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Covid-19 reinfection casts doubt on virus immunity: study

Covid-19 patients may experience more severe symptoms the second time they are infected, according to research released Tuesday confirming it is possible to catch the potentially deadly disease more than once. A study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal charts the first confirmed case of Covid-19 reinfection in the United States — the country worst hit by the pandemic — and indicates that exposure to the virus may not guarantee future immunity. The patient, a 25-year-old Nevada man, was infected with two distinct variants of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, within a 48-day time frame. The second infection was more severe than the first, resulting in the patient being hospitalised with oxygen support. The paper noted four other cases of reinfection confirmed globally, with one patient each in Belgium, the Netherlands, Hong Kong and Ecuador. Experts said the prospect of reinfection could have a profound impact on how the world battles through the pandemic. In particular, it could influence the hunt for a vaccine — the currently Holy Grail of pharmaceutical research. “The possibility of reinfections could have significant implications for our understanding of Covid-19 immunity, especially in the absence of an effective vaccine,” said Mark Pandori, for the Nevada State Public Health Laboratory and lead study author. “We need more research to understand how long immunity may last for people exposed to SARS-CoV-2 and why some of these second infections, while rare, are presenting as more severe.” Waning immunity?Vaccines work by triggering the body’s natural immune response to a certain pathogen, arming it with antibodies it to fight off future waves of infection. But it is not at all clear how long Covid-19 antibodies last. For some diseases, such as measles, infection confers lifelong immunity. For other pathogens, immunity may be fleeting at best. The authors said the US patient could have been exposed to a very high dose of the virus the second time around, triggering a more acute reaction. Alternatively, it may have been a more virulent strain of the virus. Another hypothesis is a mechanism known as antibody dependent enhancement — that is, when antibodies actually make subsequent infections worse, such as with dengue fever. The researchers pointed out that reinfection of any kind remains rare, with only a handful of confirmed cases out of tens of millions of Covid-19 infections globally. However, since many cases are asymptomatic and therefore unlikely to have tested positive initially, it may be impossible to know if a given Covid-19 case is the first or second infection. In a linked comment to The Lancet paper, Akiko Iwasaka, a professor of Immunobiology and Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology at Yale University, said the findings could impact public health measures. “As more cases of reinfection surface, the scientific community will have the opportunity to understand better the correlates of protection and how frequently natural infections with SARS-CoV-2 induce that level of immunity,” she said. “This information is key to understanding which vaccines are capable of crossing that threshold to confer individual and herd immunity,” added Iwasaka, who was not involved in the study......»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerOct 13th, 2020

Covid-19 reinfection casts doubt on virus immunity

Covid-19 patients may experience more severe symptoms the second time they are infected, according to research released Tuesday confirming it is possible to catch the potentially deadly disease more than once. A study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal charts the first confirmed case of Covid-19 reinfection in the United States — the country […] The post Covid-19 reinfection casts doubt on virus immunity appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsOct 13th, 2020

Immune system remembers coronavirus for at least 6 months: study

People may be able to fight off reinfection for at least six months after they recover from COVID-19 thanks to cells that can "remember" the virus, according to research published Monday. .....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 19th, 2021

Millions more face English virus restrictions as cases spiral

Millions more people in northern England face stricter coronavirus rules next week, officials said Friday, as reports suggested the government is considering a nationwide lockdown. A digital display shows NHS health advice on the coronavirus in Leeds on October 30, 2020. – West Yorkshire is to be placed under tier three Covid restrictions from November 2, 2020, the strictest level of rules. (Photo by Lindsey Parnaby / AFP) From Monday, nearly 2.4 million residents in five districts of West Yorkshire, including in the city of Leeds, will be barred from socialising with other households indoors. Pubs and bars not serving “substantial meals” must close, alongside casinos and betting shops, while people have also been told to avoid unnecessary travel. The Department of Health said the measures were needed as infection rates in West Yorkshire were among the highest in the country and rising rapidly. The Times reported Friday that Prime Minister Boris Johnson was considering a return to a national lockdown to battle the surge. Johnson was expected to hold a press conference on Monday to announce new restrictions, which would close everything except “essential shops”, schools and universities, the paper said, quoting a government source. In its weekly study of Covid-19 prevalence, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) said the number of people with the virus had increased to around one in 100 nationwide. “There has been growth in all age groups over the past two weeks; older teenagers and young adults continue to have the highest current rates while rates appear to be steeply increasing among secondary school children,” it said. The country’s official science advisory panel warned in a report published Friday that the virus was spreading “significantly” faster and that hospitalisations were rising at a higher rate through England than its predicted “worst-case” scenario drawn up in July. The report said that in mid-October, shortly before new local rules were introduced, around four times as many people were catching Covid than anticipated in the July report. That study warned that 85,000 more people could die during the winter wave. West Yorkshire’s imminent restrictions are the latest step in the UK government’s localised response to the surging transmission, which has come under increasing scrutiny in recent weeks. More than 11 million people — about a fifth of England’s population — will be under the tightest measures from next week. Most of the areas in the “very high” category of the government’s three-tier Covid alert system are in northern and central parts of the country. Nottingham became the latest city to enter the highest tier Friday. On Thursday night, young people took to the streets in fancy dress and drank in large groups before a ban on alcohol sales in shops came into force at 2100 GMT. – ‘Targeted’ – The pandemic has hit Britain harder than any other country in Europe, with more than 45,000 people having died within 28 days of testing positive. Case rates are spiralling again after a lull, tracking the situation elsewhere on the continent. England is seeing nearly 52,000 new cases daily, a 47 percent weekly rise, according to the ONS, which conducts its analysis of households with the help of several universities and health bodies, and excludes people in hospitals and care homes.  Britain’s European neighbours and the devolved governments in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have reimposed partial lockdowns to try to cut infection rates. Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said Friday the government would continue its “targeted and focused” strategy of local restrictions in virus hotspots. “The arbitrariness of a blanket approach would be far worse than the effects of trying to be as targeted as possible,” he said. Meanwhile, a new study reported Friday that a Covid-19 variant originating in Spanish farm workers has spread rapidly throughout Europe in recent months and now accounts for most cases in Britain. The variant — called 20A.EU1 — is thought to have been spread from northeastern Spain by people returning from holidays there, according to the study, which is awaiting peer review in a medical journal. There is currently no evidence that the strain spreads faster or impacts illness severity and immunity......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 31st, 2020

South Africa suspends AstraZeneca vaccination launch over study

South Africa said Sunday it would suspend the start of its Covid-19 vaccinations with the AstraZeneca jab after a study showed the drug failed to prevent mild and moderate cases of the virus variant that has appeared in the country......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsFeb 8th, 2021

Labella forms committee to study vaccination plan

CEBU CITY, Philippines — Cebu City Mayor Edgardo Labella has ordered the formation of a committee to study the vaccination plan and how to efficiently achieve the desired herd immunity against the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). In a phone interview with CDN Digital, Labella said that the committee will be composed of Doctor Jeffrey Ybonez, […] The post Labella forms committee to study vaccination plan appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 12th, 2021

$169 billion for 29,000 lives? Study calculates cost of US shutdowns

There's little doubt that government-ordered business shutdowns to stop the spread of Covid-19 damaged the US economy, but the exact cost has not been clear......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 24th, 2020

Researchers say study on COVID-19 in Italy doesn’t dispute virus origins

FILE PHOTO: A computer image created by Nexu Science Communication together with Trinity College in Dublin, shows a model structurally representative of a betacoronavirus which is the type of virus linked to COVID-19, better known as the coronavirus linked to the Wuhan outbreak, shared with Reuters on February 18, 2020. NEXU Science Communication/via REUTERS MILAN […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  balitaRelated NewsNov 20th, 2020

Alex Gonzaga, her parents, and fiancé Mikee recover from Covid-19

Despite plans that have been cancelled, the actress is still grateful for many things Earlier today, Alex Gonzaga shared an intimate and very personal documentary video of how life was the past three weeks since they found out that she and her parents, fiancé Mikee, and one household help Sophie, were infected with Covid-19.  She was contemplating if she should share how life was when Covid-19 hit them, and decided that she should, “so you can learn from our mistakes and to give you hope so that you know you can get better.” She started off by revealing that the virus infected their family because a member went out to buy food. The first one who got infected was her mom Pinty, and thankfully, both parents were asymptomatic.  It was her and Mikee who had it worse, and Alex was able to document how she felt on a daily basis and put it out in her vlog. She started with day three where one can see her crying, “My plans were ruined. I wanted to get married with my family and a few friends, so I needed to change my plans. I also have a new show, but I couldn’t attend. For the next two weeks, I’ll be staying here at home.” On the fourth day, she admitted that she was emotional because so many of her plans didn’t push through, including attending the birthday of her one and only nephew Seve. “Right now, no one leaves the house,” she added that it’s also important to take lots of rest, drink fluids, and take Vitamin C. She also shared the symptoms she was experiencing that time such as feeling weak, slight fever (37.7C), sore throat, loss of appetite, clogged nose, and loss of taste. They also taped a sheet of plastic over on each of the rooms so that they would not leave their rooms. Both her parents are also staying in different rooms. Thankfully, her sister Toni and family, along with her friends, tested negative.  On the fifth day, she didn’t have the appetite to eat and her mom suggested that she should go to the hospital but Mikee recommended to stay at home since things might worsen if she went to the hospital. She also started taking Melatonin, so that she can sleep better and get her much needed rest. True enough, on the sixth day, she woke up at around 10a.m. For the next few days, she added other ways to boost her immunity by eating more protein, opening the curtains and taking in the sun and savoring its warmth. She also kept an oxygenator by her side so she could check her oxygen level. On the eighth day, she was slightly back to normal except that she got tired more often. On the tenth day, she started getting emotional again, but felt very blessed. “God healed us, and my parents didn’t experience any symptoms, even if they’re senior citizens,” she continues. “And it just dawned on me that we survived Covid-19.” They had everyone, including the whole house staff, tested on the 15th day for Covid-19, with the negative results for everyone, even Mikee. It’s been three weeks and she shares in her vlog that she’s happy to be back and happy that they survived Covid-19 as a family. “You can survive Covid-19. Don’t panic. Consult with your doctor and really take care of your body. Boost your immune system. Drink your vitamins. Gargle with salt and water, and take lots of rest,” she reminds her viewers. “We should stop thinking about ourselves, we should really start thinking about others. It’s not about you, but the people around you. So that we can avoid infecting people during this pandemic.”.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 24th, 2020

World Roundup: Virus stays on skin for 9 hours& mdash;study

The coronavirus remains active on human skin for nine hours, Japanese researchers have found, in a discovery they said showed the need for frequent hand washing to combat the COVID-19 pandemic......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 18th, 2020

Addressing mental health amid a pandemic

BETTER DAYS Senator Sonny Angara Mental health has historically been a difficult subject to talk about in Philippine society. Many of us, no doubt, have our own stories, personal or otherwise, of how difficult it is to seek help. In fact, in the journal Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, an August, 2020, analysis of many studies on the matter confirmed that the low utilization of mental health services among Filipinos could be attributed in part to the stigma associated with mental health issues, with resilience and self-reliance becoming possible alternate coping strategies. Unfortunately, the COVID-19 pandemic has made mental health an even bigger issue. The quarantine, the economic effects of the pandemic, and the anxieties brought about by the virus’ unpredictability have had a negative effect on the mental health of many Filipinos. Although we as a country are consistently rated to be in the Top 5 of a global optimism index, according to the DOH, the calls for help have been increasing. According to the National Center for Mental Health (NCMH), their helpline received about 400 calls monthly from May, 2019, to February, 2020. That’s an average of 13 to 15 calls daily. By March, 672 calls were serviced, and this grew steadily in the following months, until there were 1,034 calls in July – and 440 for the half of August. These double the monthly average from March to August to 876 calls, or 32 to 37 calls daily. Many government and private mental health services are available for people who are seeking help or just someone to talk to. Aside from the NCMH crisis hotline, the Natasha Goulbourn Foundation has confidential crisis lines and a referral system to partnered psychologists. The foundation is also a hub for prevention, recognition, and treatment of depression. The Philippine Mental Health Association also offers similar services, and universities like UST, UP Diliman, and Ateneo de Manila have their own mental health service organizations. Some, like Ateneo’s Center for Family Ministries have affordable or negotiable fees. Online resources like the Silakbo.Ph website have listings for many other mental health service providers outside of the NCR. In fact, many organizations have already partnered with the Department of Health (DOH); perhaps more of them should be invited to the table to plan new policies, projects, and initiatives that will address the growing number of mental health cases. The DOH is also encouraging people to learn more about general mental health through free e-learning courses translated into Filipino.  The source material is from the World Health Organization’s (WHO) QualityRights initiative, which is a global project that aims to help participants improve their own mental health, learn how to support their loved ones and communities, and gain knowledge and skills to tackle mental health issues. Clearly, we need to reassess and adapt to the fact that more Filipinos are now looking for mental health services and treatments. This is why I am seeking to amend Republic Act 11036, the Mental Health Act, particularly its existing chapter on “Rights of Service Users and Other Stakeholders.” Our proposed amendment seek to give health service users the right to immediately receive compensation benefits and special financial assistance they are entitled to under law, should they sustain temporary or permanent mental disability in the line of duty or by reason of a person’s office or position. This is an important amendment, as the Mental Health Act requires that PhilHealth provide insurance packages to patients with mental health conditions, and that access to medicines is ensured. With the observation of World Mental Health Day last October 10, it is important to remember the DOH’s theme for this year, “Mental Health for All: Unifying Voices for Greater Investment and Access.”  This theme encourages that we open conversations on the various challenges that our mental health care system faces every day, such as social stigma and limited funding. In fact, the simple act of marking the day itself is important. It shows those who are suffering that we see them, and care for them. It tells others who are hiding their issues that it is perfectly normal to seek help. And most of all, it encourages the whole world to stand in solidarity in recognition of the need for all of society to help those with mental health issues. E-mail: sensonnyangara@yahoo.com| Facebook, Twitter & Instagram: @sonnyangara Senator Sonny Angara has been in public service for 16 years—9 years as Representative of the Lone District of Aurora, and 7 as Senator. He has authored and sponsored more than 200 laws.  He is currently serving his second term in the Senate. .....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 18th, 2020

1st COVID-19 reinfection death reported

CNN — An elderly Dutch woman has become the first known person to die from catching COVID-19 twice, according to experts, raising serious questions about how long immunity and antibodies can last. The woman, 89, suffered from a rare type of bone marrow cancer called Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia. Her immune system was compromised due to the […].....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 14th, 2020

Letting virus run free with eye to herd immunity unethical : WHO

The World Health Organization chief warned Monday against suggestions by some to just allow Covid-19 to spread in the hope of achieving so-called herd immunity, saying this was "unethical"......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 13th, 2020

Late-stage study of COVID-19 convalescent-plasma treatment with remdesivir starts

A late-stage trial testing the combination of Gilead Sciences’ remdesivir and a highly concentrated solution of antibodies that neutralize the COVID-19 virus has begun, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) said on Thursday, October 8, 2020. Trial investigators believe that giving the antibody solution to COVID-19 patients at the onset of symptoms could heighten the […] The post Late-stage study of COVID-19 convalescent-plasma treatment with remdesivir starts appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 9th, 2020

Late-stage study of first single-shot vaccine begins in US

Johnson & Johnson is beginning a huge final study to try to prove if a single-dose COVID-19 vaccine can protect against the virus. The study starting Wednesday will be one of the world’s largest coronavirus vaccine studies so far, testing the shot in 60,000 volunteers in the U.S., South Africa, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico […] The post Late-stage study of first single-shot vaccine begins in US appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 24th, 2020

British study: Virus lalong kakalat sa biritan

Dapat na mag-ingat ang mga madalas sa karaoke session sa kabila ng COVID-19 pandemic. The post British study: Virus lalong kakalat sa biritan first appeared on Abante......»»

Category: newsSource:  abanteRelated NewsSep 10th, 2020

Coronavirus immunity may disappear within months – study

PARIS, France – Patients who recover from coronavirus infections may lose their immunity to reinfection within months, according to research released on Monday, July 13, that experts said could have a "significant" influence on how governments manage the pandemic. In the first study of its kind, a team led by researchers from King's College London examined the ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 26th, 2020

2 Mideast countries, world’s top virus rates per population

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates: The small, neighboring sheikhdoms of Bahrain and Qatar have the world’s highest per capita rates of coronavirus infections. In the two Mideast countries, coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) epidemics initially swept undetected through camps housing healthy and young foreign laborers, studies now show. In Qatar, a new study found that nearly 60 percent of those testing positive […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJul 23rd, 2020

Making it to the finish line: A vaccine is coming

As the race to develop a vaccine is getting close to the finish line, health experts all over the world continue to study the infection pattern and the transmission path of COVID-19 – with new waves of infection hitting many places including those that were previously touted as a “model of virus prevention.”.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 12th, 2020

WHO warns over virus immunity as global death toll tops 200,000

GENEVA, Switzerland – The World Health Organization (WHO) warned on Saturday, April 25, that recovery from coronavirus might not protect a person from reinfection as the global death toll from the pandemic surpassed 200,000. Hundreds of millions of Muslims around the world spent the second day of the Ramadan holy month out ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsApr 26th, 2020

WHO warns of virus immunity as global death toll tops 200,000

The World Health Organization warned on Saturday that recovery from coronavirus might not protect a person from reinfection as the global death toll from the pandemic surpassed 200,000. Hundreds of millions of Muslims around the world spent the second day of the Ramadan holy month out of mosques and avoiding large family meals to break […] The post WHO warns of virus immunity as global death toll tops 200,000 appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsApr 26th, 2020