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DENR names Manaba to RIVERS ‘19 awards

Of the three Bohol rivers which the communities have jointly cleaned up in efforts to improve its water quality, the singular honor to represent Bohol as nominee to the regional and the national awards for the best improved rivers goes to Garcia Hernandez’s Manaba River. A Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) team picked […].....»»

Category: newsSource: boholnewsdaily boholnewsdailyJun 4th, 2019

DENR names Manaba to RIVERS ‘19 awards

Of the three Bohol rivers which the communities have jointly cleaned up in efforts to improve its water quality, the singular honor to represent Bohol as nominee to the regional and the national awards for the best improved rivers goes to Garcia Hernandez’s Manaba River. A Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) team picked […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  boholnewsdailyRelated NewsJun 4th, 2019

DENR eyes more trash traps in Calabarzon rivers

Forty-two additional trash traps will be established along major rivers in Cavite, Rizal, Laguna and Batangas in line with the Manila Bay rehabilitation program......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 3rd, 2020

APAC Stevie Awards names SM ‘Organization of the Year’

SM Prime Holdings Inc. bagged the “Organization of the Year” Grand Stevie Award, the most coveted award given by the prestigious Asia-Pacific Stevie Awards, which recognizes outstanding businesses for creating innovations in the workplace. SM also won the Grand Stevie for “Most Honored Organization” in 2019......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 27th, 2020

Always About the People

“Solid!” That was the only reaction, or lack thereof, that I could muster after that first breakaway slam of Kiefer Ravena’s UAAP collegiate basketball career over the outstretched arms of UST’s foreign center, Karim Abdul. Moments before, you could see Kiefer was going to go hard, as it was a one-on-one breakaway and he had the speed advantage over Abdul, who was hot on his heels. Little did I know that he was going to go for that highlight that would announce his entry into college basketball. That reaction, that loss for words, can pretty much sum up my past 10 years of covering college basketball for ABS-CBN Sports.  They first asked me to write about my most memorable UAAP game coverage; but I must confess, I was never really good at remembering exact details of games, unlike some of my fellow sportscasters, or even coaches I know, who remember almost detail for detail, or play by play. My memories come in highlights, or sometimes even just flashes of good or memorable plays.  I remember a 6’8”, 18-year old Ben Mbala, whom we first saw a glimpse of while Anton Roxas and I were covering the CESAFI league in the hot and humid Cebu Coliseum, sometime around 2012. He was playing for the Southwestern University Cobras, wasn’t as built and polished as when he was with DLSU, but you could already see the raw talent and athleticism. Fast forward a few years, I remember well how he took the UAAP by storm, with his monster dunks, and how he piloted La Salle to a championship while winning league MVP in Season 79.  I remember the heralded rookie season of Kiefer Ravena in the men’s division, after a storied juniors career. Kiefer won Rookie of the Year honors and helped lead Ateneo to two more titles to round up their 5-peat, before it was Jeron Teng’s turn to lead the Green Archers to a championship over his elder brother Jeric and the UST Growling Tigers.  I remember Bobby Ray Parks Jr. and his back-to-back MVP seasons. He was arguably the most complete college player during that time. It was painful to see his team fall short especially during his second MVP year. The Bulldogs made history the year after though, with Alfred Aroga, Troy Rosario, and Gelo Alolino now at the helm, winning the school’s first ever championship after more than forty years. I would argue that the past decade saw some of the brightest UAAP college basketball stars, both local and foreign, take to the hard court. It would almost be unfair to start naming them because I’ll surely end up leaving some names worthy enough to be mentioned. But we all remember Greg Slaughter, Ryan Buenafe, RR Garcia, Terence Romeo, Mac Belo, RR Pogoy, Roi Sumang, Charles Mamie, Alex Nuyles, Jericho Cruz, Papi Sarr, Jeron Teng, Jason Perkins, Aljun Melecio, Kiefer and Thirdy, Bobby Ray, Alfred Aroga, Kevin Ferrer, Karim Abul, Jeric Teng, Ange Kuoame, Matt and Mike Nieto, Paul Desiderio, Juan GDL, and the list goes on and on… all of them making their mark in the UAAP the past ten years. Aside from the highlights, there were the more mundane, behind-the-scenes memories, especially covering out-of-town games when we used to do the CESAFI and the PCCL. That was basketball coverage at its purest. There was a time we traveled to Lanao Del Sur to cover the Mindanao regional selection of the PCCL. Lanao was about another two to three hour drive from Cagayan de Oro along a dark highway with trees and mountains all around; and where there was only one mall in the entire town. Or when we traveled by van to La Union to cover the north regional selection of the PCCL… or even staying a whole week at the Cebu Grand Hotel, for the VisMin regional selection. Coverages then were bare bones: no real-time stats or live graphics, and I would even sometimes have to tally the points and rebounds of each player in-game on my notebook just so that I’d have some semblance of stats to mention on the coverage. Still, those games were so much fun because the players, getting their first shot at national TV coverage, would leave everything out on the floor.  In a year or so, both the UAAP and the NCAA will announce their respective new homes, and new broadcast teams will have the privilege of covering the best collegiate basketball players in the country. That’s how the ball bounces. I’m a firm believer that in life there are seasons, and a perfect time for everything. I’m just thankful for the opportunities thrown my way. If you were to ask me why the coverage of the UAAP helped build the league into what it is today, my answer would be simple: it was always about the people. At the end of the day, what makes the UAAP and its coverage great are the stories of the people that play, coach, officiate, cover, and run the games. It’s not really about the championships or the awards, but rather the challenges, hardships, and journeys of each of the individuals that brought them there.  And it is also about the directors, producers, cameramen, reporters and make-up artists that make sure that the audience sees what is supposed to be seen – the winning basket, a fan’s priceless reaction, the agony in defeat, and the glory of victory. It’s what Boom Gonzalez or Mico Halili would always say, that our job as anchors and analysts is to tell the people watching at home the story of what is happening in the game in the best way possible.  I just want to tip my hat to all the people that allowed us to do our jobs the best way possible. From our directors, producers, cameramen, floor directors, fellow panelists, courtside reporters, league officials, statisticians, make-up artists, and all those people behind the scenes whom we worked with, know that we were able to give our best because of you; and the UAAP coverage will not be what it is if not for all of your hard work and dedication.  It was, is, and will always be about the people. Marco Benitez was the team captain for the Ateneo Blue Eagles when they won the UAAP Season 65 men's seniors basketball title in 2002. Marco eventually covered collegiate basketball as analyst for ABS-CBN Sports starting in 2010. He is presently the President of the Philippine Women's University (PWU)......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2020

Wong names Morado, Salak among her top 5 setters

Deanna Wong is considered as one of top talents who make the future of Philippine volleyball look bright. A UAAP title in Season 81 and a Best Setter award in Season 80 are some of the accomplishments she collected as setter of the Ateneo de Manila University Lady Eagles. As talented and skilled as she is, Wong looks up to the legends that made and still making their marks in the local volleyball scene. Here is Wong’s list of Top 5 Pinay setters.    JIA MORADO “Well number one siyempre Ate Jia [Morado], my mentor talaga so wala nang bakit number one siya,” said Wong during her appearance on So She Did! Heady with great court vision and solid connection with her hitters best describe Morado. The UAAP Season 77 Best Setter established her legendary status during her stay with the Lady Eagles, who she piloted to back-to-back UAAP titles. Morado, who is a member of the national team, also helped Creamline win three titles in the Premier Volleyball League while collecting five straight Best Setter awards in the two-conference league.     TINA SALAK Longevity. This makes Salak a legend among the setters in the country. The 44-year old playmaker started to make waves when she led Far Eastern University to a couple of championships in the mid-90s. Salak was also the main setter of the 2005 Southeast Asian Games bronze medal team – the last squad to earn a podium finish in the biennial meet. The Army personnel played in the PVL and in the Philippine Superliga up until 2018 before going full time as coach of De La Salle-Zobel girls team.    KIM FAJARDO De La Salle University won three titles during her stint with the Lady Spikers. Fajardo is well-known for her well-rounded approach in playmaking. She easily adapts with the style of her hitters, good at reading the defense and a vocal leader inside the court. The Batangas native bagged three Best Setter awards and a Best Server recognition during her stay with the green and white. Her fierce competition with Morado made the Ateneo-DLSU rivalry extra colorful. Fajardo is also enjoying a successful career with F2 Logistics in the PSL and is a member of the national team.    JEM FERRER A member of the Ateneo Fab Five, Ferrer can be considered as one of the Lady Eagles who paved the way for Ateneo’s success in the UAAP. Ferrer was named Best Setter three times and helped the Lady Eagles advance to their first-ever Finals appearance in Season 74. Ferrer remains as one of the PVL’s top playmakers.   RHEA DIMACULANGAN University of Sto. Tomas has yet to find a setter that would equal the caliber of Dimaculangan. With her orchestrating the Tigresses’ plays, UST went on to win the Season 72 crown while bagging the Best Server and Finals Most Valuable Player honors. Dimaculangan is a member of the national team.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 20th, 2020

PBA: 'Mr. 100%' Norman Black has no patience for lazy players

When he was a PBA import, Norman Black earned the nickname "Mr. 100%".  Black was one of the most athletic reinforcements the PBA has ever seen, and he's certainly one of the most hardworking. His PBA accomplishments include two championships as a player and two Best Import awards. As a coach, Black has 11 PBA titles, including the 1989 Grand Slam with San Miguel Beer. Outside of the pros, coach Norman likewise has five UAAP championships, all in succession, with the Ateneo Blue Eagles. With over three decades of coaching experience, Black has been around a lot of players, but there's only one kind of baller that coach Norman absolutely just cannot stand. "No matter who you are, no matter how old you are, you're always trying to improve your skills. I have big problems with lazy players, it just drives me nuts because it's probably the exact opposite of what I was as a player," Coach Norman said on The Score Philippines. "I'm into guys that put the effort out there, if you're lazy, you may not last that long with me because I don't have much patience for it," Black added. Coaching PBA teams like the San Miguel Beermen, the Sta. Lucia Realtors, the TNT KaTropa, and the Meralco Bolts, Black just can't do it with players that don't give enough effort. "It used to pain me sometimes, and I won't go to any names, but some guys would show up at exactly 1:59 for a 2:00 p.m. practice every single day," Coach Norman said. "It almost made me feel that he was just waiting in his car until it was 1:55 and then he decided to walk to the gym," he added. Fortunately for Coach Norman, his current Bolts team don't have such problem players. In Meralco, Black has a nice and solid group of hardworkers, which is very much to his liking. "I'm really into discipline. I need my players to be disciplined. One thing I can say about my Meralco team, despite the fact that we haven't won a championship, is that I don't have any attitude problems, off the court problems," he said. "I don't have to tell them to be on time in practice, my guys know to come in a hour or an hour and half early to get ready for practice to get their work in," Coach Norman added.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 8th, 2020

UAAP s last decade dominated by back-to-back MVPs

Three players have hoisted the MVP trophy in back-to-back seasons in the last decade of UAAP Men's Basketball. That means that 60 percent of the top individual player awards in the past 10 years are owned by just three names. Ben Mbala's 2016 remains the best of the best among the bunch as not only did he average a dominant double-double of a league-best 20.6 points and a league-best 16.2 rebounds on top of a league-best 2.4 blocks as well as 1.4 steals and 1.2 assists, he also delivered a dominant 15-1 title to De La Salle University. The Cameroonian powerhouse had an encore next year as he normed a double-double of 26.0 points and 13.1 rebounds to go along with 2.5 blocks, 1.3 assists, and 1.3 steals, but fell just short of a second straight championship no thanks to Ateneo de Manila University. The Blue Eagles have a back-to-back MVP of their own in Kiefer Ravena in 2014 and 2015. Neither of Ravena's plums, however, came with a championship as those were won by National University and Far Eastern University, respectively in those years. Make no mistake, though, he was a key cog in the latter part of Ateneo's five-peat in his first three seasons. Also falling shy of a team title is Bulldogs' superstar Ray Parks Jr. who was the top individual player in 2011 and 2012. The Filipino-American laid the groundwork for the blue and gold's return to relevance as they slowly but surely climbed to contention. And in the first year in the post-Parks Jr. era, National U, at long last, broke through and bagged its first championship since 1954. The Tamaraws, meanwhile, also have two MVPs in the last decade, but those were won by different players in RR Garcia (2010) and Terrence Romeo (2013) Neither won a team title as well, whether it be before, during, or after their seasons as top individual players. Finally, the league's last two MVPs had seasons to remember for their respective schools. In 2018, Bright Akhuetie became the University of the Philippines' first top individual player since Eric Altamirano in 1986. A year later, Soulemane Chabi Yo brought back the trophy to University of Sto. Tomas - the first one to do so since Dylan Ababou in 2009. Breaking it down school-by-school, La Salle, Ateneo, National U, and FEU each have two MVP trophies while UP and UST have one apiece. Ken Bono was Adamson University's last MVP in 2006 while University of the East last won the MVP with James Yap in 2003. Here is the full list of NCAA MVPs in the last decade: 2010 - RR Garcia, G, FEU 2011 - Ray Parks Jr., G, National U 2012 - Ray Parks Jr., G, National U 2013 - Terrence Romeo, G, FEU 2014 - Kiefer Ravena, G, Ateneo 2015 - Kiefer Ravena, G, Ateneo 2016 - Ben Mbala, C, La Salle 2017 - Ben Mbala, C, La Salle 2018 - Bright Akhuetie, C, UP 2019 - Soulemane Chabi Yo, F, UST --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 27th, 2020

REWIND RANKINGS: Melecio, Rivero, and 16 NBTC All-Stars

The National Basketball Training Centre 24 is now on its third year and through its run, it has been graced by the likes of Kai Sotto, Joel Cagulangan, SJ Belangel, Carl Tamayo, Rhayyan Amsali, and Kevin Quiambao as top three talents. From 2018 onward, a selection committee made up of scribes from ABS-CBN Sports, ESPN5, Spin, and Tiebreaker Times have reviewed the best of the best in the NCAA, UAAP, MMBL, CESAFI-NBTC, and FCAAF and then ranked them in the definitive list of the most promising prospects in the Philippines. That list of names then became the final roster for the annual NBTC All-Star Game. Even before the NBTC 24, though, the grassroots national tournament has organized All-Star Games with 24 of the most promising prospects in the Philippines. And so, wouldn't it be fun if the All-Stars before 2018 will get the NBTC 24 treatment? In this space, the current selection committee will be retroactively ranking the NBTC All-Stars in their respective years from the game's debut in 2012 all the way to 2017. First up, it's the 2016 NBTC All-Stars - and you will be amazed at just how overflowing with talent this class is. --- 2016. This was when LSGH's Ricci Rivero was, hands-down, the best player in the NCAA, but was disqualified from individual awards due to his ejection in an elimination round game. And so, Mike Enriquez of Mapua swooped in to seize MVP, but interestingly, was left out of the NBTC All-Star Game. Over in the UAAP, DLSZ's Aljun Melecio was himself the undisputed top talent, but was no match for the 1-2 punch of Justine Baltazar and John Lloyd Clemente and the well-oiled machine that was National U. Still, never forget that the Bullpups swept the elimination round only to fall short of a perfect season as Melecio proved why he was Season MVP in Game 2 of the Finals. As always, all eyes were on the NCAA and the UAAP, but two of the most sought after recruits actually played outside those tournaments. Chiang Kai Shek's Jonas Tibayan was the most complete player in high school then and his end-to-end game was actually more than enough to let him suit up for the Gilas Pilipinas cadets in the 2017 Southeast Asian Basketball Association (SEABA) Championship. Meanwhile, Tyler Tio was a one-man fireworks show for Xavier and his scoring sprees would lead him to be touted as the next pride of the Golden Stallions. We haven't even mentioned Gomez de Liano brothers Javi and Juan who both made the UAAP Mythical Team, but would have to settle for places outside the top five in our Rewind Rankings as UPIS only had three wins to show - and of course, the NBTC 24 values winning first and foremost. In all, the 2016 NBTC All-Stars counted 10 players from the UAAP, six players from the NCAA, six players from other leagues in Manila, and two players from Cebu. The UAAP, likewise, dominated the top 10 with two Bullpups and a Jr. Archer landing in the top three. Chiang Kai Shek and Xavier also managed to snag two spots in the top six while the NCAA's highest ranking player was a Greenie at no. 4. This is the final NBTC 24 for 2016 - retroactively, that is: 1. Justine Baltazar, C, National U (white no. 11) 2. Aljun Melecio, G, DLSZ 3. John Lloyd Clemente, F, National U 4. Jonas Tibayan, F, Chiang Kai Shek (blue no. 18) 5. Ricci Rivero, G, LSGH 6. Tyler Tio, G, Xavier (white no. 11) 7. Evan Nelle, G, San Beda (white no. 10) 8. Javi Gomez de Liano, F, UPIS 9. Sherwin Concepcion, F, Mapua 10. Juan Gomez de Liano, G, UPIS 11. Sam Abu Hijleh, F, San Beda 12. John Galinato, G, Chiang Kai Shek 13. Jolo Mendoza, G, Ateneo 14. Jed Colonia, G, SHS-Ateneo 15. Gian Mamuyac, G/F, Ateneo 16. Germy Mahinay, C, San Beda 17. Rhayyan Amsali, F, National U 18. Harvey Pagsanjan, G, Hope 19. Jethro Madrigal, G/F, LSGH 20. Will Gozum, C, UPIS 21. Jancork Cabahug, F, UV 22. Marvel Jimenez, G, Hope 23. EJ Agbong, F, Adamson 24. Rendell Lee, G, Xavier.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 1st, 2020

The Int’l Banker Names BDO’s Tan, “CEO of the Year in Asia”

BDO Unibank, Inc.’s Nestor V. Tan, president and chief executive officer, was named the Banking CEO of the Year in Asia during The International Banker Awards 2019 while the bank was awarded as the Best in Innovation in Retail Banking in the Philippines. The global financial publication awards “top-ranking individuals and organizations that set new […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsFeb 22nd, 2020

PSA names Mr. Football, Ms. Golf

Philippine Azkals’ veteran Stephan Schrock and Asian Games’ gold medalist Bianca Pagdanganan will be conferred with the Mr. Football and Ms. Golf awards, respectively, during the SMC-Philippine Sportswriters Ass gala night on March 6 at the Centennial Hall of the Manila Hotel......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsFeb 17th, 2020

Malware Hides Behind Top Music Award Nominees

Cybercriminals are actively exploiting the names of artists and songs nominated for Grammy 2020 awards, to spread malware. Kaspersky protection technologies detected a 39% rise in attacks (attempts to download or run malicious files) under the guise of nominees’ works in 2019, compared to 2018. Ariana Grande, Taylor Swift, and Post Malone were attackers’ favorites, […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsFeb 5th, 2020

Kobe Bryant left deep legacy in LA sports, basketball world

By GREG BEACHAM AP Sports Writer LOS ANGELES (AP) — Kobe Bryant inspired a generation of basketball players worldwide with both his sublime skills and his unquenchable competitive fire. He also earned Los Angeles’ eternal adoration during his two decades as the fierce soul of the city’s beloved Lakers. Less than four years into his retirement from the NBA, Bryant was seeking new challenges and working to inspire his daughters’ generation through sports and storytelling when his next act ended shockingly early. Bryant, the 18-time All-Star who won five championships and became one of the greatest basketball players of his generation during a 20-year career with the Los Angeles Lakers, died in a helicopter crash Sunday. He was 41. The crash occurred in the foggy hills above Calabasas, California, about 30 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles, a person familiar with the situation told The Associated Press. A different person familiar with the case confirmed Bryant's 13-year-old daughter Gianna also was killed. Both of the AP's unnamed sources spoke on condition of anonymity because few details of the crash had been released publicly. Authorities said nine people were on the helicopter, and all were presumed dead. No names were released. Bryant lived south of Los Angeles in coastal Orange County for much of his adult life, and he often used helicopters to save time and avoid Southern California's notorious traffic. He often traveled to practices and games by helicopter before his playing career ended in 2016, and he kept up the practice after retirement as he attended to his many new ventures, which included a burgeoning entertainment company that recently produced an Academy Award-winning animated short film. The crash occurred about 20 miles from Mamba Sports Academy, Bryant’s basketball training complex in Thousand Oaks, California. A girls basketball tournament was scheduled for Sunday at the facility. Bryant, who had four daughters with his wife, Vanessa, dedicated himself to boosting women’s sports in recent years, coaching and mentoring basketball players around the world. Gianna, better known as Gigi, had a promising youth career. Bryant sat with her courtside at a Brooklyn Nets game late last year, clearly passing along his wisdom to his daughter. Bryant told Jimmy Kimmel in 2018 that Gianna wanted to play in the WNBA and recalled how fans would often approach him saying “you gotta have a boy, you gotta someone to carry on the tradition, the legacy.” Gianna took exception: “She’s like, 'Oy, I got this,’” Bryant recalled. Bryant retired nearly four years ago as the third-leading scorer in NBA history, finishing two decades in Lakers purple and gold as a prolific shooter with a sublime all-around game and a relentless competitive ethic that inspired strong reactions from fans and opponents alike. He held that No. 3 spot in the league scoring ranks until Saturday night, when the Lakers’ LeBron James passed him during a game in Philadelphia, Bryant’s hometown. “Continuing to move the game forward @KingJames,” Bryant wrote in his last tweet. “Much respect my brother.” On Saturday night, James said he was "happy just to be in any conversation with Kobe Bean Bryant, one of the all-time greatest basketball player to ever play. One of the all-time greatest Lakers.” News of Bryant’s death inspired an outpouring of grief around the sports world and beyond, but it was felt particularly painfully in Los Angeles, where Bryant was unquestionably the sprawling city's most popular athlete and one of its most beloved public figures. The Lakers’ next game isn’t until Tuesday night against the crosstown rival Clippers, but hundreds of fans — many in Bryant jerseys and Lakers gear — spontaneously gathered at Staples Center and in the surrounding LA Live entertainment complex on Sunday, weeping and staring at video boards with Bryant’s image before the Grammy awards ceremony. “I thought he was going to live forever,” Lakers great Magic Johnson told KCBS-TV. “I thought he was invincible. ... There was nobody who took more pride in putting on that Laker uniform than Kobe. Nobody. He was just special. We will miss him and we’ll remember him for his greatness, but let’s not forget how he impacted the world, too.” The NBA kept its games on as scheduled when the news broke, but the San Antonio Spurs and Toronto Raptors both took voluntary 24-second shot clock violations at the start of their game in honor of Bryant, who wore No. 24 for the second half of his career. Several other teams followed up by deliberately taking delays of 24 and 8 seconds, honoring both of his jersey numbers. Many players were seen crying before their games, and James looked emotional on the tarmac when he got off the Lakers’ team plane from Philadelphia. Bryant’s future appeared to be limitless in retirement, whether in sports or entertainment. He opened a production company shortly after leaving the Lakers, saying he was just as passionate about storytelling as he had been about his sport. He won an Oscar in 2018 for his contributions to “Dear Basketball,” an animated short about his relationship to the game. He also produced content for ESPN. In 2003, Bryant was charged with attacking a 19-year-old employee at a Colorado resort. He had said the two had consensual sex, and the charge was eventually dropped. The woman later filed a civil suit against Bryant that was settled out of court. Bryant's adulation remained strong in Los Angeles even during the sexual assault allegations. Bryant became one of the game’s most popular players as the face of the 16-time NBA champion Lakers franchise. He was the league MVP in 2008 and a two-time NBA scoring champion, but he also earned 12 selections to the NBA’s All-Defensive teams. He teamed with Shaquille O’Neal in a combustible partnership to lead the Lakers to NBA titles in 2000, 2001 and 2002. He later teamed with Pau Gasol to win two more titles in 2009 and 2010. A two-time Olympic gold medalist with the dominant U.S. team, Bryant retired in 2016 after scoring 60 points in his final NBA game. In December 2017, the Lakers hung banners retiring his No. 8 and No. 24 jerseys in the Staples Center rafters in an unprecedented double honor. Bryant looms large over the current generation of NBA players, most of whom grew up either idolizing Bryant or absorbing his work ethic and competitive spirit in the same way Bryant's generation learned from Michael Jordan. After James passed Bryant on Saturday, he remembered listening in awe to Bryant when the superstar came to speak at a childhood basketball camp. “I remember one thing he said: If you want to be great at it, or want to be one of the greats, you’ve got to put the work in,” James said. James later teamed up with Bryant on the 2008 U.S. Olympic team in Beijing. “He had zero flaws offensively,” James said. “Zero. You backed off of him, he could shoot the 3. You body him up a little bit, he could go around you. He could shoot from mid-range. He could post. He could make free throws. ... He was just immortal offensively because of his skill set and his work ethic.” Bryant was a basketball superstar for his entire adult life, and he grew up from a teenager to a respected veteran in the unforgiving Hollywood spotlight. He entered the NBA draft straight out of high school in 1996 after a childhood spent partly in Italy, where his father, former NBA player Joe “Jellybean” Bryant, played professionally. He spoke four languages and played a major role in the NBA's international growth over his two decades in the league, traveling the world and connecting with athletes in other sports and celebrities. The Lakers acquired the 17-year-old Bryant in a trade shortly after Charlotte drafted him, and he immediately became one of the most exciting and intriguing players in the sport alongside O’Neal, who had signed with the Lakers as a free agent. Bryant won the Slam Dunk Contest as a rookie, and the Lakers gradually grew into a team that won three consecutive championships. Bryant and Gasol, the Spanish star, formed the nucleus of another championship team in 2008, reaching three straight NBA Finals and winning two more titles. Between those title runs and before the quiet final years of his career, Bryant accomplished innumerable feats including an 81-point game against Toronto in January 2006. Bryant's final NBA seasons were dogged by injuries, but he still went into retirement with that jaw-dropping 60-point performance against Utah. ___ AP Basketball Writer Tim Reynolds contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 27th, 2020

In appreciation: Kobe Bryant, a life defined by hard work

By TIM REYNOLDS AP Basketball Writer It was April 14, 2016. It was the first full day of Kobe Bryant’s new chapter as a retired NBA player. All he had done the night before was score a mind-boggling 60 points in his farewell game, not getting out of Staples Center until around midnight. His staff at Kobe, Inc. were certain they would beat their boss to the office that morning. They were wrong. He beat everyone there by two hours. “We have a lot of work to do,” Bryant told them. Even in retirement, Bryant found no substitute for hard work. Kobe Bean Bryant was many things: one of the greatest players in basketball history, a five-time NBA champion, Olympic gold medalist, a fluent speaker of multiple languages, a resident of the world, an Oscar winner, the self-described Black Mamba that started as a nickname and became his brand, someone so good he had two numbers retired by the Los Angeles Lakers. And he never stopped. Basketball was his obsession for 20 years in the NBA. Storytelling was the obsession for the rest of his life. Tears, as would be expected once the news broke of Bryant’s death in a helicopter crash in Southern California on Sunday, flowed freely in the NBA world. LeBron James was inconsolable when he got the news, a day after passing Bryant for No. 3 on the all-time scoring list. Doc Rivers struggled when he tried to put feelings into words. Even from the normally beyond-stoic Kawhi Leonard had his eyes well up when he was talking about Bryant. But the pain was obvious elsewhere: Oregon women’s basketball star Sabrina Ionescu didn’t hide her anguish when she said she was dedicating the rest of her season to Bryant’s memory, soccer’s Neymar held up a “24” with his fingers after scoring a goal for Paris Saint-Germain, and marquees at the Super Bowl in Miami were lit up in the Lakers’ colors of purple and gold as a tribute. The elite ones, the ones like James and Leonard and Ionescu and Neymar, were all like Bryant. Driven. Obsessed with their craft. Those are the sort of people Bryant enjoyed most. He didn’t have much patience for anything else. Teammates were never immune from his criticism; not even Shaquille O’Neal, a fellow all-time NBA great, could avoid clashes with Bryant. O’Neal was half-a-foot taller and probably an easy 100 pounds heavier than Bryant. Didn’t matter. Bryant wanted to fight one day in practice, so they fought. His toughness was legendary; Bryant blew out his Achilles on a play in 2013 where he’d been fouled and made the two free throws knowing that his season would be over a few seconds later. It was against Golden State; the Lakers trailed at the time, and Bryant — who hyperextended a knee in that same game and played through it because the game was so important in the playoff race — swished both shots. “We were down two. Had to tie the game first,” Bryant said years later, when asked why he stayed in the game. His commitment was legendary; there was a game in 2011 in Miami where the Lakers lost by six, and Bryant was so displeased with how he played that he went back onto the court for 90 minutes of uninterrupted shooting that went on until after midnight. His teammates were on Miami Beach for dinner. Bryant was working instead. “It’s my job,” Bryant said. His swagger was legendary; during the FIBA Americas tournament in 2007, Bryant was less-than-impressed with how Brazil thought it had a chance to beat Team USA. So, he tasked himself with guarding Leandro Barbosa, who until that point had been the leading scorer in the tournament. With Bryant blanketing him — making it difficult for him to even dribble at times — Barbosa made one shot all night. The Americans won by 37. “Looking at a great white shark is one thing,” Bryant told teammates, “but jumping into the pool with one is another thing.” He played in Los Angeles, but he was a star everywhere. Everywhere. At the Basketball World Cup in China this past summer, Bryant was on the court for a game during the medal round. He said a few words in Mandarin and the fans in Beijing screamed in more delight than they had for the guy who had taken the floor just before Bryant, a fellow by name of Yao Ming. He was as driven in his storytelling life as he was in his playing days. Kobe, Inc. wasn’t just a cool name. It was his world. He wanted to inspire kids through books that combined the worlds of sports and fantasy. He was toying with the idea of taking his stories to Broadway. He won an Oscar for “Dear Basketball,” a short animated film in 2018 that had been converted from a poem that he penned when he decided it was time to retire from playing the game. He had a podcast for kids and families, not with him blathering on about whatever he wanted to talk about but with characters talking about how to be a good teammate. He had a franchise of shows called Detail, where he broke down the nuances of basketball and had other huge names from other sports do the same thing. He wasn’t kidding around when talking to his staff on April 14, 2016. Kobe Bryant still had a lot of work to do. He was just getting started. And now he’s gone. The tributes will continue, though eventually fade away. The legacy will be forever. ___ Tim Reynolds is a national basketball writer for The Associated Press. Write to him at treynolds(at)ap.org  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 27th, 2020

Rotary names 12 Golden Wheel awardees

Several top government officials, local executives, leaders of industry, and media personalities will be cited in the 2019-2020 Rotary Golden Wheel Awards to be held today at the Novotel Hotel in Cubao, Quezon City......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 24th, 2020

AP names LeBron decade’s best male athlete

He left Cleveland for Miami, finally became a champion, went back to his beloved northeast Ohio, delivered on another title promise, then left for the Los Angeles Lakers and the next challenge. He played in eight straight finals. No NBA player won more games or more MVP awards over the last 10 years than he […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsDec 30th, 2019

Biggest names in music deliver show-stopping numbers at AMA 2019

The world’s biggest artists and pop culture icons came together to honor idols, newcomers and record-breakers at the “2019 American Music Awards.”  .....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 30th, 2019

69th Palanca Awards Names Winners

Literary excellence took the spotlight once again as winning authors of the 69th Carlos Palanca Memorial Awards for Literature were honored recently at the Peninsula Manila in Makati City. A total of 56 writers, 32 of which are first-time awardees, were chosen as this year’s recipients. Two of the authors each bagged prizes in two […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsNov 17th, 2019

DILG names two Pampanga villages as Best Lupong Tagapamayapa

Governor Dennis Pineda awards certificate of recognition and cash incentive to Apalit Vice Mayor Peter Nucom andLiga ng mga Barangay Pampanga Chapter President and Balucuc Punong Barangay Renato Mu.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2019

Mike Budenholzer named 2019 NBA Coach of Year

SANTA MONICA, Calif. (AP) — Milwaukee's Mike Budenholzer has won Coach of the Year honors for the second time in his career at the NBA Awards. The @Bucks' Mike Budenholzer accepts the 2018-19 Coach of the Year trophy! ???? pic.twitter.com/0f4hcaJKy8 — NBA on TNT (@NBAonTNT) June 25, 2019 He guided the Bucks to a 60-22 record in the regular season in his first year with the franchise, leading them to the Eastern Conference finals, where they lost to eventual NBA champion Toronto. He got choked up while thanking his wife and kids Monday night. Budenholzer also coached Team Giannis in the All-Star Game last season He earned his first Coach of the Year trophy with Atlanta in 2015. Budenholzer beat out Denver's Mike Malone and Doc Rivers of the Los Angeles Clippers......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 25th, 2019

Giannis Antetokounmpo named 2019 NBA MVP

By Beth Harris, Associated Press SANTA MONICA, Calif. (AP) — The Milwaukee Bucks fell two games short of the NBA Finals. They won big at the NBA Awards. A tearful Giannis Antetokounmpo earned Most Valuable Player honors and Mike Budenholzer won Coach of the Year on Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time) in Santa Monica. Antetokounmpo, a 24-year-old forward from Greece, beat out Paul George of Oklahoma City and James Harden of Houston, who won last year. Antetokounmpo was a resounding winner. He received 941 points and 78 first-place votes in the balloting — 165 points more than Harden. Harden finished second with 776 points and 23 first-place votes. "MVP is not about stats and numbers, and obviously James Harden had unbelievable numbers and Paul George also, but obviously it's about winning," Antetokounmpo said backstage. "We created great habits throughout the season and were able to stick by them, and that's why we were able to have a chance in every single game we played and were able to win 60 games." The show had an international flair, with three international players besides Antetokounmpo winning. Antetokounmpo averaged 27.7 points and 12.5 rebounds while earning All-NBA first-team honors this season, his sixth with the Bucks. He led the franchise to the best record in the regular season and the Bucks reached the Eastern Conference finals. Tears rolled down his cheeks as Antetokounmpo thanked his mother Veronica and brothers in the audience at Barker Hanger. He credited his late father for pushing him toward his goals and his teammates and coaching staff for their help. "We started from nothing as a family," he said, "and we are going to be in every stage that we can be as a family." Antetokounmpo said backstage that he had vowed to his family he wasn't going to cry. "When you hear your name up there on the stage and then you realize these years of hard work, what you did in the past, then you start getting emotional," he said. Budenholzer also got choked up while thanking his family after his second coaching honor. He earned the trophy for the first time with Atlanta in 2015. He guided the Bucks to a 60-22 record in the regular season in his first year with the franchise, leading them to the Eastern Conference finals, where they lost to eventual NBA champion Toronto. "What they did on the court this year, including the playoffs, was special," Budenholzer said backstage. "We weren't good enough in the end, but we certainly feel like we have enough talent, we have enough character to be a team that's playing in the finals and winning a championship." Budenholzer also coached Team Giannis in the All-Star Game last season. He beat out Denver's Mike Malone and Doc Rivers of the Los Angeles Clippers. Horst was honored in voting by his fellow NBA executives, while the six biggest awards were determined in voting by a global media panel. Lou Williams was voted the Sixth Man of the Year for the second season in a row and third time in his career, tying former Los Angeles Clipper guard Jamal Crawford. The guard won for the first time in 2015 with Toronto. Williams beat out teammate Montrezl Harrell, with whom he formed the highest-scoring bench duo in NBA history last season, and Domantas Sabonis of Indiana. Williams became the career leader in points off the bench during the season. "This one was different because I kind of went into the season wanting this one. In years past I always just played and lived with whatever happened," he said. "I felt like this one was going to be a legacy piece." Rudy Gobert of the Utah Jazz won Defensive Player of the Year for the second straight season. The 26-year-old center from France beat out Antetokounmpo and George. "I never thought I would be able to do that when I started basketball playing in France," Gobert said backstage. "I didn't know an NBA player, I didn't know nothing about basketball. I was just having fun." Pascal Siakam of the NBA champion Toronto Raptors earned Most Improved Player. The 25-year-old from Cameroon averaged 16.9 points and started 79 of 80 regular-season games for the Raptors in his third year with the team. Siakam had 26 20-point outings after scoring 20 points in a game only once in his first two seasons. He then scored 32 points in Game 1 of the NBA Finals. Siakam beat out De'Aaron Fox of Sacramento and D'Angelo Russell of Brooklyn. Luka Doncic of the Dallas Mavericks easily won Rookie of the Year. The 20-year-old small forward from Slovenia accepted his trophy from RJ Barrett, who went to the New York Knicks as the No. 3 pick in the NBA draft last week. Doncic was the No. 3 pick last year. The other finalists were Deandre Ayton of Phoenix and Trae Young of Atlanta. Larry Bird and Magic Johnson shared the Lifetime Achievement Award. The former rivals took turns holding their trophies while each other spoke. Bird said the NBA is in good hands with today's talented athletes and he urged them to keep the game the same so it continues on for future generations. Johnson starred for the Los Angeles Lakers and Bird with the Boston Celtics. Mike Conley Jr., newly traded to the Utah Jazz, claimed trophies for Teammate and Sportsmanship of the Year. Conley earned the awards for his 12-year tenure with the Memphis Grizzlies. Bradley Beal of the Washington Wizards received the NBA Cares Community Assist honor......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 25th, 2019