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Athletes using power of the selfie to clean sports of doping

BOSTON — It resembles the symbol for infinity: a sideways "S'' that Kara Goucher, Molly Huddle and other elite US athletes suddenly are sporting on biceps, w.....»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarNov 19th, 2016

The Rock, Trump headline UFC card without a title fight

NEW YORK (AP) — The Rock and the president just might be the true headliners at Madison Square Garden in a rare UFC card without a championship fight. Well, at least not one confined to the standard weight classes. Nate Diaz and Jorge Masvidal are set to slug it out Saturday night in the main event of UFC 244 without much more than a made-for-PPV baddest man in MMA title at stake in a fight that has attracted the attention of two global figures. Arriving straight from Jabroni Drive, The Rock is set to take that $50,000 custom-made, one-fight-only Baddest Mother (Censored!) championship belt, shine it up real nice, and stick it straight around the waist between the winner of the Diaz vs. Masvidal slugfest. President Donald Trump will take a break from an impeachment inquiry to catch a seat as Diaz and Masvidal (-160) lock up to crown the undisputed champ of UFC 244's crudest named title. Most electrifying @ufc event of 2019. Im a lucky SOB to present the “Baddest MF” title to the winner of @GamebredFighter vs @NateDiaz209. Stacked card. Madison Square Garden erupts. #UFC244 #BMFTitle #DiazMasvidal TOMORROW NIGHT!! #ppv pic.twitter.com/i2GzisvZSJ — Dwayne Johnson (@TheRock) November 1, 2019 The BMF belt. pic.twitter.com/X4jX5ywFRX — Ariel Helwani (@arielhelwani) November 1, 2019 "That's the best fighter there is," Diaz said. "Pound for pound, GOAT type of (stuff)." Diaz fought just three months ago when he returned from a three-year hiatus to punish Anthony Pettis in a unanimous decision victory at UFC 241. Diaz (20-11) willed the championship into existence when he demanded UFC create the R-rated billing and called out Masvidal (34-11) for his next fight. UFC didn't wait long to grant Diaz's wish — President Dana White agreed to go along with the stipulation, with the caveat that the title is decided only once. Call it an extravagant publicity stunt, perhaps, for the winner of the 170-pound bout who gets bragging rights, the belt, and no title defenses. "Let me tell you something. 170, 185, 205, 155 (pounds) or BMF title, everybody wants the BMF title," Diaz said. "If you've got the option, what title would you fight for?" Kelvin Gastelum (-210) takes on Darren Till in a middleweight bout in the co-main event, and Stephen "Wonderboy" Thompson (-135) has a welterweight division fight with Vicente Luque in UFC's fourth card at the Garden. The biggest dose of star power might come in the seats. "Jumanji" star Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson will present the winner with of a championship belt that has that manufactured WWE feel. "Very befitting for the biggest fight of the entire year," Johnson said. "This fight is going to be electrifying." Trump is tight with White in a relationship that dates to UFC's infancy before its rise into national prominence. New Jersey was one of the first states that embraced UFC, and White credits cards at the Trump Taj Mahal for helping the company grow into a heavyweight in the sports world. White spoke at Trump's request at the Republican National Convention and the bombastic pair make time for dinners out when they can. Trump's reception from the New York crowd might be as fascinating as the result of the main event. Trump was loudly jeered while attending a World Series last Sunday in Washington. In New York, UFC fighters — about as politically uncouth as they come — have embraced Trump's made-for-TV schtick. Donald Jr. and Eric Trump attended a recent UFC card in New Jersey to support MAGA fan Colby Covington. "Real recognize real," Masvidal said. "No matter what your views are on Trump as a president, the guy's a (BMF), man. The money's that he's made, the obstacles that's he conquered, he's a (BMF) in his own way." Masvidal said he didn't want to "wade too far into politics" because the American fighter born to a Cuban father and Peruvian mother said "a lot of the Latin community might be upset at me." Masvidal had the New York crowd on his side at an open workout this week at MSG. Masvidal is coming off the fastest knockout in UFC history, needing all of five seconds to take out Ben Askren in July at UFC 239. He took the workout stage and put UFC officials on edge when he selected random fans to come up from the audience and spar (body shots, only). Broadcaster Megan Olivi consoled one young boy plucked from the crowd who was seemingly panicked he would have to fight. The kid just wanted to meet Masvidal, not lace 'em up. No worries, the 34-year-old Masvidal hopped down and walked the roped off area snapping selfies with fans screaming his name. He also had the crowd going nuts when he told them, "I'm going to answer some questions from you, not the media." Huh, hating on the media. Sounds familiar. Same with his dose of braggadocio. "I put an end to a lot of guys never been knocked down, never been stopped," Masvidal said. There was brief pause in the hype for the fight. Diaz, who split two tremendously entertaining matchups with Conor McGregor in 2016, has become one of UFC's most popular personalities without ever winning a championship. The weed-smoking anti-hero stunned fight fans last week when he tweeted he would drop out of the fight in the wake of adverse findings by the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) in a pre-fight drug test taken earlier this month. Diaz insisted he was as clean as a fighter put USADA on a foul-mouth blast and refused to fight until he was publicly cleared. Your all on steroids not me pic.twitter.com/ykrZmRIoPS — Nathan Diaz (@NateDiaz209) October 24, 2019 "I'm not staying quiet and figuring it out after the fight," Diaz tweeted in about the only sentence in a lengthy statement without multiple swear words. "That's cheating." It's that renegade spirit that helped skyrocket Diaz's popularity and why UFC's 500th show should come with a parental advisory stamp for any fan who wants to fork over their PPV cash......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 2nd, 2019

Anti-doping policies in National Sports Summit 2021

Efforts towards clean and fair play in the country get the spotlight when batch 2 of the online National Sports Summit 2021 starts this March 4......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsFeb 28th, 2021

Coaching great John Thompson of Georgetown dead at 78

By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — John Thompson, the imposing Hall of Famer who turned Georgetown into a “Hoya Paranoia” powerhouse and became the first Black coach to lead a team to the NCAA men’s basketball championship, has died. He was 78 His death was announced in a family statement released by Georgetown on Monday. No details were disclosed. “Our father was an inspiration to many and devoted his life to developing young people not simply on but, most importantly, off the basketball court. He is revered as a historic shepherd of the sport, dedicated to the welfare of his community above all else,” the statement said. “However, for us, his greatest legacy remains as a father, grandfather, uncle, and friend. More than a coach, he was our foundation. More than a legend, he was the voice in our ear everyday.” One of the most celebrated and polarizing figures in his sport, Thompson took over a moribund Georgetown program in the 1970s and molded it in his unique style into a perennial contender, culminating with a national championship team anchored by center Patrick Ewing in 1984. Georgetown reached two other title games with Thompson in charge and Ewing patrolling the paint, losing to Michael Jordan’s North Carolina team in 1982 and to Villanova in 1985. At 6-foot-10, with an ever-present white towel slung over his shoulder, Thompson literally and figuratively towered over the Hoyas for decades, becoming a patriarch of sorts after he quit coaching in 1999. One of his sons, John Thompson III, was hired as Georgetown’s coach in 2004. When the son was fired in 2017, the elder Thompson -- known affectionately as “Big John” or “Pops” to many -- was at the news conference announcing Ewing as the successor. Along the way, Thompson said what he thought, shielded his players from the media and took positions that weren’t always popular. He never shied away from sensitive topics -- particularly the role of race in both sports and society -- and he once famously walked off the court before a game to protest an NCAA rule because he felt it hurt minority athletes. “I’ll probably be remembered for all the things that kept me out of the Hall of Fame, ironically, more than for the things that got me into it,” Thompson said on the day he was elected to the Hall in 1999. Thompson became coach of the Hoyas in 1972 and began remaking a team that was 3-23 the previous season. Over the next 27 years, he led Georgetown to 14 straight NCAA tournaments (1979-92), 24 consecutive postseason appearances (20 NCAA, 4 NIT), three Final Fours (1982, 1984, 1985) and won six Big East tournament championships. Employing a physical, defense-focused approach that frequently relied on a dominant center -- Alonzo Mourning and Dikembe Mutombo were among his other pupils -- Thompson compiled a 596-239 record (.715 winning percentage). He had 26 players drafted by the NBA. One of his honors -- his selection as coach of the U.S. team for the 1988 Olympics -- had a sour ending when the Americans had to settle for the bronze medal. It was a result so disappointing that Thompson put himself on a sort of self-imposed leave at Georgetown for a while, coaching practices and games but leaving many other duties to his assistants. Off the court, Thompson was both a role model and a lightning rod. A stickler for academics, he kept a deflated basketball on his desk, a reminder to his players that a degree was a necessity because a career in basketball relied on a tenuous “nine pounds of air.” The school boasted that 76 of 78 players who played four seasons under Thompson received their degrees. He was a Black coach who recruited mostly Black players to a predominantly white Jesuit university in Washington, and Thompson never hesitated to speak out on behalf of his players. One of the most dramatic moments in Georgetown history came on Jan. 14, 1989, when he walked off the court to a standing ovation before the tipoff of a home game against Boston College, demonstrating in a most public way his displeasure against NCAA Proposition 42. The rule denied athletic scholarships to freshmen who didn’t meet certain requirements, and Thompson said it was biased against underprivileged students. Opposition from Thompson, and others, led the NCAA to modify the rule. Thompson’s most daring move came that same year, when he summoned notorious drug kingpin Rayful Edmond III for a meeting in the coach’s office. Thompson warned Edmond to stop associating with Hoyas players and to leave them alone, using his respect in the Black community to become one of the few people to stare down Edmond and not face a reprisal. Though aware of his influence, Thompson did not take pride in becoming the first Black coach to take a team to the Final Four, and he let a room full of reporters know it when asked his feelings on the subject at a news conference in 1982. “I resent the hell out of that question if it implies I am the first Black coach competent enough to take a team to the Final Four,” Thompson said. “Other Blacks have been denied the right in this country; coaches who have the ability. I don’t take any pride in being the first Black coach in the Final Four. I find the question extremely offensive.” Born Sept. 2, 1941, John R. Thompson Jr. grew up in Washington, D.C. His father was always working — on a farm in Maryland and later as a laborer in the city — and could neither read nor write. “I never in my life saw my father’s hands clean,” Thompson told The Associated Press in 2007. “Never. He’d come home and scrub his hands with this ugly brown soap that looked like tar. I thought that was the color of his hands. When I was still coaching, kids would show up late for practice and I’d (say) ... ‘My father got up every morning of his life at 5 a.m. to go to work. Without an alarm.‘” Thompson’s parents emphasized education, but he struggled in part of because of poor eyesight and labored in Catholic grammar school. He was moved to a segregated public school, had a growth spurt and became good enough at basketball to get into John Carroll, a Catholic high school, where he led the team to 55 consecutive victories and two city titles. He went to Providence College as one of the most touted basketball prospects in the country and led the Friars to the first NCAA bid in school history. He graduated in 1964 and played two seasons with Red Auerbach’s Boston Celtics, earning a pair of championship rings as a sparingly used backup to Bill Russell. Thompson returned to Washington, got his master’s degree in guidance and counseling from the University of the District of Columbia and went 122-28 over six seasons at St. Anthony’s before accepting the job at Georgetown, an elite school that had relatively few Black students. Faculty and students rallied around him after a bedsheet with racist words was hung inside the school’s gym before a game during the 1974-75 season. Thompson sheltered his players with closed practices, tightly controlled media access and a prohibition on interviews with freshmen in their first semester -- a restriction that still stands for Georgetown’s basketball team. Combined with Thompson’s flashes of emotion and his players’ rough-and-tumble style of play, it wasn’t long before the words “Hoya Paranoia” came to epitomize the new era of basketball on the Hilltop campus. Georgetown lost the 1982 NCAA championship game when Fred Brown mistakenly passed the ball to North Carolina’s James Worthy in the game’s final seconds. Two years later, Ewing led an 84-75 win over Houston in the title game. The Hoyas were on the verge of a repeat the following year when they were stunned in the championship game by coach Rollie Massimino’s Villanova team in one of the biggest upsets in tournament history. Success allowed Thompson to rake in money through endorsements, but he ran afoul of his Georgetown bosses when he applied for a gambling license for a business venture in Nevada in 1995. Thompson, who liked playing the slot machines in Las Vegas, reluctantly dropped the application after the university president objected. Centers Ewing, Mourning and Mutombo turned Georgetown into “Big Man U” under Thompson, although his last superstar was guard Allen Iverson, who in 1996 also became the first player under Thompson to leave school early for the NBA draft. “Thanks for Saving My Life Coach,” Iverson wrote at the start of an Instagram post Monday with photos of the pair. The Hoyas teams in the 1990s never came close to matching the achievements of the 1980s, and Thompson’s era came to a surprising and sudden end when he resigned in the middle of the 1998-99 season, citing distractions from a pending divorce. Thompson didn’t fade from the limelight. He became a sports radio talk show host and a TV and radio game analyst, joining the very profession he had frustrated so often as a coach. He loosened up, allowing the public to see his lighter side, but he remained pointed and combative when a topic mattered to him. A torch was passed in 2004, when John Thompson III became Georgetown’s coach. The younger Thompson, with “Pops” often watching from the stands or sitting in the back of the room for news conferences, returned the Hoyas to the Final Four in 2007. Another son, Ronny Thompson, was head coach for one season at Ball State and is now a TV analyst. ___ Joseph White, a former AP sports writer in Washington who died in 2019, prepared this obituary. AP Sports Writer Howard Fendrich contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 15th, 2020

Four of coach Frankie s NCAA First 5 comes straight from San Beda

Frankie Lim has been calling the shots for University of Perpetual Help from 2018 to present. Before this, the fiery mentor was at the helm of San Beda University from 2007 to 2011. Through all of that, he has had a hand in the discovery and the development of young talent for his teams as well as the game planning for the opposing rising stars. Among all of those, who are the best of the best for him? Here is Frankie Lim's NCAA First 5, as he told ABS-CBN Sports: ROBERT BOLICK Coach Frankie was no longer in San Beda when Robert Bolick became "Big Shot Bolick." Where he was instead was at the other end, doing his best to push Perpetual into getting the better of the 6-foot-1 playmaker. In his three games going up against Bolick, Coach Frankie and his boys fell short - and that only made the latter all the more impressed with the former. GARVO LANETE Before Bolick was doing what he was doing, Lanete set the standard on what San Beda should get from its lead guard. A fearless gunner forever willing to put the Red Lions on his back, the 6-foot-2 scorer was right up there with the likes of Kiefer Ravena and Kevin Alas as the best backcourt players in college. Lanete had an edge over those two, though, as he was a key cog in four championships for the red and white. MIKE NZEUSSEU Nzeusseu is not the foreign student-athlete we're used to watching. Yes, he could back down on opponents, but he was at his best either facing up and forcing his quickness on defenders or finishing setups from the likes of CJ Perez and the Marcelino twins. Coach Frankie knows a thing or two about paint presences, but he is also a big fan of more well-rounded big men. SUDAN DANIEL Daniel had an unenviable task of following Sam Ekwe, you know, the Nigerian who won MVP and Rookie of the Year in the same season. Without a doubt, though, "Superman" lived up to his lofty billing, making sure San Beda remained the team-to-beat even in the face of San Sebastian College-Recoletos' Pinatubo Trio as well as Alas and Raymond Almazan-led Colegio de San Juan de Letran. In an MVP campaign in 2010, Daniel stood as the pillar for the Red Lions' 18-0 romp through the tournament and wound up with something not even Ekwe had - a season sweep. OLA ADEOGUN At the peak of his powers, Adeogun was, simply put, scary. An unbelievable hybrid of Ekwe's power and Daniel's agility, the Nigerian saw to it that there was no let up for San Beda even after they had moved on from their two foreign student-athletes who won MVP. Adeogun did not win the top individual player himself and yet, he won the hearts of the San Beda faithful thanks to the attitude he brought to the Red Lions. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 14th, 2020

Women power rises in Philippine sports

Hardly given a second glance before, Filipino women athletes got the nation's attention with resurgent performances the past four years......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 7th, 2020

LeBron James group touts sports venues as mega-voting sites

By BILL BARROW Associated Press ATLANTA (AP) — If basketball icon LeBron James gets his way, NBA arenas and other sports venues around the country will be mega polling sites for the November general election. James and his voting rights group, formed this spring with other black athletes and entertainers, are joining with other professional basketball leaders and Michigan’s top elections official to push for mega voting sites to accommodate in-person balloting amid the COVID-19 pandemic. More Than A Vote, the James organization dedicated to maximizing Black turnout in November, shared its plans with The Associated Press on Wednesday after the Detroit Pistons became the second NBA franchise to announce plans to use its arena for voting later this year. In Georgia, Fulton County elections officials this week approved the Atlanta Hawks’ proposal to use State Farm Arena as a polling site. Plans call for the arena to serve as a countywide early voting site ahead of Election Day. The idea, which comes after Kentucky used large facilities in its June 23 primary, is to use large spaces that allow for in-person voting while still enforcing social distancing guidelines. It also underscores the attention on the mechanics of voting amid the pandemic, with the intensity already reflected in both President Donald Trump and Democratic challenger Joe Biden warning that state and local officials have the power to “corrupt” the election. Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson called her “partnership” with the Pistons an “blueprint for other teams and leagues seeking to advance our common goal of protecting access to the vote for all.” Lloyd Pierce, head coach of the Atlanta Hawks, said the arrangement in his city ensures “high turnout” in a safe environment. Benson, Pierce and David Fizdale, former New York Knicks head coach, will advise NBA franchises and arena management entities around the country on how to replicate the existing deals. The Milwaukee Bucks also confirmed they are willing to use their home arena as a voting site in the most populous city in the key battleground of Wisconsin. The coordinated push is a turnabout, of sorts, in the often-partisan jousting over voting procedures. Some Democrats panned Kentucky elections officials for limiting in-person June primary voting in the state’s two most populous counties to Louisville’s Exposition Center and the University of Kentucky football stadium in Lexington. Voting rights advocates argued in federal court that the plan, part of culling voting sites statewide amid coronavirus concerns, would harm minority voters. A federal judge rejected their claims, and voting proceeded without the melee that some advocates had forecast. Now, Benson, a Democrat, is pushing the arena model not as an example of potential voter suppression, but a way to fight it. “One of our greatest challenges in protecting voters’ access to democracy this November is identifying accessible locations where citizens can safely vote in person,” she said. Amid COVID, that could outweigh potential logistical difficulties of large sites. Lines for such venues can still be long — just as with normal polling locations — as was seen in Lexington at some points on primary day. Voters also could face traffic jams or public transit hiccups given the number of people involved. General elections also have considerably larger turnout than primaries. Nonetheless, there’s a growing bipartisan push for large-venue voting. NFL executive Scott Pioli last week presented the National Association of Secretaries of State a plan for widespread use of professional and college sports facilities. James’ group is officially nonpartisan. But the NBA star has been open about its emphasis on the Black community, where Trump faces intense opposition for his white identity politics. James has not endorsed Biden, but he endorsed Hillary Clinton over Trump in 2016. In Milwaukee, meanwhile, the Bucks owners, the Lasry family, are major Democratic Party donors. Bucks executive Alex Lasry helped lead the effort that landed the Democratic National Convention in the city.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 2nd, 2020

KiefLy still strong at four

Philippine sports’ power couple PBA star Kiefer Ravena and volleyball sensation Alyssa Valdez shared sweet posts on their social media accounts on Tuesday as they celebrated their fourth anniversary. NLEX ace guard Ravena called their blooming relationship as real and 'four-ever' despite some bashers calling it fake.         View this post on Instagram                   Ride or die. Haters gon say its fake but Fourever is real. ???????????? i love you fr fr. ?? A post shared by Kiefer Ravena (@kieferravena15) on Apr 27, 2020 at 8:50am PDT Valdez on her IG post reminded Ravena of how lucky she is for having him by her side and even called him her ‘four-leaf clover’.         View this post on Instagram                   .... and you’re my 4-leaf clover ??? A post shared by Alyssa Valdez (@alyssa_valdez2) on Apr 28, 2020 at 12:59am PDT Both athletes developed into one of sports’ most popular couples while still playing for Ateneo de Manila University in the UAAP.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 28th, 2020

For these athletes, this is a spring break they don t want

By ERIC OLSON AP Sports Writer OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Creighton right-hander Ben Dotzler was supposed to be in the bullpen at TD Ameritrade Park this weekend, readying himself to pitch against Northern Colorado. Molly Little, who plays lacrosse for Denver, expected to be on the road for a much anticipated match against Michigan, the team the Pioneers beat to reach the Elite Eight of the NCAA Tournament last year. Avrey Steiner thought she would be with her softball teammates for Illinois' first home games of the season against Bowling Green and Green Bay. Everything changed for thousands of college athletes when the NCAA announced Thursday it was canceling all spring sports championships, along with remaining winter championships, because of the coronavirus pandemic. Conferences followed, saying they were temporarily or permanently shutting down their regular seasons. Suddenly, athletes who put in long hours juggling commitments to their sports and academics had lots of free time. And they're miserable. “We didn't work a whole year,” Dotzler said, “to play 15 games.” Little said she woke up at 6:30 every morning to go to the training room to rehab an injury and stretch before lifting weights and running — all before going to a 2 1/2-hour practice and then her classes. “There's nothing that can prepare you for the feeling of your season being done, and it's not because you lost in NCAAs,” Little said. “I spent many hours crying with teammates. You work your whole life to get to this point, to play on this big stage, and to have it taken from you is devastating.” Steiner said she was doing fine emotionally until she started cleaning out her locker Friday. “That really got me,” she said. “A lot of people are going to say, 'Oh, yeah, this is like a week off or getting a couple days off. I guarantee you it's going to hit me and other people in the coming weeks.” Some good news arrived on Friday when the NCAA informed schools that spring athletes would be given another year of eligibility to make up for their lost season. Details must be worked out. States Fort, a senior on the Coastal Carolina men's golf team, hopes to return for another year even though he'll graduate in May. “I would try to make it work with grad courses,” he said. “I would do everything in my power as long as the finances are there. I would love to come back and play with these guys." Not all seniors will be able to take advantage of being granted an extra year. Some already have jobs lined up. Others have been accepted into graduate programs at other schools. There are athletes who currently are on partial scholarships, and they may not be able to afford paying the difference for another year. Though the eligibility extension offers some consolation, it will be impossible for athletes to duplicate the experiences of playing with their 2020 teams. The Richmond women's lacrosse team, for example, was off to a program-best 7-0 start and ranked in the top 20 nationally for the first time since 2008. “We just accelerated into the season and started off so hot,” senior goaltender Megan Gianforte said. "Personally, I thought I was peaking this year. I felt I was in the best condition for this season. That's why I was so excited for it. We brought in so much talent, which helps me defensively. “I'm leaving Richmond now with such unfinished business, knowing all the potential we could have had. I just know how much more we have to give.” Now the spring athletes are left to wonder what they'll do with themselves. “It is just heartbreaking to see these kids face this unfortunate situation,” longtime University of San Francisco baseball coach Nino Giarratano said. “They are too young.” Creighton sophomore Tommy Steier said he and Dotzler, his roommate, have been spending a lot of time hanging out with teammates, rehashing old stories and plotting their immediate futures. Creighton isn't allowing athletes to use the school's training facilities during the shutdown. Baseball players will work out on their own and prepare to join summer teams in a few months — if the summer leagues operate. Fort, the Coastal Carolina golfer, said a temporary sports stoppage would have been more appropriate, followed by a reassessment of the situation. He wishes the NCAA would have waited before canceling championships scheduled for months from now. For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia. The vast majority of people recover from the virus. “Obviously I'm biased because I play a small outdoor sport where spectators aren't much of an issue,” Fort said. “It was kind of quick and a little rash and short-sighted on the NCAA's part, especially to blanket cancel all sports. "I can understand basketball. That's a spectator sport where you have a ton of people constantly rubbing shoulders. I can almost understand baseball. But sports like (men's) volleyball, softball, golf and lacrosse don't have as much of a pronounced fan base.” Creighton's baseball team was busing back to Omaha from Minnesota on Thursday when the players' Twitter feeds started showing conference basketball tournaments being canceled. An hour after the players got home they received a text telling them to return to campus for a meeting. Steier and Dotzler said everyone sensed what was coming. As coach Ed Servais broke the news, seniors, who wouldn't know for another 24 hours they would be allowed to come back next year, broke into tears. “It was hard to see all of them knowing they were losing what they love to do,” Steier said. Gianforte, the Richmond lacrosse goalie, said she and her teammates had a feeling as early as Wednesday afternoon their season might be in jeopardy. That's when the Ivy League announced it was closing down spring sports. “I think the other conferences were feeling some peer pressure,” she said. Then the NBA announced Wednesday night it was suspending its season. “That," Gianforte said, “is when we knew we were goners.” ___ AP Sports Writer Janie McCauley in San Francisco contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 15th, 2020

Boxing: Irish Magno books ticket to Tokyo 2020 Olympics

Filipina boxer Irish Magno was given a second chance, and she made good on it, booking a spot in the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo after winning her Women's Flyweight Olympic Box-off bout in the 2020 Asia and Oceania Boxing Olympic Qualifiers, Wednesday in Amman, Jordan.  Magno, a 2019 SEA Games Silver Medalist, used her size and power to overwhelm Tajikistan's Sumaiya Qosimova en route to a unanimous decision victory.  Magno was swinging hard from the opening bell, throwing wild haymakers to put the pressure on the 19-year old Qosimova. The young Tajik had no answer for the bigger Magno, who coasted to a dominant opening round, even getting 10-8 scores.  Round 2 was even more dominant for Magno, as she never let up, pushing Qosimova back with powerful punches and scoring a 10-8 across the board.  Round 3 was no different, as Magno closed things out in dominant fashion with another 10-8 round across the boards for a clear-cut decision win.  "I am so very happy, and I made it because of my coach Boy Velasco, this is for you coach," said Magno post-fight.  The 28-year old Magno joins Eumir Marcial on Tokyo 2020's Pinoy boxing contingent so far. Gymnast Caloy Yulo and pole vaulter EJ Obiena are the other Filipino athletes who have so far qualified for the Summer Olympics.  Filipino flyweight Carlo Paalam still could not get over the hump however, as he came up short in his Men's Flyweight Olympic Box-off bout against Kazakhstan's Saken Bibbosinov, losing via a 4-1 Split Decision.  Paalam was aggressive from the get-go as he tried to control the pace and overwhelm the taller Kazakh.  Bibbosinov's range and reach would ultimately be the x-factor, as Paalam simply could not break through without getting hit.  Down on the cards and needing a knockout in the final round to secure a spot in Tokyo, Paalam turned things up and landed a couple of clean shots that rocked Bibbosinov's head back, but none significant enough to get a count.  All is not lost for Paalam however, as he can still earn a spot in the Summer Games through the Global Qualifiers in Paris this May. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 11th, 2020

A step ahead? Nike s Vaporfly shoe changing marathon game

By PAT GRAHAM and ALEXANDRA OLSON Associated Press To pick the favorites in this year's Olympic marathon, just glance at the shoes of the runners on the starting line. Anyone wearing Nike's Vaporfly model may already have a head start. The shoe has shaken up distance running since the world’s largest sports apparel company introduced it four years ago, with technology credited for helping runners shave minutes off their times. To some, the advances are an exciting revolution. Others have called it “technology doping” that risks reducing marathons to a shoe competition. “Running is so simple. That's why people love it so much. Now we have a shoe that is blurring that," said Geoff Burns, a runner and Ph.D candidate at the University of Michigan's School of Kinesiology. The controversy prompted World Athletics, the sport’s governing body, to issue its most stringent shoe regulations in decades ahead of the Tokyo Games. But the Vaporfly escaped a ban, and the debate continues. Now, Nike has a new racing shoe that also squeaks by the new rules: The Air Zoom Alphafly Next%, which was unveiled at a flashy fashion show in New York on Wednesday night. Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya wore a prototype of the shoe when he ran the world's first sub-2-hour marathon in an unofficial race in October. Kenya’s Brigid Kosgei was also in a version of the shoe when she set the world record for women in Chicago last year. Geoffrey Kamworor of Kenya wore a version of Vaporfly when he won the New York Marathon in November. All three of the men’s marathon medalists at the 2016 Rio Olympics laced up a version of the shoe as well. Vaporfly shoes have become a common sight at marathons all over, easily spotted with their neon green or pink hue. Many marathoners are gladly paying the $250 price tag on Nike’s website — and sometimes more — even as they wonder how much credit they can personally take for improved results. Bryan Lam, an amateur marathoner in Washington, D.C. said he spent $400 for a pair of StockX ahead of the London Marathon last spring because the version he wanted was sold out elsewhere. He ran the marathon in 2:59.30, seven minutes faster than his previous personal best, a result he called “insane.” It helped him achieve his lifelong goal of qualifying for the Boston Marathon this year. “I’d like to think that it was because of all of my training for the London Marathon but I do think the shoes had something to do with my performance,” Lam said. “It’s definitely not a level playing field when those who can afford the shoes have that type of advantage." What differentiates the Vaporfly is a foam midsole that is lighter and less dense than others, allowing for extra cushioning without adding weight. The shoe also has a carbon-fiber plate that acts like a lever to reduce the work at the ankle. Independent and company-sponsored studies have found that the shoe gives runners a 4% edge in energy efficiency. The Air Zoom Alphafly Next% steps it up a notch with two “air pods" in the sole for extra cushioning. Both the Vaporfly and the Alphafly meet a World Athletic rule that limits the sole thickness to no more than 40 millimeters. The Alphafly will be available for sale to Nike members starting Feb. 29, meaning it meets a new rule that shoes must be available on the open market by April 30 to be allowed at the Tokyo Games. Kyle Barnes, an exercise science assistant professor at Grand Valley State University in Michigan, conducted a study around two years ago that compared the Vaporfly shoes to Nike’s Zoom Matumbo 3 (a track spike) and Adidas Adizero Adios 3. His findings showed about 4.2% more efficiency by wearing the Vaporfly model. Bottom line: Barnes estimated that slipping into the Vaporfly could potentially trim several minutes off a professional’s time and in the vicinity of 10 minutes for, say, a 4-hour marathoner. “It is a form of technology doping,” said Barnes, who co-authored the study with exercise physiology professor Andrew Kilding from Auckland University of Technology in New Zealand. “You're at a disadvantage not being in those shoes. ... Everything is happening so quick right now in the shoe industry.” World Athletics sought a middle ground in its recent decision, making clear that wearing the Vaporfly will not constitute cheating. But in tightening its rules, the Monaco-based organization signaled a new era of vigilance. The governing body said an expert working group will be created to assess new shoes entering the market and placed a moratorium on certain criteria for shoes. It also banned any shoe with a sole thickness of more than 40-millimeters, or that contains more than one plate. The Vaporfly controversy has drawn comparisons to the advantages that swimmers received wearing the Speedo LZR Racer, a full-body compression suit that trapped air for buoyancy and improved performance, leading to a slew of world records. Swimming's world governing body later banned all body-length swimwear. But the minimal technology involved in running has evolved only gradually, said Burns. The last major changes, he said, came in the 1960s and '70s, when shoe manufacturers developed EVA-based foam midsoles and all-weather tracks began replacing cinder tracks. N ike also is working on a fast shoe for the 100 meters. It's called the Nike Air Zoom Viperfly and as of now will not be at the Olympics because its design does not meet the new World Athletics regulations. Nike is looking at ways to adjust the shoe so that it will comply with regulations, according to a person familiar with the discussion. The person spoke on condition of anonymity of the ongoing process since it's not public. Other companies are also pushing the boundaries of shoe technology. Saucony has a carbon-plated shoe called the Endorphin Pro, which m arathoner Jared Ward wrote in a blog felt like the shoes were “pushing me forward into more of a half-marathon cadence.” Translation: It’s fast. Joyciline Jepkosgei won the women’s marathon in New York wearing an Adidas Adizero Pro prototype, which the company said in a statement conforms with the new rules. Adidas did not release details about the shoe's technical design. Hoka One One recently came out with the Carbon X, which was described as a cushioned, carbon-plated “speed machine” for a "propulsive, responsive ride.” “We’re all fans of the sport,” said Colin Ingram, director of product for Hoka One One. “We’re all for (technology advances) as long as we're able to do it within our own DNA when we decide to jump into the foray.” For the moment, though, Nike appears to hold a sizable lead over any rival. "I suspect they're three years behind, minimum, and so it'll take a long time before race results have any real integrity in a competitive sense," sports scientist Ross Tucker wrote in an email. “It turned athletes from 2:06 to 2:04. It decided results. It changed the relationship between physiological input and performance outputs.” Burns said a new era of advanced shoe technology could potentially disrupt the prevailing sponsorship model in running, in which shoe companies generally serve as the main sponsors of athletes. Burns said more athletes may look beyond shoe companies if a contract forces them to wear a shoe that puts them at a competitive disadvantage. "If you have guys bringing knives to a gunfight, it's not a good look for the knife sponsors," Burns said. American distance runner Roberta Groner doesn't have a shoe deal and trains in a variety of brands, including a version of the Vaporfly. She could be wearing that model at the U.S. Olympic marathon trials in Atlanta later this month. "I don't get into the science," Groner said. “I just go with how I feel.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 7th, 2020

Russia confirms it will appeal 4-year Olympic ban

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia confirmed Friday that it will appeal its four-year Olympic ban for manipulating doping data. The Russian anti-doping agency, known as RUSADA, sent a formal letter disagreeing with the sanctions imposed earlier this month by the World Anti-Doping Agency. The case is now heading to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS). Next year's Olympics in Tokyo will be the third consecutive edition of the games preceded by a legal battle over Russian doping issues. RUSADA said it “disputes the (WADA) notice in its entirety," including the evidence of tampering with the data archive. The data was handed over in January and was meant to clear up past cover-ups, but has led to more legal tussles. RUSADA's own CEO, Yuri Ganus, attached his own note of protest to Friday's letter. Ganus is critical of Russian officials and had disagreed with the decision to appeal. He was overruled by his agency's founders, which include some of Russia's most influential sports leaders. The WADA sanctions ban the use of the Russian team name, flag or anthem at a range of major sports competitions over the next four years, including next year's Olympics and the 2022 soccer World Cup. Ganus said he believes any appeal has little chance of success and could even lead to harsher sanctions, including a ban of all Russian athletes, who under the current ban are allowed to compete as neutrals. “There is a possibility of entering the case new players which may demand from the court not to soften the sanctions but to toughen them,” Ganus said. "The sanctions regime that is in place against the Russian sport is not full, it is not a 100 percent. There were greater sanctions, up to a ban of all athletes." Russians will be allowed to compete in Tokyo as unaffiliated athletes if they pass a vetting process that examines their history of drug testing, and possible involvement in cover-ups at the lab. That has prompted anger from some Western athletes and organizations like the United States Anti-Doping Agency, which wanted a blanket ban on Russian athletes. The appeal was widely expected with Russian President Vladimir Putin having branded the ban “unfair.” RUSADA's supervisory board voted Dec. 19 to file an arbitration case with CAS in Switzerland after WADA ruled Russia had manipulated doping laboratory data to cover up past offenses. Putin has said it was not fair to threaten Russia with more doping-related punishment, and that any sanctions should be on an individual basis. “I think it is not just unfair but not corresponding to common sense and law,” Putin said. After a panel of three CAS arbitrators is chosen, a verdict will be issued within three months. Putin added that WADA's recommended four-year ban on Russia hosting major sports competitions would have little effect, pointing to the 2022 men's volleyball world championships as an event Russia intends to keep. WADA demands events are moved unless it's "legally or practically impossible" to do so, which could create a loophole for event organizers who don't want to break financial commitments. That ban already doesn't apply to next year's European Championship soccer games in St. Petersburg or the 2021 Champions League final, both of which are exempt because they're continental, not world, championships. Russia handed over the lab's doping data archive in January in return for having earlier sanctions lifted in 2018. WADA investigators found evidence that Russia was intensively editing the data in the weeks before the handover to remove signs of failed drug tests. Ganus has said he believes the editing took place, and he said a hearing reveal further evidence of data manipulation. “What are the risks? First of all, it is a public hearing, which will reveal to the whole world the supporting information of the official position of sports authorities on changes in the computer database,” Ganus said. WADA said it found fake messages spliced into chat logs in an apparent attempt to smear former lab director Grigory Rodchenkov, who's become a key witness for WADA since leaving Russia. Rodchenkov went public with allegations of a vast state-sponsored doping scheme after the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, where Russia was the top medal-winning country......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 28th, 2019

Polo competition kicks off SEA Games hostilities

Athletes on horseback officially kick off hostilities for the country’s hosting of the 30th Southeast Asian Games with the 0-4 goals event in Calatagan, Batangas on Sunday.  Polo is one of the 56 sports on the program of the 30th Southeast Asian Games that formally starts with the opening ceremony on Saturday at the Philippine Arena in Bocaue, Bulacan. The polo competitions also happen a day after the Bamboo Pavillon at the Miguel Romero field was blessed and inaugurated. Four countries — oil-rich Brunei, Malaysia, Singapore and host Philippines — are entered in the glamorous sport, one of the oldest in history. Having vast resources at their disposal — what with their extensive training abroad and high quality horses — nobody seems to have an advantage over the other which should be a guarantee for a “battle royale” for the two gold medals up for grabs. “That’s certainly going to happen because everybody is holding their cards close to their chests. Our rivals are tough but we are prepared for the challenges that will come our way,” Rep. Mikee Romero of Team Philippines said. “But whatever happens, we have to cherish this moment since this is the first time in decades that we have this kind of tournament of this magnitude.”  For the enormity of their efforts, all Philippine National Federation of Polo Players (PNFPP) officials should deserve this early a gold medal since the event will certainly add star power to the biennial event with the expected arrival of the who’s who in the region — royalties, tycoons and high government officials of all participating countries. “We have so many unsung heroes and heroines in putting up this kind of tournament and everybody experienced birth pains,” added Romero who, along with other members of PH team trained hard for two weeks in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Romero even failed to complete the team’s scheduled 2-week training as he fell off his horse on the eighth day and hardly walked straight for two days. Hurting and all, the show must go on.  “Everybody is excited so we have to put up a show and try to help the country attain its ultimate goal of winning the overall championship,” added Romero, who will see action in the 0-2 goals starting on December 3. The Miguel Romero Field was a venue of grandeur during its inauguration Saturday. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 23rd, 2019

Pinoy sports personalities get creative for Halloween

Ahh, Halloween. The spookiest time of the year. The time of year wherein people get to be spooky, creepy, and creative when it comes to their costumes.  As always, our favorite Filipino athletes got in on the fun and showed off their own get-ups for the Halloween, and here are some of the best!    Jeron Teng and Jeanine Tsoi One of our favorite sports power couples, former King Green Archer and current Alaska Ace Jeron Teng and ABS-CBN Sports reporter Jeanine Tsoi dressed up as Men in Black.         View this post on Instagram                   Protecting the earth from the scum of the universe ???????????? #HappyHalloween #MenInBlack A post shared by Jeanine Beatrice (@jeaninebeatrice) on Oct 31, 2019 at 6:12am PDT   Michele Gumabao and Aldo Panlilio  How about this for some nostalgia? Creamline Cool Smasher Michele Gumabao, boyfriend fitness buff Aldo Panlilio and some friends decided to go as contestants of the classic Nickelodeon game show Legends of the Hidden Temple.         View this post on Instagram                   Legends of the Hidden Temple night at casa @laureen ♥? Purple Parrots represent!!! @aldopanlilio12 Another year to think about our next costume ???? A post shared by Michele Gumabao (@gumabaomichele) on Nov 1, 2019 at 4:27am PDT Michele and Aldo also dressed up as a peanut butter and jelly sandwich!          View this post on Instagram                   What did the peanut butter say to the jelly???? @aldopanlilio12 Shot using my @fujifilmph 23mm #FujifilmXT100 #FUJIFILMPHXMICHELEGUMABAO#fujifilmphlifestyle A post shared by Michele Gumabao (@gumabaomichele) on Oct 30, 2019 at 10:35pm PDT   Junemar Fajardo  Multiple-time PBA MVP and San Miguel Beermen star Junemar Fajardo put on a happy face as he killed it as Joaquin Phoenix's Joker.         View this post on Instagram                   #JokerDance #WhysoSerious ???? A post shared by JMF (@saginghilaw15) on Oct 31, 2019 at 6:32am PDT           View this post on Instagram                   “Bisaya nga dako way paki y magbuot!”???? - @cookie.vibe #Joker A post shared by JMF (@saginghilaw15) on Oct 31, 2019 at 5:00am PDT   Rex Intal  We're not entirely sure what's going on here, but it looks like Rex Intal is dressed up as a member of the Money Heist crew being manhandled by an alien?         View this post on Instagram                   In-alien style sa banyo ng Island #GlobeHalloween A post shared by Rex Intal ???????? (@rexintal) on Oct 31, 2019 at 11:42pm PDT   CJ Perez Former NCAA MVP and current Columbian Dyip star CJ Perez and family went as members of the Darna universe. CJ as Ding tho.          View this post on Instagram                   Halloween 2019. Ding, Darna & Valentina A post shared by Cjay Perez (@cjayp7) on Oct 29, 2019 at 11:37pm PDT   Roxanne Montealegre Our very own ABS-CBN Sports reporter Roxanne Montealegre totally slayed as Wonder Woman.         View this post on Instagram                   No matter how high your standards are, the universe will meet you there ??????How’s your Halloween x Mercury Retrograde? ???? A post shared by Roxanne Montealegre (@roxannemontealegre) on Oct 31, 2019 at 7:46am PDT   Martin Javier ABS-CBN Sports commentator Martin Javier pulled off a great Captain America!            Thirdy Ravena Ateneo Blue Eagle Thirdy Ravena is up to some Stranger Things as he dressed up as Eleven for Halloween          .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 2nd, 2019

ONE Championship: Eduard Folayang believes his style matches up well against Eddie Alvarez

Lightweight stars and former world champions Eduard “Landslide” Folayang of the Philippines and Eddie “The Underground King” Alvarez of the United States are set to lock horns in a must-see ONE Lightweight World Grand Prix semi-final matchup at ONE: Dawn of Heroes this coming Friday, August 2nd at the Mall of Asia Arena in Manila.    Facing a former UFC and Bellator world champion in Alvarez, Folayang knows that he is up against what could be the biggest challenge of his career, but also believes that his style matches up well with the ultra-aggressive American.    “Yeah, for sure, [my style] matches up well [with his], and kailangan ko pang pinu-in yung mga areas na magiging precise, na magagamit ko against sa kanya,” Folayang told ABS-CBN Sports.    Alvarez is known for his charge-forward brawling style that made him a fan favorite among fans during his runs with North American promotions.    Folayang is a gifted striker who has shown stopping power in the past, most notably his third-round TKO win over Japanese legend Shinya Aoki back in 2016, the win that netted the Pinoy star his first ONE world championship.    One clean shot from either man could spell disaster for the other.    Hard-hitting Russian Timofey Nastyukhin spoiled Alvarez's ONE with a TKO win back in March, and Folayang is looking to do the same.   “I think one of the things that I saw is, halos karamihan ng mga talo ni Eddie Alvarez is more on sa mga high-level strikers, so tine-take into consideration ko yun talaga, and siyempre, depende rin talaga sa kung ano yung magiging gameplan niya eh, kasi gusto niyang manalo eh, ako ganoon dun, so I need to read kung ano yung magiging approach sa laban, kasi alam ng bawat isa sa amin na we are strikers eh, so paano yung adjustment ng bawat isa? I think yun yung isa sa mga titignan ng bawat kampo namin,” Folayang explained.    One area that could prove to be a problem for the Pinoy is the ground game. While Folayang and Team Lakay’s grappling and wrestling have improved dramatically throughout the years, top-notch grapplers have remained to be a problem for the Baguio-based team.    Alvarez, while usually prefers to stand and trade, is also a high-level wrestler and could look to bring the bout to the mat.    “Sa ground game niya, magaling din siya eh, he has proved himself time and time again na talagang may submission and knockout wins din siya, so all-around din well-rounded din siya,” Folayang said.     The 35-year old Baguio City-native is coming off a world title loss to Aoki in their rematch in Japan back in March and is eager to get back on track and begin his hunt for a third world title reign.    With the bout against Alvarez on Friday being a lightweight tournament semi-final, a win for Folayang moves him to the Grand Prix finals and a step closer to challenging for the title again.    “Sa akin, siguro, it motivates me to do well, kasi siyempre, I wasn’t able to defend my belt the last time, I think this is a good opportunity for me to bounce back,” said the two-time champ.    Catch ONE: DAWN OF HEROES on Friday, August 2 LIVE on ABS-CBN S+A channel 23 starting at 8:30 PM. Livestream will be available on the ABS-CBN Facebook Page and on iWant  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 1st, 2019

1 forecast shows US topping medal table at Tokyo Olympics

By Stephen Wade, Associated Press TOKYO (AP) — If the Tokyo Olympics were opening today, the United States would top the overall medal count and the gold-medal count. That's the forecast released Tuesday by Gracenote Sports, which supplies statistical analysis for sports leagues around the world. Simon Gleave, the head of sports analysis at Gracenote, said his model has the United States winning 51 gold medals, 34 silver, and 41 bronze for 126 overall. China is picked to finish second with 38 gold and 81 overall. Host nation Japan is third, which would be a strong showing for a country with a much smaller population than China or the United States. Japan is predicted to win 29 gold medals, 67 overall and take advantage of the "home-field advantage" that almost always goes to the host nation. Spain got a boost back in the '92 Barcelona Olympics, China jumped in 2008 in Beijing, as did Britain in London in 2012. The Tokyo Olympics open on July 24, 2020. The next seven countries ranked in order of overall medals are: Russia (65), Britain (43), Australia (43), France (41), Germany (38), Netherlands (34), and Italy (32). This is fifth forecast Gleave has put together and the record is solid. "Sometimes countries over-perform, or under-perform, and that's not to do with our model," Gleave told AP in an interview. "That just happens in sport." Three years ago in Rio de Janeiro, Gracenote picked the order of the top three countries correctly, and picked eight of the top 10 medal-winning countries. In the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, it correctly picked Norway to win a record number of medals and finish ahead of No. 2 Germany. It also picked the top four countries correctly, and in the correct order. Its predictions for seven of the top 10 countries were within one or two medals of their final totals. Russia is a major headache. Its track and field athletes are still banned from Tokyo following a widespread doping scandal. The governing body of track and field, the IAAF, has had a ban on the Russian athletics federation since 2015. Russia's medal total of course will be impacted by any change in eligibility. "If just before the Olympics, Russia is allowed to enter again it's going to be a bit of an issue," Gleave said of the medal predictions. Other highlights. — Britain finished in the top three in the last two Olympics, but is expected to fall out of that ranking. Look for Australia and Britain to be vying for a spot in the top five. — The Netherlands is picked to surpass its best overall medal total of 25 — that was 2000 in Sydney — and reach 34. — The second 10 in overall medal totals predicted are: South Korea (30), Hungary (27), Canada (25), Kenya (20), Spain (20), New Zealand (18), Ukraine (16), Brazil (15), Poland (14), and Turkey (14). — Women's participation in Tokyo will almost reach parity with men. Countries not promoting women's sports are sure to suffer in the medal standings......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 23rd, 2019

Cargo Movers complete first round sweep

F2 Logistics demolished Marinerang Pilipina, 25-7, 25-9, 25-19, to complete a clean sweep of the first round of the 2019 Philippine Superliga All-Filipino Conference Thursday at the Muntinlupa Sports Center. The Cargo Movers flaunted their might as they crushed the newcomers in the first two sets before taking it slow in the third to run away with their seventh win. Filipino-American Kalei Mau led the charge with 10 kills and two aces for 12 points while Ara Galang chipped in 10 markers for the Cargo Movers, who also drew impressive performance from Majoy Baron and Kianna Dy. Head coach Ramil de Jesus expressed elation over the way they played in the first round, where they were hardly challenged, thanks to the arrival of the power-hitting Mau, who transferred to F2 Logistics following the disbandment of United VC. “This is big for us. It’s a huge morale-booster for us as we head to the second round,” said de Jesus, who is looking to regain the All-Filipino title that has been eluding them for the past two years. “At least we saw the potential of our team whenever we play healthy. It shows that we can sweep a series of games.” The Cargo Movers needed to survive the Lady Skippers’ gallant stand in the third set tied at 17-all before scoring six unanswered points for a 23-17 spread. Marinerang Pilipina saved two more points, but Baron put up the finishing touches. “My starters are jelling well and doing great that’s why we easily won the first two sets and our opponents were late in showing aggressiveness,” said De Jesus. “But in the third set, some of my substitute players weren’t ready that cost us a close encounter.” Marinerang Pilipina gave up 25 errors unlike F2 Logistics, which almost played flawless with only eight miscues. Nobody scored in double figures for the Lady Skippers with Chiara Permentilla being the lone bright spot with nine points laced with 12 digs and four excellent receptions only for her team to stay winless in six games......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 11th, 2019

Zion Williamson brings rare potential to New Orleans

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com BROOKLYN, N.Y. – Eventually, as with every NBA Draft, there will be a “re-draft” of the Class of 2019. That’s the irresistible exercise in hindsight from media outlets that rank a particular year’s prospects not on their projected value but on actual demonstrated value five, 10 or more seasons into their professional careers. Some players will rise. Others will fall. “Bust” and “sleeper” tags will be dispersed accordingly. This team or GM will be lauded for an especially savvy selection, that one will be razzed for the quality player or players on whom it whiffed. But the through line of the dreams-come-true event Thursday night (Friday, PHL time) at Barclays Center, the lone selection that will not or at least should not change, is Zion Williamson. Williamson is the sure thing, the “can’t miss,” consensus No. 1 pick bound for the New Orleans Pelicans. He’s a 6'7", 285-pound freshman from Duke whose comps aren’t merely established players currently in the NBA but some of the game’s legends. So think Blake Griffin, sure. But also think LeBron James. And Charles Barkley. And, for that matter, every other wide-body who’s ever played with muscles on muscles, above-the-rim explosiveness, balletic body control and an instantly recognizable game that’s as charismatic as it is freakish. Yeah, awfully small subset. “I’m looking forward to playing against everybody,” Williamson said soon after his selection. “I want to be the best. I feel I have to earn everybody’s respect.” It’s not just a matter of Williamson’s game tickling NBA fans’ fancy, either. He managed, in almost his first official pro moment, to capture a lot of their hearts too. No sooner had Williamson – the first No. 1 pick to be born in this millennium (July 6, 2000) – strode to the stage in his cream-white suit, tugged on a Pelicans draft cap and embraced NBA commissioner Adam Silver, he dropped his guard to let the world share his emotions in the moment. His status as college basketball’s best and his draft position had been established months ago. There was no new mystery as to when his name would be called by Silver at the podium. And yet, when the first ESPN microphone was poked in front of him, with his mother Sharonda Sampson at his side, the big guy lost it. He choked up and blinked back tears, not quite winning that battle. “My mom sacrificed a lot for me,” Williamson said. “I wouldn’t be here without my mom. She did everything for me. I just want to thank her.” Several interviews and maybe 20 minutes later, Williamson explained how the horribly kept secret of his No. 1 selection could trigger his response. “Because I love the game of basketball,” he said. “You can hear people say things like, ‘Oh, it was likely I was going to go No. 1.’ But I guess you don’t know until you actually go through it.” What mattered most to Williamson about his mother’s role in his life? “Tough love,” he said. “She was always be the first one to keep it real with me. … She put aside her dreams just so me and my brothers could have a chance at ours.” The love already heading Williamson’s way in New Orleans was less tough and more unconditional at this stage, for the teenager represents a re-birth for a Pelicans franchise rocked by the loss of All-Star forward Anthony Davis. Davis, coincidentally, was the No. 1 pick in 2012 and generally considered the top prospect to hit the Draft before Williamson. But after six-and-a-half seasons and only two trips to the playoffs, Davis asked in December to be traded, despite having more than two-plus seasons left on his contract. David Griffin, the Pelicans' new vice president of basketball operations, had hoped that Williamson’s arrival might convince Davis to stay. When that didn’t happen, Griffin swiftly shifted to Plan B, arranging to trade the discontented big man to the Los Angeles Lakers in a deal that won’t be official until July. Now New Orleans, which has won just two playoff series in its 17 seasons and failed to qualify 10 times, has a new cornerstone. Williamson figures to be under team control contractually for as long or longer than Davis stuck around, with teammates relocated from L.A. such as Brandon Ingram, Lonzo Ball and Josh Hart to run with him and Pelicans holdovers. “What excites me the most is the fact that they’re young and they’re close to my age,” said Duke’s third No. 1 overall pick (Elton Brand in 1999, Kyrie Irving in 2011). “So they can help me a lot more, like how to deal with this transition. I think we can build something over there.” The essential block is Williamson, who swept college basketball’s major awards with a game that strains credulity. At 285 pounds, his listed weight is greater than almost every big man in the NBA, but he has quick-twitch speed and thrives in the open court. He can stare down into the rim before slamming home dunks with unnerving ferocity, and he is a deft and willing passer. Williamson averaged 22.6 points, 8.9 rebounds and 1.8 blocks in 30 minutes for the Blue Devils, while making 68 percent of his shots. He and fellow Top 10 picks R.J. Barrett (New York, No. 3) and Cam Reddish (Atlanta, No. 10) helped Duke reach the Elite Eight, with Williamson earning ACC Tournament MVP along the way. He’s not a perfect player – his jump shot and range need work – but he already is working to complement his transition and low-post repertoire. Defensively, Williamson has the motor and mobility to switch assignments and quick hands to dislodge the ball without fouling. As a rebounder, his verticality is matched by, well, his horizontality in controlling the air space above and around him. “His size, his athleticism, his power is visible,” former St. John’s coach and Naismith Hall of Famer Chris Mullin said. “But to me his speed is really incredible from end to end. “I would morph Charles Barkley and Shawn Kemp and put them together [as a comparison]. When he gets to the NBA and he plays with that extra space they have in the wide key, he’s going to be a monster.” Williamson arrives with hype – no, make that expectations, because of all he’s shown already on courts around America – that rival what James shouldered when he arrived from high school in 2003. His plan for lugging that responsibility: “Whatever the team needs me to do, I’m willing to do it, because I feel people remember winners.” The selections immediately after Williamson were nearly as predictable, based on intelligence and mock drafts that solidified in the days before the Draft. Murry State guard Ja Morant was chosen by Memphis at No. 2, and Barrett’s ensuing selection by the Knicks delighted their always boisterous fans in the stands at Barclay. The order of the next four choices was jumbled from some predictions. Yet by the time the smoke cleared, sure enough, the seven players projected to come off the board soonest had slotted into the night’s top seven spots. That included Virginia forward De’andre Hunter to Atlanta at No. 4 (via the Lakers, in the aforementioned Davis trade that has yet to be completed), Vanderbilt point guard Darius Garland to Cleveland at No. 5, Texas Tech wing Jarrett Culver to Minnesota at No. 6 and North Carolina guard Coby White to Chicago at No. 7. Just because there wasn’t a lot of suspense at Barclays didn’t mean there was no intrigue. Much of that came from unusually heavy trade action – all technically unofficial – that had teams moving up, down and all around to snag picks, dump picks or clean up their salary-cap positions in anticipation of free agency that starts June 30. The timing of the Draft, relative to when the NBA’s new business year begins, had players donning caps of teams they’ll never play for, while speaking guardedly about those for whom they really were picked. A reported nine trades impacted draft decisions made in the first round alone. There even was a moment when Morant, in his post-Draft media session, gave a shout-out to veteran Grizzlies guard Mike Conley, whose spot he’ll presumably be taking once Conley’s trade to Utah officially goes through. But there’s no such uncertainty about Williamson, the through line of this year’s class, the true line in his heartfelt reactions Thursday (Friday, PHL time) and broad-shouldered hope of a Big Easy franchise in need. Williamson showed his grasp of the NBA’s and sports’ need for fresh icons, in effect accepting his status as a legend in waiting. “You know, times change,” he said. “That’s why there are so many debates about who people think the greatest players of all time are. If you were in the time of Wilt Chamberlain and Bill Russell, you’d probably say one of those two. If you were in the time of Jordan, you’d say Jordan. In our generation, a lot of them say LeBron. “So times changes and I think younger fans like younger players.” You don’t have to be young, though, to have your eye on Zion. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 21st, 2019

Jr. NBA PH completes NTC Roster with Metro Manila participants

Jr. NBA PH press release Nine boys and 20 girls topped the final Regional Selection Camp of Jr. NBA Philippines 2019 presented by Alaska held April 27-28 at the Don Bosco Technical Institute in Makati, which will also serve as the venue for the National Training Camp on May 17-19.  The young athletes, selected by Jr. NBA Coaches Rob Newson and Alaska’s Jeffrey Cariaso, Tony dela Cruz and Willie Miller, stood out from the 591 participants, exhibiting fundamental skills and core values of Sportsmanship, Teamwork, a positive Attitude and Respect (S.T.A.R.) throughout the two-day event.  They will join top players from the Regional Selection Camps in North Luzon (Benguet), South Luzon (Lucena), Visayas (Dumaguete) and Mindanao (Butuan) and a select group from the Alaska Power Camp and vie to be named as 2019 Jr. NBA Philippines All-Stars comprised of five boys and five girls. New this year, the Jr. NBA Philippines All-Stars will be sent to the first Jr. NBA Global Championship Asia Pacific Selection Camp, a week-long camp in June that includes top youth players from the Asia-Pacific region excluding China.  In addition, the Asia-Pacific regional competition will form a team of 10 boys and 10 girls that will represent the region at the Jr. NBA Global Championship on Aug. 6-11 at ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex at Walt Disney World near Orlando, Florida that will feature youth players from the United States, Canada, Latin America, Europe, the Middle East, China, Mexico, Africa, India and the Asia-Pacific. Jr. NBA Philippines 2019 is presented by Alaska, with AXA, Gatorade, Globe, Panasonic, Rexona and Vivo as official partners. ABS-CBN S+A, Basketball TV and NBA Premium TV are the official broadcasters of Jr. NBA Philippines. Participants can register for the Jr. NBA program online at www.jrnba.asia/philippines, and follow Jr. NBA on Facebook and the NBA at www.nba.com and on Facebook and Twitter. Fans can visit www.alaskamilk.com to learn more about Alaska Milk Corporation, and follow Alaska Milk on Facebook for more information about Alaska Sports. The following is a complete list of participants selected from the Jr. NBA Philippines Regional Selection Camp in Metro Manila advancing to the Jr. NBA Philippines National Training Camp:.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 29th, 2019

PSA to honor Diaz as 2016 Athlete of the Year

Behind her powerful arms and legs, a young petite lady gave Philippine sports a lift it badly needed in the year just passed. Weightlifter Hidilyn Diaz gave this country of 100 million people something to cheer about at the break of dawn one rainy day in August after copping an Olympic medal that was long overdue during the 2016 Rio De Janeiro Games. A combination of hard work, effort, heart, and sheer luck paved the way for the 25-year-old pride of Zamboanga City to run away with the silver in the women’s 53-kg weight division behind eventual winner Hsu Shu-Ching of Chinese Taipei. Diaz totaled a combined 200 kgs. in both the snatch and clean and jerk to the 212 of the Taiwanese bet. An Airwoman First Class at the Philippine Air Force, Diaz was only hoping for a bronze medal finish, but ended up a surprise runner up when fancied Li Yaiun of China – who earlier set an Olympic record in the snatch - failed to complete her final two attempts in the clean and jerk. “Sabi ko thank you Lord. Bronze lang ang hinihingi ko, pero silver ang ibinigay mo,” said Diaz moments after her triumph as the first-ever Filipina to win an Olympic medal. The Cinderella finish by Diaz was the first for the country in the last 20 years since boxer Mansueto ‘Onyok’ Velasco punched his way to a similar silver medal feat during the 1996 Atlanta Olympics. Hidilyn also became the first Filipino weightlifter to win an Olympic medal for the country and the only one to bag a silver outside of boxers Velasco and the late Anthony Villanueva (1964 Tokyo Games). In the light of her outstanding feats, the Philippine Sportswriters Association (PSA) was one and unanimous in naming Diaz its 2016 Athlete of the Year during its traditional Awards Night presented by MILO and San Miguel on Feb. 13 at the LE PAVILION in Pasay City. Diaz is the first lady to be feted by the country’s oldest media organization with its highest individual honor after boxer Josie Gabuco and the Team Manila women’s softball team in 2012. “This one is a no-brainer. Hidilyn Diaz is truly the hands-down choice as the 2016 PSA Athlete of the Year,” said PSA president Riera Mallari, sports editor of The Standard. Last year, pro boxers Nonito Donaire Jr. and Donnie Nietes, along with young golfer Miguel Tabuena were the recipient of the coveted award annually handed out by the PSA, comprised by editors and sportswriters from the different broadsheets, tabloids, and online portals in the country. Diaz, who came home empty handed during both the 2008 (Beijing) and 2012 (London) Olympics, respectively, leads a long list of personalities and entities to be recognized during the formal rite co-presented by CIGNAL/HYPHER TV. In the coming days and weeks, recipients of the President’s Award, Lifetime Achievement honor, Executive of the Year, National Sports Association of the Year, Mr. Basketball, Mr. Golf, Mr. Football, and Ms. Volleyball will also be named as part of the two-hour program backed by Smart, Foton, Mighty Sports, Philippine Basketball Association, ACCEL, Gold Toe, SM Prime Holdings Inc., Globalport, Rain or Shine, ICTSI, and MVPSF. There will also be major awardees in different sports and citations to various personalities and entities in the annual rite backed by the Philippine Sports Commission, Philippine Charity Sweepstakes Office, and Federal Land. Not to be missed out is the PSA’s recognition to young promising achievers such as the Tony Siddayao Awards and the Milo Male and Female Junior Athletes of the Year, as well as posthumous awards to those dearly departed friends of the local sportswriting community.   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 19th, 2017

Russian doping involved over 1,000 athletes

LONDON  — Russia's sports reputation was ripped apart again Friday when a new report into systematic doping detailed a vast "institutional conspiracy" that c.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 10th, 2016