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A Coaster for Mandaue’s young athletes

MANDAUE CITY, CEBU, Philippines — Young athletes of Mandaue City will now have an easier time to get to their venues during sports events after the Mandaue City government turned over a brand new Toyota Coaster to the Mandaue City Sports Commission on Friday, October 30, 2020. “Og gusto ta no nga to bring out […] The post A Coaster for Mandaue’s young athletes appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerOct 30th, 2020

& lsquo;Rebirth of the Rebellion Sport& rsquo; docu looks into Arnis& rsquo; past, future

At the 30th Southeast Asian Games held in Clark, Pampanga, last December 2019, the Philippine National Arnis Team made history, bagging 14 out of the 20 gold medals, plus four silver and two bronze medals in the Arnis competitions—an exceptional feat for a team of young athletes, who joined a competition of such magnitude for the first time......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 22nd, 2020

Coaching great John Thompson of Georgetown dead at 78

By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — John Thompson, the imposing Hall of Famer who turned Georgetown into a “Hoya Paranoia” powerhouse and became the first Black coach to lead a team to the NCAA men’s basketball championship, has died. He was 78 His death was announced in a family statement released by Georgetown on Monday. No details were disclosed. “Our father was an inspiration to many and devoted his life to developing young people not simply on but, most importantly, off the basketball court. He is revered as a historic shepherd of the sport, dedicated to the welfare of his community above all else,” the statement said. “However, for us, his greatest legacy remains as a father, grandfather, uncle, and friend. More than a coach, he was our foundation. More than a legend, he was the voice in our ear everyday.” One of the most celebrated and polarizing figures in his sport, Thompson took over a moribund Georgetown program in the 1970s and molded it in his unique style into a perennial contender, culminating with a national championship team anchored by center Patrick Ewing in 1984. Georgetown reached two other title games with Thompson in charge and Ewing patrolling the paint, losing to Michael Jordan’s North Carolina team in 1982 and to Villanova in 1985. At 6-foot-10, with an ever-present white towel slung over his shoulder, Thompson literally and figuratively towered over the Hoyas for decades, becoming a patriarch of sorts after he quit coaching in 1999. One of his sons, John Thompson III, was hired as Georgetown’s coach in 2004. When the son was fired in 2017, the elder Thompson -- known affectionately as “Big John” or “Pops” to many -- was at the news conference announcing Ewing as the successor. Along the way, Thompson said what he thought, shielded his players from the media and took positions that weren’t always popular. He never shied away from sensitive topics -- particularly the role of race in both sports and society -- and he once famously walked off the court before a game to protest an NCAA rule because he felt it hurt minority athletes. “I’ll probably be remembered for all the things that kept me out of the Hall of Fame, ironically, more than for the things that got me into it,” Thompson said on the day he was elected to the Hall in 1999. Thompson became coach of the Hoyas in 1972 and began remaking a team that was 3-23 the previous season. Over the next 27 years, he led Georgetown to 14 straight NCAA tournaments (1979-92), 24 consecutive postseason appearances (20 NCAA, 4 NIT), three Final Fours (1982, 1984, 1985) and won six Big East tournament championships. Employing a physical, defense-focused approach that frequently relied on a dominant center -- Alonzo Mourning and Dikembe Mutombo were among his other pupils -- Thompson compiled a 596-239 record (.715 winning percentage). He had 26 players drafted by the NBA. One of his honors -- his selection as coach of the U.S. team for the 1988 Olympics -- had a sour ending when the Americans had to settle for the bronze medal. It was a result so disappointing that Thompson put himself on a sort of self-imposed leave at Georgetown for a while, coaching practices and games but leaving many other duties to his assistants. Off the court, Thompson was both a role model and a lightning rod. A stickler for academics, he kept a deflated basketball on his desk, a reminder to his players that a degree was a necessity because a career in basketball relied on a tenuous “nine pounds of air.” The school boasted that 76 of 78 players who played four seasons under Thompson received their degrees. He was a Black coach who recruited mostly Black players to a predominantly white Jesuit university in Washington, and Thompson never hesitated to speak out on behalf of his players. One of the most dramatic moments in Georgetown history came on Jan. 14, 1989, when he walked off the court to a standing ovation before the tipoff of a home game against Boston College, demonstrating in a most public way his displeasure against NCAA Proposition 42. The rule denied athletic scholarships to freshmen who didn’t meet certain requirements, and Thompson said it was biased against underprivileged students. Opposition from Thompson, and others, led the NCAA to modify the rule. Thompson’s most daring move came that same year, when he summoned notorious drug kingpin Rayful Edmond III for a meeting in the coach’s office. Thompson warned Edmond to stop associating with Hoyas players and to leave them alone, using his respect in the Black community to become one of the few people to stare down Edmond and not face a reprisal. Though aware of his influence, Thompson did not take pride in becoming the first Black coach to take a team to the Final Four, and he let a room full of reporters know it when asked his feelings on the subject at a news conference in 1982. “I resent the hell out of that question if it implies I am the first Black coach competent enough to take a team to the Final Four,” Thompson said. “Other Blacks have been denied the right in this country; coaches who have the ability. I don’t take any pride in being the first Black coach in the Final Four. I find the question extremely offensive.” Born Sept. 2, 1941, John R. Thompson Jr. grew up in Washington, D.C. His father was always working — on a farm in Maryland and later as a laborer in the city — and could neither read nor write. “I never in my life saw my father’s hands clean,” Thompson told The Associated Press in 2007. “Never. He’d come home and scrub his hands with this ugly brown soap that looked like tar. I thought that was the color of his hands. When I was still coaching, kids would show up late for practice and I’d (say) ... ‘My father got up every morning of his life at 5 a.m. to go to work. Without an alarm.‘” Thompson’s parents emphasized education, but he struggled in part of because of poor eyesight and labored in Catholic grammar school. He was moved to a segregated public school, had a growth spurt and became good enough at basketball to get into John Carroll, a Catholic high school, where he led the team to 55 consecutive victories and two city titles. He went to Providence College as one of the most touted basketball prospects in the country and led the Friars to the first NCAA bid in school history. He graduated in 1964 and played two seasons with Red Auerbach’s Boston Celtics, earning a pair of championship rings as a sparingly used backup to Bill Russell. Thompson returned to Washington, got his master’s degree in guidance and counseling from the University of the District of Columbia and went 122-28 over six seasons at St. Anthony’s before accepting the job at Georgetown, an elite school that had relatively few Black students. Faculty and students rallied around him after a bedsheet with racist words was hung inside the school’s gym before a game during the 1974-75 season. Thompson sheltered his players with closed practices, tightly controlled media access and a prohibition on interviews with freshmen in their first semester -- a restriction that still stands for Georgetown’s basketball team. Combined with Thompson’s flashes of emotion and his players’ rough-and-tumble style of play, it wasn’t long before the words “Hoya Paranoia” came to epitomize the new era of basketball on the Hilltop campus. Georgetown lost the 1982 NCAA championship game when Fred Brown mistakenly passed the ball to North Carolina’s James Worthy in the game’s final seconds. Two years later, Ewing led an 84-75 win over Houston in the title game. The Hoyas were on the verge of a repeat the following year when they were stunned in the championship game by coach Rollie Massimino’s Villanova team in one of the biggest upsets in tournament history. Success allowed Thompson to rake in money through endorsements, but he ran afoul of his Georgetown bosses when he applied for a gambling license for a business venture in Nevada in 1995. Thompson, who liked playing the slot machines in Las Vegas, reluctantly dropped the application after the university president objected. Centers Ewing, Mourning and Mutombo turned Georgetown into “Big Man U” under Thompson, although his last superstar was guard Allen Iverson, who in 1996 also became the first player under Thompson to leave school early for the NBA draft. “Thanks for Saving My Life Coach,” Iverson wrote at the start of an Instagram post Monday with photos of the pair. The Hoyas teams in the 1990s never came close to matching the achievements of the 1980s, and Thompson’s era came to a surprising and sudden end when he resigned in the middle of the 1998-99 season, citing distractions from a pending divorce. Thompson didn’t fade from the limelight. He became a sports radio talk show host and a TV and radio game analyst, joining the very profession he had frustrated so often as a coach. He loosened up, allowing the public to see his lighter side, but he remained pointed and combative when a topic mattered to him. A torch was passed in 2004, when John Thompson III became Georgetown’s coach. The younger Thompson, with “Pops” often watching from the stands or sitting in the back of the room for news conferences, returned the Hoyas to the Final Four in 2007. Another son, Ronny Thompson, was head coach for one season at Ball State and is now a TV analyst. ___ Joseph White, a former AP sports writer in Washington who died in 2019, prepared this obituary. AP Sports Writer Howard Fendrich contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 15th, 2020

Saso banks P16.5M on 2nd JLPGA championship

The two-shot victory, worth a whopping P16.5 million (Y36M), also hiked Saso’s earnings to P27 million in just three months in her rookie season in the region’s premier ladies circuit, undisputedly making her the fastest to ever collect such winnings among young Filipino athletes of any generation......»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 30th, 2020

SEA GAMES: The silver that glittered like gold

When the editorial staff of ABS-CBN Sports was tasked to come up with our most memorable coverage, it didn’t take long for this writer to respond. The Philippine men’s volleyball team’s Southeast Asian Games semifinal match was the first thing that came to mind. Pesonally, that game against the highly-fancied Thailand squad topped all the countless volleyball matches that I’ve covered in my career. I’m at a loss for words on how to describe the emotions I felt that chilly night of December 8, 2019. Around 6,700 fans filled the PhilSports Arena in Pasig City not knowing that what they were about to witness was something historic. A magical night that would take away the frustrations they felt the day before when the more popular women’s team finished the preliminary round winless. For us sportswriters covering that assignment, we knew the Filipinos were up for a tough ride. Thailand ruled the last four editions of the event. On the other hand, the Philippines’ last significant outing in the biennial meet was a bronze medal finish back in 1991 – or when the current national team’s oldest member, setter Jessie Lopez was just five-years old.      Did we doubt our own team? Let’s just say we prayed to the high heavens to give us something positive to write about. But don’t get us wrong. Those who followed the formation and preparation of the squad knew it would yield results come the SEA Games. After all, in all three batches of the Nationals that participated in the regional sports meet since 2015, this particular team had the longest time to prepare – around eight months to be exact. The team’s composition itself looked really promising. For the first time, two of country’s best hitters in Marck Espejo and Bryan Bagunas, who both have experience playing in the Japan V. League,  donned the tricolors together. Espejo returned after skipping the 2017 edition so did his teammates in the 2015 squad Rex Intal and setter Ish Polvorosa. Bagunas was on his second tour of duty along with team captain John Vic De Guzman, Mark Alfafara, RanRan Abdilla and libero Jack Kalingking. Head coach Dante Alinsunurin, who was appointed to handle the team after Oliver Almadro and Sammy Acaylar in 2015 and 2017, respectively, tapped an old hand in Lopez and injected young bloods in playmaker Owa Retamar, Jau Umandal, Kim Malabunga, Ricky Marcos and Francis Saura. As part of their buildup the Nationals joined the Thailand Open Sealect Tuna Championship July last year.          The Filipinos achieved a great feat when they won bronze. Fans were able to witness the Nationals’ campaign via YouTube streaming while we volleyball writers, got to file our full stories through the help of De Guzman and Bagunas (God bless their beautiful hearts) who supplied us with game stats and granted postgame interviews. It’s just a shame I never got to cover the team’s training in Japan when the Nationals’ preparation went on full throttle. (Note: A little confusion in the training camp coverage assignments had me flying to Japan with the women’s squad and Lance Agcaoili of Spin.ph joining the men’s team. But it was a great experience, nonetheless, and I’m grateful for Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. for the opportunity.)     I was as confused as the other sportswriters present during the draw for the group stage a couple of months before the SEA Games when Alinsunurin chose to join the four-team bracket with Indonesia, Vietnam and Cambodia. Those three teams are considered contenders every SEA Games edition. And earning a semifinal spot would be harder compared to the other group composed of Thailand, Myanmar and Singapore. Fortunately, the gamble was worth it. Espejo and Bagunas were superb offensively, Malabunga and Retamar made their presence felt and the Nationals’ blocking shocked Cambodia and Vietnam as the Filipinos swept them both to secure a semis seat.   Then came the steamrolling Indonesians. Honestly, I thought the Nationals would sweep their way to the group’s top seeding. That way the PHI’s would've avoided a semis clash with Thailand. Forced to take on the defending champions, the Filipinos found themselves down in the first set. They got back in the second frame before yielding the third. And when the Thais came to match point, 24-21, in the fourth we all thought it was over. Fans were slowly emptying the bleachers not wanting to see the impending defeat. I was already waiting for the final score. Ready break the result. Then a miracle happened. The Nationals nibbled on the Thais' lead to force a deuce. After another deadlock, the Filipinos stole the set. The fifth frame was classic story of ‘who wants it more will win.’ An extended set made it even more dramatic. I vividly remember that sequence when Bagunas hammered the game-clinching kill off a lob from Lopez. After that all that I can recall was me pumping my fist up in the air and slapping the hardest high-fives I ever did with those inside the press room while howling like a madman.    The national team assured itself of a silver after 42 years. A silver after four freaking decades. They did it. Of course, the Indonesians bullied their way to winning the gold medal in a sweep of the inexperienced Filipinos. But who cares, the host team exceeded its podium expectations. That silver that glittered like gold made that coverage truly memorable. But it never crossed my mind that it would be the last important volleyball event that I will get to report. (Note: It would’ve been the UAAP if not for the health crisis that put all sporting events to a halt. Sad.) And that’s why I ended up writing these last few paragraphs. A farewell from this section. From my first article for this website back on December 1, 2014 – a post-mortem of Petron’s breakthrough title in the Philippine Superliga Grand Prix – to my last published story, these were all written with only one thing in mind: in the service of the Filipino sports fan worldwide. Our run may have not been perfect, of course, we had our flaws. We had our fair share of criticisms from fans, athletes, sports personalities and sometimes even from our partner leagues and properties. We accepted our shortcomings. We tried to be better. But we are proud of what we did. We take pride with how we delivered sports stories through various digital executions that showcased sports beyond the confines of competition. On midnight of September 1 while most of you lay sound asleep, deep in slumber, hopefully, having a good dream and hours away from waking up looking forward to a better day, this website will be snapped out of existence.  More than half a decade of sharing stories to the Filipino sports fan will be seeing its last presence online on Monday – a holiday to celebrate the nation’s heroes. This website will then hear its final buzzer, its final whistle. Thousands of articles – written with passion, dedication and love – will be taken down as this website goes offline together with majority of ABS-CBN Sports’ social media accounts. But soon, hopefully, it will once again see the light of day.    We do hope that you will remember us, for we will remember all of you who made us your Kapamilya.   -- 30 --   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles Mark Escarlote has served as a sub-section editor for ABS-CBN Sports' website since 2014. He is among thousands of ABS-CBN employees who will be retrenched on August 31, 2020.   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 29th, 2020

SEA GAMES: The silver that glittered like gold

When the editorial staff of ABS-CBN Sports was tasked to come up with our most memorable coverage, it didn’t take long for this writer to respond. The Philippine men’s volleyball team’s Southeast Asian Games semifinal match was the first thing that came to mind. Pesonally, that game against the highly-fancied Thailand squad topped all the countless volleyball matches that I’ve covered in my career. I’m at a loss for words on how to describe the emotions I felt that chilly night of December 8, 2019. Around 6,700 fans filled the PhilSports Arena in Pasig City not knowing that what they were about to witness was something historic. A magical night that would take away the frustrations they felt the day before when the more popular women’s team finished the preliminary round winless. For us sportswriters covering that assignment, we knew the Filipinos were up for a tough ride. Thailand ruled the last four editions of the event. On the other hand, the Philippines’ last significant outing in the biennial meet was a bronze medal finish back in 1991 – or when the current national team’s oldest member, setter Jessie Lopez was just five-years old.      Did we doubt our own team? Let’s just say we prayed to the high heavens to give us something positive to write about. But don’t get us wrong. Those who followed the formation and preparation of the squad knew it would yield results come the SEA Games. After all, in all three batches of the Nationals that participated in the regional sports meet since 2015, this particular team had the longest time to prepare – around eight months to be exact. The team’s composition itself looked really promising. For the first time, two of country’s best hitters in Marck Espejo and Bryan Bagunas, who both have experience playing in the Japan V. League,  donned the tricolors together. Espejo returned after skipping the 2017 edition so did his teammates in the 2015 squad Rex Intal and setter Ish Polvorosa. Bagunas was on his second tour of duty along with team captain John Vic De Guzman, Mark Alfafara, RanRan Abdilla and libero Jack Kalingking. Head coach Dante Alinsunurin, who was appointed to handle the team after Oliver Almadro and Sammy Acaylar in 2015 and 2017, respectively, tapped an old hand in Lopez and injected young bloods in playmaker Owa Retamar, Jau Umandal, Kim Malabunga, Ricky Marcos and Francis Saura. As part of their buildup the Nationals joined the Thailand Open Sealect Tuna Championship July last year.          The Filipinos achieved a great feat when they won bronze. Fans were able to witness the Nationals’ campaign via YouTube streaming while we volleyball writers, got to file our full stories through the help of De Guzman and Bagunas (God bless their beautiful hearts) who supplied us with game stats and granted postgame interviews. It’s just a shame I never got to cover the team’s training in Japan when the Nationals’ preparation went on full throttle. (Note: A little confusion in the training camp coverage assignments had me flying to Japan with the women’s squad and Lance Agcaoili of Spin.ph joining the men’s team. But it was a great experience, nonetheless, and I’m grateful for Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. for the opportunity.)     I was as confused as the other sportswriters present during the draw for the group stage a couple of months before the SEA Games when Alinsunurin chose to join the four-team bracket with Indonesia, Vietnam and Cambodia. Those three teams are considered contenders every SEA Games edition. And earning a semifinal spot would be harder compared to the other group composed of Thailand, Myanmar and Singapore. Fortunately, the gamble was worth it. Espejo and Bagunas were superb offensively, Malabunga and Retamar made their presence felt and the Nationals’ blocking shocked Cambodia and Vietnam as the Filipinos swept them both to secure a semis seat.   Then came the steamrolling Indonesians. Honestly, I thought the Nationals would sweep their way to the group’s top seeding. That way the PHI’s would've avoided a semis clash with Thailand. Forced to take on the defending champions, the Filipinos found themselves down in the first set. They got back in the second frame before yielding the third. And when the Thais came to match point, 24-21, in the fourth we all thought it was over. Fans were slowly emptying the bleachers not wanting to see the impending defeat. I was already waiting for the final score. Ready break the result. Then a miracle happened. The Nationals nibbled on the Thais' lead to force a deuce. After another deadlock, the Filipinos stole the set. The fifth frame was classic story of ‘who wants it more will win.’ An extended set made it even more dramatic. I vividly remember that sequence when Bagunas hammered the game-clinching kill off a lob from Lopez. After that all that I can recall was me pumping my fist up in the air and slapping the hardest high-fives I ever did with those inside the press room while howling like a madman.    The national team assured itself of a silver after 42 years. A silver after four freaking decades. They did it. Of course, the Indonesians bullied their way to winning the gold medal in a sweep of the inexperienced Filipinos. But who cares, the host team exceeded its podium expectations. That silver that glittered like gold made that coverage truly memorable. But it never crossed my mind that it would be the last important volleyball event that I will get to report. (Note: It would’ve been the UAAP if not for the health crisis that put all sporting events to a halt. Sad.) And that’s why I ended up writing these last few paragraphs. A farewell from this section. From my first article for this website back on December 1, 2014 – a post-mortem of Petron’s breakthrough title in the Philippine Superliga Grand Prix – to my last published story, these were all written with only one thing in mind: in the service of the Filipino sports fan worldwide. Our run may have not been perfect, of course, we had our flaws. We had our fair share of criticisms from fans, athletes, sports personalities and sometimes even from our partner leagues and properties. We accepted our shortcomings. We tried to be better. But we are proud of what we did. We take pride with how we delivered sports stories through various digital executions that showcased sports beyond the confines of competition. On midnight of September 1 while most of you lay sound asleep, deep in slumber, hopefully, having a good dream and hours away from waking up looking forward to a better day, this website will be snapped out of existence.  More than half a decade of sharing stories to the Filipino sports fan will be seeing its last presence online on Monday – a holiday to celebrate the nation’s heroes. This website will then hear its final buzzer, its final whistle. Thousands of articles – written with passion, dedication and love – will be taken down as this website goes offline together with majority of ABS-CBN Sports’ social media accounts. But soon, hopefully, it will once again see the light of day.    We do hope that you will remember us, for we will remember all of you who made us your Kapamilya.   -- 30 --   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles Mark Escarlote has served as a sub-section editor for ABS-CBN Sports' website since 2014. He is among thousands of ABS-CBN employees who will be retrenched on August 31, 2020.   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 28th, 2020

Filipino artists dedicate murals to Kobe Bryant during Mamba Week

Nike Philippines honored the legacy of Kobe Bryant (1978 – 2020) with Mamba Week from August 23 by bringing together athletes, communities, inspiration and innovation which commemorated his enduring legacy and transcendent Mamba Mentality.  In another chapter of the Mamba Week tribute, Nike teamed up with ARAL Cru, a local graffiti trio from the community, to dedicate two murals around Metro Manila celebrating Kobe Bryant, his legacy and Mamba Mentality.  Marking the Black Mamba’s Last Historic Visit (in Araneta City) The first mural that ARAL Cru created directly faces the historic Araneta Coliseum, the venue where Kobe Bryant made his last appearance in Manila.                                                            Araneta City, Philippines The portrait of Kobe on the right side of the artwork is derived from a photo of him smiling during his last visit to the coliseum. This mural depicts imagery of fearlessness and focus, and a color scheme that resembles a sunset, which sets a tone of thankfulness for a good Kobe day that had passed. A New Day Dawning (at EDSA-Kalayaan) ARAL Cru relocated to Makai City to paint the second mural a few hours later. Symbolizing the sunrise and the beginning of a new day, this mural uses the same colors as the first but moving towards the opposite direction.                                                            EDSA-Kalayaan The mural depicts Kobe wearing his two iconic jersey numbers, 8 and 24, shooting crumpled pieces of paper into a trash bin. An optimistic way of showing the moment when we are reminded to be a little better each time the sun rises, just like Kobe. Throughout his career he evolved both as a person and as an athlete, he was always the one you could reliably turn to when the game is on the line.  Behind the Art (About ARAL Cru) ARAL Cru consists of Bvdot, Cinos, and Frank, a three-man graffiti crew from the Greater Manila Area. Through street painting and gallery work across Philippines, they are today recognized as one the most respected young talents in the street art movement in the country. Hard work, quality of execution, the ability to work under pressure, and of course, love for the game— this is how the ARAL Cru artists truly embody Mamba Mentality in their own lives. Kayo Cosio of #HoneycombArts organized and curated this project. #HoneycombArts is an organization that connects culture and messaging through a variety of public art mediums. They have also curated and executed over 60 public art projects in Manila and abroad......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 28th, 2020

Four of coach Frankie s NCAA First 5 comes straight from San Beda

Frankie Lim has been calling the shots for University of Perpetual Help from 2018 to present. Before this, the fiery mentor was at the helm of San Beda University from 2007 to 2011. Through all of that, he has had a hand in the discovery and the development of young talent for his teams as well as the game planning for the opposing rising stars. Among all of those, who are the best of the best for him? Here is Frankie Lim's NCAA First 5, as he told ABS-CBN Sports: ROBERT BOLICK Coach Frankie was no longer in San Beda when Robert Bolick became "Big Shot Bolick." Where he was instead was at the other end, doing his best to push Perpetual into getting the better of the 6-foot-1 playmaker. In his three games going up against Bolick, Coach Frankie and his boys fell short - and that only made the latter all the more impressed with the former. GARVO LANETE Before Bolick was doing what he was doing, Lanete set the standard on what San Beda should get from its lead guard. A fearless gunner forever willing to put the Red Lions on his back, the 6-foot-2 scorer was right up there with the likes of Kiefer Ravena and Kevin Alas as the best backcourt players in college. Lanete had an edge over those two, though, as he was a key cog in four championships for the red and white. MIKE NZEUSSEU Nzeusseu is not the foreign student-athlete we're used to watching. Yes, he could back down on opponents, but he was at his best either facing up and forcing his quickness on defenders or finishing setups from the likes of CJ Perez and the Marcelino twins. Coach Frankie knows a thing or two about paint presences, but he is also a big fan of more well-rounded big men. SUDAN DANIEL Daniel had an unenviable task of following Sam Ekwe, you know, the Nigerian who won MVP and Rookie of the Year in the same season. Without a doubt, though, "Superman" lived up to his lofty billing, making sure San Beda remained the team-to-beat even in the face of San Sebastian College-Recoletos' Pinatubo Trio as well as Alas and Raymond Almazan-led Colegio de San Juan de Letran. In an MVP campaign in 2010, Daniel stood as the pillar for the Red Lions' 18-0 romp through the tournament and wound up with something not even Ekwe had - a season sweep. OLA ADEOGUN At the peak of his powers, Adeogun was, simply put, scary. An unbelievable hybrid of Ekwe's power and Daniel's agility, the Nigerian saw to it that there was no let up for San Beda even after they had moved on from their two foreign student-athletes who won MVP. Adeogun did not win the top individual player himself and yet, he won the hearts of the San Beda faithful thanks to the attitude he brought to the Red Lions. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 14th, 2020

Child abuse, lack of schooling at NBA s China academies: report

Young players have been physically abused and left without schooling at NBA basketball academies in China, which were described as "sweat camp(s) for athletes", an ESPN report said......»»

Category: sportsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJul 30th, 2020

UAAP Season 82 celebrates unity and sportsmanship in virtual closing ceremony

Despite an abrupt end to UAAP Season 82 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the country’s premier collegiate league will officially wrap up the season on a high note with a virtual closing ceremony that will celebrate unity and sportsmanship in the entire UAAP community. The special online event, hosted by Mico Halili and Denice Dinsay of ABS-CBN Sports, will go live on July 25 (Saturday) at 4 pm on the ABS-CBN Sports website (sports.abs-cbn.com), Facebook, and YouTube accounts, with delayed telecast on LIGA cable sports channel at 7 pm. The closing ceremony will be a culmination of the first and second semester UAAP sports, highlighting the success and hard work of the eight member schools while also putting the spotlight on the athletes who were unable to finish their season due to the cancelation of the games. “Lalabas 'yun doon sa closing ceremonies, just to highlight na, one, as a community, as a nation, we are here to help everyone, that's one. And two, itong mga atleta na 'to na mga hindi nakapaglaro or natapos, they are part of Season 82," said UAAP Season 82 president Em Fernandez of host school Ateneo de Manila University in an interview with ABS-CBN News. UAAP announced the cancelation of Season 82 on April 7 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Second semester sports such as volleyball, football, baseball, softball, track and field, lawn tennis, and 3x3 basketball were not completed or did not start at all. The UAAP will also be awarding UST as general champions for both the high school and seniors divisions. This is the sixth straight overall championship for the Tiger Cubs and fourth straight for the Growling Tigers. Also set to receive their awards are the Season 82 MVPs for high school and college, while selected athlete-scholars from the different universities will also be recognized. The league, however, will be unable to award an Athlete of the Year for this season. The online gathering, according to ABS-CBN Integrated Sports head Dino Laurena, will celebrate the dedication of all athletes and the efforts of the entire UAAP community, noting that it has always been their mission in ABS-CBN Sports to honor and pay tribute to the work and dedication of athletes, no matter what the circumstances or challenges the sports organization is confronting.  “ABS-CBN Sports remains faithful to its advocacy of promoting the values that sports teaches all of us.  It is in this light that we want to pay tribute to our athletes who put in months of sacrifice and preparation to be able to play at a high level in the UAAP. We hope they stay hungry and passionate about the game they love, and we cannot wait to see them playing again,” he said.    Spicing up the celebration are feature performances by ABS-CBN artists Ylona Garcia and Inigo Pascual. Sponge Cola and Itchyworms, the Pinoy rock bands that performed the official UAAP Season 82 anthem “Ang Ating Tagumpay” at the opening ceremony, will also make a special appearance.  Sticking to Season 82’s theme of “All For More,” the UAAP will also recognize the efforts of schools and athletes by honoring those who have done charity work during the pandemic.  Fans will also be able to look back at last season’s game highlights as well as hear from some of their favorite players. To formally symbolize the end of UAAP Season 82, there will be a virtual turning over of hosting duties of Ateneo to its rival school De La Salle University for Season 83. ABS-CBN Sports has been the official broadcaster of the UAAP since 2000. Together, they have championed sports among the Filipino youth, have given a break to many young, talented athletes, and strengthened the local sports community in the past two decades. Celebrate sports culture in the Philippines with Kapamilya sports fans by watching the UAAP Season 82 closing ceremony on July 25 (Saturday) at 4 pm on the ABS-CBN Sports website (sports.abs-cbn.com) and ABS-CBN Sports Facebook and YouTube accounts. Catch also the delayed telecast on cable sports channel LIGA at 7 pm, with a replay on July 26 at 4:30 pm. For more sports news, follow @ABSCBNSports on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, subscribe to the ABS-CBN Sports YouTube channel, or visit sports.abs-cbn.com. For updates, follow @ABSCBNPR on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram or visit www.abscbnpr.com......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 21st, 2020

Former Pinoy world champ Malcolm Tuñacao happy working as garbage collector in Japan

Back in 2000, way before the peak of the popularity of Pinoy boxing's biggest names like Manny Pacquiao, Nonito Donaire Jr., and Donnie Nietes, a Cebuano named Malcolm "Eagle Eye" Tuñacao was riding high as the WBC Flyweight World Champion.  The then-22-year old Tuñacao defeated and dethroned Thailand's Boonsai Sangsurat to become the WBC's new flyweight king. If fact, it was a young Pacquiao that Sangsurat TKO'd to capture that very title.  In 2014, Tuñacao competed in the final fight of his career, a technical decision win over Ryuta Otsuka, to finish with a 35-3-3 professional record with 20 wins via KO/TKO.  Now, 20 years after his world title run, Tuñacao is based in Kobe, Japan and works as a garbage collector.  While most people would see his current status as a fall from grace - from world champion prize fighter to blue collar employee - Tuñacao is pretty content with where he is in life.  Speaking to Chino Trinidad on an episode of Buhay Boksingero, "Eagle Eye" shared how his life has been like after his boxing career.  “Okay lang yun, basta ang importante, yung trabaho ko, hindi ako nang-lalamang ng tao, maganda yung trabaho ko, marangal na trabaho. Sa Bisaya, ‘tinarong na trabaho," Tuñacao said of his job. “Importante may trabaho, tapos marangal na trabaho. Para sa akin, masaya na ako sa trabaho ko ngayon eh, hindi mahirap. Wala akong inargabyado na tao, wala akong tinapakan na tao, nag-sisikap ako dito para sa pamilya ko.”  Tuñacao said that in Japan, one of the cleanest countries in the world, garbage collectors are seen in a different light than in most other places.  “Mataas ang tingin sa amin, sa aming mga basurero…maraming tao na nagbibigay ng tubig, nagbibigay ng pera minsan. Kanina, binigyan kami ng pan (Japanese for bread) tapos kape.”  “Yung ibang tao, pag-kita sa aming mga basurero, masaya sila. Nirerespeto kami, yun ang importante," he added.  Tuñacao, a native of Mandaue City, says that he owes a lot to Antonio Aldeger, the man behind one of the Philippines' premier boxing stables: ALA Boxing.  “Hindi ko makalimutan yung, kasi bata pa ko nag-simula, eight years old, hanggang 38, 30 years ako sa boxing. Hindi ko makalimutan, mahirap yung pinag-daanan ko sa boxing. Kung hindi ako kinuha ni sir  [Tony] Aldeguer dati, baka wala na ako.“  He also mentioned Peñalosa as one of the driving forces behind him ultimately turning pro.  "Masaya na ako dito sa trabaho ko at nagpapasalamat ako sa mga tao na tumutulong sa akin, lalo na kay Gerry Peñalosa, isa din yun na nakatulong sa akin. Kung hindi dahil sa kanya, hindi ako nag-pro.”  Check out the full interview with Tuñacao HERE           .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 19th, 2020

ONE champ Joshua Pacio making sound investments during pandemic

Joshua “The Passion” Pacio is making good use of his time while he awaits his next defense of his ONE Strawweight World Title. The 24-year-old from Baguio City has partnered up with FlexBox, an on-demand personal training service that provides custom workouts accessible to anyone, anywhere, anytime. The reigning World Champion from Team Lakay will function as a “Celebrity Trainer” and is slated to provide virtual training for fans and fitness enthusiasts alike. “This is good, it’s added income for us while we’re waiting for our next fight,” Pacio said.  “It’s also a good opportunity to interact with fans, help them stay fit and healthy to boost their immune system during the pandemic.” The young phenom from Team Lakay is set to do his online one-on-one and group classes during his rest days. Even at his age, “The Passion” knows the value of good financing. But make no mistake about it, he is not letting up on his training while waiting for a call from ONE Championship.  “I promise I’ll be ready to defend my belt anytime,” Pacio said.  “Even though I am already at the top, I know that there are many quality opponents out there waiting for me. I always have to find ways to improve.” In his most recent outing, Pacio defeated former ONE Strawweight World Champion Alex “Little Rock” Silva by split decision in the main event of ONE: FIRE & FURY last January at the Mall Of Asia Arena in Manila, Philippines. He is the first mixed martial artist in the talented weight class to defeat all previous World Champions, gaining a reputation as one of the greatest athletes in ONE’s history. But Pacio is not letting up, nor is he allowing the praises to go to his head, as he works to improve all the weapons in his arsenal before his next trip inside the Circle. “If they give me a date, I know I can quickly catch up,” he said. “I am ready to return any time this year.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 26th, 2020

ONE Championship back in action with ONE Hero Series 13 and 14 in Shanghai

Asian martial arts giant ONE Championship successfully returned to action this past weekend, with the return of ONE Hero Series 13 and 14, both held in Shanghai, China.  The back-to-back closed-door, audience free events that were held on June 20 and 21st marked ONE's first event since their ONE: KING OF THE JUNGLE event in Singapore back in February 28th, just before the COVID-19 scare became a full-blown pandemic.  “We at ONE Championship are delighted to once again host the world’s most exciting martial arts events. I would like to personally thank all the fans for their continued support for our organization and our athlete," said Hua Fung Teh, ONE Champmionship Group President said. "Shanghai served as the perfect backdrop for the prestigious ONE Hero Series, which aims to showcase the absolute best in rising young martial arts talent from China." "By enforcing strict safety and sanitary measures, we made sure to prioritize the health and well-being of everyone who made these back-to-back events a huge success. As a result, ONE Hero Series was able to share the very best of martial arts with the world, showcasing the power of the human spirit," he continued.  According to the official press release, ONE Championship made sure to adhere to necessary protocols to ensure the safety of everyone involved in the show, which was shot and aired on Chinese broadcast platforms.  "ONE Championship established necessary protocols and procedures to ensure all athletes, staff, and contractors operated in a safe and sanitary environment with extensive medical testing, travel history questionnaires, adherence to CDC Guidelines with sanitation practices, social distancing strategies, daily symptoms monitoring, and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). The organization continues to prioritize the health and safety of everyone involved in holding the world’s most exciting martial arts events through meticulous planning and stringent execution," the release read.    ONE Hero Series 13 Official Results - Strawweight Mixed Martial Arts bout: Ze Lang Zha Xi defeats Liang Hui by Unanimous Decision (UD) after 3 rounds - Catch Weight Kickboxing bout (71.8kg): Luo Chao defeats Zhao Jun Chen by Split Decision (SD) after 3 rounds - Flyweight Kickboxing bout: Yang Hua defeats Wei Zi Qin by Split Decision (SD) after 3 rounds - Flyweight Mixed Martial Arts bout: Wang Zhen defeats Zou Jin Bo by Split Decision (SD) after 3 rounds - Lightweight Mixed Martial Arts bout: Fu Kang Kang defeats Wang Hu by Submission (Rear Naked Choke) at 3:29 minutes of round 2 ONE Hero Series 14 Official Results - Catch Weight Kickboxing bout (72.0kg): Xu Liu defeats Zhao Xiao Yu by Unanimous Decision (UD) after 3 rounds - Featherweight Mixed Martial Arts bout: Zhu Kang Jie defeats Ayijiake Akenbieke by Unanimous Decision (UD) after 3 rounds - Bantamweight Kickboxing bout: Fu Qing Nan defeats Yuan Peng Bin by Split Decision (SD) after 3 rounds - Lightweight Mixed Martial Arts bout: Zhang Ze Hao defeats Gao Bo by Knockout (KO) at 3:43 minutes of round 1 - Strawweight Mixed Martial Arts bout: Li Zhe defeats Mo Hao Xiong by Submission (Rear Naked Choke) at 3:16 minutes of round 1  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 22nd, 2020

Four champion martial artists who are also champion dads

Father’s Day comes but once a year, and is a time to celebrate the incredible patriarchs in our lives who have guided us through our toughest challenges. They are the foundation of every family, working tirelessly through day and night to make sure the people they love are happy and safe. This Father’s Day, let’s honor the men in our lives who embody strength, discipline, and loyalty. Great fathers provide their children with a feeling of security, both physically and emotionally, but aren’t afraid to let them stumble and fall in order for them to learn the lessons they need to make it through life.  These four men have given their children the gift of martial arts, but more importantly have also proven to be amazing dads. Ken Lee Brazilian jiu-jitsu and taekwondo black belt, Ken Lee, introduced martial arts to his children at a young age because he believes it can help develop them into great fighters, not just in competition, but also in life. Together with his wife Jewelz -- also a champion martial artist -- they’ve raised four incredible children, including reigning ONE Women’s Atomweight World Champion Angela Lee, and ONE Lightweight World Champion Christian Lee. Their two youngest children, Adrian and Victoria, are both on their way to following in their footsteps. Needless to say, martial arts is the family tradition. “Martial arts has always been a way of life for my family,” said Lee. But as much as he is the powerful voice in each of his children’s corners whenever they compete, Lee takes pride in being their father first and foremost. Guiding their careers, he says, is only his second priority. “I will always be their father first and coach second. As a father, the most important thing for me when it comes to my children is their safety and good health, that they are happy and able to live their dreams,” said Lee. Mark Sangiao Filipino martial arts icon Mark “The Machine” Sangiao is a well-known pioneer in the Philippines’ local martial arts community. He is a loving father to two boys, and a father-figure to his students in the famed Team Lakay. Many seek Sangiao out for his wisdom, not just in competing at the highest levels of martial arts, but also for his experience in traversing the hardships of life. The principles he imparts on his two sons, and many young Team Lakay athletes who could very well be considered his own children, have helped guide them down the right path. “As a father, what matters most for me when it comes to my children is providing them what they need,” said Sangiao.  “I’m not just referring to their material or financial needs, but most importantly giving enough attention to their emotional, psychological, and spiritual well-being. It is essential that I can provide these to my children, because these are the very core of their development and formation as good and responsible people.” Sangiao has cultivated and developed many world champions, including former titleholders Eduard Folayang, Honorio Banario, Geje Eustaquio, and Kevin Belingon, as well as ONE Strawweight World Champion Joshua Pacio. While his eldest son Jhanlo has decided to take after his father in becoming a martial artist, Sangiao says he would support his children regardless of their chosen profession. “I may end up raising a martial artist, a gardener, a businessman, a lawyer -- it doesn’t matter. I will raise them the exact same way. I will support whatever they want to be in life, and what they want for their future. I just want to raise my children to be good, strong, and responsible people,” said Sangiao. Eduard Folayang For two-time former ONE Lightweight World Champion and Team Lakay veteran Eduard “Landslide” Folayang, being a father means imparting his wisdom to his children, and helping them become good members of society. Folayang is a proud father to two young girls, and hopes to instill in them the right values and principles. “I think we have to give our children the right principles to live by. They must be strong in both the body and the mind, but also kind and generous,” said Folayang. While he will support his children no matter what they decide to do when they get older, Folayang still plans on introducing them to martial arts, which is what helped turn his life around as a young man raised in hardship and poverty. “Being a father feels great. I do want my children to practice martial arts. It’s a great way of life and will teach them a lot of lessons. I just want them to find their own talents and help make the world a better place,” said Folayang. Danny Kingad Former ONE World Title challenger and ONE Flyweight World Grand Prix Championship Finalist Danny “The King” Kingad is relatively new to fatherhood, with his son Gleurdan Adrian becoming his pride and joy after being born just two years ago.  Being a father, Kingad says, is his single greatest purpose, and he vows to do everything in his power to give his son a good life. “I want to spend every day with my son. It’s important to me to be there for him. I want to help prepare him for the challenges life will bring,” said Kingad. Kingad grew up a troubled youth who fell into bad company and many vices. It wasn’t until he discovered martial arts that his life gained meaning and direction. He hopes to one day introduce martial arts to Gleurdan, when his son is ready. “Martial arts was a saving grace for me, and I learned a lot from training and competing. I would love for my son to learn the core values that martial arts instilled in me when I was younger. I think it will teach him a lot about respect and honor. But of course, I’m here to support my son in whatever he wants to be in life,” said Kingad. “What’s important to me is that he learns to be humble and respectful, and most especially strong, to be able to handle tough times. Having a strong mind is the best asset of a martial artist.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 21st, 2020

How Pinoy athletes kept winning during the lockdown

Sporting events may be suspended or canceled, but that won't stop your favorite Filipino athletes from inspiring or entertaining people as they spend their extra time off doing worthwhile activities during the lockdown period. From reaching out to affected communities to learning a new skill, here are what your idols are up to during the community quarantine. 1)  Proudly serving the nation as frontliners Some athletes have taken their in-game dedication off the court, as they proudly serve the country as frontliners during the COVID-19 pandemic. MPBL players such as Bacoor City's Eric Acuña and Bacolod-Master Sardines' Jopher Custodio are currently heeding the call as frontliners for the Philippine Army, as well as their fellow soldiers UST women’s volleyball coach Kung Fu Reyes and volleyball star Jovelyn Gonzaga. Pasay Voyager's Dhon Reverente also suited up for the Philippine Navy while his teammate Jesse Bustos is serving in the frontlines in another way, using his camera as a photojournalist for a daily newspaper.  2)  Raising funds and holding donation drives Your beloved players continue to exemplify teamwork in these challenging times as they help the dedicated frontliners and affected households in different parts of the country. UST student-athletes joined former Golden Tigresses star Sisi Rondina in auctioning their jerseys for a cause to donate supplies to the frontliners of Barangay Luz in Cebu City. Meanwhile, volleyball legends Alyssa Valdez and Charo Soriano led a fundraiser called "Volleyball Community Gives Back PH," which aims to supply frontliners in the country with PPEs and other essentials—with celebrities like Kathryn Bernardo and Pia Wurtzbach joining their cause. Former DLSU Lady Spikers standout and Creamline utility spiker Michele Gumabao also provided relief packs and gave them personally to the affected communities in Pampanga with the help of the group Your 200 Pesos. 3)  No days off for training and getting the gains Leagues and competitions may have been put on hold, but athletes won't be stopped from keeping themselves in tiptop shape. Observing quarantine, ONE Championship's heavyweight champion Brandon Vera took his workout to the forest, preparing for his upcoming bout against Arjan Bhullar, while Team Lakay fighters, such as Eduard Folayang, Kevin Belingon, and Joshua Pacio improvised household materials as gym equipment. National athletes, such as karateka Junna Tsukii, wushu artist Agatha Wong, and Olympic medalist Hidilyn Diaz, did rigorous training sessions at home to keep themselves in form for upcoming tournaments. High-flyer Ricci Rivero also taught his fans some basic dribbling drills to improve basketball handles—as seen in an episode of "Upfront" on LIGA cable sports channel. 4) Unlocking new skills and focusing on fave hobbies Your fave sports idols also overcame boredom by learning new skills and focusing on their favorite hobbies. For instance, DLSU Green Archers guard Aljun Melecio learned to cook scrumptious lechon while taking a time-out from the hardwood. UAAP volleyball champion and national team player Rex Intal also reminded us that he is a dedicated painter with his mixed portrait of Kobe Bryant and Michael Jordan, channeling his passion for sports and art into one. And did you know that top local setter Jia Morado is a talented photographer? Check out her Instagram and be amazed by her works. 5)  Taking their talents to TikTok Athletes joined the trending TikTok craze as a source of entertainment during the lockdown. Former UAAP stars Kim Kianna Dy and Jema Galanza posted their dance covers of Young Thug's "Relationship," and Deanna Wong took on "The Weekend" dance challenge. UST Golden Tigresses' rookie Imee Fernandez also wowed the TikTok crowd with a pre-workout dance video, which garnered over 600,000 views online. For Ateneo Blue Eagles guard SJ Belangel, TikTok has also been his avenue to overcome his shyness, doing hilarious skits online.   6)  Becoming stars online No live sports to entertain the audiences? It's not a problem for these athletes who continue to provide fun content to every sports fan, with the help of ABS-CBN Sports. Catch Shaun Ildefonso as he does an entertaining commentary about everything sports on "SRSLY." Also watch Cherry Nunag’s wacky chikahan with famous athletes in "Kalye Confessions: Stay-at-Home Edition." Lastly, the lockdown won't stop the basketball conversation as Beau Belga chats with your favorite hoop idols online, while still chowing down on their fave treats on "Extra Rice with Beau Belga." Watch all of these on ABS-CBN Sports' Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and YouTube channel. Also stay tuned for more new offerings from the sports arm of ABS-CBN.  These athletes have proven they are truly winners in and out of the court. While waiting for live sports to return, you can rewatch the best games of these athletes on LIGA (SD channel 86 and HD channel 183 on SKYCable) and game highlights and special features on ABS-CBN Sports' social media pages and official YouTube account. ABS-CBN Sports will continue its commitment to providing a variety of world-class, exciting, and inspiring content to every Pinoy sports fan. Visit sports.abs-cbn.com and follow @ABSCBNSports on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. For updates, you may also visit www.abs-cbn.com/newsroom or follow @ABSCBNPR on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 8th, 2020

ONE champ Joshua Pacio now lives in the Team Lakay gym…literally

For the last couple of months, athletes like reigning ONE Strawweight World Champion Joshua “The Passion” Pacio of Team Lakay have been left with little to no alternative but to work out from home, thanks to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and the quarantines, lockdowns, and restrictions that it brought upon.  Pacio and his Team Lakay teammates have been doing a good job of keeping themselves fit even during home quarantine, but at some point, elite athletes will need to log in some gym time.  While Baguio and Benguet have already transitioned to General Community Quarantine, there remains no word as to when fitness establishments, like Team Lakay’s gym in La Trinidad, will be allowed to open up again.  (READ ALSO: Team Lakay mentor Mark Sangiao looking forward to re-opening gym once lockdown is lifted) Because of this, Pacio has decided to move into the gym for the time being in order to be able to train properly.  “If you’re an athlete you can always train at home but it’s different from the gym,” Pacio shared with ONE Championship. “When I train, I always want to improve by one percent every day. I decided to live in the gym because I know we have athletes there who can work with me.” Joining Pacio in the gym are teammates Jhanlo Sangiao, Edilberto Coquia Jr., Carlo Von Bumina-ang, and Renato Hepolito Jr.  According to Team Lakay head coach Mark Sangiao, former champs Eduard Folayang and Kevin Belingon also drop by the gym, but only when they absolutely need to.  “We have two rooms where we can stay, with beds,” Pacio said. “I’m just lucky to get a pass that’s why I have access to this gym,” said Pacio.  The 24-year old Pacio is on arguably the best stretch of his young career, regaining the ONE Strawweight World Championship against Yosuke Saruta back in mid-2019 and successfully defending it against Rene Catalan and former champion Alex Silva since.  The young champion, who can already be considered the promotion’s best strawweight ever, is always on a mission of self-improvement, and finding a way to get gym time in - even if it means living in it - is a testament to his hard work and dedication.  “Even though I am already at the top, I know that I have a lot of quality opponents waiting for me,” Pacio said. “Even though we’re in this situation, I have to find ways to improve.” Pacio admits that the quarantine took a toll on his fitness, but believes that he can get back on track in no time.  “Now I know I am still far from my desired shape, especially with my weight,” Pacio said. “But if they give me a date, I know I can quickly catch up. I am ready to return any time this year,” he concluded......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 3rd, 2020

Rivero sees former UE player Pasaol as his basketball influence

Former University of the East star Alvin Pasaol is Ricci Rivero’s spirit animal. The University of the Philippines standout considers the 3x3 basketball sensation as the player who left a lasting impact and influence in his game. Speaking in the ‘Athletes’ Tribune’ podcast, Rivero shared how the burly UE forward pushed him to improve and be better. He recalled how the do-it-all Pasaol gave him fits when the Red Warrior bullied his way to a career-high 49 points three years ago when Rivero was still a part of the then defending champion De La Salle University. “Siguro 1 to 5 si Alvin Pasaol. Kasi grabe ‘di talaga siya yung usual na player eh. I’ll give yung first five talaga kay Kuya Alvin,” Rivero, who celebrated his 22nd birthday on Monday, said when asked about his top 5 toughest UAAP rivals. “Sobrang dami ko ring natutunan sa kanya kung paano yung UAAP career ko lalo na nu’ng nasa La Salle ako.” Known for his quick hands and defense, Rivero was one of the players sent in by then head coach Aldin Ayo to mark Pasaol, who was wreaking havoc for UE on the defensive end that memorable Season 80 match on October 4, 2017. Rivero could only scratch his head while Pasaol effortlessly punched through his defense each time he had to switch to stop the rampaging Red Warrior. “Tsina-challenge ako ni Coach Aldin to try and stop nga si Alvin,” he said. “Parang may time pa ata alam ko na ‘yung most points scored ata sa UAAP kay Pasaol tapos kalaban kami nu’n. ‘Yun pa ata yunng sobrang lakas ng lineup ng La Salle eh.” Indeed, Pasaol was unstoppable that game even for a solid Green Archers side that had former Most Valuable Player Ben Mbala and Abu Tratter. Pasaol connected 20-of-30 from the field and broke the 15-year league record held by NorthPort and Letran assistant coach Jeff Napa, who registered 43 points while playing for National University in 2002. “Nu’ng time na ‘yun ‘di ko talaga alam ang gagawin ko parang dun ko rin nalaman na naggu-grow ako kasi sobrang daming moments na, ‘Ah pwede pala yun?’ Na ‘Oo nga no pwede pala ‘yan. Grabe nagawa niya mga ganun.’ Doon mo mari-realize na parang one step ahead siya sa amin,” said Rivero. Unfortunately, Pasaol’s effort wasn’t enough to lift the Red Warriors as DLSU took the win, 106-100. But it left a lasting impression on Rivero. “That moment na ‘yun pinanood ko ‘yung videos for how many times and I try to understand them kung paano niya ginagawa, paano niya basahin ang basketball niya,” he said. That match turned Rivero into a fan of Pasaol. He saw an inspiration in Pasaol. Rivero learned a lot from him that day. Now playing for the Fighting Maroons, Rivero will always be thankful for the lessons he learned while taking on the Big Red Machine from UE.   “Ang dami kong natutunan sa kanya as a player and as a young boy who looks up to someone na nakalaban niya,” said Rivero.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 25th, 2020

Makati FC workouts going digital

Makati FC has its football workouts going digital in this challenging time. The effort to launch the Makati FC online training is for the club to address the need of the young athletes to stay active, refresh what they have been taught and learn new concepts in the new normal. “As we wait and hope […].....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 17th, 2020

PH once ruled Asian basketball

PHILIPPINE basketball history is rich with legendary athletes from the 1900s to the present time. However, local hoop followers, whether the young from the Generation X or the new wave of millenials, know not much from the halcyon days of local basketball. Filipinos reigned supreme in the biennial Far Eastern Games (FEG), winning nine of […] The post PH once ruled Asian basketball appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 5th, 2020

Cabagnot creates pipeline for Filipino promising prospects in North America

With Kai Sotto making a name for himself in the US while showcasing his skills for Atlanta-based The Skills Factory, it may very well be just a matter of time before a full-blooded Filipino is playing in the NBA. Even better, there are also several promising prospects with Filipino blood who have a shot of their own - chief among them Jalen Green who has made a groundbreaking decision to jump from high school straight to the G League. Indeed, the Philippines is slowly but surely marking its territory in global basketball - and that just means that, slowly but surely as well, more and more avenues have to be built to facilitate that. One of those avenues is newly founded Fil-Am Nation Select, a program that aims to "provide a platform for exposure and education about the process of playing in the Philippines." "We have the talent. We just need to build the platform and awareness so more Filipino-foreigners can definitely be identified as being Filipino," founder Christian Gopez said. Gopez kickstarted Fil-Am Nation Select in December 2019 with the help of cousin Alex Cabagnot.         View this post on Instagram                       A post shared by Fil-Am Nation Select (@filamnationselect) on Jan 21, 2020 at 12:49am PST According to the program, it aims to answer the age-old questions of Filipino-foreigners regarding citizenship, passports, and playing for Gilas Pilipinas. As Gopez put it, "Our ultimate goal is to be the one-stop shop to discover all Filipino-foreign athletes across the globe. We are already working alongside Gilas especially about the key factor of holding dual citizenship." He then continued, "We also hope to provide more options for all colleges in the Philippines to be able to recruit from our platform." Thus far, Fil-Am Nation Select has hosted a visit from head coach Pat Aquino of five-peat UAAP Women's champion National University. In all, the program came to be because Gopez and Cabagnot, the longtime point guard of dynastic San Miguel Beer, wanted to make noise for Philippine basketball in North America. "We talked about how do we get Philippine basketball more exposure here in the US and Canada. Here with us, all Filipinos can showcase their talents and be recognized at our events," the former shared. He also added, "Just to clarify, however, we are not agents. We are a platform that helps agents and recruiters to seek players." To be part of the program, Gopez said that young talents aged 10 to 18 should attend at least one of their regional camps in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Hawaii. The best of the best, 25 each for boys and girls, would then be invited to a summit where college coaches from the Philippines would also be. In the future, those regional camps would then be expanded to Arizona, Florida, New Jersey, New York, Virginia, Chicago, Las Vegas, and Seattle. And even further, Fil-Am Nation Select may very well reach Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver, and Winnipeg in Canada as well as Australia, Italy, and United Kingdom.         View this post on Instagram                       A post shared by Fil-Am Nation Select (@filamnationselect) on Apr 18, 2020 at 8:50am PDT --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 28th, 2020

'TheLastDance: Quickfire reactions fro the first two episodes

The Last Dance shook up the sports world. Michael Jordan’s docuseries about his final season as a Chicago Bull released its first two episodes and safe to say, we’re off to a great start. The Philippines got its fix Monday afternoon through Netflix. Here are some quickfire reactions by local sports people on the first two episodes of Michael Jordan’s The Last Dance. Just about that time ???? #TheLastDance — Gabe Norwood (@GNorwood5) April 20, 2020 Favorite MJ lines from ep 1. 1. Dont let Jerry in 2. Jerry, you wanna do lay ups with us? 3. So those are the pills you take to keep you short! ???????????? #TheLastDance — Nico Salva (@nico8salva) April 20, 2020 Goosebumps!! #TheLastDance pic.twitter.com/i7afaJqfpS — L.A Tenorio (@LA_Tenorio) April 20, 2020 30min after and I’m still unable to move out of my seat. I was just staring at nothing for a good five minutes after watching #TheLastDance. Can’t wait to see the reaction of athletes regardless of age (and pati narin the viewing/streaming numbers) after watching the 1st 2 eps. — Boom Gonzalez (@gamedaywithboom) April 20, 2020 Here too are some reactions from NBA stars after watching Episodes 1 and 2 of The Last Dance. Michael Jordan’s Last Dance was fantastic and I loved all two hours of it!! Young fans that never got to see Michael play now understand why he’s the ???? of basketball! — Earvin Magic Johnson (@MagicJohnson) April 20, 2020 #TheLastDance ... Mike really was different different — Damian Lillard (@Dame_Lillard) April 20, 2020 “I think it’s pretty easy” -MJ Basically. ????????‍?? — Trae Young (@TheTraeYoung) April 20, 2020 #TheLastDance man wow! Can’t wait until next Sunday. — Victor Oladipo (@VicOladipo) April 20, 2020 If I had 3 wishes in life. I think I would have asked for #TheLastDance — DWade (@DwyaneWade) April 20, 2020 New episodes release over at Netflix Philippines every Monday.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8 .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 20th, 2020