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Adebayo takes charge as Heat stun Celtics

Bam Adebayo led a fourth-quarter fightback as the Miami Heat shrugged off an injury to Jimmy Butler to edge past the pace-setting Boston Celtics, 98-95......»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarJan 25th, 2023

Underdog Nuggets stun Clippers in game seven, Heat edge Celtics opener

Jamal Murray scored a game high 40 points and Nikola Jokic had a triple double as the Denver Nuggets stunned the Los Angeles Clippers 104-89 in game seven to reach their first Western Conference finals in 11 years......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 16th, 2020

Ukraine promises shelters for its people as harsh winter looms

Special 'invincibility centers' will be set up around Ukraine to provide electricity, heat, water, internet, mobile phone connections and a pharmacy, free of charge and around the clock, President Volodymyr Zelenskiy says.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 23rd, 2022

Malixi tops ICTSI Riviera; Concepcion regains lead

Rianne Malixi blew a three-stroke lead in the heat and wind but rebounded with a solid backside charge to foil Kim Seoyun with yet another 73 and claim the ICTSI Riviera Championship here yesterday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 7th, 2022

Ikeda takes command with eagle-spiked 70 in ICTSI Sherwood Ladies golf tiff

hihiro Ikeda took charge in a topsy-turvy opener of the ICTSI Sherwood Ladies Challenge, banking on a late eagle on her way to a two-under 70 and a two-stroke lead over Gretchen Villacencio and Chanelle Avaricio......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 7th, 2021

George takes charge as Leonard-less Clippers down Jazz for 3-2 lead

George’s performance was enough to lead the Clippers, who missed the services of Kawhi Leonard due to a knee injury......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJun 17th, 2021

Fifty for Tatum as Celtics stun Wizards, Pacers sting Hornets

Jayson Tatum erupted for 50 points as the Boston Celtics booked their place in the playoffs on Tuesday with a 118-100 win over the Washington Wizards as the NBA's play-in tournament got under way......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsMay 19th, 2021

Adebayo s step-back jumper at buzzer propels Heat to win over Nets

Bam Adebayo hit a thrilling game-winner at the buzzer to lift the Miami Heat to a 109-107 victory over the Brooklyn Nets, who lost superstar Kevin Durant to another injury......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 19th, 2021

Wilson takes charge as San Juan evens MPBL finals vs Davao Occidental

Defending champion San Juan got back on rival Davao Occidental, 70-65, to even their MPBL-Chooks-to-Go Lakan Season national finals series......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 18th, 2021

Davao Occidental rallies to stun San Juan, takes Game 1 of MPBL finals

Davao Occidental capped off a spirited comeback against defending champion San Juan, 77-75,  to steal Game One of the Maharlika Pilipinas Basketball League-Chooks-to-Go Lakan Season national finals......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 17th, 2021

Green takes charge as Ignite goes 4-0 in NBA G League

Filipino-American Jalen Green provided the spark Ignite needed to remain undefeated as they won over the Iowa Wolves, 97-90, at the NBA G League bubble in Orlando, Florida......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 16th, 2021

Trail Blazers stun Sixers again; Heat win

Los Angeles---Damian Lillard drained a pair of crucial late free throws and Robert Covington made a clutch defensive play with three seconds left as the Portland Trail Blazers beat the Eastern Conference-leading Philadelphia 76ers 118-114 on Thursday......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsFeb 12th, 2021

Lowly Pistons stun Nets; Heat outlast Knicks

In only their sixth win of the season, the Pistons took a virtually wire-to-wire victory over the Nets where they led by as much as 18 points early in the second period, 49-31......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 10th, 2021

NBA’s Celtics-Heat game postponed as COVID measures deplete Heat

NEW YORK  – The NBA game between the Boston Celtics and Miami Heat was postponed on Sunday as Covid-19 related safety protocols left the Heat with too few players available. “Because of ongoing contact tracing with the Heat, the team does not have the league-required eight available players to proceed with tonight’s game against the […] The post NBA’s Celtics-Heat game postponed as COVID measures deplete Heat appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 11th, 2021

Heat masugid kay Giannis

ITINALI raw ng Heat si Bam Adebayo sa max contract extension na five-year, $163 million. The post Heat masugid kay Giannis first appeared on Abante......»»

Category: newsSource:  abanteRelated NewsNov 26th, 2020

Rates takes charge with 69 in PGT restart

The Philippine Golf Tour kicked off its restart in new normal fittingly with an odd result — pint-sized Joenard Rates upstaging a slew of big names to seize control......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 17th, 2020

Coaching great John Thompson of Georgetown dead at 78

By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — John Thompson, the imposing Hall of Famer who turned Georgetown into a “Hoya Paranoia” powerhouse and became the first Black coach to lead a team to the NCAA men’s basketball championship, has died. He was 78 His death was announced in a family statement released by Georgetown on Monday. No details were disclosed. “Our father was an inspiration to many and devoted his life to developing young people not simply on but, most importantly, off the basketball court. He is revered as a historic shepherd of the sport, dedicated to the welfare of his community above all else,” the statement said. “However, for us, his greatest legacy remains as a father, grandfather, uncle, and friend. More than a coach, he was our foundation. More than a legend, he was the voice in our ear everyday.” One of the most celebrated and polarizing figures in his sport, Thompson took over a moribund Georgetown program in the 1970s and molded it in his unique style into a perennial contender, culminating with a national championship team anchored by center Patrick Ewing in 1984. Georgetown reached two other title games with Thompson in charge and Ewing patrolling the paint, losing to Michael Jordan’s North Carolina team in 1982 and to Villanova in 1985. At 6-foot-10, with an ever-present white towel slung over his shoulder, Thompson literally and figuratively towered over the Hoyas for decades, becoming a patriarch of sorts after he quit coaching in 1999. One of his sons, John Thompson III, was hired as Georgetown’s coach in 2004. When the son was fired in 2017, the elder Thompson -- known affectionately as “Big John” or “Pops” to many -- was at the news conference announcing Ewing as the successor. Along the way, Thompson said what he thought, shielded his players from the media and took positions that weren’t always popular. He never shied away from sensitive topics -- particularly the role of race in both sports and society -- and he once famously walked off the court before a game to protest an NCAA rule because he felt it hurt minority athletes. “I’ll probably be remembered for all the things that kept me out of the Hall of Fame, ironically, more than for the things that got me into it,” Thompson said on the day he was elected to the Hall in 1999. Thompson became coach of the Hoyas in 1972 and began remaking a team that was 3-23 the previous season. Over the next 27 years, he led Georgetown to 14 straight NCAA tournaments (1979-92), 24 consecutive postseason appearances (20 NCAA, 4 NIT), three Final Fours (1982, 1984, 1985) and won six Big East tournament championships. Employing a physical, defense-focused approach that frequently relied on a dominant center -- Alonzo Mourning and Dikembe Mutombo were among his other pupils -- Thompson compiled a 596-239 record (.715 winning percentage). He had 26 players drafted by the NBA. One of his honors -- his selection as coach of the U.S. team for the 1988 Olympics -- had a sour ending when the Americans had to settle for the bronze medal. It was a result so disappointing that Thompson put himself on a sort of self-imposed leave at Georgetown for a while, coaching practices and games but leaving many other duties to his assistants. Off the court, Thompson was both a role model and a lightning rod. A stickler for academics, he kept a deflated basketball on his desk, a reminder to his players that a degree was a necessity because a career in basketball relied on a tenuous “nine pounds of air.” The school boasted that 76 of 78 players who played four seasons under Thompson received their degrees. He was a Black coach who recruited mostly Black players to a predominantly white Jesuit university in Washington, and Thompson never hesitated to speak out on behalf of his players. One of the most dramatic moments in Georgetown history came on Jan. 14, 1989, when he walked off the court to a standing ovation before the tipoff of a home game against Boston College, demonstrating in a most public way his displeasure against NCAA Proposition 42. The rule denied athletic scholarships to freshmen who didn’t meet certain requirements, and Thompson said it was biased against underprivileged students. Opposition from Thompson, and others, led the NCAA to modify the rule. Thompson’s most daring move came that same year, when he summoned notorious drug kingpin Rayful Edmond III for a meeting in the coach’s office. Thompson warned Edmond to stop associating with Hoyas players and to leave them alone, using his respect in the Black community to become one of the few people to stare down Edmond and not face a reprisal. Though aware of his influence, Thompson did not take pride in becoming the first Black coach to take a team to the Final Four, and he let a room full of reporters know it when asked his feelings on the subject at a news conference in 1982. “I resent the hell out of that question if it implies I am the first Black coach competent enough to take a team to the Final Four,” Thompson said. “Other Blacks have been denied the right in this country; coaches who have the ability. I don’t take any pride in being the first Black coach in the Final Four. I find the question extremely offensive.” Born Sept. 2, 1941, John R. Thompson Jr. grew up in Washington, D.C. His father was always working — on a farm in Maryland and later as a laborer in the city — and could neither read nor write. “I never in my life saw my father’s hands clean,” Thompson told The Associated Press in 2007. “Never. He’d come home and scrub his hands with this ugly brown soap that looked like tar. I thought that was the color of his hands. When I was still coaching, kids would show up late for practice and I’d (say) ... ‘My father got up every morning of his life at 5 a.m. to go to work. Without an alarm.‘” Thompson’s parents emphasized education, but he struggled in part of because of poor eyesight and labored in Catholic grammar school. He was moved to a segregated public school, had a growth spurt and became good enough at basketball to get into John Carroll, a Catholic high school, where he led the team to 55 consecutive victories and two city titles. He went to Providence College as one of the most touted basketball prospects in the country and led the Friars to the first NCAA bid in school history. He graduated in 1964 and played two seasons with Red Auerbach’s Boston Celtics, earning a pair of championship rings as a sparingly used backup to Bill Russell. Thompson returned to Washington, got his master’s degree in guidance and counseling from the University of the District of Columbia and went 122-28 over six seasons at St. Anthony’s before accepting the job at Georgetown, an elite school that had relatively few Black students. Faculty and students rallied around him after a bedsheet with racist words was hung inside the school’s gym before a game during the 1974-75 season. Thompson sheltered his players with closed practices, tightly controlled media access and a prohibition on interviews with freshmen in their first semester -- a restriction that still stands for Georgetown’s basketball team. Combined with Thompson’s flashes of emotion and his players’ rough-and-tumble style of play, it wasn’t long before the words “Hoya Paranoia” came to epitomize the new era of basketball on the Hilltop campus. Georgetown lost the 1982 NCAA championship game when Fred Brown mistakenly passed the ball to North Carolina’s James Worthy in the game’s final seconds. Two years later, Ewing led an 84-75 win over Houston in the title game. The Hoyas were on the verge of a repeat the following year when they were stunned in the championship game by coach Rollie Massimino’s Villanova team in one of the biggest upsets in tournament history. Success allowed Thompson to rake in money through endorsements, but he ran afoul of his Georgetown bosses when he applied for a gambling license for a business venture in Nevada in 1995. Thompson, who liked playing the slot machines in Las Vegas, reluctantly dropped the application after the university president objected. Centers Ewing, Mourning and Mutombo turned Georgetown into “Big Man U” under Thompson, although his last superstar was guard Allen Iverson, who in 1996 also became the first player under Thompson to leave school early for the NBA draft. “Thanks for Saving My Life Coach,” Iverson wrote at the start of an Instagram post Monday with photos of the pair. The Hoyas teams in the 1990s never came close to matching the achievements of the 1980s, and Thompson’s era came to a surprising and sudden end when he resigned in the middle of the 1998-99 season, citing distractions from a pending divorce. Thompson didn’t fade from the limelight. He became a sports radio talk show host and a TV and radio game analyst, joining the very profession he had frustrated so often as a coach. He loosened up, allowing the public to see his lighter side, but he remained pointed and combative when a topic mattered to him. A torch was passed in 2004, when John Thompson III became Georgetown’s coach. The younger Thompson, with “Pops” often watching from the stands or sitting in the back of the room for news conferences, returned the Hoyas to the Final Four in 2007. Another son, Ronny Thompson, was head coach for one season at Ball State and is now a TV analyst. ___ Joseph White, a former AP sports writer in Washington who died in 2019, prepared this obituary. AP Sports Writer Howard Fendrich contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 15th, 2020

Maynilad, MWC shelve rate adjustments for 2021

Maynilad Water Services, Inc. (Maynilad) and Manila Water Company, Inc. are forgoing some water rate increases they are qualified to implement in the coming year, including the next tranche of the rate rebasing adjustment as well as the mandated Consumer Price Index (CPI) adjustment.  This was announced separately by both companies on Tuesday. In a text message, Metropolitan Waterworks and Sewerage System (MWSS) Chief Regulator Patrick Ty said the MWSS-Regulatory Office (MWSS-RO) has been discussing this matter with both Maynilad and Manila Water since the start of this year. “We just received the proposals of the two Concessionaires and we are currently evaluating them,” Ty said.  In a statement, Maynilad said that with this deferral, the company “hopes to alleviate the day-to-day struggles of its customers as they and the whole country strive to recover from adversity and rise stronger than before, ready to start anew”. “During these difficult times when no one is spared the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, Maynilad is one with the government in finding ways to help our countrymen make the situation more manageable,” it also said. Manila Water, on the other hand, said “in the spirit of Bayanihan and to alleviate the plight of our customers due to the pandemic, Manila Water will not be implementing the rate adjustment in 2021 under the approved 2018 Rate Rebasing.” Done every five years, rate rebasing is review of water utilities’ past performance and the projection on their future cash flows.  It is supposed to set the water rates at a level that would allow both Maynilad and Manila Water to recover their expenditures and earn a rate of return. For 2020, Maynilad and Manila Water also volunteered to defer the implementation of the next tranche of annual rate hike approved under the current rate rebasing period, which started in 2018.  Their decision came as both companies were being scrutinized by no less than President Rodrigo Duterte for their allegedly onerous contracts with MWSS. To be implemented in tranches from 2018 to 2022, the approved increase in Maynilad’s rates under the fifth rate rebasing period would be P5.73 per cubic meter (/cu. m.). For this year, it was supposed to increase its rates by P1.95/cu.m, then another P1.95/cu.m in 2021.    As for Manila Water, the increase in its rates under rate rebasing would play around P6.22 to P6.55/cu.m.  This year, it was supposed to increase its rates by P2/cu.m, and another P2/cu.m by 2021.  By 2022, depending on the medium-term water sources project that the company will be allowed to pursue, the Ayala-led firm could charge its customers an increase of P0.76/cu.m up to P1.04/cu.m. The CPI adjustment, on the other hand, is the annual inflation adjustment and takes place every January. Maynilad is the largest private water concessionaire in the Philippines in terms of customer base.  It is the agent and contractor of the Metropolitan Waterworks and Sewerage System (MWSS) for the West Zone of the Greater Manila Area, which is composed of the cities of Manila (certain portions), Quezon City (certain portions), Makati (west of South Super Highway), Caloocan, Pasay, Parañaque, Las Piñas, Muntinlupa, Valenzuela, Navotas and Malabon all in Metro Manila; the cities of Cavite, Bacoor and Imus, and the towns of Kawit, Noveleta and Rosario, all in Cavite Province.  Meanwhile, Manila Water caters to the East Zone concession area covering the Cities of Makati, Mandaluyong, Pasig, Pateros, San Juan, Taguig and Marikina. It is also in charge of the southeastern parts of Quezon City, and Sta. Ana and San Andres in Manila. In the Province of Rizal, MWCI services the City of Antipolo and Municipalities of San Mateo, Rodriguez, Cainta, Taytay, Teresa, Angono, Baras, Binangonan, and Jala-jala......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsNov 3rd, 2020

Miami Heat laban lang Butler, Adebayo triple kayod

NASA hukay na ang isang paa ng Miami Heat, isang maling hakbang at matutuldukan na ang pangarap nilang makamit ang titulo sa 2019-20 NBA season. The post Miami Heat laban lang Butler, Adebayo triple kayod first appeared on Abante......»»

Category: newsSource:  abanteRelated NewsOct 8th, 2020

Lakers fend off gritty Heat, on verge of NBA title

The Lakers survived a low-scoring affair against a determined Heat defense that was reinforced by the returning Bam Adebayo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 7th, 2020

Dragic still can& rsquo;t play; Adebayo is day-to-day

Orlando—Miami Heat star Goran Dragic said he is unlikely to be fit to play in Tuesday’s NBA Finals game four but is hopeful he may recover in time to feature later in the series......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 6th, 2020