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Children less sick from COVID-19, but still spread the virus

For reasons unknown, children rarely have severe symptoms when infected by COVID-19 and may even be a bit less likely to get the disease in the first place, experts told AFP......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarMar 14th, 2020

Children less sick but still spread the virus

For reasons unknown, children rarely have severe symptoms when infected by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and may even be a bit less likely to get the disease in the first place, experts told AFP. But that doesn’t mean infants, toddlers and teens are not carriers for the new coronavirus, which jumped from animals to […] The post Children less sick but still spread the virus appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsMar 14th, 2020

Dirty Places at Home and Cleaning Products to Use

The Covid-19 is a global pandemic affecting thousands of people. Without a cure in sight, this virus is easily spread with droplets from sneezing or coughing. Healthcare professionals suggest handwashing, covering coughs, and using face masks when sick as preventive measures. Another tip is to stay away from dirty places and to clean homes and […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsSep 24th, 2020

Virus-proofing sports facilities presents a big challenge

By DAVE CAMPBELL AP Sports Writer MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The jersey-wearing camaraderie. The scent of sizzling sausages. The buzz before a big game. The distinctive atmosphere of live sports, that feeling in the air, will return in time as pandemic restrictions are eased. But will that very air be safe in a closed arena with other fans in attendance? The billions of dollars spent on state-of-the-art sports facilities over the last quarter-century have made high-efficiency air filtration systems more common, thanks in part to the pursuit of green and healthy building certifications. Upgrades will likely increase in the post-coronavirus era, too. The problem is that even the cleanest of air can’t keep this particular virus from spreading; if someone coughs or sneezes, those droplets are in the air. That means outdoor ballparks have high contaminant potential, too. “Most of the real risk is going to be short-distance transmission, people sitting within two, three or four seats of each other,” said Ryan Demmer, an epidemiologist at the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health. “It’s not really about the virus spreading up, getting into the ventilation system and then getting blown out to the entire stadium because this virus doesn’t seem to transmit that way. It doesn’t aerosolize that well.” The three hours spent in proximity to thousands of others is part of the fan experience. It's also why major sports leagues have been discussing plans to reopen in empty venues, for now. High-touch areas with the potential to spread the virus — called fomite transmission — are plentiful at the ballgame, of course. Door handles. Stair rails. Restroom fixtures. Concession stands. Hand washing by now has become a societal norm, but disinfectant arsenals need to be brought up to speed, too. “I can’t really find good hand sanitizer easily in stores. So think about trying to scale that up, so everybody who comes into U.S. Bank Stadium gets a little bottle of Purel. Things like that can be modestly helpful,” Demmer said. There is much work to be done. Vigilant sanitizing of the frequent-touch surfaces will be a must. Ramped-up rapid testing capability during pre-entry screening could become common for fans. Minimizing concourse and entry bottlenecks, and maintaining space between non-familial attendees, could be mandatory. Mask-wearing requirements? Maybe. Most experts, including those at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, believe the primary mode of transmission for COVID-19 is close person-to-person contact through breathing, coughing or sneezing but there's no consensus on some of the details. “There’s still widespread disagreement between experts on which mode of transmission dominates for influenza. So the likelihood of us figuring this out soon for this virus is low,” said Joe Allen, director of the Healthy Buildings Program and an assistant professor at Harvard’s School of Public Health. “We may never figure it out, but I also think it’s irrelevant because it’s a pandemic and we should be guarding against all of them.” Including, of course, the air. The American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers designed the Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) scale to measure a filtration system's effectiveness (from 1-16) at capturing microscopic airborne particles that can make people sick. Not just viruses, but dust, pollen, mold and bacteria. Most experts recommend a MERV rating of 13 or higher, the minimum standard for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification. An emerging technology in this area is called bipolar ionization. Connecticut-based AtmosAir has a bipolar ionization air treatment system in about 40 sports venues. Staples Center in Los Angeles was one of the first major sports customers. TD Garden in Boston and Bridgestone Arena in Nashville are among the others who’ve signed on. The Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority approved last year a 10-year contract for a little more than $1 million with AtmosAir to install its system in U.S. Bank Stadium, home of the Vikings and the first indoor NFL stadium to use it. The building, which measures 1.8 million square feet, has 53 air handling units with AtmosAir tubes installed, including 30 in the seating bowl. The ions act like fresh air, reducing the amount of outside air needed to be introduced for the cleansing process. The protein spikes in the coronavirus particles make them easier to catch and kill, said Philip Tierno, a New York University School of Medicine professor of microbiology and pathology. Said AtmosAir founder and CEO Steve Levine: “We’re never going to create a mountaintop, but we’re going to put in maybe three to four times the ions over the ambient air and then let those ions attack different pollutants in the air. The ions grab onto particles and spores and make them bigger and heavier, so they’re much easier to filter out of the air." The next time fans do pass through the turnstiles, in a few weeks or a few months, in most cases they will probably encounter an unprecedented level of cleanliness. “There will be some controls that are visible, extra cleaning and disinfection, but some of it will be invisible, like for what’s happening in the air handling system,” said Allen, the Harvard professor. “The consumers will decide when they feel comfortable going back, and that’s going to depend on what strategies are put in place in these venues and stadiums and arenas and, most importantly, how well these organizations communicate that to the paying public.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 1st, 2020

Travel restrictions on resident foreigners

Like most countries in Asia, the Philippines imposed restrictions on the movement of people in and out of the country as a critical component of its response to combat the spread of the COVID-19 virus......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 23rd, 2020

Navotas City only allows cemetery visits by schedule

Navotas City is only allowing residents to visit cemeteries by schedule to prevent the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection in the city this Undas or All Souls’ Day. Mayor Toby Tiangco on Saturday said that the residents should first reach out to the contact number provided by the local government to express their intent to visit a cemetery and get a schedule when they will be allowed to do so. “May sistema ng scheduling na magtetext sila, bibigyan sila ng oras para siguradong hindi puno ‘yung cemetery (We are scheduling them through text messages. We will give them a schedule to ensure that the cemetery will not be crowded),” Tiangco said over CNN Philippines interview. According to him, residents are then given two hours to visit and pay respects to their departed loved ones. However, they are not allowed to eat or drink there as the said activities might lead to catching the virus or infecting others. “Then, may pagitan na two hours para sa labas pasok ng mga tao (from the cemetery) and then two hours ulit para doon sa mga (bagong papasok) (Then, there is a two-hour gap for the exit of first batch visitors before another batch would be allowed,” Tiangco added. Tiangco said that they are taking various safety measures to maintain its gain in its COVID-19 response. “Ang gusto lang namin maging safe (muna ang sitwasyon) bago lumabas ang tao (We first want to make sure that the situation is safe before allowing our people to go out),” he said. As of the latest University of the Philippines’ OCTA Research data, Navotas City is the second lowest city among 17 Metro Manila cities in terms of COVID-19 attack rate. The city only has an attack rate of 4.9 percent per 1,000 population, according to the said research. “This serves as a validation of all our efforts to keep our constituents safe from COVID-19. However, we need to stay vigilant and careful. We cannot let our guard down because our cases could go up any time,” he said......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 17th, 2020

Letting virus run free with eye to herd immunity unethical : WHO

The World Health Organization chief warned Monday against suggestions by some to just allow Covid-19 to spread in the hope of achieving so-called herd immunity, saying this was "unethical"......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 13th, 2020

Trump restarts public speeches, falsely claims Covid has a cure

US President Donald Trump will give a public speech at the White House on Saturday for the first time since testing positive for Covid-19, and will also hold a Florida rally next week in an attempt to relaunch his stumbling reelection campaign with only 25 days to go. Knocked off the campaign trail by his hospitalization for three nights last week, the president is in the midst of a frenetic bid to catch up with surging Democratic challenger Joe Biden. On Friday, during an extended media blitz, he falsely claimed that Covid-19 now has a cure. He also revealed that he’d been told he was near death at the worst of his bout with the virus, which has killed more than 210,000 Americans and severely dented his chances of winning a second term on November 3. Saturday’s speech, which a senior administration official said would be on Trump’s favored theme of “law and order,” will give him a chance to dispel lingering doubts about his health. The crowd will be on the South Lawn of the White House, while the president will stand up on the balcony, the official said, confirming US media reports. And on Monday, Trump will take another big step by holding a rally in Sanford, in the crucial electoral state of Florida, his campaign said. The events come despite continued questions over how sick Trump was last week and how complete his recovery is now, with White House officials refusing to answer basic queries including the date on which the president first contracted the virus and whether he has tested negative since. – ‘Better than a vaccine’ – On Friday, Trump gave a marathon interview to right-wing talk radio host Rush Limbaugh in which he said the experimental Regeneron antibody cocktail that he took as part of therapeutic treatment was “a cure.” It’s “a total game changer” and “better than a vaccine,” he said. In fact, there is no cure and still no approved vaccine for the coronavirus. Trump repeatedly asserted that he feels fine and he has been backed up by statements from the presidential physician, Sean Conley. But in his Limbaugh interview, Trump suggested for the first time that he had been close to death, had it not been for the therapeutic drugs. “I’m talking to you today because of it. I could have been a bad victim,” he said, referring to friends of his who had died from Covid-19. Trump said that doctors told him afterward, “you were going into a very bad phase.”  “You know what that means,” said the president. According to Conley, Trump is now fit for a “safe return to public engagement” from Saturday. – Battle for attention – Trump has tried to fill the gap left by his enforced absence from the campaign trail by making back-to-back appearances on friendly media outlets. He twice spoke at length on Fox on Thursday and was due back on Fox’s Tucker Carlson Tonight show late Friday, appearing from the White House where he was to undergo what the network described as an on-air “medical evaluation,” conducted remotely by Fox contributor Doctor Marc Siegel. Biden, however, is already picking up the pace of travel, with a stop in Nevada on Friday after going to Arizona on Thursday. Polls show Biden leads heavily in key demographics including women and the elderly, prompting analysts to talk increasingly of a possible landslide victory. Trump’s biggest liability — overwhelming public dissatisfaction over his handling of the coronavirus crisis — has returned as the headline issue of the campaign thanks to the president’s own infection. Adding to the pressure, congressional Democrats who control the House of Representatives unveiled plans for a commission to investigate a president’s physical and mental fitness for the job — a move clearly meant to jab at Trump. The speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, said it was time to examine Trump’s “disassociation from reality.”.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 9th, 2020

Doctors to rule on Trump discharge, but spokeswoman Covid positive

Doctors were to decide Monday whether to discharge Donald Trump from hospital but news that the president's spokeswoman had also tested positive for COVID-19 underlined the out-of-control spread of the virus through a chaotic White House......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 6th, 2020

Stay vigilant vs COVID-19, Robredo urges public

While she is hopeful about the country’s decreasing coronavirus cases, Vice President Leni Robredo said this should not be a reason for Filipinos to be complacent and they must continue to be vigilant against COVID-19. Vice-President Leni Robredo (OVP / Facebook / FILE PHOTO / MANILA BULLETIN) Robredo, in a Facebook post, said the people must maintain all the necessary precautionary measures and health protocols despite the improving COVID-19 situation. These include wearing face masks and face shields, frequent hand washing, and maintaining physical distancing from each other in public places. “While the numbers give us hope, this is no time to relax or be complacent,” the opposition leader said. ”Let us also pray fervently that all who are sick and those afflicted by the virus will get well soon and that our frontliners will be cloaked in the mantle of protection,” she added. “Kaya natin ‘to (We can do this),” Robredo stressed. The vice president issued a reminder to the public as the country has started to flatten the curve with the low number of COVID-19 cases’ reproduction number. The latest Department of Health (DOH) data showed the reproduction number was below 0.9. Robredo believed the current downward trend is the end result of the two-week modified enhanced community quarantine (MECQ) that was implemented in Metro Manila and nearby provinces last month. “Our medical experts were right to demand for a two-week MECQ. We’re seeing the fruits of that now,” she said......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsSep 9th, 2020

Soccsksargen  records single-day high of 58 COVID-19 cases

KORONADAL CITY (MindaNews / 6 September) – Soccsksargen region recorded a single-day high of 58 confirmed cases of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), with several cases due to exposure to persons earlier tested positive for the virus, indicating the spread of the disease through local transmission. Arjohn Gangoso, Department of Health – Soccsksargen (DOH-Soccsksargen) health education and […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsSep 7th, 2020

DTI sees 4K percent rise in online businesses during virus lockdown

MANILA, Philippines — The Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) has seen a 4,000-percent increase in the number of registered online businesses during the six-month lockdown enforced by the government to curb the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19). During a Senate committee hearing into the proposed Internet Transactions Act on Thursday, DTI Secretary Ramon Lopez […] The post DTI sees 4K percent rise in online businesses during virus lockdown appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 3rd, 2020

All-out : Task force vows tighter curfew enforcement amid GCQ extension

“Curfew must be enforced regardless of the existing community quarantine status. Containing the unnecessary movement and gathering of people even within a community is part of the general medical solution against COVID-19 since what we are after is the prevention of the spread of this deadly virus,” said Police Lt. Gen. Guillermo Eleazar, commander of the task force......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 1st, 2020

Binay to DOH: Explain origin of COVID-19 infection in PH

MANILA, Philippines — Senator Nancy Binay on Sunday slammed the Department of Health (DOH) for its pronouncement that it is too early to conclude that COVID-9-infected Chinese tourists, who visited the country this year, helped spread the virus. “Seryoso?! So, ‘di pala sa turistang Chinese galing ang Covid sa Pilipinas. But would the DOH be […] The post Binay to DOH: Explain origin of COVID-19 infection in PH appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 30th, 2020

David: Gov’t efforts vs COVID-19 ‘working’ but MM not yet ready for MGCQ

The University of the Philippines (UP) OCTA Research said government’s effort in fighting the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is proving to be effective that has resulted in the decline in new infections. Commuters inside an e-trike wears face shield as DOTr requires the use of face shield when riding public transport (JANSEN ROMERO / MANILA BULLETIN) But the UP experts are not recommending that Metro Manila be placed under modified general community quarantine (MGCQ) after the lapse of GCQ on August 31. Despite reverting to a more relaxed lockdown, Dr. Guido David in an interview over DzBB Saturday said that the flattening of the curve is still achievable. “Sa ngayon, hindi pa naman namin nakikitang tumataas [ang cases], kaya optimistic naman kami na itong GCQ (general community quarantine) baka iba na sya sa GCQ dati kasi mas maingat na tayo ngayon (So far, we haven’t seen the cases rise that is why we are optimistic that this GCQ is different from the previous one because the people now are more careful,” David said. He cited the mandatory wearing of face shield in malls, offices, and public transportation as an effective measure to curb the spread of the virus. David also lauded the country’s “improving” contact tracing, isolation of probable cases, and increased testing capacity. “Yung contact tracing natin pinapaganda na natin, yung isolation and treatment, may lapses tayo dati dyan sa implementation, ngayon mukhang naayos na natin yan. Yung testing, nag-increase pa. Yung local government, baka mas proactive na sila ngayon sa pag manage ng localized lockdowns (Our contact tracing has improved. We seem to have fixed our lapses in implementing isolation and treatment. The testing has increased too. Our local government units are more proactive now in managing localized lockdowns),” he added. “Sa Cebu nung nag-GCQ na ulit sila, hindi naman tumaas ang bilang ng kaso. Parang natuto na sila at siguro nasanay na dun sa new normal, kaya patuloy pa ring pagbaba yung kaso. Yung Cebu, as an example, 300 cases sila per day nung nag-ECQ sila, tapos bumaba na. Ngayon nakaka-80 cases na lang sila per day. So yun yung inaasahan natin sa Metro Manila (In Cebu, when they were placed under GCQ again, their daily cases did not increase. Perhaps they already learned their lesson and have gotten used to the new normal so their cases continue to decrease. Cebu used to have 300 cases per day when they were placed under ECQ. Now they only have 80 cases daily. And that’s what we’re expecting in Metro Manila),” David said. Earlier, the research group said that flattening of the COVID-19 curve is “possible” by end of August to September because the virus reproductive rate is going down from 1.5 to 1.1. However, David noted that UP OCTA team still would not recommend Metro Manila to shift to moderate general community quarantine (MGCQ). “Hindi natin mare-recommend yan kasi puno pa rin yung mga hospital natin para makapag-MGCQ tayo. Obserbahan muna natin (We’re not recommending MGCQ because our hospitals are still full. We should observe first),” he said. “Buti nang ma-retain tayo ng GCQ tapos hintayin natin na bumaba pa yung bilang ng kaso, kahit mapababa natin ng 2,000-1,000 cases per day, tsaka tayo mag-open ng iba pang economic sectors (It would be better for us to retain the GCQ status and wait for the number of new cases to decrease, let’s say 2,000-1,000 cases per day, then we can open other economic sectors),” David added......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 29th, 2020

PRC: DOH to blame for virus spread

The Philippine Red Cross has attributed the spread of COVID-19 in communities and households to the Department of Health (DOH)’s belated release of results to patients who tested positive for the novel coronavirus......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2020

Bizmen can join IATF as resource persons — Palace

Malacañang on Friday invited businessmen to become "resource persons" in crafting policies meant to control the spread of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) in the country, but fell short of giving them a seat in the virus task force......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 21st, 2020

Gaza children return to school despite virus fears

Hundreds of thousands of children returned to school in Gaza Saturday after a five-month suspension aimed at reining in the spread of the novel coronavirus in the crowded Palestinian territory......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 9th, 2020

And now, plastic shields for public transportation

  STARTING August 15, passengers in public transportation, including airlines, in Metro Manila will be required to wear plastic face shields over face masks, as an additional barrier against the spread of COVID-19 virus in droplets from the breath of an infected person that may be in the surrounding air. This additional requirement was made […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsAug 8th, 2020

Facebook removes Trump post over false virus claims

San Francisco, United States | Facebook said Wednesday it had removed a video post by US President Donald Trump in which he contended that children are "almost immune" to the coronavirus, a claim the social network called "harmful COVID misinformation.".....»»

Category: techSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 6th, 2020

Facebook deletes Trump’s COVID ‘misinformation’

Facebook said Wednesday it had removed a post from the page of US President Donald Trump over what it called “harmful COVID misinformation.” The post was a video clip from a Fox News interview in which Trump contended that children are “almost immune” from the deadly virus. “This video includes false claims that a group […] The post Facebook deletes Trump’s COVID ‘misinformation’ appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsAug 6th, 2020