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'IkawNa: Female TV host jackpot na sa career, swerte pa sa lovelife

MAY bagong talk show na binuo ang isang TV network pero hindi pa ito masimulan dahil ang isa sa host ay naka-lock in pa sa ginagawa nitong teleserye. Hindi naman siya puwedeng magpaalam sa production dahil mahalaga ang karakter niya. Ang sabi sa amin ng isang source, “Hihintayin kung kelan siya available na saka pa […] The post #IkawNa: Female TV host jackpot na sa career, swerte pa sa lovelife appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerNov 22nd, 2020

2 payo ni Kuya Germs sinusunod pa rin ni Manilyn; Gabbi swerte na sa lovelife, jackpot pa sa career

HANGGANG ngayon ay buhay na buhay pa rin sa puso at isip ni Manilyn Reynes ang mga alaala ni German “Kuya Germs” Moreno. Napakalaki ng tinatanaw na utang na loob ng Kapuso singer-actress sa yumaong TV host-comedian at hindi raw niya makakalimutan ito habang siya ay nabubuhay. Ayon kay Mane, may dalawang payo ang TV […] The post 2 payo ni Kuya Germs sinusunod pa rin ni Manilyn; Gabbi swerte na sa lovelife, jackpot pa sa career appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 6th, 2020

'Ikaw na ang lucky: Lovi Poe swerte na sa career, jackpot pa sa lovelife

Personal na acting coach ang kinuha ni Lovi Poe nang manatili sa Los Angeles, California sa loob ng limang buwan. Hindi siya pormal na nag-aral sa isang acting school doon dahil bawat araw ay may isang acting coach siyang kasama para mas mapalawak pa ang kanyang talento sa pag-arte. “Hindi siya acting school. It’s not […] The post #Ikaw na ang lucky: Lovi Poe swerte na sa career, jackpot pa sa lovelife appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 25th, 2019

Rayver swerte pa rin sa career kahit may pandemya; ‘All-Out Sundays’ balik-studio na

    BALIK-STUDIO na ang “All-Out Sundays” na napapanood tuwing Linggo nang tanghali sa GMA 7. Pero hindi pa raw ito talaga live kundi “taped as live” lang at tuwing Sabado ang schedule ng taping. Kaya masaya ang singer-actor-host na si Rayver Cruz dahil sa wakas ay makakatuntong na ulit siya ng GMA pagkatapos ng […] The post Rayver swerte pa rin sa career kahit may pandemya; ‘All-Out Sundays’ balik-studio na appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 9th, 2020

Sylvia swerte na sa career, jackpot pa sa negosyo

SIGURADONG proud nanay ang award-winning actress na si Sylvia Sanchez sa achievements ng kanyang mga anak na sina Arjo at Ria Atayde. In fairness, talagang umaariba silang mag-iina sa mundo ng showbiz – puro papuri ang natatanggap ni Ibyang sa Kapamilya series na Pamilya Ko habang humahataw naman ang Bagman 2 ni Arjo sa iWant. […] The post Sylvia swerte na sa career, jackpot pa sa negosyo appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 20th, 2019

IN PHOTOS: The ABS-CBN Ball looks of Coleen Garcia-Crawford

MANILA, Philippines — Coleen Garcia has always been among the public's favorite female personalities since she started her showbiz career. Coleen started in TV commercials, then to become a regular host on It's Showtime. She then left to concentrate on movies and TV projects such as Pasion de Amor, ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 10th, 2019

Serena vs. Sharapova set for prime time on Day 1 of US Open

By Howard Fendrich, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — Serena Williams vs. Maria Sharapova is, not surprisingly, getting primetime billing at the U.S. Open. The two tennis stars' 22nd career meeting — and first at Flushing Meadows — will be the opening act in Arthur Ashe Stadium for the night session on Monday as the year's last Grand Slam tournament gets started. "Of course I'm going to watch it. I know you all are going to watch it. I think everyone in New York is going to watch it," defending champion and No. 1 seed Naomi Osaka said Friday. "Yeah, I mean, for me, I'm not that surprised that that happened, because, like, at every Grand Slam, there is always some sort of drama. You know what I mean? Like a first round. Like, 'Oh, my God!'" The U.S. Tennis Association announced the show-court schedules for both Day 1 and Day 2. That includes 15-year-old Coco Gauff in action at Louis Armstrong Stadium on Tuesday. The first match in the main stadium Monday will be French Open champion Ash Barty against Zarina Diyas, followed by defending men's champion and No. 1 seed Novak Djokovic against Roberto Carballes Baena. Then at night, Williams-Sharapova will be followed by 20-time Grand Slam champion Roger Federer against qualifier Sumit Nagal. Williams owns 23 major singles trophies, while Sharapova has five. Both have been ranked No. 1. They've met at every other major tournament at least once, including in a final at each, but never before at the U.S. Open. Williams has won 18 matches in a row against Sharapova, and leads their overall series 19-2. In Louis Armstrong Stadium on Monday, the day slate includes Williams' older sister, two-time U.S. Open champion Venus, 2016 runner-up Karolina Pliskova and No. 5 seed Daniil Medvedev, while the night program features three-time major champ Stan Wawrinka and 2017 U.S. Open runner-up Madison Keys. Tuesday's participants in Ashe include Osaka and two-time French Open finalist Dominic Thiem during the afternoon, with 18-time major title winner Rafael Nadal and 2017 U.S. Open champion Sloane Stephens in action at night. In addition to Gauff's first-round match against Anastasia Potapova, Day 2 in Armstrong will include two-time major champion Simona Halep and Australian Open semifinalist Stefanos Tsitsipas in the afternoon, along with two-time Australian Open champion Victoria Azarenka and the combustible Nick Kyrgios against American Steve Johnson at night. ___ RULES RECAP In an effort to avoid the sort of confusion that reigned over last year's U.S. Open final between Serena Williams and Naomi Osaka, the U.S. Tennis Association wants to make the sport's rules — and chair umpires' rulings — clearer to on-site spectators and TV viewers. So when a player is warned by an official about a code violation — getting coaching during a match, say, or destroying a racket — that will be displayed on the scoreboard. "It's not a constant marker there," U.S. Open chief umpire Jake Garner said Friday. "It's just when the violation occurs, it will show up on the board at the moment it's given." The USTA decided against allowing match officials speak to the media after a contest involving controversy or questions, but Garner or tournament referee Soeren Friemel — both are new appointees — might be made available. Two other rules tweaks this year: The excessive heat rule will allow for 10-minute breaks for all men's or women's matches, whether or not they already were in progress when the weather reached a point of being dangerous to players; women can now only have one bathroom or change-of-clothing break per three-set match, not two. ___ TOKYO'S TEAM? Host Japan might not get to field its dream mixed doubles team for tennis at the next year's Summer Olympics. That's because Kei Nishikori thinks playing with Naomi Osaka might just be too much tennis in Tokyo. The 2014 U.S. Open runner-up is planning to play singles and men's doubles at the 2020 Games and for now isn't thinking about adding mixed doubles to his plans. "Very hot, very humid, playing singles and two doubles — I don't know if I can," Nishikori said at Flushing Meadows on Friday. A Nishikori-Osaka duo not only would be expected to contend for a medal in Tokyo — it would be among the most popular pairings in Olympic tennis history. Osaka, who moved from Japan to the United States when she was 3, is the No. 1 ranked women's player and the reigning champion at both the U.S. Open and Australian Open. Nishikori, who also left Japan to live in the United States, is No. 7 in the current ATP rankings. At last year's U.S. Open, he and Osaka became the first Japanese male and female players to reach the semifinals of the same Grand Slam tournament. They're also friends who have played video games together. But what about Olympic tennis together? "I haven't thought too much yet, honestly," Nishikori said. "I don't know. I will talk to Naomi later." ___ AP Sports Writer Brian Mahoney contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 24th, 2019

Billy, Coleen swerte sa lovelife at career

Billy, Coleen swerte sa lovelife at career.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 28th, 2016

Coaching great John Thompson of Georgetown dead at 78

By JOSEPH WHITE AP Sports Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — John Thompson, the imposing Hall of Famer who turned Georgetown into a “Hoya Paranoia” powerhouse and became the first Black coach to lead a team to the NCAA men’s basketball championship, has died. He was 78 His death was announced in a family statement released by Georgetown on Monday. No details were disclosed. “Our father was an inspiration to many and devoted his life to developing young people not simply on but, most importantly, off the basketball court. He is revered as a historic shepherd of the sport, dedicated to the welfare of his community above all else,” the statement said. “However, for us, his greatest legacy remains as a father, grandfather, uncle, and friend. More than a coach, he was our foundation. More than a legend, he was the voice in our ear everyday.” One of the most celebrated and polarizing figures in his sport, Thompson took over a moribund Georgetown program in the 1970s and molded it in his unique style into a perennial contender, culminating with a national championship team anchored by center Patrick Ewing in 1984. Georgetown reached two other title games with Thompson in charge and Ewing patrolling the paint, losing to Michael Jordan’s North Carolina team in 1982 and to Villanova in 1985. At 6-foot-10, with an ever-present white towel slung over his shoulder, Thompson literally and figuratively towered over the Hoyas for decades, becoming a patriarch of sorts after he quit coaching in 1999. One of his sons, John Thompson III, was hired as Georgetown’s coach in 2004. When the son was fired in 2017, the elder Thompson -- known affectionately as “Big John” or “Pops” to many -- was at the news conference announcing Ewing as the successor. Along the way, Thompson said what he thought, shielded his players from the media and took positions that weren’t always popular. He never shied away from sensitive topics -- particularly the role of race in both sports and society -- and he once famously walked off the court before a game to protest an NCAA rule because he felt it hurt minority athletes. “I’ll probably be remembered for all the things that kept me out of the Hall of Fame, ironically, more than for the things that got me into it,” Thompson said on the day he was elected to the Hall in 1999. Thompson became coach of the Hoyas in 1972 and began remaking a team that was 3-23 the previous season. Over the next 27 years, he led Georgetown to 14 straight NCAA tournaments (1979-92), 24 consecutive postseason appearances (20 NCAA, 4 NIT), three Final Fours (1982, 1984, 1985) and won six Big East tournament championships. Employing a physical, defense-focused approach that frequently relied on a dominant center -- Alonzo Mourning and Dikembe Mutombo were among his other pupils -- Thompson compiled a 596-239 record (.715 winning percentage). He had 26 players drafted by the NBA. One of his honors -- his selection as coach of the U.S. team for the 1988 Olympics -- had a sour ending when the Americans had to settle for the bronze medal. It was a result so disappointing that Thompson put himself on a sort of self-imposed leave at Georgetown for a while, coaching practices and games but leaving many other duties to his assistants. Off the court, Thompson was both a role model and a lightning rod. A stickler for academics, he kept a deflated basketball on his desk, a reminder to his players that a degree was a necessity because a career in basketball relied on a tenuous “nine pounds of air.” The school boasted that 76 of 78 players who played four seasons under Thompson received their degrees. He was a Black coach who recruited mostly Black players to a predominantly white Jesuit university in Washington, and Thompson never hesitated to speak out on behalf of his players. One of the most dramatic moments in Georgetown history came on Jan. 14, 1989, when he walked off the court to a standing ovation before the tipoff of a home game against Boston College, demonstrating in a most public way his displeasure against NCAA Proposition 42. The rule denied athletic scholarships to freshmen who didn’t meet certain requirements, and Thompson said it was biased against underprivileged students. Opposition from Thompson, and others, led the NCAA to modify the rule. Thompson’s most daring move came that same year, when he summoned notorious drug kingpin Rayful Edmond III for a meeting in the coach’s office. Thompson warned Edmond to stop associating with Hoyas players and to leave them alone, using his respect in the Black community to become one of the few people to stare down Edmond and not face a reprisal. Though aware of his influence, Thompson did not take pride in becoming the first Black coach to take a team to the Final Four, and he let a room full of reporters know it when asked his feelings on the subject at a news conference in 1982. “I resent the hell out of that question if it implies I am the first Black coach competent enough to take a team to the Final Four,” Thompson said. “Other Blacks have been denied the right in this country; coaches who have the ability. I don’t take any pride in being the first Black coach in the Final Four. I find the question extremely offensive.” Born Sept. 2, 1941, John R. Thompson Jr. grew up in Washington, D.C. His father was always working — on a farm in Maryland and later as a laborer in the city — and could neither read nor write. “I never in my life saw my father’s hands clean,” Thompson told The Associated Press in 2007. “Never. He’d come home and scrub his hands with this ugly brown soap that looked like tar. I thought that was the color of his hands. When I was still coaching, kids would show up late for practice and I’d (say) ... ‘My father got up every morning of his life at 5 a.m. to go to work. Without an alarm.‘” Thompson’s parents emphasized education, but he struggled in part of because of poor eyesight and labored in Catholic grammar school. He was moved to a segregated public school, had a growth spurt and became good enough at basketball to get into John Carroll, a Catholic high school, where he led the team to 55 consecutive victories and two city titles. He went to Providence College as one of the most touted basketball prospects in the country and led the Friars to the first NCAA bid in school history. He graduated in 1964 and played two seasons with Red Auerbach’s Boston Celtics, earning a pair of championship rings as a sparingly used backup to Bill Russell. Thompson returned to Washington, got his master’s degree in guidance and counseling from the University of the District of Columbia and went 122-28 over six seasons at St. Anthony’s before accepting the job at Georgetown, an elite school that had relatively few Black students. Faculty and students rallied around him after a bedsheet with racist words was hung inside the school’s gym before a game during the 1974-75 season. Thompson sheltered his players with closed practices, tightly controlled media access and a prohibition on interviews with freshmen in their first semester -- a restriction that still stands for Georgetown’s basketball team. Combined with Thompson’s flashes of emotion and his players’ rough-and-tumble style of play, it wasn’t long before the words “Hoya Paranoia” came to epitomize the new era of basketball on the Hilltop campus. Georgetown lost the 1982 NCAA championship game when Fred Brown mistakenly passed the ball to North Carolina’s James Worthy in the game’s final seconds. Two years later, Ewing led an 84-75 win over Houston in the title game. The Hoyas were on the verge of a repeat the following year when they were stunned in the championship game by coach Rollie Massimino’s Villanova team in one of the biggest upsets in tournament history. Success allowed Thompson to rake in money through endorsements, but he ran afoul of his Georgetown bosses when he applied for a gambling license for a business venture in Nevada in 1995. Thompson, who liked playing the slot machines in Las Vegas, reluctantly dropped the application after the university president objected. Centers Ewing, Mourning and Mutombo turned Georgetown into “Big Man U” under Thompson, although his last superstar was guard Allen Iverson, who in 1996 also became the first player under Thompson to leave school early for the NBA draft. “Thanks for Saving My Life Coach,” Iverson wrote at the start of an Instagram post Monday with photos of the pair. The Hoyas teams in the 1990s never came close to matching the achievements of the 1980s, and Thompson’s era came to a surprising and sudden end when he resigned in the middle of the 1998-99 season, citing distractions from a pending divorce. Thompson didn’t fade from the limelight. He became a sports radio talk show host and a TV and radio game analyst, joining the very profession he had frustrated so often as a coach. He loosened up, allowing the public to see his lighter side, but he remained pointed and combative when a topic mattered to him. A torch was passed in 2004, when John Thompson III became Georgetown’s coach. The younger Thompson, with “Pops” often watching from the stands or sitting in the back of the room for news conferences, returned the Hoyas to the Final Four in 2007. Another son, Ronny Thompson, was head coach for one season at Ball State and is now a TV analyst. ___ Joseph White, a former AP sports writer in Washington who died in 2019, prepared this obituary. AP Sports Writer Howard Fendrich contributed......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 15th, 2020

The 51st GMMSF-BOEA: List of winners for movies and TV categories

The 51st Guillermo Mendoza Memorial Scholarship Foundation Box-Office Entertainment Awards announced on Sunday, Oct. 18, the winners for this year’s annual show simulcast on YouTube and TV 5. The prestigious award-giving body honors Filipino actors, actresses and commercial success. Here are the winners: FILM Phenomenal Box Office Star – Kathryn Bernardo and Alden Richards (Hello, Love, Goodbye)Box Office King – Aga Muhlach (Miracle in Cell No. 7)Box Office Queen – Xia Vigor (Miracle in Cell No. 7)Film Actor of the Year – Alden Richards, Aga Muhlach (Hello, Love, Goodbye)Film Actress of the Year – Kathryn Bernardo (Hello, Love, Goodbye)Prince of Philippine Movies and Television – Enrique Gil (Alone / Together)Princess of Philippine Movies and Television – Liza Soberano (Alone / Together)Movie Supporting Actor of the Year – Joel Torre (Miracle in Cell No. 7)Movie Supporting Actress of the Year – Bella Padilla (Miracle in Cell No. 7)Most Popular Loveteam of Movies – Enrique Gil and Liza Soberano (Alone / Together)Most Promising Actor – JC Santos (Open Film, 2019)Most Promising Actress – Kim Molina (Jowable)Most Popular Film Producers – Olivia Lamasan and Carlo Katigbak (Star Cinema (ABS-CBN Film Productions, Inc.)Most Popular Film Screenwriter – Carmi Raymundo /Rona Go/Cathy Garcia-Molina (Hello, Love, Goodbye)Most Popular Film Director – Cathy Garcia-Molina (Hello, Love, Goodbye)Comedy Actor of the Year – Paolo Ballesteros (The Panti Sisters)Best Acting Ensemble in a Movie – Miracle in Cell No. 7 (VIVA Films) TELEVISION TV Actor of the Year for Primetime – Coco Martin (Ang Probinsyano)TV Actor of the Year for Daytime – JM De Guzman (Pamilya Ko)TV Actress of the Year for Primetime – Angel Locsin (The General’s Daughter)TV Actress of the Year for Daytime TV – Dimples Romana (Kadenang Ginto)Prince of Philippine Television – Joshua Garcia (The Killer Bride)Princess of Philippine Television – Janella Salvadaor (The Killer Bride)TV Supporting Actor of the Year – Tirso Cruz III (The General’s Daughter)TV Supporting Actress of the Year – Yassi Pressman (Ang Probinsyano)Most Popular Male Child Performer – Kenken Nuyad (Parasite Island)Most Popular Female Child Performer – Sophia Reola (Nang Ngumiti ang Langit)Most Popular Loveteam for Television – Miguel Tanfelix and Bianca Umali (Sahaya)Most Promising Loveteam for Television – Andrea Brillantes & Seth Fedelin (Kadenang Ginto)Most Promising Male Star for Television – Kyle Echarri (Kadenang Ginto)Most Promising Female Star for Television – Francine Diaz (Kadenang Ginto)Most Popular TV Program for News & Public Affairs – 24 ORAS (GMA Network)Most Popular TV Program for Primetime Drama – Ang Probinsyano (ABS-CBN)Most Popular TV Program for Daytime Drama – Kadenang Ginto (ABS-CBN)Most Popular TV Program for Talent Search, Reality, Talk and Game Show – Magandang Buhay (ABS-CBN)Most Popular TV Program for Musical-Variety – ASAP Natin ‘To (ABS-CBN)Male TV Host of the Year – Jose Manalo, Wally Bayola, Paolo Ballesteros (Eat Bulaga!)Female TV Host of the Year – Toni Gonzaga (Pinoy Big Brother Otso, The Voice Kids)Best Ensemble Performance – The General’s Daughter (ABS-CBN).....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 19th, 2020

Kalad Karen handang iwan ang career sa Pinas para sa British fiancé: Sa love, you have to choose

KUNG papipiliin ang TV host-comedienne na si Kalad Karen, handa siyang isakripisyo ang kanyang career para sa pagmamahal niya sa kanyang fiancé. Hindi magdadalawang-isip ang impersonator ni Karen Davila na iwan ang napakagandang career niya rito sa Pilipinas kapalit ng pagsasama nila ng British boyfriend na si Luke Wrightson. Kuwento ni Kalad Karen sa panayam […] The post Kalad Karen handang iwan ang career sa Pinas para sa British fiancé: Sa love, you have to choose appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 18th, 2020

Hugot ni Bea sa pagiging malas sa lovelife: Mas gusto ko pa ring magmahal

KAHIT na ilang beses nang minalas at nabigo sa larangan ng pag-ibig hindi pa rin sinusukuan ni Bea Alonzo ang love. Aminado ang Kapamilya actress na wala pa siyang swerte sa lovelife pero hindi pa naman siya umaabot sa salitang “trauma” at lalong wala naman siyang balak isumpa ang pakikipagrelasyon. Hindi man diretsahang binanggit ni […] The post Hugot ni Bea sa pagiging malas sa lovelife: Mas gusto ko pa ring magmahal appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 11th, 2020

‘Law of attraction’ epektib kay Maine: Kung para sa ‘yo, anuman ang mangyari mapapasayo…

LAHAT ng blessings at swerte na natanggap at dumating sa buhay ni Maine Mendoza ay tila produkto ng tinatawag na “law of attraction.” Naniniwala ang Phenomenal Star na kung para sa ‘yo talaga ang isang bagay, mapupunta ito sa yo kahit ano pa ang mangyari. Ibinahagi ng TV host-actress ang ipinost ng isa niyang loyal […] The post ‘Law of attraction’ epektib kay Maine: Kung para sa ‘yo, anuman ang mangyari mapapasayo… appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 9th, 2020

Things You Didn’t Know About Park So-Dam of ‘Record of Youth’

PARK SO-DAM gained international recognition in 2019 starring as Ki Jung (Jessica, only child from Illinois Chicago) in the multi-awarded, record-setting film Parasite. Not a lot of people know that she already had accomplished a lot in her career even before the international fame. Right now, she is creating buzz playing the lead female lead […] The post Things You Didn’t Know About Park So-Dam of ‘Record of Youth’ appeared first on Pinoy Parazzi......»»

Category: newsSource:  pinoyparazziRelated NewsSep 9th, 2020

Nar Cabico bongga ang career sa US; hamon nina Sanya at Gardo di inurungan ni Uge

    TULOY ang buhay at singing career ng Kapuso host-actor na si Nar Cabico sa Amerika. Ibinalita ng singer-comedian na kababalik lamang niya sa bahay nila sa Austin, Texas matapos ang ilang gigs sa Las Vegas, Nevada. Sa US inabutan ng lockdown si Nar noong kasagsagan ng COVID-19 pandemic kaya naman para hindi siya […] The post Nar Cabico bongga ang career sa US; hamon nina Sanya at Gardo di inurungan ni Uge appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 2nd, 2020

SEA GAMES: The silver that glittered like gold

When the editorial staff of ABS-CBN Sports was tasked to come up with our most memorable coverage, it didn’t take long for this writer to respond. The Philippine men’s volleyball team’s Southeast Asian Games semifinal match was the first thing that came to mind. Pesonally, that game against the highly-fancied Thailand squad topped all the countless volleyball matches that I’ve covered in my career. I’m at a loss for words on how to describe the emotions I felt that chilly night of December 8, 2019. Around 6,700 fans filled the PhilSports Arena in Pasig City not knowing that what they were about to witness was something historic. A magical night that would take away the frustrations they felt the day before when the more popular women’s team finished the preliminary round winless. For us sportswriters covering that assignment, we knew the Filipinos were up for a tough ride. Thailand ruled the last four editions of the event. On the other hand, the Philippines’ last significant outing in the biennial meet was a bronze medal finish back in 1991 – or when the current national team’s oldest member, setter Jessie Lopez was just five-years old.      Did we doubt our own team? Let’s just say we prayed to the high heavens to give us something positive to write about. But don’t get us wrong. Those who followed the formation and preparation of the squad knew it would yield results come the SEA Games. After all, in all three batches of the Nationals that participated in the regional sports meet since 2015, this particular team had the longest time to prepare – around eight months to be exact. The team’s composition itself looked really promising. For the first time, two of country’s best hitters in Marck Espejo and Bryan Bagunas, who both have experience playing in the Japan V. League,  donned the tricolors together. Espejo returned after skipping the 2017 edition so did his teammates in the 2015 squad Rex Intal and setter Ish Polvorosa. Bagunas was on his second tour of duty along with team captain John Vic De Guzman, Mark Alfafara, RanRan Abdilla and libero Jack Kalingking. Head coach Dante Alinsunurin, who was appointed to handle the team after Oliver Almadro and Sammy Acaylar in 2015 and 2017, respectively, tapped an old hand in Lopez and injected young bloods in playmaker Owa Retamar, Jau Umandal, Kim Malabunga, Ricky Marcos and Francis Saura. As part of their buildup the Nationals joined the Thailand Open Sealect Tuna Championship July last year.          The Filipinos achieved a great feat when they won bronze. Fans were able to witness the Nationals’ campaign via YouTube streaming while we volleyball writers, got to file our full stories through the help of De Guzman and Bagunas (God bless their beautiful hearts) who supplied us with game stats and granted postgame interviews. It’s just a shame I never got to cover the team’s training in Japan when the Nationals’ preparation went on full throttle. (Note: A little confusion in the training camp coverage assignments had me flying to Japan with the women’s squad and Lance Agcaoili of Spin.ph joining the men’s team. But it was a great experience, nonetheless, and I’m grateful for Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. for the opportunity.)     I was as confused as the other sportswriters present during the draw for the group stage a couple of months before the SEA Games when Alinsunurin chose to join the four-team bracket with Indonesia, Vietnam and Cambodia. Those three teams are considered contenders every SEA Games edition. And earning a semifinal spot would be harder compared to the other group composed of Thailand, Myanmar and Singapore. Fortunately, the gamble was worth it. Espejo and Bagunas were superb offensively, Malabunga and Retamar made their presence felt and the Nationals’ blocking shocked Cambodia and Vietnam as the Filipinos swept them both to secure a semis seat.   Then came the steamrolling Indonesians. Honestly, I thought the Nationals would sweep their way to the group’s top seeding. That way the PHI’s would've avoided a semis clash with Thailand. Forced to take on the defending champions, the Filipinos found themselves down in the first set. They got back in the second frame before yielding the third. And when the Thais came to match point, 24-21, in the fourth we all thought it was over. Fans were slowly emptying the bleachers not wanting to see the impending defeat. I was already waiting for the final score. Ready break the result. Then a miracle happened. The Nationals nibbled on the Thais' lead to force a deuce. After another deadlock, the Filipinos stole the set. The fifth frame was classic story of ‘who wants it more will win.’ An extended set made it even more dramatic. I vividly remember that sequence when Bagunas hammered the game-clinching kill off a lob from Lopez. After that all that I can recall was me pumping my fist up in the air and slapping the hardest high-fives I ever did with those inside the press room while howling like a madman.    The national team assured itself of a silver after 42 years. A silver after four freaking decades. They did it. Of course, the Indonesians bullied their way to winning the gold medal in a sweep of the inexperienced Filipinos. But who cares, the host team exceeded its podium expectations. That silver that glittered like gold made that coverage truly memorable. But it never crossed my mind that it would be the last important volleyball event that I will get to report. (Note: It would’ve been the UAAP if not for the health crisis that put all sporting events to a halt. Sad.) And that’s why I ended up writing these last few paragraphs. A farewell from this section. From my first article for this website back on December 1, 2014 – a post-mortem of Petron’s breakthrough title in the Philippine Superliga Grand Prix – to my last published story, these were all written with only one thing in mind: in the service of the Filipino sports fan worldwide. Our run may have not been perfect, of course, we had our flaws. We had our fair share of criticisms from fans, athletes, sports personalities and sometimes even from our partner leagues and properties. We accepted our shortcomings. We tried to be better. But we are proud of what we did. We take pride with how we delivered sports stories through various digital executions that showcased sports beyond the confines of competition. On midnight of September 1 while most of you lay sound asleep, deep in slumber, hopefully, having a good dream and hours away from waking up looking forward to a better day, this website will be snapped out of existence.  More than half a decade of sharing stories to the Filipino sports fan will be seeing its last presence online on Monday – a holiday to celebrate the nation’s heroes. This website will then hear its final buzzer, its final whistle. Thousands of articles – written with passion, dedication and love – will be taken down as this website goes offline together with majority of ABS-CBN Sports’ social media accounts. But soon, hopefully, it will once again see the light of day.    We do hope that you will remember us, for we will remember all of you who made us your Kapamilya.   -- 30 --   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles Mark Escarlote has served as a sub-section editor for ABS-CBN Sports' website since 2014. He is among thousands of ABS-CBN employees who will be retrenched on August 31, 2020.   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 29th, 2020

SEA GAMES: The silver that glittered like gold

When the editorial staff of ABS-CBN Sports was tasked to come up with our most memorable coverage, it didn’t take long for this writer to respond. The Philippine men’s volleyball team’s Southeast Asian Games semifinal match was the first thing that came to mind. Pesonally, that game against the highly-fancied Thailand squad topped all the countless volleyball matches that I’ve covered in my career. I’m at a loss for words on how to describe the emotions I felt that chilly night of December 8, 2019. Around 6,700 fans filled the PhilSports Arena in Pasig City not knowing that what they were about to witness was something historic. A magical night that would take away the frustrations they felt the day before when the more popular women’s team finished the preliminary round winless. For us sportswriters covering that assignment, we knew the Filipinos were up for a tough ride. Thailand ruled the last four editions of the event. On the other hand, the Philippines’ last significant outing in the biennial meet was a bronze medal finish back in 1991 – or when the current national team’s oldest member, setter Jessie Lopez was just five-years old.      Did we doubt our own team? Let’s just say we prayed to the high heavens to give us something positive to write about. But don’t get us wrong. Those who followed the formation and preparation of the squad knew it would yield results come the SEA Games. After all, in all three batches of the Nationals that participated in the regional sports meet since 2015, this particular team had the longest time to prepare – around eight months to be exact. The team’s composition itself looked really promising. For the first time, two of country’s best hitters in Marck Espejo and Bryan Bagunas, who both have experience playing in the Japan V. League,  donned the tricolors together. Espejo returned after skipping the 2017 edition so did his teammates in the 2015 squad Rex Intal and setter Ish Polvorosa. Bagunas was on his second tour of duty along with team captain John Vic De Guzman, Mark Alfafara, RanRan Abdilla and libero Jack Kalingking. Head coach Dante Alinsunurin, who was appointed to handle the team after Oliver Almadro and Sammy Acaylar in 2015 and 2017, respectively, tapped an old hand in Lopez and injected young bloods in playmaker Owa Retamar, Jau Umandal, Kim Malabunga, Ricky Marcos and Francis Saura. As part of their buildup the Nationals joined the Thailand Open Sealect Tuna Championship July last year.          The Filipinos achieved a great feat when they won bronze. Fans were able to witness the Nationals’ campaign via YouTube streaming while we volleyball writers, got to file our full stories through the help of De Guzman and Bagunas (God bless their beautiful hearts) who supplied us with game stats and granted postgame interviews. It’s just a shame I never got to cover the team’s training in Japan when the Nationals’ preparation went on full throttle. (Note: A little confusion in the training camp coverage assignments had me flying to Japan with the women’s squad and Lance Agcaoili of Spin.ph joining the men’s team. But it was a great experience, nonetheless, and I’m grateful for Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. for the opportunity.)     I was as confused as the other sportswriters present during the draw for the group stage a couple of months before the SEA Games when Alinsunurin chose to join the four-team bracket with Indonesia, Vietnam and Cambodia. Those three teams are considered contenders every SEA Games edition. And earning a semifinal spot would be harder compared to the other group composed of Thailand, Myanmar and Singapore. Fortunately, the gamble was worth it. Espejo and Bagunas were superb offensively, Malabunga and Retamar made their presence felt and the Nationals’ blocking shocked Cambodia and Vietnam as the Filipinos swept them both to secure a semis seat.   Then came the steamrolling Indonesians. Honestly, I thought the Nationals would sweep their way to the group’s top seeding. That way the PHI’s would've avoided a semis clash with Thailand. Forced to take on the defending champions, the Filipinos found themselves down in the first set. They got back in the second frame before yielding the third. And when the Thais came to match point, 24-21, in the fourth we all thought it was over. Fans were slowly emptying the bleachers not wanting to see the impending defeat. I was already waiting for the final score. Ready break the result. Then a miracle happened. The Nationals nibbled on the Thais' lead to force a deuce. After another deadlock, the Filipinos stole the set. The fifth frame was classic story of ‘who wants it more will win.’ An extended set made it even more dramatic. I vividly remember that sequence when Bagunas hammered the game-clinching kill off a lob from Lopez. After that all that I can recall was me pumping my fist up in the air and slapping the hardest high-fives I ever did with those inside the press room while howling like a madman.    The national team assured itself of a silver after 42 years. A silver after four freaking decades. They did it. Of course, the Indonesians bullied their way to winning the gold medal in a sweep of the inexperienced Filipinos. But who cares, the host team exceeded its podium expectations. That silver that glittered like gold made that coverage truly memorable. But it never crossed my mind that it would be the last important volleyball event that I will get to report. (Note: It would’ve been the UAAP if not for the health crisis that put all sporting events to a halt. Sad.) And that’s why I ended up writing these last few paragraphs. A farewell from this section. From my first article for this website back on December 1, 2014 – a post-mortem of Petron’s breakthrough title in the Philippine Superliga Grand Prix – to my last published story, these were all written with only one thing in mind: in the service of the Filipino sports fan worldwide. Our run may have not been perfect, of course, we had our flaws. We had our fair share of criticisms from fans, athletes, sports personalities and sometimes even from our partner leagues and properties. We accepted our shortcomings. We tried to be better. But we are proud of what we did. We take pride with how we delivered sports stories through various digital executions that showcased sports beyond the confines of competition. On midnight of September 1 while most of you lay sound asleep, deep in slumber, hopefully, having a good dream and hours away from waking up looking forward to a better day, this website will be snapped out of existence.  More than half a decade of sharing stories to the Filipino sports fan will be seeing its last presence online on Monday – a holiday to celebrate the nation’s heroes. This website will then hear its final buzzer, its final whistle. Thousands of articles – written with passion, dedication and love – will be taken down as this website goes offline together with majority of ABS-CBN Sports’ social media accounts. But soon, hopefully, it will once again see the light of day.    We do hope that you will remember us, for we will remember all of you who made us your Kapamilya.   -- 30 --   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles Mark Escarlote has served as a sub-section editor for ABS-CBN Sports' website since 2014. He is among thousands of ABS-CBN employees who will be retrenched on August 31, 2020.   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 28th, 2020

TV career ni Vice, hindi na mina-manage ng ABS-CBN

TRULILI  kaya na hindi na ang ABS-CBN ang nagma-manage sa television career ni Vice Ganda? Ayon sa nakuha naming tsika ay nagpa-release na si Vice sa ABS-CBN at ang Viva Artists Agency na lang ang solong magma-manage sa kanya. Ang Viva ang nangangalaga pagdating sa mga pelikula ng TV host-comedian at nadagdag nga  itong The […] The post TV career ni Vice, hindi na mina-manage ng ABS-CBN appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 15th, 2020

Lovelife hugot ni Vice: Kung mahal ko, go! Pero kung hindi na, wala na

HANDANG magsakripisyo at magpatawad si Vice Ganda hangga’t mahal niya ang taong karelasyon. Naniniwala ang TV host-comedian na kakamabal ng tunay na pagmamahal ang pag-intindi at pagpapasensiya sa iyong partner. Nakapagsalita muli si Vice tungkol sa usaping love sa “It’s Showtime,” nang aminin ng isang Tawag ng Tanghalan contestant na lagi silang nag-aaway ng girlfriend […] The post Lovelife hugot ni Vice: Kung mahal ko, go! Pero kung hindi na, wala na appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 13th, 2020

PBA: Chot says it would have been 'cool' to coach Ginebra

Coach Chot Reyes' greatest PBA success was with Talk 'N Text, the flagship MVP franchise. But over the course of his career in the PBA, which spanned two decades, Coach Chot also did his rounds with the SMC teams. He started his career with Purefoods, winning an All-Filipino title in his first conference in 1993. Reyes also had one random stop with San Miguel Beer, coaching the Beermen all the way to the 2007 Philippine Cup Finals. Now long-retired from professional basketball, Coach Chot wishes he could have had the chance to handle Barangay Ginebra, the only SMC team he missed. "I always thought it would be cool to coach Ginebra," Reyes said on Coaches Unfiltered. "Having that NSD [Never Say Die] behind you every night behind you, we always talk about that with coach Tim [Cone]. Sabi ko swerte mo. And he's [Cone] enjoying, he's really having the time of his life. I've always been intrigued by the chance to coach Ginebra," he added. While being the Gin Kings coach would have been nice, Reyes mentions another team in his list of what ifs. Reyes was the Ateneo coach back in the early 1990s, and he regrets not being able to lead the Blue Eagles to a UAAP championship. "The one thing I rue is not being able to give a championship for the Ateneo in the college level," Coach Chot said. "I coached Ateneo to a juniors championship, and I coached Ateneo for three years in the UAAP seniors, 1990-92, but those were the down years. We had to raise our own money to even buy our stuff and equipment. That's like sayang, if I had that opportunity when I was coaching Ateneo but I don't that's going to happen anymore now and I'm at peace with that," he added.   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 11th, 2020

Scottie Thompson: Ang sarap pala magsuot ng jersey na pula

Five years into his PBA career, Scottie Thompson is already a four-time champion with Ginebra. All but one of those have come at the expense of Meralco. Meaning, three of those have come at the expense of good friend Baser Amer. "Tatlong beses din kami pinagharap ni Baser sa Finals eh," Thompson said in last Friday's The Prospects Pod. "Parang sinadya e para makabawi." Things did not necessarily go this way for the old pals back in their days in college. In fact, it was very much the opposite. Thompson's five years for University of Perpetual Help completely coincided with San Beda University featuring Amer at guard. And in their second to fourth seasons, the two were matched up opposite each other in the Final Four. "Sa amin noon, ang goal (kapag kalaban) San Beda dahil lagi silang twice-to-beat, makaisa lang kami. Pag makaisa na, ibang usapan na yun kasi siyempre, mabibigay na namin sa kanila yung pressure," Perps' triple-double threat shared. He then continued, "Sa awa ng Diyos, 'di kami nakaisa." Indeed, each and every time, the Red Lions got the better of the Altas. "Nasira pangarap naming lahat eh," Thompson could only say. And each and every time, the red and white went on to win it all. In this light, you could say that three of Amer's four collegiate championships have come at the expense of Thompson. Now, though, the tables have turned. And apparently, Thompson has a theory as to why. "Iniisiip ko, bawing-bawi na, may bonus pa. Doon ko nasabi sa sarili ko na ang sarap pala magsuot ng jersey na pula," he said. He then continued, "Kailangan pala, red and white." Perpetual's colors are wine and gold while San Beda's are red and white. In the PBA, though, Thompson wears red and white for Ginebra while Amer wears orange, white, and navy blue for Meralco. Still, the NCAA 90 MVP made it clear that he is the player he is today also because of all those losses to the Red Lions. As he put it, "I think nag-grow ako lalo as a player nung lagi kaming tinatalo nina Baser sa Final Four. Suki kami dyan eh. Minsan na nga lang kami, hirap na ngang makapasok sa Final Four, sina Baser pa makakalaban. Jackpot lagi eh." He then continued, "At the same time, dun din naman kami na-motivate lalo nun. At hanggang ngayon, nandun yung ganung motivation sa akin." --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 8th, 2020