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Column: A quiet, measured response from golf on civil unrest

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer Golf has never been known to move quickly. Harold Varner III illustrated as much with thoughtful observations he posted on social media after civil unrest in America over the weekend reached levels not seen in more than 50 years. “I’ve received more messages than ever before, mostly from people who wanted me to speak up immediately because of who I am. I AM BLACK,” his post began. “But it’s not helpful to anyone when impulsive, passionate reaction takes precedence over clear-minded thought.” What followed from Varner, one of three PGA Tour members of black heritage, was just that. He referred to the “senseless killing” of George Floyd, the handcuffed black man who died last week when a white police officer in Minneapolis put a knee to the back of his neck until he stopped breathing. “To me, it was evil incarnate,” Varner said. “There are objective truths in life. I think that’s one of them,” he wrote in his Monday post. Varner also cautioned against single-minded thoughts, that one can be against police killing a man while saying that burning businesses and police stations is wrong. “We can go beyond the trap of one-dimensional thinking. Once we do, our eyes will see the righteous, our hearts will feel the love, and we’ll have done more to honor all those subjected to evil and its vile nature,” he concluded. The more prominent voice is Tiger Woods, whose profile worldwide is so great that he chose early in his career not to get too opinionated on social issues. One example was two years ago at Riviera, during Black History Month, when he was asked during a news conference what concerned him about the plight of black Americans. Woods was smart in his delivery, short on substance, when he said African Americans have had their share of struggles, it has gotten better and there’s room for improvement. Accurate and safe. His tweet Monday night arrived shortly before 10 p.m. in Florida. It began with his heart going out to Floyd, his loved ones and “all of us who are hurting right now.” And while he said he has “the utmost respect” for law enforcement and the training involved to know how, when and where to use force, “This shocking tragedy clearly crossed that line.” Woods referenced the Rodney King riots in Los Angeles in 1992 — he was a teenager growing up in neighboring Orange County — and said “education is the best path forward.” “We can make our points without burning the very neighborhoods we live in,” he said. “I hope that through constructive, honest conversations we can build a safer, unified society.” Whether he said a little or a lot, Woods said something. That was important. Voices need to be heard, especially relevant ones. Golf doesn’t have many of those. It has a shabby history of inclusion, particularly when it comes to blacks, starting with the PGA of America taking until 1961 to drop its “Caucasian-only clause.” The PGA Tour now attracts the best from every corner of the globe. It can be an expensive game, yet not even the privileged are assured of making it. Woods said in a 2009 interview on being the only black on tour, "It’s only going to become more difficult for African Americans now, because golf has opened up around the world.” And so where does golf fit in the discussion of equality and justice? The PGA Tour is the only major sports league that did not issue a public statement or reference the views of its players on the homepage of its website. Would anyone have taken it seriously given the composition and color of the tour's membership? Did it need to carve out a spot on the dais that already was crowded with voices from other sports that are far more germane to the issues? Commissioner Jay Monahan was searching for answers over the weekend and ultimately chose to keep his thoughts within the tour, sending a letter Monday to his staff and then sharing it with the players. “The hardships and injustices that have and continue to impact the African-American community are painful to watch and difficult to comprehend,” Monahan wrote. “And as a citizen of this country and a leader of this organization, I must admit that I’m struggling with what my role should be. But I am determined to help and make a difference.” Monahan said he had several “meaningful and emotional” conversations with colleagues and friends in the black community, “who — once again — showed me that sometimes listening and making a commitment to understand are the only things you can offer, and that’s OK.” “What I was left with was this,” he wrote. “Make no mistake about it — someone you know and care about is hurting right now, even if they haven’t told you that directly. ... And if anyone at the tour is hurting, we should all hurt.” He also included a link from the Refinery29 website on the unseen pain blacks endure. “Too often we just move on when we are not directly influenced by the news of the day," he wrote. “Yes, we have all been impacted by the global pandemic, but we should also be painfully aware and impacted by the dividing lines in our country. “We might not know exactly what to do right now, but we shouldn’t be deterred.” The PGA Tour resumes next week at Colonial, back to its familiar world with little controversy and ample privilege. No other sport does charity as well as golf. This issue requires more than that. If the best it can do is listen and commit to understand, that's OK......»»

Category: sportsSource: abscbn abscbnJun 2nd, 2020

Trump signs order ‘protecting’ monuments

US President Donald Trump on Friday signed an executive order pledging to enforce prosecution for protesters who vandalize public memorials, as he announced he was skipping a weekend at his New Jersey golf resort to ensure “LAW & ORDER” in Washington. Trump’s order follows a wave of civil unrest across America triggered by the killing of […] The post Trump signs order ‘protecting’ monuments appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsJun 27th, 2020

Golf makes a conservative return with an eye on the long run

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer PGA Tour Commissioner Jay Monahan went from wondering if any golf would be played this year to a schedule that resumes next week with a calendar filled through Thanksgiving. What hasn't changed is his belief that the worst of the COVID-19 pandemic isn't over just because golf is back. “I don't think it's over," Monahan said Friday in a telephone interview. “I'm really confident in the plan. But you spend a lot of your time, given the uncertainty, thinking through scenarios that could play out. That's what we'll continue to do. We won't be comfortable until we're told we can be comfortable. That will be when we have a vaccine and there's no risk.” Golf is the second major sports league to return behind NASCAR, which began racing three weeks ago and ran nine national series races in a span of 14 days. The Charles Schwab Challenge next week in Fort Worth, Texas, has one of the strongest fields in Colonial's rich history, starting with the top five players from the world ranking. There will be no spectators for at least a month, even though Texas Gov. Greg Abbott this week moved the state to Phase III in the recovery that allows outdoor events at 50% capacity. “We've developed a safety plan that doesn't include spectators. That's what we stand by,” Monahan said. “We want to have a sustained return. If you think about a run to go through the FedEx Cup, we want to make sure week to week we're not taking on unnecessary risk.” Monahan said he is “not the arbiter of confidence,” rather it comes from guidance of health experts at all levels and a plan that involves testing players, caddies and essential personnel as much as twice a week — trying to create a bubble for the traveling circus that is golf. Players were mailed a test kit and were recommended to use it before they travel. They will be tested when they arrive at tournaments and before they leave if they're on charter flights the tour has arranged, and then the process is repeated at the next tournament. Thermal readings and health surveys are required daily, along with sanitizing and social distancing. “It's the only manner we could return,” he said. The tour added another layer this week in a deal with South Dakota-based Sanford Health to have mobile labs at every tournament, with capacity to get results in a matter of hours without taking away resources from the markets where they play. Monahan said CBS Sports is creating its own bubble for the telecast, with Jim Nantz the only person in the booth and other analysts working remotely. Ninety days will have passed from the opening round of The Players Championship, which was canceled the next day, until the first tee shot at Colonial. “We all went home dealing with the same questions,” he said. “How do I get a complete understanding of where we are with the virus and all the elements? How do we recognize that we're turning off (canceling) 11 events? How do you think about resumption and at the same time develop a safety and testing program, not our area of expertise?" The reset began with the majors picking new dates — the British Open was canceled — with the PGA Championship in San Francisco moving to Aug. 6-9, the U.S. Open in New York on Sept. 17-20, and the Masters on Nov. 12-15. “At that time it was very unclear where we would be with safety and testing,” Monahan said. “It could have been earlier than we are, it could have been through points of next year. Information was changing by the minute.” Now that golf is returning, Monahan couldn't predict when spectators would return. He said the tour has worked with tournaments the last several years on building a reserve fund for a crisis such as this. “If you’re not selling tickets, and there’s not hospitality, you don’t have the pro-am experience or the honorary observer program for the sponsor ... that’s a significant financial impact on those tournaments, and the impact on the way tournaments connect with their communities,” he said. Tournaments and their title sponsors still have managed to raise money for their local charities. The Zurich Classic matched last year's donation of $1.5 million to a children's services foundation. The John Deere Classic expects $10 million in donations, even though it canceled its July event. The pandemic is not the only talking point as golf tries to get back on track. The tour on Friday posted Monahan's letter to staff and players on the nation's civil unrest, which the AP first reported on Tuesday. He had a 10-minute video conversation with Harold Varner III, one of three PGA Tour members of black heritage, who wrote passionately on social media on George Floyd, killed when a white police officer held a knee to the back of Floyd's neck while the black man was handcuffed. The conversation was scheduled before the protests began, and Varner was chosen because he's on the Player Advisory Council and golf was ready to resume. “We'll be talking about COVID and civil and social unrest for some time,” Monahan said. “Next week will not be an exception on that front.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 6th, 2020

Chile to vote on new constitution in response to protests

SANTIAGO, Chile – Chile announced Friday, November 15, it will stage a referendum to replace the country's dictatorship-era constitution next year – a key demand of protesters after nearly a month of sometimes violent civil unrest. The current charter, in force since 1980 and enacted by the former military junta of ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 15th, 2019

US PGA Tour cancels Hong Kong event over player safety

HONG KONG: The US PGA Tour on Tuesday cancelled next month’s season-ending event on its Chinese feeder golf circuit in Hong Kong citing “continued demonstrations, civil unrest and safety concerns.”…READ.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsSep 24th, 2019

NDRRMC says typhoon response adequate

The National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council said Thursday that it has not been negligent in issuing timely and adequate warnings and advisories related to the strength of typhoon “Ulysses” even if many residents in Metro Manila and nearby provinces seemed to be caught by surprise with the sudden flooding in their areas. (MANILA BULLETIN) Requests from people asking to be rescued from the roof or second floors of their houses, specifically in Marikina City, Pasig City, and Rizal, due to the overflow of the Marikina River have flooded social media and the NDRRMC Operations Center, according to Assistant Secretary Casiano Monilla, Office of Civil Defense deputy director for operations. “Patuloy ang paglilikas natin but since yesterday or even the other day, inililikas na ang ating mga kababayan especially doon sa traditionally naaapektuhan ng bagyo. We were not caught flat-footed dito sa event na ito. Kung minsan lang kasi, kapag nag-ikot ang local officials ay hindi kaagad sumusunod ang mga kababayan. Mas nagrerely tayo kung ano ang ating nararamdaman, kung ano ang prevailing na situation na nararamdaman other than the advise na binibigay ng PAGASA,” he said in a virtual media forum. (We are still conducting rescue operations but since [Wednesday] or even [Tuesday], we have already conducted pre-emptive evacuation of our countrymen especially in areas that are traditionally affected by typhoons. We were not caught flat-footed by this event. Sometimes, the residents don’t listen to local officials even if they are already warned. They usually rely on what they are feeling or the prevailing situation rather than the advise given by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, and Astronomical Services Administration)The NDRRMC has yet to provide data on the extent of damage of  Ulysses and how many people were affected. But NDRRMC chairman and Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana, in a separate interview, said the damage has been “huge.” “[There was] huge damage. [There were] totally flooded villages and low-lying areas were flooded,” Lorenzana said when asked to describe the extent of Ulysses’ effects. Lorenzana said he has briefed President Duterte about the deployment of troops to save some residents in Marikina who were asking to be rescued due to the overflow of the Marikina River. “I just came from the Palace. I briefed him what our troops are doing in Marikina to save people from their rooftops,” he said. Social media users were quick to point out the similarity in the devastation of Ulysses to typhoon “Ondoy” in 2009 which inundated a vast portion of Metro Manila after hours of intense rains. Ondoy left 747 people dead and billions of damages in agriculture and infrasture. In Marikina, Mayor Marcelino Teordoro said Ulysses brought the water level of Marikina River to 22 meters as of 11 a.m. Thursday, which was higher than the 21.5-meter level reached during typhoon Ondoy. Monilla said local government units (LGUs) have the responsibility to conduct search and rescue operations on their affected residents but he noted that the NDRRMC is behind the LGUs to augment their capabilities. “Ondoy really served as a lesson especially sa area ng Marikina at Pasig sa NCR. Nagkaroon na sila even the early warning signals. Sa amin naman, ang pagdirect ng operations ay aming nirerely sa LGUs at kami lang ay tumutulong sa local governments in harnessing the response units para madagdagan ang units na nagre-rescue sa ating mga kababayan (Ondoy really served as a lesson especially in Marikina and Pasig in the National Capital Region. They established early warning signals. On our part, the direction of [rescue] operations rely on the local government units and we just help them in harnessing the response units which will rescue our countrymen),” he said.  “Because highly populated ang lugar it could be a challenge relocating them. Ang Provident [Village] nga which serves as a lesson in Ondoy ay affected din sa ngayon. Highly urbanized kasi ang Metro Manila that’s why it’s really a challenge paano i-relocate ang mga tao na laging affected ng ganito,” he added. Meanwhile, the NDRRMC has also tapped the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) and several private companies to deploy their manpower and assets for search and rescue operations. Gen. Gilbert Gapay, AFP chief, said the Joint Task Force NCR has been leading the rescue efforts in Metro Manila. They were aigmented by two disaster response units from the 7th Civil Relations Group, 101stSearch and Rescue volunteers, and private group REACT PH. Another search and rescue unit from Bantay Bayan volunteers were deployed in areas on Tullahan River and Caloocan City to conduct search and rescue operations. The Joint Task Force Bicolandia, Northern Luzon Command (NolCom), and Southern Luzon Command (SolCom) also deployed thousands of soldiers to coordinate the search and rescue operations in Bicol region, Cordillera Administrative Region, Ilocos (Region 1), Cagayan Valley (Region 2), Central Luzon (Region 3), Calabarzon (Region 4A), and Mimaropa (Region 4B). Monilla said they have received reports that major dams in Luzon have been releasing excess water which may inundate Central Luzon and parts of Metro Manila. “Ang Angat, Ipo, La Mesa, at Wawa dams nagpapakawala ng tubig dahil sa patuloy na pagtaas ng tubig dulot ng ulan na hatid ni Ulysses so baka abutin pa hanggang mamayang hapon o gabi (Angat, Ipo, La Mesa, and Wawa dams were releasing water because of the continuous rain brought about by Ulysses so the [flooding] may persist until afternoon or evening),” he said. .....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsNov 12th, 2020

The weasel and the damage done

Across major American cities, retailers are boarding up windows, and police are putting more officers on the beat amid fears that the US election could bring renewed civil unrest......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 3rd, 2020

A more measured response

The response from the Palace to a call from the European Parliament to suspend the Philippines’ tax-free privileges in the European Union (EU) as a result of human rights concerns was predictably—and unnecessarily—prickly and pugnacious......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 22nd, 2020

Robredo: I need to criticize the gov’t

  BY RAYMUND F. ANTONIO Vice President Leni Robredo believes it would be a disservice to the Filipino people if she chooses to be quiet about the government’s shortcomings in its response efforts to the coronavirus pandemic. Robredo said she has a basic right to criticize the administration on how it handles the health crisis […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsSep 16th, 2020

The future of PE, now

In response to last week’s two-part column “The future of PE,” one of the country’s most respected sports training institutions reached out to The STAR to share how they have evolved in the time of pandemic......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 13th, 2020

Facebook to ban new political ads ahead of US election

Facebook said Thursday it will ban new political advertising the week before the US election, one of its most sweeping moves yet against disinformation as CEO Mark Zuckerberg warned of a "risk of civil unrest" after the vote......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 5th, 2020

Facebook to ban new political ads on cusp of US election

Facebook said Thursday it will ban new political advertising the week before the US election, one of its most sweeping moves yet against disinformation as CEO Mark Zuckerberg warned of a "risk of civil unrest" after the vote......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 4th, 2020

Biden, Harris slam Trump over social unrest, Covid response

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and running mate Kamala Harris launched a two-pronged attack Thursday against Donald Trump, saying the president is fueling unrest over police brutality and racial injustice and has failed to protect Americans......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 28th, 2020

US donates 100 ventilators to Philippines for COVID-19 pandemic response

A press release from the U.S. Embassy in the Philippines said the Department of Health would facilitate the delivery of the 100 ventilators to hospitals across the country in coordination with the Office of Civil Defense and the U.S. Agency for International Development......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 28th, 2020

Column: Woods gets to see and hear how the other half lives

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer OLYMPIA FIELDS, Ill. (AP) — Tiger Woods arrived at Olympia Fields for the first time in 17 years, this time with no one around to chase after his every move from the moment he stepped out of the car until he walked off the course. That's not a bad thing. He'll be in a red shirt on Sunday with about the same number of people. That's not good, at least not for him. Woods is learning after three tournaments what others have begun to realize over the last three months. Some players thrive on energy from the crowd as a pick-me-up. Now the reaction, the volume, is the same for a birdie as a double bogey. Woods is one of those players who feeds off noise. “Always have,” he said. “I've played in front of thousands of people ever since I turned pro 24 years ago. It's always been odd when I haven't played in front of people. In one way, it's been nice between tees not getting tapped or getting a glove pulled out of my pocket. Those are things I've had to deal with for a very long time. “But you hit good shots and you get on nice little runs ... we don't have the same energy, the same fan energy.” This is not his issue alone, nor is it the reason he has yet to finish in the top 35 in the three tournaments he has played since golf returned from the coronavirus-caused shutdown. Hitting good shots and making putts goes a long way in any environment. Graeme McDowell was walking along the ninth fairway in the middle of his second round last week at the TPC Boston when he said he felt like a “golf zombie.” “It's like I have no soul,” he said. The courses are different and look the same. They're empty. McDowell spoke of needing the adrenaline he gets from the crowd around the first tee at a U.S. Open or Ryder Cup. Maybe some players do better with no one watching, especially if they're on edge and need something to calm them down. McDowell isn't one of them. Neither is Rory McIlroy. He played the final two rounds with Woods, as big a draw as there is in golf, with hardly anyone watching. Woods began the final round with four straight birdies and the only buzz came from Twitter. McIlroy knows about ebbs and flows in his game. He once missed four out of five cuts and won three out of four tournaments, all in a span of four months in 2012. But his play since returning to an empty stage in June is worth noting. He had had seven consecutive top 5s, including a victory at a World Golf Championship, and reached No. 1 in the world. Since the return, he has seven straight tournaments out of the top 10 and has yet to reach the back nine with a chance to win. Coincidence? Maybe. Three months off surely cost him some momentum. “This is going to sound really bad,” McIlroy said, “but I feel like the last few weeks, I've just been going through the motions. ... And look, that's partly to do with the atmosphere and partly to do with how I'm playing. I'm not inspiring myself, and I'm trying to get inspiration from outside sources to get something going. I can definitely see where Graeme is coming from." That might allow McIlroy to reconsider what he once said about Woods. He played with Woods and Justin Thomas in the opening two rounds at Riviera a few years ago and was amazed by all the commotion around Woods. “I swear, playing in front of all that, he gives up half a shot a day on the field. Like, it's two shots a tournament he has to give to the field because of all that goes on around,” McIlroy said that day. “Whoever is teeing off at 8:30 in the morning doesn't get that and can just go about his business. He has to deal with that every single time.” McIlroy missed the point. If all that commotion costs Woods two shots to the field, what does it cost the players with him? Right now, nothing. Without spectators, has Woods lost an advantage he once had? “Absolutely,” Woods replied. "Anyone who has played in front of thousands of people, it is very different. That's always been one of the things I've become accustomed to. The guys who played with me, who haven't become accustomed to it, they have only experienced one round here and there. That's been every round I've played for over two decades. “That advantage — for me, and some of the other top players — trying to deal with all that noise and the movement, that experience is no longer there.” Nick Faldo touched on this when he was discussing the 10-year anniversary of Woods winning the 1997 Masters, a watershed moment in golf. Faldo said that when he slipped the green jacket on Woods that Sunday, he thought the Masters would be the only major he could win. Sure, Augusta National suited his game. “But also because the Masters was the only major that the media was kept outside the ropes,” Faldo said. "And I thought that was going to be his biggest challenge. Now it’s his greatest asset. Everyone joining him now on the weekend at a major goes into his world. That’s Tiger’s arena. Other guys will step into that arena one week and go back out. He’s there all the time. And good luck coming into his world.” It's a new world for everyone now. It's especially different for Woods, not so much for some of the players paired with him. For the less accomplished players who always wondered what it was like to be in his shoes, the absence of spectators has allowed Woods to see what it's like to be in theirs......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 26th, 2020

& lsquo;We are cooperating with the PDEA& rsquo;

We write in response to the column of Mr. Charlie Manalo headlined “What happened to the probe?” which was published Monday, August 17......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 18th, 2020

Americans warned against travel to Phl

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a level 3 health notice advising Americans to reconsider any travel to the Philippines on account of the increasing number of coronavirus disease cases in the country. Along with the CDC health alert, the US State Department added alleged crime, terrorism, civil unrest, rampant kidnapping […] The post Americans warned against travel to Phl appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsAug 8th, 2020

Corruption: The other pandemic

In my May 25 column, I bemoaned the corruption which, that early in the global effort to arrest the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, was reportedly creeping in across the board. We were shocked to learn that immediately after the United States Congress passed a multi-trillion dollar pandemic response package which included a substantial sum for unemployment benefits for laid off workers, reports of large sums being siphoned off by crooked personnel of the implementing agencies at national and local levels surfaced......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 7th, 2020

Column: The revolving door at No. 1 in the world ranking

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer Jon Rahm is the No. 1 player in the world. The best player in golf? That depends on the week. Webb Simpson looked to be tough to beat when he won the RBC Heritage, giving him two victories, a runner-up finish and a third place in his last six PGA Tour events. But then Dustin Johnson won the Travelers Championship, renewing conversations that when he puts in the time, no one has a greater package of talent. During his two weeks off, however, golf became obsessed with super-sized Bryson DeChambeau and his 200 mph ball speed that carried him to victory in Detroit, his seventh straight top 10. And then two days after DeChambeau took a 10 — ideal for gymnastics, not so much for golf — on the 15th hole at Muirfield Village to miss the cut, Rahm built an eight-shot lead at the turn and held on for a victory at the Memorial that sent him to No. 1 in the world. For how long? Longer than Tom Lehman, for sure. Of the 24 players who have been No. 1 since the world ranking began in 1986, Lehman was there the shortest time — one week. And just his luck, he took that week off, so he never even played a tournament at No. 1 in the world. Rory McIlroy, whom Rahm replaced at No. 1, and Justin Thomas can return to the top if they win the World Golf Championship this week in Memphis, Tennessee. At least that's easier to track than two weeks ago, when five players at the Memorial had a mathematical chance of reaching No. 1. Whether the reason is depth or parity, it's become a revolving door that doesn't appear to be stopping anytime soon. Brooks Koepka started the year at No. 1, and McIlroy took over in February. Rahm was asked Tuesday if he considered them the best players in the world while they were at No. 1, and if he looks at himself that way now. “I think nowadays it's really tough to determine one player,” Rahm said. "Because yeah, Brooks is having a hard year right now. He's not playing his best. But he has won four majors in the last few years. Rory played amazing last year. It's hard to dictate one player alone. But it would be foolish of me to say that I'm not here thinking I'm the best player. “And I think all the great players out there who have got to this point are playing like they believe they're the best player,” he said. “In golf, you need to prove that every week.” McIlroy and Johnson have done that better than anyone over the last decade. McIlroy has reached No. 1 on eight occasions for a total of 106 weeks. Johnson has been there five times for a total of 96 weeks. During their longest stretches — 64 weeks for Johnson, 54 weeks for McIlroy — there was little argument. With Tiger Woods, there was no argument. Not since Woods in 2009 has a player started and finished a year without surrendering the No. 1 ranking. It was the eighth time Woods did that. Consider the 281 consecutive weeks Woods was No. 1, from the 2005 U.S. Open until the 2010 HSBC Champions. In the last 281 weeks, No. 1 has changed hands 27 times. Phil Mickelson was never on that list, and Rahm was quick to point out that playing against Woods in his prime certainly didn't help Lefty's cause. “But it still doesn't take away from what I've done,” Rahm said. “Now at the same time, getting here, it's great. I played great golf the last four years. ... It's not only to get here. but to stay here, hopefully for a long time.” Of the previous 23 players to reach the top of the ranking, seven won in their debut at No. 1. The most recent was Johnson in 2017 at the Mexico Championship, his second of three straight wins. The most timely belonged to Adam Scott, who had three chances to reach No. 1 by winning, and then got there during a week off. He returned and won at Colonial. The best was Ian Woosnam. He got to No. 1 in 1991 and then won the Masters. It's just a number. Rahm understands the world ranking enough to realize it's a product of two years, not one week. He should be proud, just as the 23 others before him. Thomas reached No. 1 after The Players Championship in 2018 and didn't play until the Memorial. He conceded to feeling a little different. “I just remember being a little more nervous because it's like all eyes are on you, and you're the best player in the world, so you feel like you should kind of play up to that,” he said. He tied for eighth. It could have been worse. Jordan Spieth missed the cut in his debut at No. 1. Adding to the volatility of the No. 1 ranking is the strength of the fields, which have been loaded with the world's best players since the restart and will remain strong with this World Golf Championship, the PGA Championship, the FedEx Cup playoffs and then the U.S. Open, all in the next two months. Getting to No. 1 is hard work. These days, staying there might be even harder......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 29th, 2020

'SONA2020 | Special Coverage

Bulatlat.com COVID-19 hastens PH economic decay As COVID-19 wipes out whatever is left of the limited opportunities for Filipinos to earn a living, the Duterte administration’s lacking response, combined with an oppressive political environment, creates conditions for a perfect storm of social unrest. ‘Worst outcomes of pandemic result of poor gov’t response’ – think-tank“The Duterte… The post #SONA2020 | Special Coverage appeared first on Bulatlat......»»

Category: newsSource:  bulatlatRelated NewsJul 26th, 2020

'SONA coverage | COVID-19 hastens PH economic decay

As COVID-19 wipes out whatever is left of the limited opportunities for Filipinos to earn a living, the Duterte administration’s lacking response, combined with an oppressive political environment, creates conditions for a perfect storm of social unrest. The post #SONA coverage | COVID-19 hastens PH economic decay appeared first on Bulatlat......»»

Category: newsSource:  bulatlatRelated NewsJul 24th, 2020