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Bold and daring Aljur in & lsquo;Nerisa& rsquo;

Television star Aljur Abrenica is back to doing films, and starting his renewed journey on the big screen, the 31-year-old actor banners Nerisa opposite former beauty queen Cindy Miranda. .....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerJul 29th, 2021

BJ Pascual celebrates & lsquo;Musings& rsquo; anniversary with Pia Wurtzbach daring shoot

Celebrity photographer BJ Pascual teamed up with Pia Wurtzbach, creative director Vince Uy, and fashion stylist Pam Quinones for a daring photoshoot in celebration of “Musings Series” first anniversary last Aug 8......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 14th, 2021

Djokovic hails & lsquo;bold, brave& rsquo; Osaka

PARIS—World number one Novak Djokovic on Tuesday hailed Naomi Osaka as “brave and bold” for withdrawing from the French Open after revealing her struggles with depression and anxiety......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2021

Gloc-9 and Lirah& rsquo;s & lsquo;Macho Rap& rsquo;

Some matches are just made in heaven, as confirmed by the latest collab of OPM legend Gloc-9 and rising pop artist Lirah, ”Macho Rap.” With the daring vibe of Gloc-9 blending harmoniously with the saccharine sounds of Lirah’s vocals, the song definitely dropped some serious sizzle to the local music scene......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsDec 18th, 2020

Coaching great John Thompson of Georgetown dead at 78

By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — John Thompson, the imposing Hall of Famer who turned Georgetown into a “Hoya Paranoia” powerhouse and became the first Black coach to lead a team to the NCAA men’s basketball championship, has died. He was 78 His death was announced in a family statement released by Georgetown on Monday. No details were disclosed. “Our father was an inspiration to many and devoted his life to developing young people not simply on but, most importantly, off the basketball court. He is revered as a historic shepherd of the sport, dedicated to the welfare of his community above all else,” the statement said. “However, for us, his greatest legacy remains as a father, grandfather, uncle, and friend. More than a coach, he was our foundation. More than a legend, he was the voice in our ear everyday.” One of the most celebrated and polarizing figures in his sport, Thompson took over a moribund Georgetown program in the 1970s and molded it in his unique style into a perennial contender, culminating with a national championship team anchored by center Patrick Ewing in 1984. Georgetown reached two other title games with Thompson in charge and Ewing patrolling the paint, losing to Michael Jordan’s North Carolina team in 1982 and to Villanova in 1985. At 6-foot-10, with an ever-present white towel slung over his shoulder, Thompson literally and figuratively towered over the Hoyas for decades, becoming a patriarch of sorts after he quit coaching in 1999. One of his sons, John Thompson III, was hired as Georgetown’s coach in 2004. When the son was fired in 2017, the elder Thompson -- known affectionately as “Big John” or “Pops” to many -- was at the news conference announcing Ewing as the successor. Along the way, Thompson said what he thought, shielded his players from the media and took positions that weren’t always popular. He never shied away from sensitive topics -- particularly the role of race in both sports and society -- and he once famously walked off the court before a game to protest an NCAA rule because he felt it hurt minority athletes. “I’ll probably be remembered for all the things that kept me out of the Hall of Fame, ironically, more than for the things that got me into it,” Thompson said on the day he was elected to the Hall in 1999. Thompson became coach of the Hoyas in 1972 and began remaking a team that was 3-23 the previous season. Over the next 27 years, he led Georgetown to 14 straight NCAA tournaments (1979-92), 24 consecutive postseason appearances (20 NCAA, 4 NIT), three Final Fours (1982, 1984, 1985) and won six Big East tournament championships. Employing a physical, defense-focused approach that frequently relied on a dominant center -- Alonzo Mourning and Dikembe Mutombo were among his other pupils -- Thompson compiled a 596-239 record (.715 winning percentage). He had 26 players drafted by the NBA. One of his honors -- his selection as coach of the U.S. team for the 1988 Olympics -- had a sour ending when the Americans had to settle for the bronze medal. It was a result so disappointing that Thompson put himself on a sort of self-imposed leave at Georgetown for a while, coaching practices and games but leaving many other duties to his assistants. Off the court, Thompson was both a role model and a lightning rod. A stickler for academics, he kept a deflated basketball on his desk, a reminder to his players that a degree was a necessity because a career in basketball relied on a tenuous “nine pounds of air.” The school boasted that 76 of 78 players who played four seasons under Thompson received their degrees. He was a Black coach who recruited mostly Black players to a predominantly white Jesuit university in Washington, and Thompson never hesitated to speak out on behalf of his players. One of the most dramatic moments in Georgetown history came on Jan. 14, 1989, when he walked off the court to a standing ovation before the tipoff of a home game against Boston College, demonstrating in a most public way his displeasure against NCAA Proposition 42. The rule denied athletic scholarships to freshmen who didn’t meet certain requirements, and Thompson said it was biased against underprivileged students. Opposition from Thompson, and others, led the NCAA to modify the rule. Thompson’s most daring move came that same year, when he summoned notorious drug kingpin Rayful Edmond III for a meeting in the coach’s office. Thompson warned Edmond to stop associating with Hoyas players and to leave them alone, using his respect in the Black community to become one of the few people to stare down Edmond and not face a reprisal. Though aware of his influence, Thompson did not take pride in becoming the first Black coach to take a team to the Final Four, and he let a room full of reporters know it when asked his feelings on the subject at a news conference in 1982. “I resent the hell out of that question if it implies I am the first Black coach competent enough to take a team to the Final Four,” Thompson said. “Other Blacks have been denied the right in this country; coaches who have the ability. I don’t take any pride in being the first Black coach in the Final Four. I find the question extremely offensive.” Born Sept. 2, 1941, John R. Thompson Jr. grew up in Washington, D.C. His father was always working — on a farm in Maryland and later as a laborer in the city — and could neither read nor write. “I never in my life saw my father’s hands clean,” Thompson told The Associated Press in 2007. “Never. He’d come home and scrub his hands with this ugly brown soap that looked like tar. I thought that was the color of his hands. When I was still coaching, kids would show up late for practice and I’d (say) ... ‘My father got up every morning of his life at 5 a.m. to go to work. Without an alarm.‘” Thompson’s parents emphasized education, but he struggled in part of because of poor eyesight and labored in Catholic grammar school. He was moved to a segregated public school, had a growth spurt and became good enough at basketball to get into John Carroll, a Catholic high school, where he led the team to 55 consecutive victories and two city titles. He went to Providence College as one of the most touted basketball prospects in the country and led the Friars to the first NCAA bid in school history. He graduated in 1964 and played two seasons with Red Auerbach’s Boston Celtics, earning a pair of championship rings as a sparingly used backup to Bill Russell. Thompson returned to Washington, got his master’s degree in guidance and counseling from the University of the District of Columbia and went 122-28 over six seasons at St. Anthony’s before accepting the job at Georgetown, an elite school that had relatively few Black students. Faculty and students rallied around him after a bedsheet with racist words was hung inside the school’s gym before a game during the 1974-75 season. Thompson sheltered his players with closed practices, tightly controlled media access and a prohibition on interviews with freshmen in their first semester -- a restriction that still stands for Georgetown’s basketball team. Combined with Thompson’s flashes of emotion and his players’ rough-and-tumble style of play, it wasn’t long before the words “Hoya Paranoia” came to epitomize the new era of basketball on the Hilltop campus. Georgetown lost the 1982 NCAA championship game when Fred Brown mistakenly passed the ball to North Carolina’s James Worthy in the game’s final seconds. Two years later, Ewing led an 84-75 win over Houston in the title game. The Hoyas were on the verge of a repeat the following year when they were stunned in the championship game by coach Rollie Massimino’s Villanova team in one of the biggest upsets in tournament history. Success allowed Thompson to rake in money through endorsements, but he ran afoul of his Georgetown bosses when he applied for a gambling license for a business venture in Nevada in 1995. Thompson, who liked playing the slot machines in Las Vegas, reluctantly dropped the application after the university president objected. Centers Ewing, Mourning and Mutombo turned Georgetown into “Big Man U” under Thompson, although his last superstar was guard Allen Iverson, who in 1996 also became the first player under Thompson to leave school early for the NBA draft. “Thanks for Saving My Life Coach,” Iverson wrote at the start of an Instagram post Monday with photos of the pair. The Hoyas teams in the 1990s never came close to matching the achievements of the 1980s, and Thompson’s era came to a surprising and sudden end when he resigned in the middle of the 1998-99 season, citing distractions from a pending divorce. Thompson didn’t fade from the limelight. He became a sports radio talk show host and a TV and radio game analyst, joining the very profession he had frustrated so often as a coach. He loosened up, allowing the public to see his lighter side, but he remained pointed and combative when a topic mattered to him. A torch was passed in 2004, when John Thompson III became Georgetown’s coach. The younger Thompson, with “Pops” often watching from the stands or sitting in the back of the room for news conferences, returned the Hoyas to the Final Four in 2007. Another son, Ronny Thompson, was head coach for one season at Ball State and is now a TV analyst. ___ Joseph White, a former AP sports writer in Washington who died in 2019, prepared this obituary. AP Sports Writer Howard Fendrich contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 15th, 2020

Morikawa quickly goes from college grad to major champion

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Collin Morikawa couldn't help but break into a smile, and not just because the shiny Wanamaker Trophy he won at Harding Park was positioned on a stand next to him. Just over 14 months ago, Morikawa went through commencement after his All-American career — on the golf course and in the classroom — across the Bay Bridge and up the road at Cal-Berkeley. Since then, he has played 28 tournaments around the world and already has three victories on the PGA Tour, one of them a major championship. In the last 50 years, only four other players won their first major before age 23 or younger — Jordan Spieth, Rory McIlroy, Tiger Woods and Seve Ballesteros. He already is No. 5 in the world. That alone puts him among the elite, except that Morikawa didn't need to win the PGA Championship to feel that way. “When I woke up today, I was like, ‘This is meant to be.’ This is where I feel very comfortable,” Morikawa said. “This is where I want to be, and I'm not scared from it. I think if I was scared from it, the last few holes would have been a little different. But you want to be in this position.” Harding Park was not a place for the meek. Rare is Sunday at a major with so many possibilities at the beginning, at the turn and down the stretch. The drama was relentless. Nine players at one point could claim a share of the lead. There was Dustin Johnson, who started with a one-shot lead. The power of Tony Finau, Bryson DeChambeau and Cameron Champ was on full display. Jason Day brought the experience of winning majors and being No. 1 in the world. Morikawa embraced the moment and delivered the signature shot that allowed him to win a thriller. Actually, there were two moments. After catching a good break — even the most tested major champions need those — with a tee shot off a tree and into play on the 14th, he was short of the green and chipped in for birdie to take the lead. Two holes later, Paul Casey tied him with a nifty up-and-down for birdie on the 16th, where the tees were moved forward to 294 yards to entice players to go for the green. Morikawa thought back to the 14th hole at Muirfield Village during the Workday Charity Open, where he fearlessly hit driver in a similar situation — big trouble left, water right — and drilled it to 12 feet. His shot was the signature moment of this major, a driver that bounced just right and onto the green and rolled up to 7 feet below the cup. He made the eagle putt and was on his way to a two-shot victory with a 6-under 64, matching the lowest final round by a PGA champion. There were no spectators because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Casey must have felt like one. He was still on the 17th tee when he looked back and saw Morikawa's shot. “Nothing you can do but tip your cap to that,” Casey said. “Collin has taken on that challenge and pulled it off. That's what champions do.” He won at Muirfield Village last month not from that bold play on the 14th hole, but after Justin Thomas made a 50-foot birdie putt in the playoff. Morikawa answered with a 25-foot birdie of his own and won two holes later. He is comfortable in the most uncomfortable situations. It was Thomas who gave Morikawa more confidence than he needed. They got together for dinner at the Canadian Open last summer, Morikawa's first start since graduating from Cal. Thomas told him he was good enough, he would make it. Thomas knew from experience. He spent a year in the minor leagues before getting his PGA Tour card, went through a year of learning without winning and now has 13 wins, a major and twice has been No. 1 in the world. Morikawa didn't wait that long. He won the Barracuda Championship to earn a PGA Tour card. He won against a strong field for validation. Now he's a major champion. Young stars are emerging every year, and it was easy to overlook Morikawa. He was a runner-up two years in a row for the Hogan Award, given to the nation's best college player. Doug Ghim won in 2018, Matthew Wolff a year later. And it was Wolff who denied Morikawa a victory last year in Minnesota by making a long eagle putt on the last hole. Players know best. “There’s always a bunch of guys that rock up on the scene, and he didn’t necessarily get the most publicity out of the group he was in,” Casey said. “I know talent when I see it. I don't like the term ‘talent,’ but you know when somebody is good. And Collin was good. We could just tell. ... And we weren't wrong.” Morikawa grew up in Southern California with Wolff. He considers the Bay Area a second home from his time at Cal and the dozen times the Golden Bears played or had qualifiers at Harding Park, a public course that never was this tough. In just over a year — it feels less than that because of the three months golf was shut down because of the pandemic — he has emerged as a star without ever being surprised. He thought back to his debut 14 months ago and recalled being comfortable then. He tied for 14th. “There's a different sense of comfort now,” Morikawa said. Another big smile. A bright future......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 10th, 2020

Sri Lanka bans & lsquo;drunk driving& rsquo; of elephants under new law

Sri Lanka will issue captive elephants with their own biometric identity cards and ban their riders from drinking on the job under a wide-ranging new animal protection law......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2021

Red Velvet reigns with summer anthem & lsquo;Queendom& rsquo;

After almost two years of doing solo projects, Irene, Wendy, Seulgi, Joy, and Yeri of Red Velvet finally dropped a new record that celebrates their being “summer queens.’.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2021

& lsquo;Kun Maupay Man It Panahon& rsquo; bags award at Locarno fest

Daniel Padilla and Charo Stantos-Concio starrer Kun Maupay Man It Panahon billed internationally as Whether the Weather is Fine, won a special award at the 74th Locarno Film Festival (LFF) in Switzerland......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2021

Lovi Poe is sweet as & lsquo;Candy& rsquo; in new MV

Actress Lovi Poe slowly makes a name for herself as an international recording artist with her recently released music video for the summer pop single, “Candy.”.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2021

& lsquo;Makulay ang Buhay& rsquo; returns on air

Join ‘Mom C’ Camille Prats—with lovable puppets Benjie and his best friend dog Penpen—in a fun and colorful morning as edu-tainment program Makulay ang Buhay returns on air every Saturday and Tuesday beginning tomorrow, Aug. 21 on GMA......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 20th, 2021

Coco Martin expresses lifelong gratitude to viewers, promises a more action-packed & lsquo;Ang Probinsyano& rsquo;

Television action star Coco Martin is ushering in the sixth year of “FPJ’s Ang Probinsyano” with a grateful heart as he prepares for the series’ history-making anniversary celebration next month......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 20th, 2021

PhilHealth probes & lsquo;upcasing& rsquo; practice of hospitals, providers

State insurer Philippine Health Insurance Corp. (PhilHealth) said Thursday it was looking into instances of “upcasing” committed by hospitals and healthcare providers amid the COVID-19 pandemic......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 20th, 2021

Chinese drama & lsquo;Falling Into Your Smile& rsquo; drops OST, BTS shoot

According to WeTV, the Chinese streaming platform, Falling Into Your Smile is the hottest and most-streamed Chinese drama right now, beating out other on-air Chinese and Korean dramas on its platforms across the regions with an IMDb rating of 9.1......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 19th, 2021

Julie Anne San Jose is & lsquo;Asia& rsquo;s Limitless Star& rsquo;

GMA Network has decided to give Julie Anne San Jose a new moniker. They dropped the Pop Sweetheart title and started calling the 27-year-old singer and actress “Asia’s Limitless Star” in time for the launch of Limitless, A Musical Trilogy......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 17th, 2021

& lsquo;Huwag Kang Mangamba& rsquo; gets Best Drama Series nod at ContentAsia Awards

ABS-CBN’s hit inspirational series Huwag Kang Mangamba has been nominated at the ContentAsia Awards 2021, competing against four other shows in the region for Best Drama Series/Telefilm made for a Single Asian Market......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 17th, 2021

& lsquo;Kapuso Bigay Premyo& rsquo; welcomes home this year& rsquo;s grand winner

Everyone dreams of owning their own house. With the rising cost of daily expenses, this may not be an easy feat for the average Filipino. There is also a scarcity of affordable housing options accessible to the masses. These factors make joining promos like the Kapuso Bigay Premyo Panalo worthwhile as it gives one the chance to own a home just by sending entries with the required proofs of purchase......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 17th, 2021

Koko hits & lsquo;secret agenda& rsquo; of Cusi-led PDP faction

The faction in the ruling party led by Energy Sec. Alfonso Cusi has a “secret agenda” in grabbing power from Senator Manny Pacquiao and threatening to expel him from PDP-Laban, Senator Aquilino Pimentel III said......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 16th, 2021

& lsquo;Booster shots& rsquo; on hold until nation& rsquo;s protected & mdash; Palace

Malacañang  has urged those getting COVID-19 “booster shots” to wait for the country to achieve population protection first before receiving more than the required number of doses......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 16th, 2021

Quit paying & lsquo;tax& rsquo; to communists or face raps, NICA warns traders

The National Intelligence Coordinating Agency  issued a stern warning Monday against companies and individuals that they will face charges for paying extortion money to the Communist Party of the Philippines -New People’s Army-National Democratic Front which, in effect, finances the group’s reign of terror, especially in the countryside......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 16th, 2021

& lsquo;Vax-resistant& rsquo; Lambda in PH

The Department of Health on Sunday confirmed the country's first case of the COVID-19 Lambda variant, a “variant of interest” which is supposed to be more transmissible and vaccine-resistant than other strains......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsAug 16th, 2021