Advertisements


Are we ready for the big earthquakes, landslides and tsunamis?

Our country is prone to natural calamities......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarFeb 12th, 2024

CAAP kicks off UN-backed airport program

The Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines has launched the Get Airports Ready for Disaster Program in coordination with the United Nations Development Program, DHL Group, and the in-country supporter Philippine Disaster Resilience Foundation. CAAP spokesperson Eric Apolonio said the GARD Program is a global public-private partnership aimed at supporting airports in planning for their role as logistical hubs in the event of natural disasters such as floods, earthquakes, fires, and landslides, as well as integrating the airport’s role in national emergency plans. The program, launched in 60 airports in 28 countries, includes training personnel in handling the influx of goods and people during calamities, assisting authorities in relief operations, and assessing the current state of the airports concerned. In the Philippines, the GARD Program was initially introduced in 2013 at Ninoy Aquino International Airport in Pasay City. The second and third workshops were held at Mactan-Cebu International Airport in 2014 and Clark International Airport in 2022. Apolonio added that CAAP is proud and grateful to have the Laguindingan Airport as the first CAAP airport to hold the workshop. CAAP has been coordinating with DHL on the workshop since 2016. “In the future, we hope that exercises such as GARD can be echoed at other CAAP-operated airports around the country as well,” said CAAP director general Manuel Antonio Tamayo. “We see the ever-growing importance of strengthening our airports’ resilience to disasters. Our airports serve as gateways crucial to the delivery of people, goods, and services, especially during emergencies and natural disasters,” he added. At least 20 participants from the different units of Laguindingan Airport and attached agencies participated in the three-day workshop, where they learned the methodologies of GARD, from finding solutions to bottlenecks in airport logistics during disasters to airport assessment and report writing. Established in 2009, GARD aims to echo the demand for airport preparedness and the response capacity of transportation hubs in the event of disasters. The post CAAP kicks off UN-backed airport program appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsJul 31st, 2023

Small tsunamis reach areas along Japan s Pacific coast: JMA

TOKYO, Dec. 3 (Xinhua) -- Small tsunamis were observed in areas along Japan's Pacific coast early Sunday after earthquakes struck waters off a southern Philippine island late Saturday night, Japan's weather agency said. A 40-centimeter tsunami was observed on Hachijo Island in the Izu chain near Tokyo at 4:27 a.m. local time, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) said. Coastal areas of Wakayama and Kochi.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsDec 4th, 2023

Small tsunamis reach areas along Japan s Pacific coast: JMA

TOKYO, Dec. 3 (Xinhua) -- Small tsunamis were observed in areas along Japan's Pacific coast early Sunday after earthquakes struck waters off a southern Philippine island late Saturday night, Japan's weather agency said. A 40-centimeter tsunami was observed on Hachijo Island in the Izu chain near Tokyo at 4:27 a.m. local time, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) said. Coastal areas of Wakayama and Kochi.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsDec 3rd, 2023

Bulusan acting up anew — Phivolcs

The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, or Phivolcs, on Monday warned of increased chances of steam-driven or phreatic eruptions occurring at the crater or summit of Bulusan Volcano in Sorsogon province. Phivolcs said it has recorded 87 volcanic earthquakes in the Bulusan Volcano Network since 5 a.m. on 14 October, of which 29 were volcano-tectonic earthquakes. The agency also observed weak to moderate degassing at the active summit crater and vents this week. Bulusan has emitted an average of 241 tons of volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas daily since 19 October. Phivolcs also noted an increase in volcanic carbon dioxide concentrations from June to August 2023, and an increase in volcanic spring temperatures since February. Phivolcs said these parameters indicate that hydrothermal activity driven by deep magma degassing may be occurring beneath the volcano and may lead to steam-driven eruptions at any of the summit vents. However, Bulusan remains under Alert Level 0 (normal) although Phivolcs reminded the public that increased chances of steam-driven or phreatic eruptions occurring at the crater or summit area are still expected. Phivolcs has warned the public against entering the four-kilometer-radius permanent danger zone, particularly near the vents on the south-southeastern slopes due to the possibility of sudden and hazardous steam-driven or phreatic eruptions, rockfalls and landslides. Flying close to the volcano’s summit should also be avoided as ash from a sudden phreatic eruption can be hazardous to aircraft. Phivolcs also warned people living in the valleys and along the river or stream channels to be vigilant against sediment-laden stream flows and lahar in the event of heavy and prolonged rainfall. The post Bulusan acting up anew — Phivolcs appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsOct 23rd, 2023

Hero within all of us doesn’t make the news

Often remembered only when their special day is marked, the nation's heroes deserve more than passing mention in a two to three-paragraph story either buried in the inside pages or turning up in a rehashed editorial or opinion piece. It's that time of the year again when many of us take a day – or a long weekend off – for beach bums or sun worshippers, or take the occasion to do our laundry, declutter closets, reunite with old friends or relatives, catch up with reading books you meant to curl up with on a rainy day, or the time when you give your pet dog a shampoo and a brisk rubdown. It is a day all wage-earners look forward to because it means extra holiday pay or a fatter paycheck. In short, except for their kin and descendants of their closest friends who attend obligatory rites at national shrines, we often take our heroes for granted, storing them temporarily in the dustbins of history, only to be resurrected at the next celebration of National Heroes Day or Araw ng Mga Bayani. Students recite their names by rote only to pass history or related subject tests, mouthing facts and figures without paying attention to their meaning or importance in the Philippine setting. Bonifacio, Rizal, Aguinaldo, Mabini, Antonio and Juan Luna, Gabriela and Diego Silang, Jose Abad Santos, Josefa Llanes-Escoda, Maria Orosa, Gen. Vicente Lim, and countless others. Youngsters often recall these personalities only because several streets, towns, and military camps have been named after them. When the award-winning film "Heneral Luna" was shown to capacity crowds with Apolinario Mabini, often called the "Brains of the Philippine Revolution" and the "Sublime Paralytic" playing a stellar role, many in the audience wondered aloud why he was always shown in a seating position. Parents who were fortunate enough to have been raised by families with more than textbook or quiz/trivia knowledge of the making of our history through the participation of these remarkable figures decry the fact that many of today's youth are more familiar with the eating or wardrobe preferences as well as the latest squeeze or amour of their favorite Korean or Hollywood idol than the roles played by Gabriela Silang, Antonio Luna, or Llanes-Escoda in the resistance against Spanish, American, and Japanese invaders. Some young people and even adults are known to sing all of their idols' top hits by heart at the drop of a hat. Still, they need to be made aware of the contributions of Nicanor Abelardo, Lucio San Pedro, and Sister Rosalina Abejo to the richness of Philippine music. Is this sad state of affairs a result of the failure of history and arts and culture classes in our school's curriculum, a lack of trained teachers to teach these courses, or simply growing disinterest in these subjects among our students? Have the heroes who are supposed to serve as role models or inspirations not only for the young but to the citizenry in general lost their luster or have faded glory? It would be a pity if such is the case, especially in these times when we need them most to rally behind a cause, symbolize or motivate advocacy, or provide us hope in a world tottering on the brink of war, facing disease, hunger, and the disastrous effects of climate change. While we should not forget those, who led us towards the path of independence from the harsh consequences of foreign rule that destroyed countless lives, bred insurrections, and almost obliterated our sense of pride and national identity, let us not forget those in our midst who continue to tread the less-traveled road and remain anonymous. In recent times, these are the modern-day heroes like the brave and persevering soldiers who man the worn out and ready-to-fall-apart BRP Sierra Madre entrenched on Philippine soil at Ayungin Shoal in the West Philippine Sea, despite continuing threats and harassment from the Chinese Coast Guard whose government insists the Shoal is theirs. A July 2016 Permanent Court of Arbitration ruling under the United Nations said, "China's nine-dash line claim over the disputed waters is invalid." From the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, first responders or front liners like doctors, nurses, and others in allied professions were acknowledged as the heroes of the day, alongside countless supporters who donated medical equipment and facilities and organizers of community pantries that provided a seemingly endless supply of food to those in need. They are our firefighters, police and military forces (despite a rotten few), peacemakers, teachers, and rescuers in mercy missions to save lives in areas hit by floods, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and other violent forces of nature. They may even be a neighbor who helps the homeless or vagrant by giving him not only food but odd jobs to keep them off the streets and away from the wretchedness of begging, a friend who has opened up her home to stray cats and dogs, a plant nursery owner who donates saplings and seeds so others can learn – and profit – from the joys of gardening. These community leaders have made a difference by initiating livelihood projects in their respective neighborhoods. It could even be you. Leading by example, you can teach others that settling tax obligations, obeying traffic rules, and paying it forward is all about being a good citizen. According to one wise man: "Heroes prove to us that no matter how much suffering there is in the world, there are supremely good people around whom we can count on to do the right thing even when most people are not prone to do so." The post Hero within all of us doesn’t make the news appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsAug 27th, 2023

Gov’t ready to respond to typhoon-hit communities — PBBM

President Ferdinand Marcos Jr. over the weekend assured the public of the government's preparedness to respond to communities that Typhoon "Goring" would hit. In a statement posted on his official Twitter account, Marcos said the government is monitoring the typhoon-stricken areas, particularly those situated in Northern Luzon. "Our government is focused on the situation in Northern Luzon which is once again experiencing heavy rain and wind brought by Typhoon #GoringPH," Marcos said. "More than 10,000 DSWD food packs have been prepositioned in the affected areas in the north and our disaster and response units are also on standby if evacuation and rescue operations are required," he added. Marcos said the government would ensure a sufficient supply of food and other non-food items until the typhoon exits the country. The Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) on Sunday issued a yellow warning for Cagayan and Isabela province on its 5:00 a.m. bulletin due to Super Typhoon Goring. This alert indicates the potential for flooding and landslides in regions susceptible to such events. The state weather bureau monitored the core of Super Typhoon Goring's eye near the coastal waters of Palanan, Isabela as of 4 a.m. Sunday. The typhoon possesses maximum sustained winds of 185 kilometers per hour (kph) around its core, accompanied by gusts reaching 230 kph. PAGASA noted the super typhoon to be gradually drifting in a south-southwest direction and could unleash potent typhoon-strength winds extending up to 260 kph from its core. The post Gov’t ready to respond to typhoon-hit communities — PBBM appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsAug 27th, 2023

Cagayan braces for ‘Goring’

BAGUIO CITY — The Cagayan Valley Regional Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council on Friday disclosed that the province is on red alert status amid the possible threat of typhoon “Goring.” The CVRDRRMC — through the Memorandum Order 86 series of 2023 — is solidifying preparations in anticipation of the effects of the new weather disturbance. Local DRRM offices were also directed to conduct heightened monitoring in their respective Areas of Responsibility and strictly implement the “no sailing, fishing and swimming” policy in their AORs. All Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Councils were directed to submit reposts of their preparedness measures and incident monitoring while those who are in the areas not directly affected or are not affected at all are also advised to organize Humanitarian Assistance at Disaster Response Teams ready to extend assistance to the people. Local chief executives in the region were also told to perform their mandate in times of calamities. LDRRMOs are also to conduct Pre-Disaster Risk Assessment or PDRA. State weather bureau PAGASA, meantime, said that Goring continues to intensify as it moves southwestward of the country while another cyclone has been monitored near the Philippine area of responsibility. In its latest weather bulletin, PAGASA said that “Goring” will affect Batanes, Babuyan Islands, and mainland Cagayan, Isabela and the northern portion of Aurora, and Ilocos provinces until Monday noon with forecast rainfall are generally higher in elevated or mountainous areas. It also warned that flooding and rain-induced landslides are possible, especially in areas that are highly or very highly susceptible to these hazards as identified in hazard maps and in localities that experienced considerable amounts of rainfall for the past several days. Meanwhile, the weather bureau said the Southwest Monsoon or habagat will be enhanced by “Goring” and bring occasional rains over the western portions of Central Luzon and Southern Luzon beginning tomorrow and over the western portion of Visayas beginning on Sunday. The post Cagayan braces for ‘Goring’ appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 25th, 2023

Hawaii fire death toll nears 100, and anger grows

The death toll in Hawaii from the deadliest US wildfire in more than a century ticked towards 100 Sunday, fueling criticism that government inaction contributed to the heavy loss of life. At least 96 people were confirmed to have died as of Sunday night, but officials warned the figure was likely to rise as recovery crews with cadaver dogs work their way through hundreds of homes and burned-out vehicles in Lahaina. The historic coastal town on the island of Maui was almost destroyed by the fast-moving inferno early Wednesday morning, with survivors saying there had been no warnings. When asked Sunday why none of the island's sirens had been activated, Hawaii Senator Mazie Hirono said she would wait for the results of an investigation announced by the state's attorney general. "I'm not going to make any excuses for this tragedy," Hirono, a Democrat, told CNN's "State of the Union." "We are really focused, as far as I'm concerned, on the need for rescue, and, sadly, the location of more bodies." More than 2,200 buildings were damaged or destroyed as the fire tore through Lahaina, according to official estimates, wreaking $5.5 billion in damage and leaving thousands homeless. "The remains we're finding are from a fire that melted metal," said Maui Police Chief John Pelletier. "When we pick up the remains... they fall apart." That was making identification difficult, he added, appealing for those with missing relatives to give DNA samples that might speed up the process. Pelletier said cadaver dogs still had a vast area to search in the hunt for what could still be hundreds of people who are unaccounted for. "We're going as fast as we can. But just so you know, three percent -- that's what's been searched with the dogs," he said. Questions over alert system  The wildfire is the deadliest in the United States since 1918, when 453 people died in Minnesota and Wisconsin, according to nonprofit research group the National Fire Protection Association. The death toll surpassed 2018's Camp Fire in California, which virtually wiped the small town of Paradise off the map and killed 86 people. Questions are being asked about how prepared authorities were for the catastrophe, despite the islands' exposure to natural hazards such as tsunamis, earthquakes and violent storms. In its emergency management plan last year, the State of Hawaii described the risk wildfires posed to people as being "low." Yet the layers of warning that are intended to buffer a citizenry if disaster strikes appear not to have operated. Maui suffered numerous power outages during the crisis, preventing many residents from receiving emergency alerts on their cell phones. No emergency sirens sounded and many Lahaina residents spoke of learning about the blaze from neighbors running down the street or seeing it for themselves. "The mountain behind us caught on fire and nobody told us jack," resident Vilma Reed, 63, told AFP. "You know when we found that there was a fire? When it was across the street from us." Reed, whose house was destroyed by the blaze, said she was dependent on handouts and the kindness of strangers, and was sleeping in a car with her daughter, grandson and two cats. The New York Times reported Sunday that firefighters sent to tackle the flames found some hydrants had run dry. "There was just no water in the hydrants," the paper quoted firefighter Keahi Ho as saying. Roadblocks The congregation of Grace Baptist Church, which was leveled in the blaze, gathered Sunday in a coffee shop in Kahului for two hours of solace. Pastor Arza Brown led the service in his sandals, the only shoes that survived the blaze that destroyed his house. But the trappings of ministry were far from his mind as he comforted fellow evacuees. "That's one thing about getting together today -- just to be with each other and encourage each other," he said. For some survivors, the difficult days after the tragedy were being worsened by what they see as official intransigence, with roadblocks preventing them from getting back to their homes. Maui police said the public would not be allowed into Lahaina while safety assessments and searches were ongoing -- even some of those who could prove they lived there. Maui's fires follow other extreme weather events in North America this summer, with record-breaking wildfires still burning across Canada and a major heat wave baking the US southwest. Europe and parts of Asia have also endured soaring temperatures, with major fires and floods wreaking havoc. Scientists say human-caused global warming is exacerbating natural hazards, making them both more likely and more deadly.   The post Hawaii fire death toll nears 100, and anger grows appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 14th, 2023

Bong Go provides support to flood victims in Davao City

  In an effort to bolster the country's disaster preparedness and response capabilities, Senator Christopher "Bong" Go has been advocating for two crucial bills in the Senate that he earlier filed: Senate Bill No. (SBN) 188, which seeks to establish the Department of Disaster Resilience (DDR), and SBN 193, mandating the establishment of mandatory evacuation centers nationwide. On Saturday, July 29, Go led two relief operations for thousands of flood victims in Barangays Lasang and Bunawan in Davao City. In his speech, Go said that the government should remain proactive in its approach in dealing with disaster-related situations, considering that the country is highly vulnerable to natural calamities. SBN 188 proposes the creation of the DDR, an independent government agency dedicated to strengthening the nation's resilience against the impacts of natural and human-induced disasters. The DDR aims to consolidate disaster-related functions and resources from different agencies under a single, unified body. By streamlining disaster response efforts, the department can facilitate quicker and more efficient aid delivery to affected communities during times of crisis. “Importante po ito sa akin. Unang-una, halimbawa dito po sa Barangay Lasang, binaha sila. Di ba ang barangay po ang nakikipag-coordinate kaagad with the LGUs. Ito pong barangay level na pagbaha, how about ‘yung mga national level, o municipal level o city level, o province-wide na pagbaha… maayos na koordinasyon ang kailangan,” he said. “Bago dumating ang bagyo, balita pa lang sa PAGASA, coordination kaagad ng Department of Disaster Resilience, kung mayroon tayong isang departamentong nakatutok para sa mga disaster related… bago dumating ang bagyo, coordination with LGUs. Ilikas ang mga kababayan natin sa ligtas na lugar, dalahin sa mga evacuation center. Preposition of goods by the DSWD,” Go added. “Kailangan koordinasyon kaagad ng departamento na i-involve kaagad ang mga ibang departamento na kasamahan niya. DSWD preposition of goods, mga Coast Guard, Navy para ilikas agad ang mga kababayan natin sa ligtas na lugar at maayos na evacuation center, sa Department of Health para malinis ang evacuation center, sanitation para ligtas ang mga kababayan natin. At pag-alis ng bagyo, hindi lang puro task force, dapat isang departamento na pwedeng mag-coordinate hanggang makabalik sa normal na pamumuhay ang lugar na tinamaan ng bagyo. Restoration of normalcy kaagad at rehabilitation effort,” he said. The Office of Civil Defense has recently voiced its support for the establishment of the DDR, emphasizing the importance of such institution in improving operations in managing and responding to future crises. "Things can be better if there will be an independent authority or department, but it’s not that simple – tanggap po namin iyon… We leave it to Congress and we leave it to the Palace, to Malacañang. Meanwhile, kami naman, we are doing our best given the limitations, makakaasa po kayo," OCD Administrator Ariel Nepomuceno said in a past interview. Alongside the establishment of DDR, Go champions SBN 193, which calls for the creation of mandatory evacuation centers across the Philippines. These evacuation centers are designed to be equipped with necessary facilities to provide temporary shelter and essential services to evacuees during disasters. The senator noted that these evacuation centers will be strategically placed in areas less prone to hazards, ensuring the safety and well-being of evacuees during disasters. Furthermore, the centers will be equipped with essential amenities such as food, clean water, medical services, sanitation facilities, and temporary sleeping quarters. Go cited that the Philippines, located in the Pacific Ring of Fire and the typhoon belt, is no stranger to the destructive forces of nature. “Yearly, the country faces the threat of typhoons, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, and other hazards. These disasters not only result in loss of lives and livelihoods but also impede economic progress and development,” shared Go. To minimize the devastating impact of disasters, Go underscored that comprehensive disaster resilience measures are imperative. The senator is confident that by supporting these priority bills, the Senate and the Filipino people can collectively work towards a safer, more resilient nation, where communities can recover swiftly and thrive even in the face of adversity. “Ang lugar natin nasa Pacific Ring of Fire tayo. Prone tayo sa mga bagyo, prone tayo sa pagputok ng bulkan, prone tayo sa sunog, ‘di ba? So dapat po ay magkaroon na tayo ng isang maayos na departamento, Department of Disaster Resilience at Mandatory Evacuation Center sa mga syudad, munisipyo, at probinsya para hindi magamit ang mga eskwelahan tuwing may mga sunog, baha. Nagagamit po ang eskwelahan, naantala ang pag-aaral ng mga bata dahil ginagamit po as evacuation center,” he said. Together with Councilors Dante Apostol, Marissa Abella, Diosdado Mahipus, and Al Ryan Alejandre, Go provided grocery packs, masks, vitamins, and snacks to 4,399 flood victims. The senator also extended shoes, mobile phones, bicycles, watches, and balls for basketball and volleyball to select recipients. Meanwhile, Go, chairperson of the Senate Committee on Health, urged those who have health issues to seek assistance from the Malasakit Center at the Southern Philippines Medical Center (SPMC) in Davao City. The Malasakit Centers Act of 2019, which Go principally authored and sponsored, brings together various government agencies, including the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), the Department of Health (DHOH), the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PHIC), and the Philippine Charity Sweepstakes Office (PCSO), under one roof to provide a convenient process for availing medical assistance particularly for poor and indigent patients in public hospitals. There are now 158 Malasakit Centers nationwide which have assisted more than seven million Filipinos, according to DOH data. In SPMC alone, the Malasakit Center there has assisted more than 200,000 patients. On the same day, Go attended the ribbon-cutting of the multipurpose building in Brgy. Lasang and road concretion with drainage canal construction in Brgy. Bunawan, two infrastructure projects he supported the funding of as vice chairperson of the Senate Committee on Finance. He likewise supported the acquisition of multi-purpose vehicles for the community, construction of various multipurpose buildings and local roads, rehabilitation of water systems, drainage systems and flood control structures in different barangays throughout the city, the construction of a 300-bed capacity infectious diseases building for SPMC and the acquisition of ambulances, among others. ### The post Bong Go provides support to flood victims in Davao City appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 31st, 2023

In the wake of ‘Egay’

Like a little tin roof against a strong gust of wind, our notions of preparedness in times of calamity are often blown away for various reasons. When “Yolanda” (Haiyan) caused so much destruction in 2013, they said it was because nobody really knew what a storm surge was. Meanwhile, Typhoon “Odette” (Rai) in 2021, packing winds of up to 260 kilometers per hour, flattened Siargao. It was later described as the “strongest storm to hit Mindanao in 10 years.” Prone as we are to cyclones, is it fair to say it is still ill-preparedness that worsens the damage and loss during typhoons? July being National Disaster Resilience Month, we may as well examine where we are in the realm of disaster preparedness and rehabilitation. “Yolanda’s” wrath caused the death of 6,300 and damage of about P101 billion, sources say. The government “had to spend some P559.86 billion for rehabilitation and recovery.” “Odette” meanwhile, took the lives of over 400 people and did damage worth P51.8 billion. It was the 15th storm to hit the country that year. At one time or another, parts of the calamity-prone Philippines get hit and suffer damage that takes billions of pesos and a long time to reverse. In the a ftermath, we identify areas for disaster preparedness that may yet be improved. And what came out after the most recent typhoon slammed into the northern Philippines? Super Typhoon “Egay” (Doksuri) hit provinces “with ferocious wind and rain, displacing nearly 16,000 villagers,” reports said. As usual, floods rose and electric posts fell, causing power outages. And, as usual, too, the aid came to the affected families, as temporary as the rains that soaked them and the winds that blew away their homes and livelihood. There are always funds for calamities, after all, and for “Egay,” this was more than P173 million. MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute), a “pioneer in scholarly, open access publishing” based in Basel, Switzerland, defines disaster preparedness as “a set of steps taken to guarantee that the resources needed for a successful response are accessible before a disaster happens or that the resources can be accessed quickly when disaster strikes.” The response, for the most part, is the most obvious sign of improvement. Where it took hours for rescue teams to arrive due to logistical nightmares in decades past, now our teams are ready and able to save more lives. Evacuations are often done in advance following prior warnings from the agencies concerned for local governments to mobilize. What is unfortunate about super typhoons hitting agricultural areas is that farms and crops take months to recover from the extensive damage. The power supply is another matter that, when cut off because of storms, worsens the situation for victims of calamities in affected areas, sometimes for days. Why do we have electric posts all over the country that only get toppled by strong winds barreling in the months of July to September? Impassable roads and bridges, too, cause delays and inconvenience in places razed by typhoons. Public Works and Highways can only manage infrastructure issues, but when it comes to soil erosion that causes landslides, for example, or shrinking mangroves that would have protected coastal towns from floods – well, that is Environment and Natural Resources. Government can keep creating agencies and bodies to handle risk reduction and disaster management, but in the end, what will save more people and lessen the overall impact of harsh calamities is a concerted effort from all sectors, all departments, and agencies, performing their duties consistently even before disasters come rolling in. Sometimes strong winds cannot uproot stronger roots. The post In the wake of ‘Egay’ appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsJul 27th, 2023

Mayon ‘slow’ lava flow continues — PHIVOLCS

Mayon Volcano's slow lava effusion continues along its three gullies that run down the volcano's slopes, the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) said on Sunday. In its latest advisory, PHIVOLCS said that lava flows in the Mi-isi and Basud gullies on Mayon's southern and eastern flanks have reportedly maintained distal lengths of roughly 2.8 kilometers (km) and 600 meters, respectively, over the past 24 hours. PHIVOLCS added that the lava flow on Basud gully, on the southeast face of Mayon Volcano, had grown from 2.7 kilometers to 2.8 kilometers, as of Sunday. PHIVOLCS further said that rockfall and pyroclastic density currents (PDCs), which were caused by the collapse of the lava flow edges and the summit dome, were still depositing debris within four kilometers of the crater. "In total, five LFVQs (low-frequency volcanic quakes), four PDCs, and 158 rockfall events were recorded by the Mayon Volcano Network," it said. PHIVOLCS added that the number of earthquakes and rock falls at Mayon Volcano has gone down, but the amount of sulfur dioxide it is emitting has increased. Mayon's sulfur dioxide output increased from 1,758 metric tons on 21 July to 2,047 tons on 22 July, with plumes that are 400 meters tall and moving in a southwest direction. PHIVOLCS told the people who live near Mayon Volcano, which has been on Alert Level since 8 June, that rockfalls, landslides, avalanches, ballistic fragments, lava flows, and moderate-sized explosions could happen. The National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council said on 23 July that Mayon's unrest had already touched 38,389 people and forced 20,227 people from 26 barangays in the Bicol Region to leave their homes. The post Mayon ‘slow’ lava flow continues — PHIVOLCS appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 23rd, 2023

NHA ground breaks housing for Cotabato quake victims

National Housing Authority General Manager Joeben Tai led the groundbreaking and capsule-laying ceremonies at a project site for earthquake victims in Makilala, Cotabato last Thursday, 13 July. Tai said the project is under the NHA’s Housing Assistance Program for Calamity Victims which is aimed to respond to the housing needs of families affected by calamities like earthquakes, floods, fires, landslides, and typhoons. A total of 1,329 families whose homes were destroyed by a series of 6.1 to 6.9-magnitude earthquakes in Cotabato in the last quarter of 2019 benefitted from the project. The family beneficiaries come from nine barangays of Makilala, namely, Bato, Buenavida, Buhay, Cabilao, Indangan, Luayon, Malabuan, Malasila, and Sto. Niño. Tai shared his sentiments on how devastating it is to be a victim of disasters as it leads to loss of homes, property, communities, and even loved ones. Assuring that the structures built by the NHA are of quality and can withstand up to 7-magnitude earthquakes, Tai further added that under his leadership, “the NHA will continue to partner with other government agencies and the private sector to fulfill the agency’s mandate to provide quality homes and progressive communities for low-income and marginalized Filipino families.” Joining Tai in the ceremonies were NHA Region XII Manager Engr. Zenaida M. Cabiles, Cotabato 2nd District Representative Rudy S. Caoagdan, Cotabato Governor Emmylou “Lala” Taliño-Mendoza, Makilala Mayor Armando M. Quibod and Vice Mayor Ryan D. Tabanay; Office of Civil Defense Region XII Director Raylindo S. Aniñon, Opusland Inc. President Ramon “Shintaro” Valdez, and Department of Human Settlements and Urban Development Region XII Officer-in-Charge Engr. Gifaril Martinez-Cabalquinto. The post NHA ground breaks housing for Cotabato quake victims appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsJul 15th, 2023

NHA ground breaks housing for Cotabato quake victims

National Housing Authority General Manager Joeben Tai led the groundbreaking and capsule-laying ceremonies at a project site for earthquake victims in Makilala, Cotabato on 13 July 2023. Tai said the project is under the NHA's Housing Assistance Program for Calamity Victims, which is aimed to respond to the housing needs of families affected by calamities like earthquakes, floods, fires, landslides, and typhoons. A total of 1,329 families whose homes were destroyed by a series of 6.1- to 6.9-magnitude earthquakes in Cotabato in the last quarter of 2019 benefitted from the project. The family beneficiaries come from nine barangays of Makilala, namely, Bato, Buenavida, Buhay, Cabilao, Indangan, Luayon, Malabuan, Malasila, and Sto. Niño. Tai shared his sentiments on how devastating it is to be a victim of disasters as it leads to the loss of homes, property, communities, and even loved ones. Assuring that the structures built by the NHA are of quality and can withstand up to 7-magnitude earthquakes, Tai said that under his leadership, “the NHA will continue to partner with other government agencies and the private sector to fulfill the agency’s mandate to provide quality homes and progressive communities for low-income and marginalized Filipino families.” Joining Tai in the ceremonies were NHA Region XII Manager Engr. Zenaida M. Cabiles, Cotabato 2nd District Representative Rudy S. Caoagdan, Cotabato Governor Emmylou “Lala” Taliño-Mendoza, Makilala Mayor Armando M. Quibod, and Vice Mayor Ryan D. Tabanay; Office of Civil Defense Region XII Director Raylindo S. Aniñon, Opusland Inc. President Ramon "Shintaro" Valdez, and Department of Human Settlements and Urban Development Region XII officer-in-charge Engr. Gifaril Martinez-Cabalquinto. The post NHA ground breaks housing for Cotabato quake victims appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 15th, 2023

Mayon tremors continue

Mayon Volcano in Albay continues to experience elevated seismic activity a month after being placed under Alert Level 3 due to significant unrest. The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology said in its latest Mayon report on Sunday that it recorded 26 volcanic earthquakes and 303 instances of rockfall within the past 24 hours Phivolcs also recorded three dome-collapse pyroclastic density current or PDC events and one lava front collapse PDC event. Additionally, there has been a “very slow” lava flow with a length of 2.8 kilometers along             Mi-isi Gully and 1.3 kilometers along Bonga Gully. The lava flows in Basud Gully have also maintained their respective lengths of 3.3 kilometers and 4 kilometers. Phivolcs also noted an increase in the volcano’s daily sulfur dioxide emissions from 792 tons on 8 July to 1,145 tons on 9 July. The emissions produced plumes that reached a height of 1,000 meters and drifted towards the west-southwest. Residents near the volcano were alerted to the potential occurrence of rockfalls, landslides, avalanches, ballistic fragments, lava flows, and moderate-sized explosions, among other hazards, due to Mayon’s unrest. Around 50 families still living within the six-kilometer permanent danger zone of Mayon were relocated due to ongoing unrest, according to the Department of Social Welfare and Development.   The post Mayon tremors continue appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsJul 9th, 2023

Mayon unrest continues: volcanic quakes, rockfall incidents recorded

Mayon Volcano in Albay continues to experience elevated seismic activity a month after being placed under Alert Level 3 due to significant unrest. The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) said in its latest report on Sunday that Mayon experienced 26 volcanic earthquakes and 303 instances of rockfall within the past 24 hours PHIVOLCS added that the volcano had encountered three dome collapse pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) and one lava front collapse PDC. Additionally, there has been a "very slow" lava flow with a length of 2.8 kilometers along Mi-isi Gully and 1.3 kilometers along Bonga Gully. The lava flows in Basud Gully have also maintained their respective lengths of 3.3 kilometers and 4 kilometers. PHIVOLCS also noted an increase in the volcano's daily sulfur dioxide emissions from 792 tons on 8 July to 1,145 tons the next day. The emissions produced plumes that reached a height of 1,000 meters and drifted toward the west-southwest. The residents were alerted to the potential occurrence of rockfalls, landslides, avalanches, ballistic fragments, lava flows, and moderate-sized explosions, among other hazards, due to Mayon's unrest. With that, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) reported that approximately 50 families still living within the six-kilometer permanent danger zone (PDZ) of Mayon Volcano were relocated due to ongoing unrest. The DSWD's Bicol field office's Disaster Response Management Division discovered the families in Barangay Anoling, known for being geographically isolated within Camalig town in Albay. The DSWD added that the evacuated families would be provided temporary shelter at Baligang Elementary School. The forced evacuation was carried out in collaboration with the Camalig Municipal Police Station, Municipal Social Welfare and Development Office, and Municipal Disaster Response and Management Office of the local government unit in Camalig. The post Mayon unrest continues: volcanic quakes, rockfall incidents recorded appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 9th, 2023

How disaster-resilient are we?

News stories with accompanying photographs again flood the usual outlets of radio, television, print, and now, even social media, showing school children busy with their lessons while gathered under the shade of towering trees, tents, gymnasiums or basketball courts, crowded corridors of government buildings, even chapels. In previous seasons, the students were displaced from their schools by earthquakes or typhoons. Today, they are refugees fleeing from the lava flow and deadly fumes from a volcano, acting up with signs of worsening disaster ahead. Their schoolrooms have been taken over by entire communities whose residents have left their homes along the fringes of Mayon, the country’s most active volcano, because there is nowhere else to park their hastily-packed belongings and no space to sleep, eat and get on with their lives. President Ferdinand Marcos Jr., who visited the evacuation sites in Albay province, agreed with local officials that the situation could last longer than expected or at least three months before they could return to their homes. A news report said more than 17,000 students in five Albay towns were affected by the transfer, and more evacuees were distributed to about 20 emergency shelters. “We have to find ways to ensure the learning continuity,” a teacher told a news reporter, adding that learning modules used at the height of the Covid-19 pandemic were again being used. Still, one problem was tracking down the dispersed students. Because of its geography, the Philippines is one of the world’s most vulnerable countries, hosting natural hazards like typhoons (20 to 21 hitting the country a year), floods, earthquakes, storm surges, landslides and volcanic eruptions. There are 24 active volcanoes in the Philippines and more than 1,500 on Earth, which are in Indonesia, Japan, Mexico, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Ecuador, Italy, El Salvador and Kenya, are at higher risk of volcanic eruptions. As of 15 June 2023, 24 active volcanos have been recorded as erupting worldwide. Considering the statistics in the Philippines, how disaster-resilient are we? Local government units or LGUs on the frontline of building resilient communities want financial aid and technical skills in dealing with disaster risk reduction and resilience-building measures. Several Internet apps on early warning systems can enable local officials to develop real-time analyses and adopt swift solutions as part of disaster preparedness and mitigation efforts. The LGUs’ crucial role in this effort should cascade to their respective communities through early warning systems. Also, due recognition should be given to their powers, authority, and corresponding responsibilities to lessen the adverse effects of calamities descending on their shoes, especially in places with no previous history of disasters. But then again, the question of financial capability comes into play because no local governments are equal in the budget, with bigger LGUs getting a bigger slice of the pie from local revenues than the smaller ones. Observers have cited areas of concern: insufficient data and contingency funds of LGUs, lack of adequate disaster risk reduction skills among political leaders, and not enough planning and contingency measures on the part of school authorities on how to deal with problems arising from the use of their grounds and facilities as evacuation sites. The Philippines, however, is not alone in this regard. In the highly-developed United States, for example, it has been observed that not all state officials “have a game plan for local emergency management that encompasses pre-disaster resilience and long-term rebuilding and recovery. Most solely have a short-term emergency response strategy.” Still, it is never too late to catch up, even if this will require spending more on preventive measures like investing in equipment warning residents of impending disasters, anticipating the problems of evacuees by building safer and more permanent shelters instead of displacing school children from their classrooms, extending safety zones and relocating homes away from risk areas, and planning recovery steps once the disaster blows over. We can no longer afford to sit back and wait for the point of no return, acting only when calamity strikes. Being prepared can save thousands of lives, homes and livelihoods. The post How disaster-resilient are we? appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 18th, 2023

Mayon continues intensified unrest – Phivolcs

The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs) recorded one volcanic earthquake and 177 rockfalls on Mayon Volcano, the agency said on Sunday. Based on its 8 a.m. report, Phivolcs said that Mayon Volcano continues to have "intensified unrest or magmatic unrest" within the last 24 hours after it recorded volcanic earthquakes and rockfalls. Mayon also sent out amounts of plumes that moved in an easterly direction, releasing 1,205 tonnes of sulphur dioxide as of Saturday. The volcano in Albay still had a fair crater glow that could be seen with the human eye, even though its structure had grown. In a radio interview on Sunday, Mayon Volcano Observatory's resident volcanologist Dr. Paul Alanis said that Mayon's current behavior may continue for a few more days based on the volcano's previous behaviors. "The lava will flow easily as a new lava dome emerged. This could be the new phase of the Mayon Volcano eruption," Alanis said. Phivolcs issued a warning to residents in the area about potential hazards such as rockfalls, landslides, avalanches, ballistic fragments, lava flows, lava fountaining, pyroclastic density currents, moderate-sized explosions, and lahars during periods of heavy and prolonged rainfall. The agency also reminded the public that they can't go into the six-kilometer radius of the Mayon Volcano's Permanent Danger Zone and prohibited everyone to fly any aircraft close to the area. The post Mayon continues intensified unrest – Phivolcs appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsJun 11th, 2023

Alert Level 4 in Mayon Volcano possible—Phivolcs

The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology or Phivolcs is not ruling out the possibility of raising Mayon Volcano’s status to the alert level 4 category amid its increasing “magmatic unrest” on the summit dome. In an interview, Phivolcs officer-in-charge Director Teresito Bacolcol said the danger zone in the sector—where the crater rim is low—will also be expanded to eight kilometers or more once the alert level has been further raised. Bacolcol said they are monitoring two scenarios that may happen in Mayon, including the 2014 eruption and the 2018 explosion. “The 2018 scenario [is] the rockfall events progress into a magmatic eruption which ah would include which included lava flows fountaining or 2014 scenario may also happen which is the rockfall activity progress into a very slow rate dome exclusion then followed by a short lava flow so we are hoping for the second scenario,” he explained. Phivolcs has logged 199 rockfall events and six pyroclastic density currents. The crater glows in the volcano and is monitored but can’t be seen by the naked eye with its edifice currently inflated. Mayon also spewed 332 tonnes of sulfur dioxide and emitted 800 meters tall of volcanic plume drifting south of the province. From Alert Level 2 (increasing unrest), the Phivolcs raised Mayon’s status to Level 3 (increased tendency towards hazardous eruption) on Thursday, following a continuous increase in its rockfall events. Mayon’s Level 3 category means it is exhibiting magmatic eruption of a summit lava dome, with increased chances of lava flow and hazardous pyroclastic density currents, affecting the upper to middle slopes of the volcano and of potential explosive activity within weeks or even days. Entering to six-kilometer radius Permanent Danger Zone and flying aircraft close to the volcano remained prohibited as rockfalls, landslides or avalanches, ballistic fragments, lava flows and lava fountaining, pyroclastic density currents, and moderate-sized explosions could be very dangerous. If raised to alert level 4 category, Mayon may pose hazardous eruptions, with intense unrest and persistent tremor and many low frequency-type earthquakes are possible. While SO2 emission levels may show a sustained increase or abrupt decrease. Level 4 category in Mayon likewise indicates intense crater glow, incandescent lava dome, lava fountain, and lava flow in the summit area. Mayon Volcano has erupted more than 50 times since 1616, with the most destructive eruption recorded in 1814, when the town of Cagsawa was buried killing 1,200 people. Its eruption in 1993 caused 79 deaths, while subsequent eruptions in 2000, 2006, 2009, 2014, and 2018 forced tens of thousands of residents in nearby villages to evacuate. In December 2006, rains from powerful Typhoon Durian caused mudslides and floods at the foot of the volcano that killed more than 1,000 people. In 2014, a new lava dome growth of 30 to 50 meters height was observed in Mayon but there was no crater glow. In 2018, the Mayon status was raised to Alert Level 4 after it exhibited a five-kilometer tall phreatomagmatic eruption that lasted 8 minutes and logged explosion-type earthquakes corresponding to the vertical column eruptions, 15 tremor events, some corresponding to lava fountaining episodes, 35 rockfall events and two pyroclastic density currents or PDCs from lava collapse. This event has affected more than 54,000 people of Albay and displaced 1,300 families or 5,016 individuals residents nearby the volcano. Bacolcol said Mayon’s eruption interval is usually three to 10 years with the most recent being five years ago, in 2018. He said the Mayon’s unrest as of this time is “shaping up to be similar to the 2018 event.” Nonetheless, he hopes that the Mayon’s imminent eruption will change course. “We’re hoping it would be a 2014-like event,” he said. The post Alert Level 4 in Mayon Volcano possible—Phivolcs appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 10th, 2023

‘Prepare, coordinate, cooperate, save lives’ — Go tells frontline agencies

Senator Christopher ”Bong” Go, on Friday, 26 May, emphasized the importance of government preparedness and citizen awareness as Super Typhoon Betty entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility. With the potential for heavy rainfall and flooding, Go, during an ambush interview after attending the groundbreaking for the Super Health Center in Libertad, Misamis Oriental, called on the national government to coordinate with local government units to ensure the safety and well-being of affected communities.. “Nakikiusap po ako sa national government, sa DSWD (Department of Social Welfare and Development), preposition of goods kaagad at coordination with LGUs,” he added. Go stressed the significance of effective coordination with LGUs, saying, “Napakaimportante po ng coordination with LGUs dahil sila po ang nakakaalam kung saan dapat ilikas, saan 'yung safe na lugar, saan dapat 'yung evacuation center.” He also emphasized the need for the national government to be on top of the situation to guide citizens needing assistance. The senator also urged citizens not to be complacent and to adhere to government advisories. “Sa ngayon pa lang, huwag tayong magpakakumpiyansa. Habang papasok pa lang, may panahon po tayo na mag-prepare,” said Go. “Sumunod tayo sa paalala ng gobyerno. Sundin natin kung kailangan na lumikas. Umalis na sa mababang lugar, 'yung mga prone sa flooding dahil delikado 'yan,” he urged. The senator urged citizens to stay informed through reliable information sources and to heed the guidance of local officials and authorities.  Go also stressed the necessity of LGUs having ready relief supplies, search and rescue teams, and appropriate equipment, including personnel trained in emergency response. The typhoon’s passing may result in significant rainfall, potentially causing flash floods and landslides, according to the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, and Astronomical Services Administration. The projected path of the storm indicates that it will be approximately 250 kilometers away from Batanes and the Babuyan Islands within the weekend. During the interview, Go also took the opportunity to push for his advocacy for the establishment of a Department of Disaster Resilience.  “Yun po ang aking pinapangarap at hindi po ako titigil na isulong po ito. Sana po ay maging batas ito someday, itong Department of Disaster Resilience,” he said. Go emphasized the necessity of more proactive measures when dealing with natural calamities, reiterating his long-standing appeal for the establishment of the DDR through his proposed Senate Bill No. 188, a cabinet-level department dedicated to disaster response and mitigation efforts. “Hindi 'yung panay task force, task force ng pangalan ng typhoon. Eh ang problema n'yan kapag bagong administrasyon, mawawala na naman po ang task force. Kaya dapat Cabinet level para tuluy-tuloy po ang rehabilitasyon at makabalik sa normal ang apektadong mga komunidad,” concluded Go. The post ‘Prepare, coordinate, cooperate, save lives’ — Go tells frontline agencies appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 27th, 2023

How ready are we to manage disasters?

A recent report from the World Meteorological Organization warned that global temperatures are expected to rise to record levels in the next five years, triggered by greenhouse gases and the recurring El Niño. With the current hot weather already a bane to many, and occasional thundershowers offering temporary relief, the scenario in the not-too-distant future looms as a threat more than a warning, as the chances of having the hottest days on record within five years appear to be a dead certain reality. “A warming El Niño is expected to develop in the coming months, and this will combine with human-induced climate change to push global temperatures into uncharted territory,” said WMO Secretary-General Pro. Peterri Taalas. “This will have far-reaching repercussions for health, food security, water management, and the environment. We need to be prepared.” Despite the grim announcement, Taalas offers a ray of hope. We still have time to prevent the inevitable from happening; he provides to soothe doomsayers. This is not an impossible situation and is not irreversible, he adds. Strengthening weather and climate services to protect people from extreme weather conditions and new greenhouse gas monitoring will be on top of the agenda of matters to be discussed during the forthcoming WMO Conference scheduled from 22 May to 2 June. For our part, how ready are we to handle disasters of this sort? Are we equipped to face or institute disaster-reduction/mitigation efforts? There has been a lot of discussion on making a paradigm shift from reactive to proactive in the matter of responding to disasters, including floods, earthquakes, and droughts, among others. The government and the private sector have stressed that responses should be immediate and efficient, and emergency relief immediately followed by the rebuilding of destroyed houses or infrastructure or rehabilitation and livelihoods restored to the affected victims. The World Conference on Disaster Reduction mapped out a framework from 2005-2015 that adopted “five priorities for action: 1. Ensure that disaster risk reduction is a national and local priority with a strong institutional basis for implementation; 2. Identify, assess and monitor disaster risks and enhance early warning; 3. Use knowledge, innovation, and education to build a culture of safety and resilience at all levels; 4. Reduce the underlying risk factors; and 5. Strengthen disaster preparedness for effective response at all levels.” Considering that the Philippines ranks first in the world regarding risks associated with natural disasters and is “host” to an average of 20 typhoons annually, six of which are destructive according to a World Risk Index report, have we used these recommendations? Only a few years ago, five Northern Luzon town mayors were facing charges in the Office of the Ombudsman after they were found missing from their posts as Typhoon Ompong ravaged most parts of the islands, causing deaths and destruction in the aftermath. Many victims of past calamities continue to live in makeshift dwellings as they cannot rebuild their homes far from their workplaces and schools for their children. There is a never-ending line of displaced people seeking food or ayuda and a mad scramble for the same caused by disorderly or ill-maintained distribution systems. Donations are being ripped off and do not go to the intended beneficiaries. Instead of being disaster-prepared, we react as if these calamities are happening for the first time. In contrast, look at how neighboring Bangladesh, another developing nation in 6th place on the Global Risk Index, deals with the catastrophes that come their way. Its government has boosted community-focused risk reduction efforts, decentralized disaster management, developed partnerships, and enhanced community resilience by working together to reduce their vulnerability to the elements and participating in risk-reduction activities. Our local government executives should look up to their Bangladesh counterparts and learn a thing or two, reviewing their original mandates and responsibilities to their constituents. Old systems that did not work must be discarded or restructured according to the needs of the times. And the time to act is now before it’s too late. The post How ready are we to manage disasters? appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsMay 21st, 2023