends coming and going on our plates and literature pages flying off to oblivion, what remains steadfast in our eating habit is this: Siesta. –NICKKY FAUSTINE P. DE GUZMAN.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 18th, 2020

Roque spoke too soon

Presidential Spokesman Harry Roque almost succeeded in painting his boss, President Duterte, into a corner on the House speakership row, until the unexpected happened, i.e, the coup pulled by majority of the congressmen to oust the current Speaker, Taguig-Pateros Rep. Alan Peter Cayetano.Presidential Spokesman Harry Roque almost succeeded in painting his boss, President Duterte, into a corner on the House speakership row, until the unexpected happened, i.e, the coup pulled by majority of the congressmen to oust the current Speaker, Taguig-Pateros Rep. Alan Peter Cayetano......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 16th, 2020

Salingoy Art Group member, grand prize winner sa painting contest

Salingoy Art Group member, grand prize winner sa painting contest.....»»

Category: newsSource:  bicolstandardRelated NewsOct 14th, 2020

Doctors coats turned into COVID-fighting art in Panama

Artist Genaro Rodriguez was so moved after being commissioned to turn a COVID-19 doctor's white coat into a piece of art that he likened the experience to "painting a superhero's cape.".....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 3rd, 2020

WATCH: Ilocos Norte fresh grad’s amazing room renovation

Sonder Evennys Agustin talks about his room’s Japanese-inspired extreme makeover and the importance of bringing art into our lives Spending his days and nights indoors due to the health crisis is not the experience 22-year-old Sonder Evennys Agustin thought he was going to have after graduating from civil engineering. As the days went on and he tried to find things to fill up his days, he realized he had been staring at a blank canvas this whole time. Over a month, within the four walls that had become his world, Sonder transformed his room into a tranquil Japanese-inspired space. “The main reason [I transformed my room] is gusto kong maging productive ngayong lockdown (The main reason I transformed my room is that I wanted to be productive during the lockdown),” says the Ilocos Norte native in an interview with Manila Bulletin Lifestyle. “Kaya po naisipan ko pong gumawa nga mga furniture and then naisipan ko na din pong irenovate ang room ko (I thought of making furniture and renovating my room).” A WAVE OF INSPIRATION Sonder imitates The Great Wave off Kanagawa in the face of his walls Big in Japan On YouTube, Sonder shares the process in creating his Japanese style furniture, including a chic kohiteburu, or coffee table, as well as a floating table. The eye-catching masterpiece of the room, however, is his mural recreating The Great Wave off Kanagawa created by Katsushika Hokusai in the late Edo period of Japan. It truly ties the whole room together and elevates it to a whole other level. Hokusai’s woodblock print, created almost two centuries ago, is one of the most recognizable and influential art pieces in the world. Original prints are on display top museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the British Museum in London. Artist in residence Of course, any plans to travel to those museum-filled cities to see the original are grounded as of the moment. But Sonder’s beautiful recreation shows that we don’t need to travel to experience and appreciate art in our daily lives. “As a local artist, important po para sa aking na to bring art into a room,” Sonder adds. “Kasi, isa ito sa mga nagbibigay buhay sa isang lugar. Kumbaga po is sila nagbibigay lasa sa isang pagkain (Because it is a live-giving space. It is like giving flavor to food).” “And dahil love ko po ang art, dapat lang na ilagay ko po sa kwarto ko po para ipaalala sa akin na ang Diyos ay may binigay sa akin na talent na dapat ko lang pong ipagmalaki (And because I love art, I just have to put it in my room to remind me that God has given me a talent that I should be proud of).” THE GREAT ROOM Sonder’s renovated bedroom Sonder says that his artistic talents and sensibilities come from both sides of the family. As a child, he competed in various drawing and painting competitions. He even placed first in the Department of Education’s (DepEd) National Festival of Talents (NFOT) in 2014 when it was hosted in Olongapo City. While his extreme makeover room edition took 30 days to put together, Sonder wants to make it clear that it took a while to save up for the big renovation. Even while studying, he accepted commissions for paintings, drawings, and murals. But it was all worth it. “Kung gusto mo talagang maka-achieve ng kahit ano, huwag kang mawalan ng determinasyon na matapos ang goal mo (If there is something you want to achieve, do not lose your determination to finish your goals),” Sonder adds. “Wala pong mahirap sa taong may determinasyon sa buhay. Maging positibo lang sa buhay. Yung mga negatibo dapat naiwaksi (There is nothing difficult for a person with determination in their life. Just stay positive in life and disregard the negatives).” .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 15th, 2020

Test Your IQ Quiz – How to Discover your IQ Online

When you hear about gifted kids on the news, the next thing the reported will say is how high their IQ is. Or if a kid prodigy is discovered, say in piano, painting or in math, again their IQ will be reported. It makes you wonder, how do they measure IQ. What even IS IQ […] The post Test Your IQ Quiz – How to Discover your IQ Online appeared first on Pinoy Parazzi......»»

Category: newsSource:  pinoyparazziRelated NewsSep 15th, 2020

Matapos ang inisan, topakan: Bianca Gonzalez at asawang si JC Intal first time nag-date simula ng quarantine

“Nakaka-miss din pala to be out and eat out.” Ito ang sweet na pagbabalita ng TV host na si Bianca Gonzalez matapos na sila ng kanyang mister na si PBA cager JC Intal ay mag-dinner date sa kauna-unahang pagkakataon simula pa ng isailalim ang bansa sa quarantine noong Marso. “Our very first date since the […] The post Matapos ang inisan, topakan: Bianca Gonzalez at asawang si JC Intal first time nag-date simula ng quarantine appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 5th, 2020

SEA GAMES: The silver that glittered like gold

When the editorial staff of ABS-CBN Sports was tasked to come up with our most memorable coverage, it didn’t take long for this writer to respond. The Philippine men’s volleyball team’s Southeast Asian Games semifinal match was the first thing that came to mind. Pesonally, that game against the highly-fancied Thailand squad topped all the countless volleyball matches that I’ve covered in my career. I’m at a loss for words on how to describe the emotions I felt that chilly night of December 8, 2019. Around 6,700 fans filled the PhilSports Arena in Pasig City not knowing that what they were about to witness was something historic. A magical night that would take away the frustrations they felt the day before when the more popular women’s team finished the preliminary round winless. For us sportswriters covering that assignment, we knew the Filipinos were up for a tough ride. Thailand ruled the last four editions of the event. On the other hand, the Philippines’ last significant outing in the biennial meet was a bronze medal finish back in 1991 – or when the current national team’s oldest member, setter Jessie Lopez was just five-years old.      Did we doubt our own team? Let’s just say we prayed to the high heavens to give us something positive to write about. But don’t get us wrong. Those who followed the formation and preparation of the squad knew it would yield results come the SEA Games. After all, in all three batches of the Nationals that participated in the regional sports meet since 2015, this particular team had the longest time to prepare – around eight months to be exact. The team’s composition itself looked really promising. For the first time, two of country’s best hitters in Marck Espejo and Bryan Bagunas, who both have experience playing in the Japan V. League,  donned the tricolors together. Espejo returned after skipping the 2017 edition so did his teammates in the 2015 squad Rex Intal and setter Ish Polvorosa. Bagunas was on his second tour of duty along with team captain John Vic De Guzman, Mark Alfafara, RanRan Abdilla and libero Jack Kalingking. Head coach Dante Alinsunurin, who was appointed to handle the team after Oliver Almadro and Sammy Acaylar in 2015 and 2017, respectively, tapped an old hand in Lopez and injected young bloods in playmaker Owa Retamar, Jau Umandal, Kim Malabunga, Ricky Marcos and Francis Saura. As part of their buildup the Nationals joined the Thailand Open Sealect Tuna Championship July last year.          The Filipinos achieved a great feat when they won bronze. Fans were able to witness the Nationals’ campaign via YouTube streaming while we volleyball writers, got to file our full stories through the help of De Guzman and Bagunas (God bless their beautiful hearts) who supplied us with game stats and granted postgame interviews. It’s just a shame I never got to cover the team’s training in Japan when the Nationals’ preparation went on full throttle. (Note: A little confusion in the training camp coverage assignments had me flying to Japan with the women’s squad and Lance Agcaoili of Spin.ph joining the men’s team. But it was a great experience, nonetheless, and I’m grateful for Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. for the opportunity.)     I was as confused as the other sportswriters present during the draw for the group stage a couple of months before the SEA Games when Alinsunurin chose to join the four-team bracket with Indonesia, Vietnam and Cambodia. Those three teams are considered contenders every SEA Games edition. And earning a semifinal spot would be harder compared to the other group composed of Thailand, Myanmar and Singapore. Fortunately, the gamble was worth it. Espejo and Bagunas were superb offensively, Malabunga and Retamar made their presence felt and the Nationals’ blocking shocked Cambodia and Vietnam as the Filipinos swept them both to secure a semis seat.   Then came the steamrolling Indonesians. Honestly, I thought the Nationals would sweep their way to the group’s top seeding. That way the PHI’s would've avoided a semis clash with Thailand. Forced to take on the defending champions, the Filipinos found themselves down in the first set. They got back in the second frame before yielding the third. And when the Thais came to match point, 24-21, in the fourth we all thought it was over. Fans were slowly emptying the bleachers not wanting to see the impending defeat. I was already waiting for the final score. Ready break the result. Then a miracle happened. The Nationals nibbled on the Thais' lead to force a deuce. After another deadlock, the Filipinos stole the set. The fifth frame was classic story of ‘who wants it more will win.’ An extended set made it even more dramatic. I vividly remember that sequence when Bagunas hammered the game-clinching kill off a lob from Lopez. After that all that I can recall was me pumping my fist up in the air and slapping the hardest high-fives I ever did with those inside the press room while howling like a madman.    The national team assured itself of a silver after 42 years. A silver after four freaking decades. They did it. Of course, the Indonesians bullied their way to winning the gold medal in a sweep of the inexperienced Filipinos. But who cares, the host team exceeded its podium expectations. That silver that glittered like gold made that coverage truly memorable. But it never crossed my mind that it would be the last important volleyball event that I will get to report. (Note: It would’ve been the UAAP if not for the health crisis that put all sporting events to a halt. Sad.) And that’s why I ended up writing these last few paragraphs. A farewell from this section. From my first article for this website back on December 1, 2014 – a post-mortem of Petron’s breakthrough title in the Philippine Superliga Grand Prix – to my last published story, these were all written with only one thing in mind: in the service of the Filipino sports fan worldwide. Our run may have not been perfect, of course, we had our flaws. We had our fair share of criticisms from fans, athletes, sports personalities and sometimes even from our partner leagues and properties. We accepted our shortcomings. We tried to be better. But we are proud of what we did. We take pride with how we delivered sports stories through various digital executions that showcased sports beyond the confines of competition. On midnight of September 1 while most of you lay sound asleep, deep in slumber, hopefully, having a good dream and hours away from waking up looking forward to a better day, this website will be snapped out of existence.  More than half a decade of sharing stories to the Filipino sports fan will be seeing its last presence online on Monday – a holiday to celebrate the nation’s heroes. This website will then hear its final buzzer, its final whistle. Thousands of articles – written with passion, dedication and love – will be taken down as this website goes offline together with majority of ABS-CBN Sports’ social media accounts. But soon, hopefully, it will once again see the light of day.    We do hope that you will remember us, for we will remember all of you who made us your Kapamilya.   -- 30 --   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles Mark Escarlote has served as a sub-section editor for ABS-CBN Sports' website since 2014. He is among thousands of ABS-CBN employees who will be retrenched on August 31, 2020.   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 29th, 2020

Trump insults Biden, predicts reelection in New Hampshire rally

US President Donald Trump on Friday insulted his Democratic challenger Joe Biden as "low-IQ" and barely conscious in a New Hampshire speech reinforcing his strategy of painting himself as the defender of the country against socialist mayhem......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 29th, 2020

SEA GAMES: The silver that glittered like gold

When the editorial staff of ABS-CBN Sports was tasked to come up with our most memorable coverage, it didn’t take long for this writer to respond. The Philippine men’s volleyball team’s Southeast Asian Games semifinal match was the first thing that came to mind. Pesonally, that game against the highly-fancied Thailand squad topped all the countless volleyball matches that I’ve covered in my career. I’m at a loss for words on how to describe the emotions I felt that chilly night of December 8, 2019. Around 6,700 fans filled the PhilSports Arena in Pasig City not knowing that what they were about to witness was something historic. A magical night that would take away the frustrations they felt the day before when the more popular women’s team finished the preliminary round winless. For us sportswriters covering that assignment, we knew the Filipinos were up for a tough ride. Thailand ruled the last four editions of the event. On the other hand, the Philippines’ last significant outing in the biennial meet was a bronze medal finish back in 1991 – or when the current national team’s oldest member, setter Jessie Lopez was just five-years old.      Did we doubt our own team? Let’s just say we prayed to the high heavens to give us something positive to write about. But don’t get us wrong. Those who followed the formation and preparation of the squad knew it would yield results come the SEA Games. After all, in all three batches of the Nationals that participated in the regional sports meet since 2015, this particular team had the longest time to prepare – around eight months to be exact. The team’s composition itself looked really promising. For the first time, two of country’s best hitters in Marck Espejo and Bryan Bagunas, who both have experience playing in the Japan V. League,  donned the tricolors together. Espejo returned after skipping the 2017 edition so did his teammates in the 2015 squad Rex Intal and setter Ish Polvorosa. Bagunas was on his second tour of duty along with team captain John Vic De Guzman, Mark Alfafara, RanRan Abdilla and libero Jack Kalingking. Head coach Dante Alinsunurin, who was appointed to handle the team after Oliver Almadro and Sammy Acaylar in 2015 and 2017, respectively, tapped an old hand in Lopez and injected young bloods in playmaker Owa Retamar, Jau Umandal, Kim Malabunga, Ricky Marcos and Francis Saura. As part of their buildup the Nationals joined the Thailand Open Sealect Tuna Championship July last year.          The Filipinos achieved a great feat when they won bronze. Fans were able to witness the Nationals’ campaign via YouTube streaming while we volleyball writers, got to file our full stories through the help of De Guzman and Bagunas (God bless their beautiful hearts) who supplied us with game stats and granted postgame interviews. It’s just a shame I never got to cover the team’s training in Japan when the Nationals’ preparation went on full throttle. (Note: A little confusion in the training camp coverage assignments had me flying to Japan with the women’s squad and Lance Agcaoili of Spin.ph joining the men’s team. But it was a great experience, nonetheless, and I’m grateful for Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. for the opportunity.)     I was as confused as the other sportswriters present during the draw for the group stage a couple of months before the SEA Games when Alinsunurin chose to join the four-team bracket with Indonesia, Vietnam and Cambodia. Those three teams are considered contenders every SEA Games edition. And earning a semifinal spot would be harder compared to the other group composed of Thailand, Myanmar and Singapore. Fortunately, the gamble was worth it. Espejo and Bagunas were superb offensively, Malabunga and Retamar made their presence felt and the Nationals’ blocking shocked Cambodia and Vietnam as the Filipinos swept them both to secure a semis seat.   Then came the steamrolling Indonesians. Honestly, I thought the Nationals would sweep their way to the group’s top seeding. That way the PHI’s would've avoided a semis clash with Thailand. Forced to take on the defending champions, the Filipinos found themselves down in the first set. They got back in the second frame before yielding the third. And when the Thais came to match point, 24-21, in the fourth we all thought it was over. Fans were slowly emptying the bleachers not wanting to see the impending defeat. I was already waiting for the final score. Ready break the result. Then a miracle happened. The Nationals nibbled on the Thais' lead to force a deuce. After another deadlock, the Filipinos stole the set. The fifth frame was classic story of ‘who wants it more will win.’ An extended set made it even more dramatic. I vividly remember that sequence when Bagunas hammered the game-clinching kill off a lob from Lopez. After that all that I can recall was me pumping my fist up in the air and slapping the hardest high-fives I ever did with those inside the press room while howling like a madman.    The national team assured itself of a silver after 42 years. A silver after four freaking decades. They did it. Of course, the Indonesians bullied their way to winning the gold medal in a sweep of the inexperienced Filipinos. But who cares, the host team exceeded its podium expectations. That silver that glittered like gold made that coverage truly memorable. But it never crossed my mind that it would be the last important volleyball event that I will get to report. (Note: It would’ve been the UAAP if not for the health crisis that put all sporting events to a halt. Sad.) And that’s why I ended up writing these last few paragraphs. A farewell from this section. From my first article for this website back on December 1, 2014 – a post-mortem of Petron’s breakthrough title in the Philippine Superliga Grand Prix – to my last published story, these were all written with only one thing in mind: in the service of the Filipino sports fan worldwide. Our run may have not been perfect, of course, we had our flaws. We had our fair share of criticisms from fans, athletes, sports personalities and sometimes even from our partner leagues and properties. We accepted our shortcomings. We tried to be better. But we are proud of what we did. We take pride with how we delivered sports stories through various digital executions that showcased sports beyond the confines of competition. On midnight of September 1 while most of you lay sound asleep, deep in slumber, hopefully, having a good dream and hours away from waking up looking forward to a better day, this website will be snapped out of existence.  More than half a decade of sharing stories to the Filipino sports fan will be seeing its last presence online on Monday – a holiday to celebrate the nation’s heroes. This website will then hear its final buzzer, its final whistle. Thousands of articles – written with passion, dedication and love – will be taken down as this website goes offline together with majority of ABS-CBN Sports’ social media accounts. But soon, hopefully, it will once again see the light of day.    We do hope that you will remember us, for we will remember all of you who made us your Kapamilya.   -- 30 --   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles Mark Escarlote has served as a sub-section editor for ABS-CBN Sports' website since 2014. He is among thousands of ABS-CBN employees who will be retrenched on August 31, 2020.   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 28th, 2020

Filipino artists dedicate murals to Kobe Bryant during Mamba Week

Nike Philippines honored the legacy of Kobe Bryant (1978 – 2020) with Mamba Week from August 23 by bringing together athletes, communities, inspiration and innovation which commemorated his enduring legacy and transcendent Mamba Mentality.  In another chapter of the Mamba Week tribute, Nike teamed up with ARAL Cru, a local graffiti trio from the community, to dedicate two murals around Metro Manila celebrating Kobe Bryant, his legacy and Mamba Mentality.  Marking the Black Mamba’s Last Historic Visit (in Araneta City) The first mural that ARAL Cru created directly faces the historic Araneta Coliseum, the venue where Kobe Bryant made his last appearance in Manila.                                                            Araneta City, Philippines The portrait of Kobe on the right side of the artwork is derived from a photo of him smiling during his last visit to the coliseum. This mural depicts imagery of fearlessness and focus, and a color scheme that resembles a sunset, which sets a tone of thankfulness for a good Kobe day that had passed. A New Day Dawning (at EDSA-Kalayaan) ARAL Cru relocated to Makai City to paint the second mural a few hours later. Symbolizing the sunrise and the beginning of a new day, this mural uses the same colors as the first but moving towards the opposite direction.                                                            EDSA-Kalayaan The mural depicts Kobe wearing his two iconic jersey numbers, 8 and 24, shooting crumpled pieces of paper into a trash bin. An optimistic way of showing the moment when we are reminded to be a little better each time the sun rises, just like Kobe. Throughout his career he evolved both as a person and as an athlete, he was always the one you could reliably turn to when the game is on the line.  Behind the Art (About ARAL Cru) ARAL Cru consists of Bvdot, Cinos, and Frank, a three-man graffiti crew from the Greater Manila Area. Through street painting and gallery work across Philippines, they are today recognized as one the most respected young talents in the street art movement in the country. Hard work, quality of execution, the ability to work under pressure, and of course, love for the game— this is how the ARAL Cru artists truly embody Mamba Mentality in their own lives. Kayo Cosio of #HoneycombArts organized and curated this project. #HoneycombArts is an organization that connects culture and messaging through a variety of public art mediums. They have also curated and executed over 60 public art projects in Manila and abroad......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 28th, 2020

‘Home Is Where The Art Is’

The last few weeks ay back to painting Ang Poet Nyo!.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2020

Intal considers semis win over Thais in SEA Games better than UAAP titles

Winning three titles in the UAAP is already an incredible feat. But for Ateneo de Manila University product Rex Intal, those college championships pale in comparison with the ecstasy he felt when the Philippine national men’s volleyball team toppled powerhouse Thailand in the semifinals of the 30th Southeast Asian Games last year. [Related story: SEA GAMES: PHI men's volleyball team advances to the gold medal round] A member of the Nationals who captured a historic silver medal in the biennial meet, Intal considers their thrilling come-from-behind win that dethroned Thailand in the knockout semis as the most memorable game he has ever played in.    “For me it was one of the best games talaga na nalaruan ko. Not the best performance pero best games na most unforgettable,” said Intal in his appearance on Volleyball DNA hosted by Anton Roxas and Denden Lazaro. “Actually most unforgettable game na talaga.” The former Blue Eagle middle went as far as saying that the victory over the Thais, which was watched by an electric crowd inside the PhilSports Arena last December, even topped the three titles he had while playing for Ateneo.   “Naramdaman ko talaga na may tumalo na sa first, second and third UAAP championships. Sorry UAAP pero iba ‘yung SEA Games na naramdaman ko. Iba ang naramdaman ko nu’ng umabot kami ng Finals,” said Intal, who with PHI squad teammates Marck Espejo and Ish Polvorosa led the Blue Eagles to a UAAP grand slam from Season 77 to 79.   “Individually ah, hindi 'yung combined na three UAAP championships,” cleared Intal. “Siguro kapag combined medyo same.” The Nationals faced top seed Thailand, which ruled the previous four editions, on December 8 in the crossover semis attended by a 6,700-strong crowd.   The experience of playing in front of the home crowd in an all-important game that time was a surreal feeling according to Intal. “Grabe ang experience na ‘yun. Ang saya maglaro nu’ng time na ‘yun kasi first time ‘yung buong crowd hindi hiwalay,” said Intal of the atmosphere inside the venue compared to what he’s used while playing in the UAAP. “Lahat nagtsi-cheer talaga. In front of the home crowd ang sarap maglaro sa crowd na ‘yun,” he added. “Isa ‘yun sa di ko makakalimutan na experience sa buong buhay ko.” It was a dramatic win for the Nationals as they came back from a 1-2 deficit and a scary 21-24 hole in the fourth set to upset Thailand in five sets.   “Nu’ng nanalo kami nung napalo na ni Bryan ang bola sigawan na kami nun,” recalled Intal, who scored six points in the match playing in four sets. “’Di kami makapaniwala. As in lahat ng boses na mayroon kami kailangan naming ilabas.” “Totoo pala na kailangan mong kurutin yung sarili mo, ‘Totoo ba ‘to? Totoo ba ‘to?’” he added. “’Yung inisip ko nun ay ‘di ‘yung natalo namin ang Thailand. Ang naisip ko was may medal na kami.” That win assured the Philippines of a silver medal for the first time since its runner-up finish in the 1977 SEA Games in Malaysia and a rematch against group stage tormentors Indonesia. The Indonesians were too much for the inexperienced Filipinos as the host team yielded in straight sets. But still, although the Nationals fell short in the gold medal round for Intal the whole SEA Games experience especially their conquest of Thailand will always be on the top of his list.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 21st, 2020

Blue Eagles credit Bundit, Lady Eagles as inspirations in success

Multi-titled coach Tai Bundit had a hand in the success of the Ateneo de Manila University Blue Eagles when they won three straight UAAP titles from Season 77 to 79. Not to take any credit away from Oliver Almadro for his hard work to turn the Blue Eagles into a powerhouse, but the former national team mentor did pick a thing or two from Bundit’s system which he added to his program. One of which is Bundit’s notorious trip to Ateneo’s track oval. Known for his Spartan-like training program, Bundit strengthened the stamina and conditioning of the Lady Eagles through sprints around the oval which players have to accomplish within a given time limit. “Dahil kay Coach Tai napa-oval na rin kami. Sinisisi namin si Coach Tai rin dun sa oval,” said former Blue Eagle Rex Intal laughing while recalling his dreaded visits to the track oval on his appearance on Volleyball DNA. “Actually, inis na inis na kami kay Coach Tai dahil sa oval.” “Kapag may mahirap kayong [Lady Eagles] ginagawa [gagawin din namin],” he added. But aside from Bundit’s training program the biggest influence the Thai mentor imparted to the Blue Eagles was the heartstrong mantra that fueled the Lady Eagles into winning their breakthrough UAAP title in 2014. “Siguro we really looked up to them [Lady Eagles],” said the 2019 Southeast Asian Games silver medalist. In Season 76, both the Blue Eagles and the Lady Eagles advanced to the Finals. The Lady Eagles were on their third straight Finals appearance while the Blue Eagles earned a championship spot for the first time in years.   Interestingly, the Ateneo men’s team seemed to have a better chance of winning the crown against National University compared to the Lady Eagles, who faced a series of do-or-die matches before taking on the thrice-to-beat De La Salle University in the Finals. “Grabe ‘yun akala namin mas malaki pa ‘yung chance namin na mag-champion kasi grabe ang run nila talaga eh. Akala talaga namin mas malaki ‘yung chance namin or either both magtsa-champion,” said Intal, who was on his sophomore year when Ateneo challenged the then reigning champion NU in the first of five consecutive Finals showdowns. However, it was the Lady Eagles who came up with the championship in tow. “Sobrang nakaka-proud ang women’s team nu'ng season na yun,” said Intal. “Sa amin naman experience-wise nagkulang kami pagdating ng Finals. Parang may daga kami sa dibdib nun.” The Bulldogs were just too much for the rookie Marck Espejo-bannered Blue Eagles. After the defeat, Almadro immediately talked to his players. “Grinupo kaagad kami ni Coach Oliver sa gitna ng court sa side namin. Hinuddle n’ya kami. Nagce-celebrate ang lahat pero naka-huddle kami. Umiiyak ang team, si Coach O umiiyak,” Intal recalled. “Sabi niya, ‘Guys tingnan nyo ang mga tao na nandito, tingnan nyo ang mga sumuporta sa inyo. Ini-expect nyo ba yan nu’ng simula ng season? Ini-expect nyo ba na aabot tayo rito? Walang nag-expect ng ganyan pero nandito sila sionuportahan tayo. Naniniwala sila na kaya natin.’” “’Next year babawi tayo. Next year tayo naman ang magsi-celebrate,’” the mentor added.    Almadro’s words were true. The following year, the Blue Eagles began what would be a three-peat dynasty.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 18th, 2020

Would you buy a painting unsigned?

It’s a failure of foresight to just look at the name. After all, the artists who are esteemed now began as young and upcoming practitioners......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 10th, 2020

Life imitates art? Rico Blanco s 15-year-old ostrich painting more than surreal

“Tadhana'y mayro'ng trip na makapangyarihan.”.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 5th, 2020