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& lsquo;No-disconnection& rsquo; policy extended

Energy Regulatory Commission on Thursday ordered distribution utilities to stop any disconnection on account of non-payment of bills until Dec. 31, 2020......»»

Category: financeSource: thestandard thestandardOct 30th, 2020

Consumer group backs & lsquo;no-disconnection& rsquo; rules issued by ERC

Consumers led by the Power for People Coalition on Wednesday expressed support to the declaration of the Energy Regulatory Commission extending the “no-disconnection” policy for non-paying customers until the end of the year......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 15th, 2020

& lsquo;Go Local, Buy Local& rsquo; drive draws support

Calls to “go and buy local” to revive and strengthen the local agriculture sector and food manufacturing industry to boost food supply and bolster economic recovery amid the COVID-19 pandemic are gaining momentum, according to policy think tank Stratbase ADR Institute......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 10th, 2020

No power disconnection policy extended

Low-usage power consumers can now heave a sigh of relief as distribution utilities have been ordered to extend the “no disconnection” policy until the end of the year......»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsOct 31st, 2020

& lsquo;Young retirees& rsquo; trigger shift in Tourism policy

Tourism chief Bernadette Romulo-Puyat said the Philippine Retirement Authority (PRA) board of trustees would move to repeal its current policy allowing foreigners as young as 35 years old to retire in the Philippines......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 22nd, 2020

ERC set to extend & lsquo;no-disconnection& rsquo; notice

The Energy Regulatory Commission will soon ask electric cooperatives and distribution utilities to extend the “no-disconnection” notice until the end of the year to help consumers cope with the impact of the coronavirus pandemic, an official of the agency said Tuesday......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsOct 13th, 2020

DOJ rejects accusation of & lsquo;red-tagging& rsquo; policy

Department of Justice officials on Friday told legislators that the agency is confident on its mechanism on the investigation of political violence and does not need to have a “policy of red-tagging.”.....»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsSep 18th, 2020

SEA GAMES: The silver that glittered like gold

When the editorial staff of ABS-CBN Sports was tasked to come up with our most memorable coverage, it didn’t take long for this writer to respond. The Philippine men’s volleyball team’s Southeast Asian Games semifinal match was the first thing that came to mind. Pesonally, that game against the highly-fancied Thailand squad topped all the countless volleyball matches that I’ve covered in my career. I’m at a loss for words on how to describe the emotions I felt that chilly night of December 8, 2019. Around 6,700 fans filled the PhilSports Arena in Pasig City not knowing that what they were about to witness was something historic. A magical night that would take away the frustrations they felt the day before when the more popular women’s team finished the preliminary round winless. For us sportswriters covering that assignment, we knew the Filipinos were up for a tough ride. Thailand ruled the last four editions of the event. On the other hand, the Philippines’ last significant outing in the biennial meet was a bronze medal finish back in 1991 – or when the current national team’s oldest member, setter Jessie Lopez was just five-years old.      Did we doubt our own team? Let’s just say we prayed to the high heavens to give us something positive to write about. But don’t get us wrong. Those who followed the formation and preparation of the squad knew it would yield results come the SEA Games. After all, in all three batches of the Nationals that participated in the regional sports meet since 2015, this particular team had the longest time to prepare – around eight months to be exact. The team’s composition itself looked really promising. For the first time, two of country’s best hitters in Marck Espejo and Bryan Bagunas, who both have experience playing in the Japan V. League,  donned the tricolors together. Espejo returned after skipping the 2017 edition so did his teammates in the 2015 squad Rex Intal and setter Ish Polvorosa. Bagunas was on his second tour of duty along with team captain John Vic De Guzman, Mark Alfafara, RanRan Abdilla and libero Jack Kalingking. Head coach Dante Alinsunurin, who was appointed to handle the team after Oliver Almadro and Sammy Acaylar in 2015 and 2017, respectively, tapped an old hand in Lopez and injected young bloods in playmaker Owa Retamar, Jau Umandal, Kim Malabunga, Ricky Marcos and Francis Saura. As part of their buildup the Nationals joined the Thailand Open Sealect Tuna Championship July last year.          The Filipinos achieved a great feat when they won bronze. Fans were able to witness the Nationals’ campaign via YouTube streaming while we volleyball writers, got to file our full stories through the help of De Guzman and Bagunas (God bless their beautiful hearts) who supplied us with game stats and granted postgame interviews. It’s just a shame I never got to cover the team’s training in Japan when the Nationals’ preparation went on full throttle. (Note: A little confusion in the training camp coverage assignments had me flying to Japan with the women’s squad and Lance Agcaoili of Spin.ph joining the men’s team. But it was a great experience, nonetheless, and I’m grateful for Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. for the opportunity.)     I was as confused as the other sportswriters present during the draw for the group stage a couple of months before the SEA Games when Alinsunurin chose to join the four-team bracket with Indonesia, Vietnam and Cambodia. Those three teams are considered contenders every SEA Games edition. And earning a semifinal spot would be harder compared to the other group composed of Thailand, Myanmar and Singapore. Fortunately, the gamble was worth it. Espejo and Bagunas were superb offensively, Malabunga and Retamar made their presence felt and the Nationals’ blocking shocked Cambodia and Vietnam as the Filipinos swept them both to secure a semis seat.   Then came the steamrolling Indonesians. Honestly, I thought the Nationals would sweep their way to the group’s top seeding. That way the PHI’s would've avoided a semis clash with Thailand. Forced to take on the defending champions, the Filipinos found themselves down in the first set. They got back in the second frame before yielding the third. And when the Thais came to match point, 24-21, in the fourth we all thought it was over. Fans were slowly emptying the bleachers not wanting to see the impending defeat. I was already waiting for the final score. Ready break the result. Then a miracle happened. The Nationals nibbled on the Thais' lead to force a deuce. After another deadlock, the Filipinos stole the set. The fifth frame was classic story of ‘who wants it more will win.’ An extended set made it even more dramatic. I vividly remember that sequence when Bagunas hammered the game-clinching kill off a lob from Lopez. After that all that I can recall was me pumping my fist up in the air and slapping the hardest high-fives I ever did with those inside the press room while howling like a madman.    The national team assured itself of a silver after 42 years. A silver after four freaking decades. They did it. Of course, the Indonesians bullied their way to winning the gold medal in a sweep of the inexperienced Filipinos. But who cares, the host team exceeded its podium expectations. That silver that glittered like gold made that coverage truly memorable. But it never crossed my mind that it would be the last important volleyball event that I will get to report. (Note: It would’ve been the UAAP if not for the health crisis that put all sporting events to a halt. Sad.) And that’s why I ended up writing these last few paragraphs. A farewell from this section. From my first article for this website back on December 1, 2014 – a post-mortem of Petron’s breakthrough title in the Philippine Superliga Grand Prix – to my last published story, these were all written with only one thing in mind: in the service of the Filipino sports fan worldwide. Our run may have not been perfect, of course, we had our flaws. We had our fair share of criticisms from fans, athletes, sports personalities and sometimes even from our partner leagues and properties. We accepted our shortcomings. We tried to be better. But we are proud of what we did. We take pride with how we delivered sports stories through various digital executions that showcased sports beyond the confines of competition. On midnight of September 1 while most of you lay sound asleep, deep in slumber, hopefully, having a good dream and hours away from waking up looking forward to a better day, this website will be snapped out of existence.  More than half a decade of sharing stories to the Filipino sports fan will be seeing its last presence online on Monday – a holiday to celebrate the nation’s heroes. This website will then hear its final buzzer, its final whistle. Thousands of articles – written with passion, dedication and love – will be taken down as this website goes offline together with majority of ABS-CBN Sports’ social media accounts. But soon, hopefully, it will once again see the light of day.    We do hope that you will remember us, for we will remember all of you who made us your Kapamilya.   -- 30 --   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles Mark Escarlote has served as a sub-section editor for ABS-CBN Sports' website since 2014. He is among thousands of ABS-CBN employees who will be retrenched on August 31, 2020.   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 29th, 2020

SEA GAMES: The silver that glittered like gold

When the editorial staff of ABS-CBN Sports was tasked to come up with our most memorable coverage, it didn’t take long for this writer to respond. The Philippine men’s volleyball team’s Southeast Asian Games semifinal match was the first thing that came to mind. Pesonally, that game against the highly-fancied Thailand squad topped all the countless volleyball matches that I’ve covered in my career. I’m at a loss for words on how to describe the emotions I felt that chilly night of December 8, 2019. Around 6,700 fans filled the PhilSports Arena in Pasig City not knowing that what they were about to witness was something historic. A magical night that would take away the frustrations they felt the day before when the more popular women’s team finished the preliminary round winless. For us sportswriters covering that assignment, we knew the Filipinos were up for a tough ride. Thailand ruled the last four editions of the event. On the other hand, the Philippines’ last significant outing in the biennial meet was a bronze medal finish back in 1991 – or when the current national team’s oldest member, setter Jessie Lopez was just five-years old.      Did we doubt our own team? Let’s just say we prayed to the high heavens to give us something positive to write about. But don’t get us wrong. Those who followed the formation and preparation of the squad knew it would yield results come the SEA Games. After all, in all three batches of the Nationals that participated in the regional sports meet since 2015, this particular team had the longest time to prepare – around eight months to be exact. The team’s composition itself looked really promising. For the first time, two of country’s best hitters in Marck Espejo and Bryan Bagunas, who both have experience playing in the Japan V. League,  donned the tricolors together. Espejo returned after skipping the 2017 edition so did his teammates in the 2015 squad Rex Intal and setter Ish Polvorosa. Bagunas was on his second tour of duty along with team captain John Vic De Guzman, Mark Alfafara, RanRan Abdilla and libero Jack Kalingking. Head coach Dante Alinsunurin, who was appointed to handle the team after Oliver Almadro and Sammy Acaylar in 2015 and 2017, respectively, tapped an old hand in Lopez and injected young bloods in playmaker Owa Retamar, Jau Umandal, Kim Malabunga, Ricky Marcos and Francis Saura. As part of their buildup the Nationals joined the Thailand Open Sealect Tuna Championship July last year.          The Filipinos achieved a great feat when they won bronze. Fans were able to witness the Nationals’ campaign via YouTube streaming while we volleyball writers, got to file our full stories through the help of De Guzman and Bagunas (God bless their beautiful hearts) who supplied us with game stats and granted postgame interviews. It’s just a shame I never got to cover the team’s training in Japan when the Nationals’ preparation went on full throttle. (Note: A little confusion in the training camp coverage assignments had me flying to Japan with the women’s squad and Lance Agcaoili of Spin.ph joining the men’s team. But it was a great experience, nonetheless, and I’m grateful for Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. for the opportunity.)     I was as confused as the other sportswriters present during the draw for the group stage a couple of months before the SEA Games when Alinsunurin chose to join the four-team bracket with Indonesia, Vietnam and Cambodia. Those three teams are considered contenders every SEA Games edition. And earning a semifinal spot would be harder compared to the other group composed of Thailand, Myanmar and Singapore. Fortunately, the gamble was worth it. Espejo and Bagunas were superb offensively, Malabunga and Retamar made their presence felt and the Nationals’ blocking shocked Cambodia and Vietnam as the Filipinos swept them both to secure a semis seat.   Then came the steamrolling Indonesians. Honestly, I thought the Nationals would sweep their way to the group’s top seeding. That way the PHI’s would've avoided a semis clash with Thailand. Forced to take on the defending champions, the Filipinos found themselves down in the first set. They got back in the second frame before yielding the third. And when the Thais came to match point, 24-21, in the fourth we all thought it was over. Fans were slowly emptying the bleachers not wanting to see the impending defeat. I was already waiting for the final score. Ready break the result. Then a miracle happened. The Nationals nibbled on the Thais' lead to force a deuce. After another deadlock, the Filipinos stole the set. The fifth frame was classic story of ‘who wants it more will win.’ An extended set made it even more dramatic. I vividly remember that sequence when Bagunas hammered the game-clinching kill off a lob from Lopez. After that all that I can recall was me pumping my fist up in the air and slapping the hardest high-fives I ever did with those inside the press room while howling like a madman.    The national team assured itself of a silver after 42 years. A silver after four freaking decades. They did it. Of course, the Indonesians bullied their way to winning the gold medal in a sweep of the inexperienced Filipinos. But who cares, the host team exceeded its podium expectations. That silver that glittered like gold made that coverage truly memorable. But it never crossed my mind that it would be the last important volleyball event that I will get to report. (Note: It would’ve been the UAAP if not for the health crisis that put all sporting events to a halt. Sad.) And that’s why I ended up writing these last few paragraphs. A farewell from this section. From my first article for this website back on December 1, 2014 – a post-mortem of Petron’s breakthrough title in the Philippine Superliga Grand Prix – to my last published story, these were all written with only one thing in mind: in the service of the Filipino sports fan worldwide. Our run may have not been perfect, of course, we had our flaws. We had our fair share of criticisms from fans, athletes, sports personalities and sometimes even from our partner leagues and properties. We accepted our shortcomings. We tried to be better. But we are proud of what we did. We take pride with how we delivered sports stories through various digital executions that showcased sports beyond the confines of competition. On midnight of September 1 while most of you lay sound asleep, deep in slumber, hopefully, having a good dream and hours away from waking up looking forward to a better day, this website will be snapped out of existence.  More than half a decade of sharing stories to the Filipino sports fan will be seeing its last presence online on Monday – a holiday to celebrate the nation’s heroes. This website will then hear its final buzzer, its final whistle. Thousands of articles – written with passion, dedication and love – will be taken down as this website goes offline together with majority of ABS-CBN Sports’ social media accounts. But soon, hopefully, it will once again see the light of day.    We do hope that you will remember us, for we will remember all of you who made us your Kapamilya.   -- 30 --   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles Mark Escarlote has served as a sub-section editor for ABS-CBN Sports' website since 2014. He is among thousands of ABS-CBN employees who will be retrenched on August 31, 2020.   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 28th, 2020

WHAT IF... Dawn Macandili landed in Ateneo?

Dawn Macandili is a La Sallian through and through. From prep to college, the former Lady Spikers libero was under the De La Salle University education system. Macandili’s volleyball career started during her grade school days in DLSU-Lipa that eventually landed her a ticket to DLSU-Zobel. There she won three UAAP titles and eventually won three more with the Lady Spikers  in college. The diminutive defense specialist wore the green and white with great pride. With that said, it’s hard to imagine Macandili wearing any other color. But then what if she did? Besides, Macandili admited that she did try to get into other schools for college in case her DLSU entrance exam didn't go out well. “Nag-try din ako mag-entrance exam sa ibang school kasi siyempre baka naman ang kapal ng mukha ko ‘De La Salle ako tapos bumagsak pala ako,’” said Macandili laughing during her appearance on Volleyball DNA hosted by Anton Roxas and Denden Lazaro. She mentioned two schools, Ateneo de Manila University and College of St. Benilde. So what if Macandili chose to don the blue and white instead of sister-schools DLSU and CSB’s colors? Now that’s interesting. Imagine the UAAP Season 78 and 79 Best Receiver and Season 78 Best Digger Macandili playing alongside Lazaro for the Lady Eagles. For sure, it will be a nightmare for the opposing teams considering the caliber of these liberos. Of course, Macandili would definitely take the backseat in her first two years in Seasons 76 and 77 as it would still be Lazaro’s and all-around hitter Ella De Jesus’ show. But with Lazaro and De Jesus exhausting all their playing eligibility after Season 77, the national team standout would’ve been Ateneo’s game-changer in Season 78. Macandili would’ve saved the Lady Eagles from their Achilles’ Heel: floor defense. Ateneo was sixth in digs and third in reception that season. She would’ve lightened up the defensive load on Ateneo hitters Alyssa Valdez and Jho Maraguinot. Her presence would also give the Lady Eagles a last line of defense in case opposing hitters got past middles Bea De Leon and Amy Ahomiro. And of course, it would’ve been quite a sight to watch the connection of Macandili with setter Jia Morado in Ateneo’s transition from defense to offense.         With these pieces set, the Lady Eagles’ reign might even be extended to a three-peat. Macandili’s last two seasons in Ateneo would surely be a challenging one after the departure of Valdez after Season 78 and Morado foregoing her final year in Season 80. But then again with a veteran in Macandili at the helm, Ateneo’s chances of winning another crown would’ve been higher.   ---     Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 26th, 2020

CHED to schools and universities: Follow guidelines

The Commission on Higher Education stressed the importance of putting the students’ safety first and to follow government guidelines and protocols after the alleged training sessions of some varsity teams amid the pandemic.   In a virtual meeting on Wednesday with the Philippine Sports Commission, Games and Amusement Board and Department of Health, which issued the Joint Administrative Order (JAO) on the conduct of physical activities and sports, CHED reminded universities and colleges to follow applicable guidelines. CHED Chairman Prospero De Vera III mentioned that their agency, which supervises tertiary education in the country, has issued several advisories and guidelines since March advising the students to stay home.  These were consistent with the guidelines issued by the IATF and the tri-agency-issued JAO.  “Safety of our students is the topmost concern,” said De Vera. This statement mirrors the constant stand and reminder of PSC Chairman Butch Ramirez who, in his statement related to this issue, said that the life and safety of athletes is “important that no medal can ever equal.”  In the same statement, Ramirez also advised sports officials to always keep the safety of their athletes “top priority.” University of Sto. Tomas is in hot water following the alleged ‘Sorsogon bubble’ of its men’s basketball team conducted by head coach Aldin Ayo. UAAP Executive Director Rebo Saguisag and Season 83 President Nonong Calanog said that the university in question is now finalizing their internal investigation and UAAP expects to receive the final report before their meeting on Friday.  The UAAP was also requested to seek clarification from National University, whose women’s volleyball athletes allegedly trained as well, despite government issued restrictions. PSC National Training Director Marc Velasco thanked De Vera and reiterated the PSC’s stance on the safety of athletes. “The PSC will always push to uphold the issuances regarding sports and physical activity and we are happy that CHED is a steady partner when it comes to sports in universities and colleges,” said Velasco. GAB Chairman Abraham Mitra appreciated the input of CHED saying that De Vera’s inputs “gave the group another perspective on these issues” and actively gave examples of how the GAB handles similar situation on professional sports. Also in the meeting were CHED Executive Directory Atty. Cindy Jaro and DOH Section Head of Policy and Technology Rodley Carza. The group expects to have representatives of the two universities join the next meeting set on September 1, where they hope to resolve the matter and take final action......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 26th, 2020

Over 100 movies, specials arrive for & lsquo;After School& rsquo; with YouTube Kids

With the extended time being spent at home, parents may be more open to allowing their children some extra screen-time. With this, it is even more important for parents to choose the right content for their kids and ensure a wholesome watching experience.To help parents keep their kids engaged, enriched and entertained, YouTube Kids is expanding its library of kid-friendly content with over 100 high-quality full-length movies and specials. .....»»

Category: techSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJul 31st, 2020

MORE Power investigates alleged & lsquo;sabotage& rsquo; causing electricity disruptions in Iloilo City

More Electric and Power Corp. said it is investigating the possible “sabotage” of its distribution facilities that led to the extended unscheduled power interruptions in Iloilo City over the weekend......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJun 23rd, 2020

NCAA looking at fewer sporting events for Season 96

With the fate of Season 96 still up in the air because of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the NCAA braces for the possibility of holding fewer sporting events in its calendar. Season 95 Management Committee (ManComm) chairman Peter Cayco said that because of the effects of the pandemic, which put Luzon and other parts of the country under community quarantine since March, some member schools might not be able to field teams in other non-mandatory sporting events. Member schools may opt to take a ‘leave of absence’ in those events except for mandatory sports basketball, swimming, volleyball and track and field. “’Yung mandatory na apat ‘yun muna,” said Cayco. “Ngayon ang rekomendasyon naman ni Fr. Vic (Calvo) ‘yung wala dun sa apat na events at mayroong mga schools na gustong lumaro na makaka-more than four teams sila eh ‘di tuloy.” Under the NCAA rules, a sporting event can only be held if there are at least four participating schools. The ManComm is also submitting a proposal to the Policy Board to push the opening of Season 96 to 2021 in compliance with the Inter-Agency Task Force directive of suspending all sporting events until the end of the year. Aside from the delayed opening, the committee is also recommending an extension for senior student-athletes affected by the cancellation of Season 95.   Affected second semester sports were volleyball, football, beach volleyball, athletics, lawn and soft tennis and cheerleading while completed events were basketball, chess, swimming, table tennis, taekwondo and demo sport 3x3 basketball.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 13th, 2020

NCAA ManComm to propose opening of Season 96 to 2021

With the country’s current situation amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the NCAA Management Committee is proposing to push back the opening of Season 96 to next year. “What's on the table now that we want the Policy Board to approve is we move Season 96 to 2021,” said Season 95 ManComm chairman Peter Cayco of Arellano University. Initially, the committee planned to move the opening of Season 96, which will be hosted by Letran, from July to November.   However, Cayco pointed out that they have to comply with the directives of the Inter-Agency Task Force including the suspension of sporting events until the end of the year. The ManComm official also added that with Luzon put under an enhanced community quarantine since March, it will take time for student-athletes to get back into competitive shape and for teams to prepare for the season. “Right now, we are following the directives of the IATF. Nagsabi na sila na there will be no sports activities until the end of the year,” said Cayco. “Number two, if for example January 1, puwede na sports activities, ‘yung atleta natin puro wala sa kondisyon ‘yan,” he added. “Of course, alam naman natin na iba ‘yung practice shape sa game shape. Siguro it would take at least three months to get them back in shape. That would be March already. Then, Holy Week na on April. So we are looking at May or June.” Part of the committee’s proposal is to hold friendly games among member schools to aid in their preparations. “We would host 'friendlies'. Meaning pre-season games na parang FilOil among NCAA schools,” said Cayco. But all will still be up to the Policy Board to decide. “Pina-finalize na namin tapos i-approve muna ng ManCom. Kasi in principle approved na ng ManCom kaya lang kailangan mong i-formalize muna into a resolution. Tapos forward namin sa Policy Board. Kung ma-approve 'yun na,” said Cayco. The NCAA announced the cancellation of Season 95 last March 19 because of the pandemic. Affected second semester sports were volleyball, football, beach volleyball, athletics, lawn and soft tennis and cheerleading. Completed events for Season 95 were first sem sporting events basketball, chess, swimming, table tennis, taekwondo and demo sport 3x3 basketball.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 12th, 2020

NCAA ManComm recommends extension for senior student-athletes

The NCAA Management Committee will propose to the Policy Board the extension of playing eligibility for senior student-athletes. Taking into consideration the unexpected cancellation of Season 95 because of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and the possible delay of Season 96 opening to 2021, the committee is looking to make some adjustments for affected senior athletes. The ManComm is recommending to raise the age limit for seniors in Season 96 and allowing those affected by the scrapping of Season 95 to take a second course to be eligible to play for another year.    “We are also proposing that we adjust our eligibility for the athletes whose tournaments were postponed or yung hindi natapos. Ni-rerequest namin sa Policy Board to give them another year of eligibility,” said Season 95 ManComm head Peter Cayco of Arellano University. Cayco cleared that the proposal is only for those seniors whose sporting events were cut short or cancelled entirely. Affected second semester sports because of the cancellation were volleyball, football, beach volleyball, athletics, lawn and soft tennis and cheerleading. Completed events for Season 95 were first sem sporting events basketball, chess, swimming, table tennis, taekwondo and demo sport 3x3 basketball. “Ang adjustments nu’ng sa academics papayagan lang natin ‘yan doon sa mga atleta na ‘yung di natapos ang tournament o ‘di talagang nagawa ang tournament,” said Cayco. Under the current NCAA rule, student-athletes who have finished their studies are not allowed to take graduate course or a second degree to extend their playing year. “Sa academics, di natin pinapayagan sa NCAA ang second course. Let’s say naka-graduate siya, for this season alone, ang rekomendasyon namin is payagan nating mag-enroll ng second course para lang makalaro,” said Cayco. With the ManComm pushing the opening of Season 96, which will be hosted by Letran, to May or June next year, Cayco said that they are looking to raise the age limit for seniors to 26. “Ang papasok naman sa kanila ay yung age factor,” he said. “Let’s say last playing year mo na because of age ngayong taon na ito eh naurong. Ang suggestion namin ay bigyan natin ng one more playing year.” “Gawin nating 26 sila just for the next season,” Cayco added. “Di siya precedent, gagawin lang natin kasi di naman kasalanan ni atleta na aa-cancel ang season nila.” This proposal, according to Cayco, will just be an adjustment for Season 96. But when the situation ‘normalizes’, they will revert back to the league’s old rules.       --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 12th, 2020

& lsquo;Dobol B Sa News TV& rsquo; turns 3

Daily newscast Dobol B Sa News TV celebrates another successful year and takes “Serbisyong Totoo” up a notch as it continues with its extended programming to deliver more relevant news and commentaries especially while the nation faces challenging times......»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 28th, 2020

DOF expects & lsquo;very bad& rsquo; tax haul in April

Finance Secretary Carlos Dominguez III said Monday he expects a “very bad” tax collection performance this month amid the implementation of enhanced community quarantine in Luzon that was extended until April 30......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 20th, 2020

PVL, PSL vow to make unified tournament happen

The dream of a unified tournament that will pit the best teams from the country’s two prestigious club volleyball leagues is looking bright with both camps vowing to make it happen. Officials from the Premier Volleyball League and the Philippine Superliga had a series of meetings since December last year to plot a unified all-Filipino competition that fans have been waiting to see for years. “I’m talking with (PSL) chairman Philip Juico and may mga inaayos pa kami,” said PVL organizer Sports Vision president Ricky Palou. Unfortunately, the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic halted the talks with Luzon put under enhanced community quarantine that has been extended until April 30. But both sides are looking forward to come back to the table once the ECQ is lifted. “As soon as the government announces that it is safe to hold sporting events again such as the PBA, or volleyball tournaments such as ours, we will get back to work and get back where we left off in our talks,” said PSL president Dr. Ian Laurel, who once worked with Sports Vision as an analyst for the defunct V-League, which was rebranded as the PVL in 2017. To be finalized are the guidelines and format as well as the duration of the tournament. Also to be settled are the officiating, the number of participating teams and the broadcast. ABS-CBN S+A airs the PVL while TV5 is the broadcast partner of the PSL.    “I cannot say at what percent we are towards our goal kasi there are still things that we need to settle like the officiating, the tournament format among others,” Laurel said. “So I cannot say na talagang on the go na. But I can say that both parties are 100 percent committed on working together.” Initially, both camps are looking to unwrap the tournament around August but with the COVID-19 situation, the project might be pushed back next year. Because of the contagion, the PSL was forced to suspend its ongoing import-flavored Grand Prix while the PVL has yet to begin its Season 4. The PVL is looking to tweak its calendar by holding the Open Conference as its season-opener instead of the Reinforced Conference.    “Initially, dapat this year [ang tournament] but ‘yun nga with how the things are going with the coronavirus and everything baka next year na,” according to Palou. The PVL official added that they have to iron out the number of participating teams. Both leagues currently have eight active club teams each. “PSL wants all the teams involved. I met with the team owners before all of this noong January. The feeling of the team owners ng PVL ay eight teams ay masyadong mahaba ang tournament,” said Palou. “They are looking at a shorter tournament. Maybe 'yung top four teams lang ng PVL and PSL and we will not play each other anymore kasi nga may ranking na rin naman sa mga liga para it will be a shorter tournament,” he added. If the unified tourney pushes through fans will get to witness PVL stars like Alyssa Valdez, Jema Galanza, Myla Pablo, Jia Morado, Maddie Madayag and Bea de Leon go up against Kalei Mau, Ara Galang, Aby Marano, Jaja Santiago, Mika Reyes, Kim Fajardo, Dawn Macandili and Rachel Anne Daquis of the PSL. It will also pit PVL’s top clubs Creamline, PetroGazz, BanKo and Motolite against PSL powerhouse squads F2 Logistics, Petron, Chery Tiggo (Foton) and Cignal. Ultimately, it will be a groundbreaking project for Philippine volleyball fans.     “We want to make it happen for volleyball fans,” said Laurel. “This is for them. This is for Philippine volleyball.”   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 19th, 2020

Tugade extends & lsquo;rental holiday& rsquo; of airport tenants to end of April

The Department of Transportation extended the “rental holiday” for airport concessionaires until end of April to help the aviation industry amid the COVID-19 pandemic......»»

Category: financeSource:  thestandardRelated NewsApr 17th, 2020

Coaches hope for extension on senior players

Coaches are looking forward to the possibility of giving seniors whose swan songs were cut short because of the cancellation of the UAAP Season 82 volleyball tournament an extension.  The UAAP Board last week decided to scrap the remainder of the season following the extension of the enhanced community quarantine in Luzon to April 30 amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. UAAP volleyball ran for only a week or a total of four playdates. With the abrupt and unexpected end of the season, there is clamor for the league to consider giving the seniors another year to play. The UAAP in its statement regarding the cancellation said that ‘all other issues will be resolved at the proper time.’      “Talking of another season, it is very disappointing for many seniors not only in UP,” said University of the Philippines mentor Godfrey Okumu, who has key seniors who were supposed to play their last year for the Fighting Maroons. According to the existing UAAP rules, only those who are under 25 years old before the eligibility deadline will be allowed to play.     If given an extension, UP seniors Tots Carlos, Isa Molde, Jessma Ramos, Marist Layug, Rem Cailing and Justine Dorog, are still eligible at least under the age requirement. “Most of my seniors are only 21 years old, so if their eligibility is extended, it is my sincere hope that they may choose to play,” added Okumu, whose squad had a 1-1 win-loss record before the cancellation. “But I will not want us to cross that bridge now, until we get to it.” Coach Oliver Almadro of women’s defending champion Ateneo de Manila University is just waiting for the UAAP Board’s decision on the matter. Seniors Kat Tolentino turned 25 last January, Jamie Lavitoria will be 26 this year while Jho Maraguinot is just 24.     “I haven’t talked to my graduating seniors what’s the next step,” said Almadro. “We just have to wait and see what the UAAP Board’s decision on eligibility, etc.” National University coach Norman Miguel has two key seniors in his Season 82 lineup in returning Risa Sato and Audrey Paran. Sato will turn 26 in October while Paran will turn 23 in December.   “I remember one time, we have brought this up to the team that there may be a possibility na ma-extend ang playing years ng mga seniors like Risa and Audrey,” said Miguel, whose Lady Bulldogs won all of their two outings. “Pero wala pa akong nakuhang sagot sa kanila that time, and since magkakalayo pa kami ngayon.” On the other hand, Far Eastern University men’s team mentor Rei Diaz is not pressuring his seniors JP Bugaoan, Peter Quiel, Jude Garcia, Owen Suarez and Kris Silang to stay in case of an extension.  “Siyempre may kanya-kanyang plano din sila pagka-graduate nila. Sa ngayon support muna tayo sa plan nila kung anumang maging desisyon nila rerespetuhin natin,” he said. “Although some of them nagsabi na tutulong pa rin sila sa team at kung may pagkakataon eh lalaruin nila. ‘Yung iba pinag-iisipan pa nila.” The UAAP Board is set to meet after the lifting of the ECQ.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 16th, 2020