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Behind closed doors: COVID-19 s hidden burden on families and how they cope

Yeung said that inequality still figures in the family discussion, with shocks registering uneven effects on different households......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarMay 23rd, 2020

Team Lakay stars support ONE Championship s decision to post-pone closed-door events

As the world went into quarantine, sporting events started to either get postponed or cancelled as mass gatherings were prohibited and social distancing was imposed. ONE Championship, the Singapore-based martial arts promotion, has initially planned on continuing to hold events in Singapore behind closed doors starting April, but just days before the first event was supposed to take place, ONE ultimately decided to postpone the events as a result of Singapore going into a partial lockdown. While the events would have provided the fans something to look forward to and would have given athletes a chance to work and provide for their families, health, safety, and combatting the COVID-19 ultimately became the primary priority. Team Lakay stars shared their thoughts and are in full support of ONE Championship’s decision. “I totally agree with the decision, and I'm so proud to be a part of ONE Championship family,” said Team Lakay head coach Mark Sangiao. “I feel so fortunate to belong to an organization that values life over profit.”   “I believe this is very reasonable as most countries are lockdown and the organization’s cooperation is necessary to make sure this COVID-19 pandemic will be eased,” said former ONE Lightweight World Champion Eduard “Landslide” Folayang.   “I believe that ONE made the right move in postponing their events,” said former ONE Bantamweight World Champion Kevin “The Silencer” Belingon. “It shows that ONE cares about the safety of their crew, athletes and the fans.”   “ONE is the best. They really care for all the fighters and all people that organize the events behind the scenes,” said ONE featherweight contender Edward “The Ferocious” Kelly.   “I believe that it is a good decision,” said ONE Flyweight contender Danny "The King" Kingad. “It shows that they really think about the safety of the athletes and everyone who works with ONE.”   “I support ONE Championship postponing their closed-door events for now because even if it is a closed-door event,” said ONE Strawweight contender Lito “Thunder Kid” Adiwang. They may need fighters based outside of Singapore to participate, and with our situation that we can’t travel yet, I believe ONE did the right thing.”   “For me, I believe that it’s the wisest thing to do to make sure that the athletes are totally safe,” said former ONE Featherweight World Champion Honorio “The Rock” Banario. “Remember, ‘What you cannot see, you cannot defeat’, the virus is so small that the eye cannot even see it.”   “I’m happy that I can say that ONE Championship is always looking out for the safety of us athletes, of the people in the company, and the fans,” shared ONE Strawweight World Champion Joshua “The Passion” Pacio.   “I trust ONE Championship and their decisions,” said former ONE Flyweight World Champion Geje “Gravity” Eustaquio. “They are one of the best companies in the world, they aren’t selfish and they make sure that they promote good things for everybody. I believe that we will overcome this.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 20th, 2020

Team Lakay mentor Mark Sangiao looking forward to re-opening gym once lockdown is lifted

Following the May 15 deadline of the Luzon-wide Enhanced Community Quarantine due to the COVID-19 pandemic, some parts of the island have started to ease restrictions on the quarantine with the sole purpose of getting the economy back on track While the National Capital Region will remain under Modified Enhanced Community Quarantine, other places like Baguio City have transitioned into General Community Quarantine, which means some restrictions will be eased up. Gym operations however, are not yet among those restrictions to be lifted. Still, the transition to GCQ is a start, and barring a second wave of infections to hit, a return to the gym could soon be on the horizon, which is welcome news to the members of Team Lakay. For Team Lakay head coach Mark Sangiao, once the lockdown has been lifted, re-opening the gym and returning to the regular routine is the primary goal. “I only have one plan after the lockdown, and that is to go back to our regular training program and routine. I know they are doing their own training at home, but of course things are different in the gym,” Sangiao said. The La Trinidad-based martial arts stable closed their gym doors during the height of the quarantine back in March, and have only returned there to do individual workouts or as a control center for their relief operations. The team hasn’t been able to work out as a group in months and have resorted to home training to keep themselves fit. “While we’re on lockdown, we continue training at home, and when needed for social responsibilities, we go out,” Sangiao stated.  “Then if there’s a chance, we drop by the gym and train. Whoever can go out and is within the vicinity, sometimes we meet up in the gym to work out and do sauna after. I also have more time in managing the team’s social media one thing that I wasn’t able to do in this pandemic,” he added. Still, even with things looking quite bleak right now, Sangiao says that he is grateful for good health. “I would say that we are very fortunate because we are all doing fine here amid the scary things that we’re seeing with COVID. I pray that we find a cure soon for this pandemic.” Obviously, the Team Lakay mentor is longing for things to return to normal so that they can once again enjoy even the little things, like going out for lunch as a team. “Like all the others, I miss a lot of things that we used to do before the lockdown, like eating with the team after training. There is a small restaurant near the gym and we often went there for lunch after our training,” Sangiao shared.  "That’s a very good restaurant, and it became our bonding. As they say, ‘Good memories, and good plans start at the dining table.’” Still, the number one thing that Sangiao, and the rest of Team Lakay want to be able to return to work. “We might visit the place after the ECQ, but just like what I’ve said, I have only one plan after the lockdown – that is to go back to our regular training program and routine and prepare the athletes for their future battles,” he concluded.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 19th, 2020

US sport grapples with prospect of fan-free future

American professional sports leagues plotting their path back from the coronavirus shutdown are preparing for a future played out behind closed doors or to sparsely populated arenas, scenarios that analysts say are likely to carry a heavy financial burden and could lead to profound changes......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMay 8th, 2020

Wife of Jonas Burgos likens burden to kin of COVID-19 victims

“Now they have an idea of how painful and difficult it is for the families of the disappeared.” The post Wife of Jonas Burgos likens burden to kin of COVID-19 victims appeared first on Bulatlat......»»

Category: newsSource:  bulatlatRelated NewsApr 28th, 2020

MPBL Commissioner Duremdes: 'We’re going to finish the season'

The Maharlika Pilipinas Basketball League Lakan Season will push through with its stalled division and national finals. MPBL Commissioner Kenneth Duremdes gave this assurance Wednesday to quash speculations the league is going to cancel the remaining games of its third season in the wake of the prolonged COVID-19 pandemic. As to when will be the resumption of the division finals, Duremdes said it will depend on the national government’s decision on easing up restrictions on the staging of public gatherings, including sports events. “We’re going to finish the season, said Duremdes, who is holed up in his hometown of Koronadal, South Cotabato. “We’re just waiting for the clearance of the national government.” President Rodrigo Duterte has yet to announce whether the Luzon-wide enhanced community quarantine (ECQ), in effect until April 30, will be lifted, extended, or modified. Though the consensus is a modified ECQ will be implemented, Duremdes said there are a lot of issues to be tackled before the MPBL can resume. “First, we need to advice the four teams (San Juan Knights, Makati Super Crunch, Davao Occidental Tigers, Basilan Steel) involved since they are all coming from inactivity and the players need to get back in shape,” said Duremdes. “Then we need to consider the stand of the LGUs (local government units). Other factors to be considered, according to Duremdes, are land travel, resumption of domestic flights, sea travel, and the availability of hotels, restaurants, and game venues. “We can play as soon as the ECQ is lifted but behind closed doors,” said Duremdes. “Hopefully the situation brightens up.” Both the South division finals between San Juan and Makati and the North division finals between Davao and Basilan are tied at 1-1, forging Game 3 deciders. San Juan beat Makati, 76-60, in their series opener but Makati rebounded with a 91-88 victory in Game 2 held behind closed doors at FilOil Flying V Arena in San Juan. Basilan edged Davao, 74-72, in Game 1 in Tagum City, but Davao equalized with an 81-76 triumph in Game 2 held at the jampacked Lamitan City Gymnasium. The division winners will dispute the Lakan Season national crown in a best-of-five series. The Batangas City Tanduay Athletics ruled the inaugural MPBL Anta Rajah Cup participated in by 10 teams, while the San Juan Knights emerged champions of the 26-team Datu Cup. Now boasting 31 teams, MPBL is supposed to open its fourth season on June 12, but it will be moved back owing to recent developments. Like Duremdes, MPBL founder and CEO (chief executive officer) Sen. Manny Pacquiao is also bent on finishing the Lakan Season once the coronavirus gets contained. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 22nd, 2020

From Hopkinton to Boston, marathon absence is seen and felt

By JIMMY GOLEN AP Sports Writer HOPKINTON, Mass. (AP) — “It All Starts Here.” The motto is bannered on the Hopkinton website, laid into the floor of the Marathon Elementary School, painted on a sign that sends Boston Marathon participants off on their way to Copley Square. Since 1924, this 300-year-old town serendipitously located 26.2 miles west of Boston has been the starting line for the world’s most prestigious road race and, like Marathon and Athens themselves, the two are enduringly linked. “It gets stronger and stronger every year, this relationship,” said Tim Kilduff, a longtime Hopkinton resident and former Boston Marathon race director. “We see it as: The spirit of the marathon resides in Hopkinton, and we lend it out one day a year.” From the starting line in this leafy Colonial town to the finish on Boylston Street, residents and runners are preparing for a spring without the Boston Marathon — the first in 124 years. Organizers and authorities have postponed the race originally scheduled for Monday until Sept. 14 because of the coronavirus pandemic, stripping the streets of brightly colored singlets and opening a gap in the sporting schedule for runners from all over the world. “Tradition’s an overused word. But this really is a rite of spring,” Kilduff said. “So this year it will lead into a beautiful fall season in New England.” ___ On a regular marathon weekend, Hopkinton triples in size from its 16,000 residents to absorb a field of more than 30,000 runners, wheelchair racers and hand cyclists. The Town Common teems with people, along with food carts and other vendors serving both tourists and race participants previewing the course. But while others may think of Hopkinton only on the third Monday in April, the marathon and its essence permeates the town all year. Residents drive over the starting line painted on Main Street on their way to work or to concerts at the gazebo. An International Marathon Center is planned for the town, a sister city of Marathon, Greece, where the long-running tradition was birthed. There are three marathon-related statues in Hopkinton, including “The Starter,” which stands at the starting line, pistol raised, ready to send the field off for another race to Boston’s Back Bay. These days, his face is covered with a cloth mask. “This is not the NBA or baseball or the NFL. This is ours,” said Kilduff, who was the race director in 1983-84, ran the marathon in 1985 and for the last 33 years has been a spotter on the truck that leads the men’s field to the finish line. “Anybody who has run the race, volunteered for the race, supported the race, feels that they own a part of the race. They own just a little bit. So it’s ours,” he said. “The Boston Marathon is almost bigger than itself in the emotion it elicits, and the respect that people have for it.” ___ Training for a marathon can be a solitary endeavor, but the event itself is a social distancing calamity. Participants crowd into corrals to wait for the start, then run in packs to minimize air resistance. Volunteers hand out water on the course and medals at the finish. Fans and family are waiting with high fives or hugs. At Wellesley College, where the cheering is so loud it is known as the Scream Tunnel, students traditionally wave signs encouraging the runners to stop for a kiss. It’s hard to imagine this custom — already a relic of another era — surviving post-pandemic. “A lot of the signs are jokes about kissing. That’s part of the tradition, too,” said Erin Kelly, a senior who returned home to San Diego when the campus closed. “The marathon is just a big part of Wellesley’s culture. I was looking forward to seeing it as a student one last time.” ___ Oncologist Amy Comander decided to run the Boston Marathon in 2013, when colleagues at Massachusetts General Hospital treated many of those injured when two pressure-cooker bombs exploded at the finish line. “I just told myself: You’re running next year. And I did,” she said. And every year since. After starting work at Newton-Wellesley Hospital, right around the Mile 16 marker, Comander has used it as a base for her training runs. During the race itself, the sight of coworkers, friends and even patients out front cheering her on gives her a boost of energy right when she needs it: just before making the turn toward Heartbreak Hill. “I see it as a true privilege that I can go to work and I’m on the marathon course," Comander said. “You’re talking to someone who truly loves everything about the Boston Marathon." Comander is registered to run for her seventh year in a row, this time to raise money for cancer survivors and their families; she is still determined to do so in September. But on Monday, she will be caring for cancer patients, a task more stressful because of the danger the coronavirus poses to their weakened immune systems. “I will be a little sad,” said Comander, who plans to take a break from the clinic to get in an 8-mile run — but not on the course, per the request of authorities concerned about crowds. “I feel like I need to do that for myself.” ___ The daffodils are in bloom now from Hopkinton Green to Copley Square and all along the 26.2-mile route in between. Thousands of the bright yellow flowers were planted after the 2013 bombing as a symbol of rebirth and resilience, and they have the benefit of blossoming in mid-April — right around Patriots' Day — to cheer the runners along. Thousands more potted daffodils have decorated the course each year since the explosions at the finish line that killed three people and wounded more than 180 others. With the state holiday and the race postponed until the fall, the blooms will have long since withered. Instead, many of the flowers grown to decorate the course were placed outside of hospitals to thank health care staffers for working through the pandemic. Outside Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, just down the road from the 1 Mile To Go marker in Kenmore Square, the flowers were arranged in a heart. A sign encouraged workers to take a plant home. ___ Just a few steps from the finish line, the Marathon Sports shoe store on Boylston Street gets especially busy over the weekend leading up to the race, when tens of thousands of runners descend on the Back Bay. Things typically cool off on Monday, giving the staff a chance to pop out and cheer the finishers. "We don’t have any official party," said Dan Darcy, the chain’s marketing director. “It’s really just a celebration of the runners that day." Marathon participants are easily recognizable after the race: There is the medal around their neck, of course, and a mylar warming blanket draped around their shoulders if the weather is cold. Often their bib number is still pinned to their chest. “If we have any runners coming through our doors on Marathon Monday, I can tell you they’ll be recognized and they’ll hear the support from our staff,” Darcy said in a telephone interview from Fairbanks, Alaska, where he is working remotely. Marathon Sports has been a reluctant landmark since the first of the two bombs exploded outside its window at 2:49 p.m. on April 15, 2013. Darcy was watching the race from a different spot that day and tried unsuccessfully for hours to get in touch with his coworkers. A few were injured; others turned the store into a field hospital, treating the wounded until trained first responders could arrive. A memorial stands on the sidewalk outside to the three killed in the explosions and the two police officers who died in the ensuing manhunt, which shut down the city and surrounding area for much of the week. The store reopened about two weeks later. Now it’s closed again. “We are going to be encouraging runners to go out and get a run in on their own, keeping the social distancing, but not to run the race route itself,” Darcy said. “We’re not able to do any sort of celebration.” ___ Last month, as Americans began to isolate indoors and one sporting event after another was canceled, the Boston Athletic Association sacrificed its spring start in the hopes of keeping its 124-year tradition alive. Since the first edition in 1897, the race had always coincided with the state holiday of Patriots' Day that commemorates the first shots in the Revolutionary War. As the snow melts in New England, the course becomes increasingly populated with joggers emerging from a winter indoors to get in their training runs. To Kilduff, this year's fall race will be an opportunity to come out of a different kind of isolation. “You know what happened in the year after the bombing: There’s going to be this huge buildup of pent-up energy. And it’s going to be exhibited on the course,” he said. "It’s going to create a brand new chapter in the history of the Boston Marathon. "I’m excited as hell about this.” ___ Jimmy Golen has covered the Boston Marathon for The Associated Press since 1995......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 20th, 2020

Storybook to help children cope with pandemic

To help children understand the COVID-19 pandemic, humanitarian organizations have launched a story book which explains how young people can protect themselves, their families and friends from the virus. Dubbed as “My Hero is You, How kids can fight COVID-19,” the book also explains how to manage difficult emotions since children confront a rapidly changing […] The post Storybook to help children cope with pandemic appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsApr 10th, 2020

Top Asian MMA gym EVOLVE MMA to launch free online workouts

As the world copes with the challenge of the Covid-19 crisis, Evolve MMA is giving the Martial Arts community a massive boost, offering a full-schedule of daily online sessions that everyone can avail of, free of charge. Top Asian martial arts gym Evolve MMA closed its doors for the first time ever on March 27th as the Singapore government ordered ‘all center-based classes’ stopped and gatherings of 10 or more banned. With three locations across The Lion City, the award-winning franchise has become a haven for combat sports students and fitness enthusiasts across the globe, providing world-class training for global superstars and beginners alike. With the global pandemic creating a massive void in people’s lives, Evolve sought a way to fill it. Looking to hit the ground running, the Evolve online classes start from Monday evening March 30th and participants from around the world are invited to learn from some of the most elite coaches in the game. Evolve MMA founder and ONE Championship CEO Chatri Sityodtong announced the news via his Facebook page earlier on Monday; As Asia’s premier brand for Martial Arts training, Evolve MMA boasts more World Champions than any other gym on the planet. Needless to say, memberships are highly sought-after, so this news will provide a golden opportunity for students wishing to enhance their skills under the tutelage of some true Martial Arts masters.   With over 1,000 years of championship experience, Evolve MMA’s instructors should help make days of isolation a positive experience.  Constantly looking to share immense Martial Arts and fitness knowledge with the world, Evolve MMA’s latest Facebook posts offer a glimpse into the incredible wealth of information available. With World Champions in every major discipline, Evolve MMA is the perfect source with which to either start or continue one’s Martial Arts and fitness journey......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 30th, 2020

Hospitals bursting at the seams, plead for relief in treating cases

Major hospitals in Metro Manila on Tuesday closed their doors to additional patients seeking treatment for the COVID-19 coronavirus due to overcapacity, even as the Philippines saw its number of positive cases surge to 552 as the Department of Health reported 90 new cases, a new daily high......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMar 25th, 2020

Folayang, Eustaquio, ONE Championship stars react to closed-door events

While most of the sporting world has stopped due the current COVID-19 outbreak, Singapore-based martial arts promotion ONE Championship is intent on keeping the show going, as they’ve already announced that they will be putting on closed-door, audience-free shows starting April. Looking to push a message of positivity, the upcoming closed-door events were entitled HOPE, STRENGTH, DREAMS, and INSPIRATION, all of them set to be held in Singapore. And while mixed martial artists often rely on the crowd for an extra boost when inside the circle, ONE Championship’s athletes have expressed their support and agreement to the closed-door setting given the worldwide enforcement of social distancing and staying at home. For former two-time ONE Lightweight World Champion Eduard “Landslide” Folayang putting on events in a closed-door setting will uphold the safety of the athletes, the fans, and the staff while still also giving the athletes a chance to make a living. “We’re under a pandemic now, so we have to look at the safety of the athletes, the staff, and the fans. It’s better [to hold closed-door events] than the fights being canceled altogether. I think it’s a good move because the fans can just wait for it on their TVs or social media accounts," Folayang said via ONE Championship.  “The sports events that people are waiting for, like the NBA, are canceled as well, so I think that will be the advantage for ONE. I know there are a lot of people who want to watch live, but I know that even they wouldn’t push through because of health concerns,” he added. Reigning ONE Middleweight and Heavyweight World Champion “The Burmese Python” Aung La N Sang said that he promises to put on a show for the fans no matter where the event is held. “Thank you to the ONE fans for keeping us in business. We promise to put on amazing shows, even with closed-door events. The staff is taking extra precautions and as an athlete, I am super thankful for them. And for me, it doesn’t matter if it’s a closed-door event, a stadium event, or [an event] in the parking lot, I plan on putting on great shows for the fans.” Former ONE Flyweight World Champion Geje “Gravity” Eustaquio understands that while a closed-door setting will hurt a bit in terms of revenue, it’s better for the fighters to compete closed-door than to have their fights cancelled completeley. “It’s a very wise move. On the athletes’ part, that decision is very favorable because we all know the hardships athletes go through to prepare [for a bout]. It’s always a dream for them to compete, so it would not be good if their matches get canceled altogether.” “The good thing is ONE Championship understands that. That’s why I am in favor of the events to go through, albeit in closed doors. Of course, it will hurt the company a little bit, especially when it comes to gate revenue. But sometimes, you have to make sacrifices,” Eustaquio added. Reigning ONE Featherweight World Champion Martin “The Situ-Asian” Nguyen hopes for the best as the pandemic continues to affect the whole world. “At the end of the day, this virus is just a phase that will pass hopefully sooner than later. We just have to be smart in these certain situations and take self-care, as well as be mindful of others.” ONE Flyweight World Grand Prix runner-up Danny “The King” Kingad knows the risks of putting on a live event during this time of a virus pandemic. “I think boss Chatri made a great decision. I think that’s okay for the rest of us. After all, we cannot take into account each and every person who enters the arena during events – and we can’t be too sure because one person could be the start of an outbreak.” “For me, that’s a great decision, putting everything in closed doors for the meantime,” he continued. Former ONE Strawweight World Championship challenger Rene “The Challenger” Catalan echoed Kingad’s sentiments, saying that a mass gathering - much like a normal, packed ONE Championship event - can be the start of disease transmission, especially one as highly contagious as the COVID-19 virus. “For me, sir Chatri’s decision to continue the event in closed-doors is the right move. If an event pushes through which is open to the public, there is a big possibility for disease transmission. It’s a good move, and the right move, to push for closed-doors, as long as the competition continues.”  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 23rd, 2020

ONE athletes remind fans to stay rational amid COVID-19 outbreak

It has been an uncertain time as COVID-19, also known as the coronavirus, continues to spread all over the world.   ONE Championship was one organization that erred on the side of safety and took precautionary measures, holding the recently concluded ONE: KING OF THE JUNGLE behind closed doors and moving ONE: HEART OF HEROES in Vietnam from 20 March to 26 June.   Though affected one way or another, these ONE heroes are reminding fans to stay rational as the world combats another outbreak. “I think it’s all about awareness of the things that people can do to counter it. For example, people need to strengthen their immune system and stay healthy and hygienic,” former ONE Strawweight World Title contender Rene “The Challenger” Catalan said.  “I actually laud ONE Championship for pulling off a closed-door event, just so the matches would continue.” Three-time ONE Lightweight World Champion Eduard “Landslide” Folayang echoed similar sentiments, saying that all people can do now is take good measure so they do not get infected. “I think it’s all about taking care of your body. Eating the right food, having enough sleep, getting good exercise, that’s the best remedy for us now,” Folayang said.  While the concern surrounding the virus is warranted, “Landslide” asks people to be more level-headed, especially when taking in information about the virus.  “We also need to verify the information that we get right now. Before we listen to rumors, which could eventually lead to us being scared, we have to check the facts first. We shouldn’t let fear get in our way,” Folayang said.  “If you would see, the moment the news hit, face masks were out of stock and people were in panic. That is a perfect example of it. Almost everyone is hoarding it, but before it comes to that, I think people should have looked at the whole angle. “People should pick who they listen to. At the end of the day, it’s all about listening to the medical specialists who know what they’re talking about.” .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 10th, 2020

Bullpups bag title via sweep

Nazareth School of National University capped a sweep of the 82nd UAAP high school basketball with a gritty 87-80 win over FEU-Diliman in Game 2 of the best-of-three finals held behind closed doors yesterday due to the COVID-19 scare at the Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 9th, 2020

PBA holds special meeting to discuss ways to deal with rising Covid-19 cases

BY JONAS TERRADO   The PBA will hold a special board meeting on Tuesday to discuss ways to deal with the rising cases of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Commissioner Willie Marcial said he’ll lay down all possible options, including the likelihood of games being rescheduled or even played behind closed doors after COVID-19 cases spiked […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tempoRelated NewsMar 9th, 2020

South Korea reports lowest new virus infections in days

SEOUL, South Korea – Hundreds of churches across South Korea closed their doors on Sunday, March 8, and held online services as the country reported its lowest number of new coronavirus cases in more than a week. South Korea – which has the highest number of confirmed COVID-19 cases ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMar 8th, 2020

ONE: KING OF THE JUNGLE in Singapore to be a closed door event

ONE Championship recently announced that the company has made the decision to convert one of its live events into a closed-door event. ONE: KING OF THE JUNGLE, which is scheduled for Friday, 28 February in Singapore is to proceed as planned, but the Singapore Indoor Stadium will be closed off to fans and media. The decision was made with regards to the situation in Singapore surrounding the Novel Coronavirus (official name COVID-19).  Singapore’s Ministry of Health recently raised its Disease Outbreak Response System Condition (DORSCON) level from yellow to orange after having confirmed 75 cases of infection. ONE Chairman and CEO Chatri Sityodtong made the announcement to convert their event in Singapore to a closed-door event initially on his social media accounts. Shortly after, Sityodtong fielded questions from the media on a global conference call. “In light of the coronavirus situation in Singapore, I have made the decision to convert ONE: King of the Jungle on February 28 into a closed event for broadcast only. The Singapore Indoor Stadium will not be open to the general public, but the event will proceed behind closed doors as scheduled live on all TV and digital platforms across 150+ countries around the world,” Sityodtong wrote on his official Facebook page. Fans who purchased tickets to the event will be given a full refund through Sportshub Tix, ONE’s official ticketing partner in Singapore. All bouts are to proceed as scheduled, and will still be available live via TV and digital platforms worldwide, as well as through the ONE Super App. The main event of ONE: KING OF THE JUNGLE will see two-sport ONE World Champion Stamp Fairtex of Thailand defend her ONE Atomweight Kickboxing World Title against Janet “J.T.” Todd of the United States. In the co-main event of the evening, reigning ONE Strawweight Kickboxing World Champion Sam-A Gaiyanghadao of Thailand will take on Lachlan “Rocky” Ogden of Australia for the ONE Strawweight Muay Thai World Title. Representing Singapore on the global stage is former ONE World Title challenger Amir Khan, who is accompanied by fellow Singaporean stars Tiffany “No Chill” Teo and Radeem Rahman. In addition, Singapore-based athletes Troy Worthen and Ritu “The Indian Tigress” Phogat are set to see action. “We just felt that this was an incredible moment for us to ignite hope and strength across the continent of Asia and to our fans all over the world during this difficult time,” Sityodtong said during the global conference call. “I also want to say that it is only by love, compassion, and resilience that Singapore as a country and Asia as a continent can overcome and conquer the Coronavirus.” Sityodtong also says that while Singapore will proceed with its closed-door event, other events the organization has scheduled in other countries will proceed as planned. ONE Championship remains firm in its promise to deliver at least 50 events this year across all of its properties, and will make decisions to alter its events based on various factors as situations change. “It was not an easy decision for us. In fact, many people were pushing us to cancel the event. But I thought back to why I started ONE Championship in the first place. And our mission since day one has been to unleash real-life superheroes who ignite the world with hope, strength, dreams, and inspiration,” Sityodtong continued. “It’s a very different mission than all of our other global competitors. Yes we want to put on the greatest fights. Yes, we have the greatest martial artists in the world but there’s a deeper mission for ONE Championship. And in a time of crisis, in a time of fear in the continent of Asia, our heroes are ready to inspire the world.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 18th, 2020

Out of the Woods: Tiger emerges for TV match with Lefty, QBs

By DOUG FERGUSON AP Golf Writer The purpose is to raise $10 million or more for COVID-19 relief efforts, and provide entertainment with four of the biggest stars from the PGA Tour and NFL. Another appeal to the Sunday made-for-TV exhibition, “The Match: Champions for Charity,” is a chance to see Tiger Woods swing a golf club for the first time in 98 days. Live golf is on television for the second straight Sunday, this one with the game's biggest headliner. Woods was last seen on television Feb. 16 at the Genesis Invitational, where he moved cautiously in California's chilly late winter weather and posted weekend rounds of 76-77 to finish last among the 68 players who made the cut at Riviera. He skipped a World Golf Championship in Mexico City, and said his surgically repaired back wasn't quite ready in sitting out the opening three weeks of the Florida swing. And then the pandemic took over, and there has been no place to play. This is a reasonable start. Woods and retired NFL quarterback Peyton Manning will face Phil Mickelson and Tom Brady, who won six Super Bowls with the New England Patriots and signed this year with Tampa Bay. The match will be at Medalist Golf Club in Hobe Sound, Florida. It is Woods' home course and about 20 minutes from Seminole, where last week Rory McIlroy, Dustin Johnson, Rickie Fowler and Matthew Wolff ushered golf's return to live television. What to make of Woods? His only interviews were with GolfTV, the Discovery-owned channel with whom Woods has a financial deal, and a playful Zoom call with the other match participants hosted by Ernie Johnson of Turner Sports, which is televising the match. He described his health in the April 9 interview with GolfTV as “night and day.” “I feel a lot better than I did then,” Woods said. “I've been able to turn a negative into a positive and been able to train a lot and get my body to where I think it should be.” Mickelson has missed the cut in four of his five tournaments this year — the exception was third place at Pebble Beach, where he started the final round one shot behind Nick Taylor and closed with a 75. Just like last week, rust is to be expected for players who haven't competed in two months — three, in the case of Woods. Manning, meanwhile, is retired and is a golf junkie. Brady remains employed, and this week got in some informal work with his new teammates in Tampa Bay. No fans will be allowed, just like last week at Seminole. One difference is the players will be in their own carts, whereas the four PGA Tour players last week carried their bags. But this is as much about entertainment as competition. It's the second edition of a match between Woods and Mickelson, the dominant players of their generation and rivals by name, but not necessarily by record. Woods has 82 career victories to 44 for Mickelson, leads 15-5 in major championships and 11-0 in winning PGA Tour player of the year. Mickelson won their first made-for-TV match over Thanksgiving weekend in 2018, a pay-per-view event that ran into technical problems and was free for all. Lefty won in a playoff under the lights for $9 million in a winner-take-all match. He also has a 5-3-1 advantage over Woods in the nine times they have played in the final round on the PGA Tour, most recently in the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am in 2012 when Mickelson shot 64 to a 75 for Woods. He also stopped two streaks. Woods was going for his seventh straight PGA Tour victory when Mickelson beat him at Torrey Pines in 2000. Later that year, Woods had won 19 consecutive times on the PGA Tour when he had at least a share of the 54-hole lead until Mickelson beat him at the Tour Championship. Woods, however, captured the streak that mattered, holding off Mickelson in the final group at the Masters in 2001 to hold all four professional majors at the same time. The banter was lacking in Las Vegas, and perhaps having Manning and Brady will change the dynamics. The broadcast includes Charles Barkley providing commentary and Justin Thomas, whom Woods has embraced, on the course as a reporter in his television debut. After this exhibition, golf has two weeks before the PGA Tour is set to return at Colonial in Fort Worth, Texas. Mickelson plans to play. Woods has not said when he will return......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News20 hr. 21 min. ago

Facing uncertainties

Restaurants empty, stores closed, shops locked with the usual sign that says: “For everyone’s safety and in support of the government directives to help prevent the spread of COVID-19, we are temporarily closing our store today until further notice.”.....»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsMay 23rd, 2020

PCSO to aid Covid-hit Lotto agents

As an initiative to assuage the financial burden amid the pandemic, a total of P18.7 million financial assistance will be given to Lotto and Keno agents nationwide, the Philippine Charity Sweepstakes Office (PCSO) said on Saturday. According to General Manager Royina Marzan-Garma, 6,241 individual Lotto and Keno agents all over the country will receive the […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsMay 23rd, 2020

IPI: Always in Action for the Nation

As COVID-19 struck countries around the globe and became a pandemic, millions were displaced and left with the question “What happens now?”. While waiting for the government’s initiative of nationwide mass testing, Filipino families were struggling more than ever to make ends meet and at the same time, protecting themselves from the onset of this […] The post IPI: Always in Action for the Nation appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 23rd, 2020

Closed-door set up works if games are good says East Asia Super League boss

Playing games with no audience present looks like one of the first key steps in having sports leagues resume in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic. That seems to be the safest compromise for now and while it still has its drawbacks, playing games with no live crowd can certainly work. "I was listening to a podcast of Bill Simmons and he was talking about the difference between UFC and WWE and what does it look like with no audience? He was saying that the UFC was really cool because the core product and the fight was so real, you can hear things like the groaning and the hitting. It was much more live," East Asia Super League CEO Matt Beyer said. "With the WWE, essentially just choreographed moves, he said it was terrible," the EASL boss added. Beyer was with a webinar with Blackwater's Ariel Vanguardia for Hoops Coaches International, discussing how basketball can be after COVID-19. [Related: The Terrific 12 can be first venue for PBA teams after COVID-19] Playing with no live audience can and will work if the product presented is good and engaging. In the advent of social media, now is also a perfect time to take advantage of the technology. After all, more and more fans are watching games from smaller screens anyway. "I think if the core product, if the game itself is really good, then you can make the production perhaps cooler in a different way with no audience," Beyer said. "It's just that you have to realize, you're playing for the fans in their homes on their devices and you're not playing for a live crowd, which I think for the players is going to be a different experience for sure," he added. With no cure for COVID-19 yet, a new normal will have to be strictly implemented if sports are to come back. Playing inside a controlled bubble might as well be the only way to have basketball come back at least for this year, and that will mean playing with no live crowd. "I think that from the player experience, a big part is gonna be having players tested on a regular basis to be able to take part. And then it's going to be a regulation of the ecosystem around the players, who's in the arena, the people from the TV crew, etc.," Beyer said. "The challenge will be as people interact before we have a vaccine, there's just so many question marks. So how do you keep a controlled environment with all the variables?" the EASL boss added.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 22nd, 2020