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PH shorts, Boracay docu go to Busan

Apart from Andrew Stephen Lee's short film "Manila is Full of Men Named Boy," there are two more Filipino entries in the Wide Angle section of the 23rd Busan International Film Festival in South Korea, from Oct. 4 to 13.   Joji Villanueva Alonso's short film "Last Order" and Kevin Piamonte's documentary "Land from God" are also included in the Wide Angle section.   Producer-turned-filmmaker Alonso recalled that her 17-minute film had received two invitations to compete in festivals abroad---in Pyongyang, North Korea and Busan, South Korea.   "Since I could only have one world premiere and since the invitation from Pyongyang came first, I accepted it,"...Keep on reading: PH shorts, Boracay docu go to Busan.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Sep 20th, 2018Related News

Justin and Hailey seen entering Marriage Bureau

It seems like wedding bells will be ringing soon for Justin Bieber and Hailey Baldwin.   A photo obtained by TMZ shows the couple entering the Marriage Bureau in New York City, reportedly to acquire a marriage license. Citing eyewitnesses inside the courthouse, TMZ said the pop superstar was crying and was overheard telling Hailey, "I can't wait to marry you, baby."   People magazine likewise claimed that Justin and Hailey are now planning "to have a real wedding." "They have hired a wedding planner and have been looking at venues," a source said.   Meanwhile, in an interview with The Cut, Hailey, the daughter of actor Stephen Baldwin, talked about her dr...Keep on reading: Justin and Hailey seen entering Marriage Bureau.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Sep 16th, 2018Related News

Defending champion Capitals have almost no camp competition

By Stephen Whyno, Associated Press ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — While smiles are in high supply at training camp for the defending Stanley Cup champion Washington Capitals, open jobs are not. Returning 18 of 20 the players who dressed in their Cup-clinching victory, the Capitals have almost no competition for roster spots going into the regular season. Barring injuries, the front office and coaching staff could pencil in probably 95 percent of the opening night roster before anyone hits the ice. "Obviously, I know our roster pretty well," general manager Brian MacLellan said Friday. "It's still going to be competitive on the fourth line. We're going to try to find a fourth line that we'd like to add a little bit more skill, a little more speed, and what we can do on the penalty kill." Alex Ovechkin, Evgeny Kuznetsov, Braden Holtby and the rest of Washington's championship core remaining intact leaves the likes of Travis Boyd and newcomers Nic Dowd and Sergei Shumakov competing for fourth-line roles. MacLellan figures there will also be a competition between veteran Brooks Orpik and young defensemen Christian Djoos and Madison Bowey for playing time on the third pairing. That's a far cry from a year ago when the Capitals lost a handful of key contributors and were looking for someone — anyone — to step up and fill voids. Those voids don't exist this year given that only fourth-line center Jay Beagle and backup goaltender Philipp Grubauer aren't around. "You never know what's going to happen tomorrow because it's hockey stuff," Ovechkin said. "It's hard when your friends and when some of your teammates left, especially when you win the Cup, but there's a salary cap. ... It's hard to keep." It wasn't hard this time. The Capitals signed pending free agent defenseman John Carlson before he hit the market and re-signed playoff hero Devante Smith-Pelly and deadline pickup Michal Kempny. Their low turnover is similar to what the Pittsburgh Penguins had when they repeated as Cup champions. Todd Reirden replacing Barry Trotz as coach after four years as his top assistant is the biggest change. Reirden knows the roster as well as anyone and won't lie to players about opportunities, but he's trying to set them up to compete for spots that might come open because of injuries. "It's a different kind of competition," Reirden said. "You can't predict it, but all the players that are in camp, they know that there's competition. And whether that's competition for Day One of the season, Day 21 or 121 that there's a chance for them to be a part of a team that is the defending Stanley Cup champs." Dowd saw a chance to win a full-time job with the defending champions and jumped at the opportunity. The 28-year-old who has played for the Kings and Canucks wants to show he can bring everything Beagle did and provide some more offense. He's trying not to wonder every day in camp about where he stands in making the team. "I spent my first two to three years of pro hockey going into training camp trying to split the atom and trying to get in the minds of the coaches and, 'Why am I here, why I am there in the lineup, why am I this group, why am I in that group?'" Dowd said. "A lot of the time it makes no difference where you sit in practices and all that, and it just puts more stress on yourself in worrying about that." Most players at Capitals camp don't have much to worry about because they know where they'll be in October when the season starts. It's almost certain Pheonix Copley is Holtby's backup with prospect Ilya Samsonov in the American Hockey League with Hershey, and neither Bowey nor Djoos will be sent to the minors. Boyd, who played one playoff game during the Cup run, can't be sure and knows he's fighting for a job. "I didn't want to walk in here and think that I'm on the team," Boyd said. "I don't think I am. I definitely think that obviously there's some guys here that are good players too, trying to gain ahold of I guess the one or two spots that are open." NOTES: Carlson and center Lars Eller are nursing minor lower-body injuries that caused them to miss the first day of on-ice work. ... Reirden says the Capitals will take only a handful of veteran players to Boston for the preseason opener Sunday because the Bruins will have a big chunk of their team in China for exhibition games there......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsSep 15th, 2018Related News

ADB, Vanuatu, Zero Mass Water Commission Clean Technology to Deliver Safe, Reliable Drinking Water

TANNA, VANUATU (27 August 2018)- Asian Development Bank (ADB) Vice-President Mr. Stephen Groff today joined Vanuatu's Minister of Education and Training Mr. Jean-Pierre Nirua and Zero Mass Wate.....»»

Source: Philippinetimes PhilippinetimesCategory: NewsSep 14th, 2018Related News

ADB, Vanuatu, Zero Mass Water Commission Clean Technology to Deliver Safe, Reliable Drinking Water

TANNA, VANUATU (27 August 2018)- Asian Development Bank (ADB) Vice-President Mr. Stephen Groff today joined Vanuatu's Minister of Education and Training Mr. Jean-Pierre Nirua and Zero Mass Wate.....»»

Source: Manilanews ManilanewsCategory: NewsSep 14th, 2018Related News

Here s why Chris Webber should be in the Hall of Fame

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst C-Webb needs to be in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. My Turner colleague Chris Webber has always brought out polarizing opinions -- first as a player, and now as a broadcaster. And I’m not objective when it comes to him, either. I love the guy. He’s a true student of the game, not afraid to speak his mind on and off the court, and is someone whose love for the game knows no equal. It’s just a matter of time before he gets his chance to run a team, either in the front office or as a part-owner. But it will and should happen. And, after his impactful career as a player, he should be enshrined in Springfield. Everyone’s criteria for the Hall is different. To me, getting in the Hall as a player requires a yes answer to two questions: 1) were you among the very best at your position for a substantial period of time during your career, and 2) did your presence and/or play change the game in a meaningful way while you played? (This is why a guy like Sixers guard Andrew Toney, in my view, is HOF-worthy, even though “The Boston Strangler” played from 1980-88 and was limited significantly by injury in two of those seasons.) Webber is a “yes” to both of those questions. In the NBA, Webber was a five-time All-Star, four times with the Kings, and was Rookie of the Year in 1993. He was first- or second-team All NBA four times. His career PER of 20.9 is the highest of any non-retired and Hall of Fame eligible player that isn’t currently in the Hall. (Tim Duncan, Kobe Bryant and Kevin Garnett each have higher PERs than Webber, and each is an obvious HOF lock, but they aren’t Hall of Fame eligible until 2020.) Webber’s career PER is better than those of Hall of Famers including Allen Iverson, Bob McAdoo, Ed McCauley, George McGinnis, Billy Cunningham, Steve Nash, David Thompson, Connie Hawkins, Alex English, Walt Bellamy, Cliff Hagan and many others. Yet in his fifth year of eligibility, Webber was again passed over by the Hall of Fame voters this year. That needs to change. His impact on the game, from high school to being a member of the “Fab Five” at Michigan in college and during his 15 NBA seasons, is undeniable. The Hall encompasses all of a person’s basketball achievements, and Webber’s career is Hall-worthy. At Country Day High School in Michigan, he led his team to three state championships, averaging 29 points and 13 rebounds per game his senior season, when he was a consensus national player of the year. He then decided to cap an incredible recruiting class, which had three of the top 10 players in the country, among a group of freshmen that came to be known as “The Fab Five.” (Also on that Michigan team was a junior guard who averaged 2.9 points per game, who had no future as pro player, but who carved out a place for himself nonetheless in the NBA -- Rob Pelinka, who became a high-powered agent representing the likes of Kobe Bryant before becoming the Lakers’ General Manager in 2017.) “The Fab Five”, like it or not -- and, I liked it very much -- changed basketball forever. And Webber was the lynchpin of those Michigan teams that reached consecutive NCAA championship games in 1992 and ‘93. Across the board, the Fab Five had long-lasting impact. Aesthetically, they were vanguards, wearing long, loooong shorts that became all the rage throughout basketball.  And while trash talking has been at the heart of hoops for generations, Michigan raised it to a team-wide art form. It drove traditionalists crazy, while kids watching at home loved it. They were the accelerant to the “one-and-done” era, even though none of them left Michigan after their freshman season. But seeing five freshmen start games and play the lion’s share of minutes rippled throughout the college game. Going forward, teams didn’t just recruit blue-chippers, they put them on the floor immediately. What John Calipari does annually at Kentucky now is but the logical conclusion to what Michigan started, and every Power 5 team in college basketball has had to follow suit or get left behind. Of course, “The Fab Five” era wound up being star-crossed. I’m well aware of the penalties assessed to the Michigan program because of the money that Ed Martin gave to players, including Webber. The university vacated the ‘92-93 season, including all of its NCAA Tournament games that year, and took down the banners commemorating “The Fab Five” and their two Final Four runs. (Michigan also vacated all of its games from 1995-96 because of Martin’s associations with other players on teams during those seasons, and its ‘93, ‘96 and ‘98 NCAA Tournament appearances, as well as its ‘97 NIT title and ‘98 Big 10 Tournament championship.) It’s obvious to me that if not for his involvement with Martin, Webber would have been on the 2000 U.S. Olympic team, which won the gold medal in Australia, as well -- another potential feather in his cap that would bolster his Hall of Fame credentials. I will say, as delicately as I can, that there are coaches and players in the Hall that have been accused of doing some of the very things that got Michigan and Webber in so much trouble. That, in and of itself, should not be disqualifying. Webber’s NBA career also did not include a championship. But he was just as impactful on the pro game. Beginning in Golden State and Washington, C-Webb was a category all his own -- a big man with catcher’s mitts for hands who could pulverize in transition, yet was also an incredibly deft passer, both from the post or out front. As a rookie, Webber elevated Golden State from a 34-48 record in 1992-93 to 50-32 the next season. Traded to Washington after that one season with the Warriors, having conflicted mightily with Coach Don Nelson, Webber helped get the then-Bullets to the postseason for the first time in nine years. Once there, the Bullets went toe-to-toe with the defending-champion Bulls in a tough, three-game first-round series in ’97. But it wasn’t until Webber was sent to what was then the equivalent of Siberia in the NBA -- Sacramento -- that his game reached full flower. Playing with another excellent passing big man in Vlade Divac, and a flashy savant of a point guard in Jason Williams, Webber and the Kings were the vanguard of the modern NBA game, coming to fruition years before the Suns’ Seven Seconds or Less attack led by one of last week’s Hall of Fame inductees, Steve Nash. The Kings moved the ball with flair and purpose. The Warriors have changed the game forever by stretching the floor to the breaking point for opposing defenses with their 3-point proficiency, but even they didn’t have what Sacramento possessed -- two bigs who could initiate and finish from anywhere inside the 3-point line. No one could do what the Kings could do, and with Webber, Sacramento changed almost overnight from perennial joke to perennial championship contender. The Kings made the playoffs six straight seasons, reaching the Western Conference finals in 2002 before losing in controversial fashion to the Lakers in seven games. Webber’s knee injury during the Kings’ semifinal playoff series with Dallas in 2003 marked the beginning of the end for him and the Kings. If he hadn’t gotten hurt, Sacramento probably would have beaten the Mavericks and played San Antonio in the West finals. And while San Antonio would have been favored in that series, the Kings would have had a chance, with the winner facing the Nets in The Finals that year. And a championship would also have made C-Webb’s pro career look much different. But, that didn’t happen. It doesn’t matter, though. Webb’s career stands on its own merits. At all levels, he has had impact and changed the game, and he deserves to have his moment in the sun in Springfield. Sometimes it takes players of merit a little longer, for various reasons -- think Spencer Haywood, or, this year, Mo Cheeks. Chris Webber is a Hall of Famer, and it isn’t a close call. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsSep 11th, 2018Related News

Stephen Curry in Manila Philippines 2018 'SC30AsiaTour – Manila Video

#StephenCurry #StephenCurryInManilaPhilippines source link: Stephen Curry in Manila Philippines 2018 #SC30AsiaTour – Manila Video.....»»

Source: Manilainformer ManilainformerCategory: Sep 9th, 2018Related News

From the Bay to the PH: Stephen Curry s Manila Tour

Golden State Warriors star Stephen Curry made good on a promise he made to Filipinos three years ago -- to return to Manila.  Stephen’s game-breaking approach to basketball has scored him legions of adoring Filipino fans and followers from all around the globe who revel in every deep 3, every slippery drive to the rim, every sneaky steal.  His popularity has transcended borders, languages and cultures, and nowhere was that more evident than in Manila. Stephen’s first day began with a more than two hour on court workout with his trainer Brandon Payne. From shooting to speed and agility drills, Curry put in off season work as he continues to prepare for the upcoming NBA season. Steph Curry early practice in Manila ! pic.twitter.com/gCYsttNQIa — DYAN CASTILLEJO (@DYANCASTILLEJO) September 7, 2018 Curry wasted no time in tasting the local cuisine, and he couldn't have started with anything better, as he tried out some halo-halo.  Curry tries halo halo pic.twitter.com/Nn6Nm6zdGE — DYAN CASTILLEJO (@DYANCASTILLEJO) September 7, 2018   A cold dessert that includes shaved ice, and various fruits such as shredded coconut, mangoes, jackfruit mixed with gelatin and milk. After touring a Jeepney, he traveled to Mall of Asia for the Under Armour Southeast Asia 3x3 Finals which saw he and his father, Dell Curry, on court for a shooting contest with other local fathers, sons and daughters. The competition was fierce but Dell and Stephen secured the win. From a press conference with journalists who came from all around Southeast Asia to cover the UA Brand House ribbon cutting to a skills competition shootout with his dad Dell, everywhere Stephen went in public, his Filipino fans followed in lockstep, fascinated by the presence of the two-time MVP and three-time World Champion. The fans weren’t the only ones awestruck - Stephen himself was blown away by the incredible landscape and cultural significance of the dense and bustling Manila.  Taking a quick tour of some city sights, Stephen then toured a Jeepney, the flamboyant WWII era truck that still can be found transporting residents throughout Manila. Curry capped off the day with a relaxing Filipino scalp massage at Titan and a visit to his shoe brand's main store. Before leaving the country, Curry dropped by the opening ceremony of UAAP season 81, where he led the legions of student-athletes in reciting the oath of sportsmanship. .@StephenCurry30 officially opens #UAAPSeason81! 🔥 pic.twitter.com/GhSKYky44j — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) September 8, 2018 After a busy three-day visit to Manila, much is left for the MVP's Asian Tour. Curry still has scheduled visits to Japan and China, among other Asian nations. .....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsSep 8th, 2018Related News

Steph, Carry On

Stephen Curry looked very impressive during a shootaround, enjoyed a spoonful of the popular Filipino dessert “halo-halo” then talked about winning a third straight NBA crown......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: SportsSep 7th, 2018Related News

Stephen Curry back in Manila after three years

The last time Stephen Curry was in Manila, the Golden State Warriors star had just won his first championship ring. His daughter Riley was an internet sensation, and he had just dropped Curry Two– Source link link: Stephen Curry back in Manila after three years.....»»

Source: Manilainformer ManilainformerCategory: Sep 7th, 2018Related News

Steph Curry dances and dazzles in Manila return – Manila Video

It was a long wait but NBA superstar Stephen Curry delivered on his promise to return to the Philippines and enthrall thousands of his supporters. Video and editing by RYAN LEAGOGO/INQUIRER.net source link: Steph Curry dances and dazzles in Manila return – Manila Video.....»»

Source: Manilainformer ManilainformerCategory: Sep 7th, 2018Related News

Steph Curry grateful for dad Dell s influence in his career

It was as if Stephen Curry's road to the NBA was predestined. Steph's father Dell had been a quality role player during his 16-year NBA career and the younger Curry got to witness that jo.....»»

Source: Philippinetimes PhilippinetimesCategory: NewsSep 7th, 2018Related News

Curry to grace star-studded UAAP Season 81 opening

Filipino basketball fans’ wish has been granted as two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Stephen Curry will make an appearance at the opening ceremony of the star-studded UAAP Season 81 on Saturday at the Mall of Asia Arena in Pasay City. Host school National University announced on Thursday night the attendance of the Golden State Warriors’ [...] The post Curry to grace star-studded UAAP Season 81 opening appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Source: Manilatimes ManilatimesCategory: Sep 7th, 2018Related News

Stephen Curry back in Manila after three years

The last time Stephen Curry was in Manila, the Golden State Warriors star had just won his first championship ring. His daughter Riley was an internet sensation, and he had just dropped Curry Two--.....»»

Source: Manilanews ManilanewsCategory: NewsSep 7th, 2018Related News

Manila returnee Steph Curry showcases marksmanship, bares new NBA goal

Stephen Curry looked very impressive during a shootaround, enjoyed a spoonful of the popular Filipino desert “halo-halo” then talked about winning a third straight NBA crown......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: SportsSep 7th, 2018Related News

Steph Curry gets sweet Manila welcome, tries ‘halo-halo’

  It's always been customary for Filipinos to treat their visitors to their local food and there is nothing more quintessential than a bowl, or two, of halo-halo. The cold sweet treat composed of shaved ice, milk, jelly, ice cream, purple yam, and various sweetened fruits is a dessert loved by many--- even NBA superstar Stephen Curry. Halo-halo was served to Curry after he finished his workout Friday at Shangri-La in Bonifacio Global City before his scheduled press conference. "I have a sweet tooth, and I like it a lot," said the NBA champion Curry is in the Philippines as part of his UnderArmour tour, where he is also launching a new colorway of Curry 5s in brigh...Keep on reading: Steph Curry gets sweet Manila welcome, tries ‘halo-halo’.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Sep 7th, 2018Related News

Steph Curry is coming to Manila! – Manila Video

Check this out, basketball fans! Three-time NBA champion Stephen Curry is on his way to Manila as part of the #SC30AsiaTour! #WiredDifferent source link: Steph Curry is coming to Manila! – Manila Video.....»»

Source: Manilainformer ManilainformerCategory: Sep 6th, 2018Related News

Warriors star Stephen Curry to grace UAAP Season 81 opening ceremony

UAAP season 81 will be starting with a splash. Host school National University announced earlier tonight that Golden State Warriors star Stephen Curry will grace the opening ceremonies of the collegiate league on Saturday, September 8, at the Mall of Asia Arena to "to inspire UAAP athletes and sports fans." JUST IN: Stephen Curry will be at the #UAAPSeason81 opening to inspire UAAP athletes and sports fans! pic.twitter.com/mRymysrRkk — National-U (@NationalUPhil) September 6, 2018 Curry will be in Manila as part of his tour of Asian countries that includes Japan and China, to promote his new Curry 5 signature basketball shoe.  This will be the former MVP's second time to visit the Philippines after his successful tour back in 2015.  .....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsSep 6th, 2018Related News

Worth a thousand words: NBA photographer Andrew Bernstein details his best shots

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Andrew Bernstein knew he wanted to be a sports photographer or maybe a documentary filmmaker. Trouble was, he recalled recently, his school at the time – the University of Massachusetts Amherst – offered courses in neither photography nor film. Not exactly a well-planned start to his chosen career. So Bernstein transferred to the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif. And once the native of Brooklyn stepped off the plane into 85-degree sunshine, he was hooked. Thus began a professional path that has taken him around the world, yet kept him Los Angeles-centric as the NBA’s senior photographer. A part-time job as an assistant to Sports Illustrated shooters helped Bernstein score his first NBA gig as a photographer the 1983 All-Star Game at L.A.’s famous Forum. He’d eventually serve as team photographer for the city’s Dodgers, Lakers, Clippers and Kings, but it was in his work for the NBA that Bernstein made his greatest mark. In 1986, Bernstein helped create NBA Photos as the league’s in-house licensing agency, for which he served as senior director until 2011. He chronicled Team USA through its 1992, 1996 and 2000 Olympic championships, and has worked 36 NBA Finals and All-Star Games. Next month, his hardcover collaboration with Kobe Bryant -- “The Mamba Mentality: How I Play” -- will hit bookshelves everywhere. This week as part of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, the 60-year-old photographer will be honored as a recipient of the 2018 Curt Gowdy Media Award. To shed light on his craft and share some behind-the-scenes tales, Bernstein -- prior to heading to Springfield, Mass. -- talked with NBA.com about some of his favorite and most famous images. Come fly with him ... Details: Michael Jordan soars with several Lakers in futile pursuit at the 1988 Hall of Fame preseason game between Chicago and Los Angeles at the Springfield Civic Center. Bernstein: “It was one of those crazy moments -- in those days, I could only do one remote camera. Now I can do almost an infinite number because it’s all done by radio. But back then, you had to hard-wire into the strobe [lighting] system for the big flashes, and you could only fire one. I chose the one shooting through the glass, behind the backboard. A lot of things could have gone wrong. His hand could have been in his face. He could have been out of the frame instead of just on the edge. I could only take one shot every four seconds [with the strobe] -- it’s not like I could lean on the motor drive and then pick one frame out of 10. … But it became known as “Come Fly with Me.” It did kind of define him at the time as being able to fly.” Back story: Bernstein added: “If you have a microscope, you can actually see me on the other side of the court, sitting there with a little trigger button. Then there’s the trivia question of all time -- who’s the other guy? That No. 3 happens to be [University of Virginia star and NBA role player] Jeff Lamp.” MJ: Champion, finally Details: Michael Jordan and his father, James, in the visitors’ dressing room at the Forum, after Game 5 of the 1991 Finals. Bulls 108, Lakers 101. Bernstein: “The network would do the trophy presentation in the winning team’s locker room, and the visitors’ side at the Forum was about the size of a closet. There seemed to be a thousand people in there, and all hell was breaking loose. I got up on top of a table in the middle of the room for a vantage point. When they came back live from a commercial, they wanted to have Michael on -- but they couldn’t find Michael. Some sixth sense said, ‘Look to your left,’ and there he was, in the locker, hugging that trophy, crying his eyes out with his dad next to him. I always felt, if he’d had to play that whole season for free to get to the mountain top, he would have. I knew this was a special moment. I banged a couple of frames really quick.” Back story: After James Jordan was murdered in 1993, Bernstein got a phone call from Michael’s office saying he “would love it if I made a print and sent it to him,” Bernstein said. “Which I did. I was very close with my dad and Michael Jordan knew him -- my dad was with me through the entire Dream Team experience [in 1992]. And I knew his dad. So it was a poignant moment in my career to have him request that photo. If I had to pick one photo to put on my tombstone, this would probably be it.” ‘Mamba’ coiled to strike Details: Shot from a camera suspended in the rafters at the Forum, a Hasselblad 120mm with a 350mm lens. “A heavy rig,” Bernstein called it, anchored with multiple clamps and safety cables on the catwalk, aimed straight down. Bernstein: “I love the composition of this photo and how everything just came together. The Forum had that beautiful Laker-gold ‘key.’ This was young Kobe, his first or second year, and he was a dunk machine back then. Look how he’s cocked back like that and flying thorugh the air, the basket right there. All the elements came together. When I saw this the next morning -- I had to take the film to the lab after the game, drop it off, then go back in the morning after sweating it out all night, hoping that I’d see something like this -- I was like, ‘Wow!’ All the preparation, hours and hours, setting the equipment up, and it all paid off.” Back story: It’s not common to see the top of a player’s head and the bottom of his sneakers in the same shot. Bernstein knew he had to share it and, thanks to the large-format film, he knew he could share it big. “As soon as I saw this,” he said, “I immediately made a giant print for Kobe -- I mean, like 50 [inches] by 70. Huge. I framed it and drove it to his house. He was living with his parents in Pacific Palisades at the time. I hope he still has it. I had given players like Magic [Johnson] and whomever 8x10s, but I never had framed something I was super-proud of.” Old Kobe ‘dunking’ again Details: Kobe Bryant, deep in his career, before a game against the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden in January 2010. Bernstein: “During a long East Coast trip, the Lakers had played the night before in Cleveland and were at the Garden less than 24 hours later. Kobe was banged up that year. This was an hour and a half to game time, and he was literally willing himself to play that night. Both ankles are in ice. He’s got the finger in a little cup of ice. During my pregame routine, walking from the locker room to the training room, I just saw him there. Other guys were coming and going, but he was in this meditative state. I took one frame -- God forbid the click of the camera disturb or distract him. Phil [Jackson] called this ‘The Thinker,’ like Rodin’s sculpture.” Back story: A skilled photographer learns how quickly how to be unobtrusive, a “fly on the wall.” Said Bernstein: “You have to, to get behind-the-scenes intimate photos of players away from the bright lights, and what goes on in the bowels of the arena or during travel. In 2009-10, Phil and I collaborated on a book called ‘Journey to the Ring,’ which took the Lakers from media day to whenever their season would end. They ended up winning it all that year, which was unbelievable for the project. The photos were in black-and-white, which was a conscious decision Phil and I made.” Photographer, shoot thyself Details: Kobe Bryant and Andrew Bernstein before the 2016 NBA All-Star Game, Western Conference locker room at Toronto’s Air Canada Centre. Bernstein: “This was his last All-Star Game and it was a true Kobe love-fest. I spent the entire weekend just with him, followed him everywhere he went. I mean, I didn’t cover it like I normally do for the NBA, and NBA Photos was very generous for letting me cover it through him. It was a beautiful weekend. He took it all in and was very appreciative. His humility came out -- a lot of people don’t think Kobe is humble, but I think he was. And he was very grateful, that he had an impact on all these All-Stars who were grateful to him.” Back story: The locker room was closed to the media, but as the league’s guy, Bernstein always has special access. “A couple of people were coming over to get photos with him -- Gregg Popovich, Russell Westbrook, Chris Paul and a couple others,” the photographer said. “And I just jumped in myself. Very, very rarely -- I mean, four times in our 20 years together -- did I jump in the picture with him. But I couldn’t resist.” Shadowing the superstars Details: Another overhead shot at the Forum, this time during the 1991 Finals, with Magic Johnson and Michael Jordan fighting for what eventually will be a rebound. Bernstein: “With this angle, it’s always a crap shoot what you’re going to get. The rim could be blocking a guy’s face. Somebody could be too far under the basket. The focus point is so critical -- you have to be right on where it’s focused. As for the shadows, if you can imagine lights in each corner of the court, way up high. It just depended on where the players were placed. If one of them is blocking the light on one side, you get a shadow off to the other side. It’s always dramatic with the strobe. But just to get these two icons in the same frame was difficult.” Back story: Just as the famous parquet court at Boston Garden looked so iconic on TV and from afar, the Forum was best viewed from a distance. The paint worn off the top of the rim by balls and hands was something few ever saw. “The Forum was a dump,” Bernstein said. “The walls were caked with dirt. Nobody ever cleaned it. They used to feed us under the stands where the rodents were. It was like a Hollywood impostor, and it’s in Inglewood, which is not your glitzy Hollywood location. But they made it look good on TV. It was a tough place to work, I have to tell you.” Brothers in arms Details: A fisheye lens captures the moments immediately after Game 5 of 2017 Finals, with Golden State’s Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry front and center. Bernstein: “I’ve gotten good at getting out and being the first guy in the scrum. When a championship is won, I sharpen my elbows and just go for it. I try to be right next to the TV guy and well, I guess people know me and I make my way to wherever I have to be. This particular time, I knew there had to be a moment in there where Curry and Durant had an interaction. And it was amazing -- they’re almost like one body. It’s Kevin’s first championship and Steph is so happy for him as his teammate. And the pressure that was on the whole team to win this championship. I love this picture. It shows so much about the way I work and how I think about what I need to do in the moment.” Back story: Bernstein’s camera captured Durant’s mother Wanda to the left, crying and enjoying the moment. But a few seconds earlier, he said, “his mom came up and grabbed him by the front of the jersey. She kept yelling, ‘We did it! We did it!’ That’s a great picture too.” ‘Uncoachable?’ Unforgettable Details: Kobe Bryant and Phil Jackson share a moment after beating the Magic in Game 5 and winning the 2009 NBA championship at Orlando’s Amway Arena. Bernstein: “If you remember the 2008-09 season, there was a lot of pressure on Kobe. People had been saying that he couldn’t win without Shaq, Phil had actually written that he was ‘uncoachable.’ But there’s such a paternal father-son thing going on in this picture. … I know I’ve got to go to the star player immediately at the buzzer. So I ran out and found Kobe. Phil and he had just come together and they were hugging, which is a nice picture. But I knew the instant after a hug can be just as special. Something told me to wait till after the hug -- because [with the limitation of the strobe lights] I can’t shoot rapidly -- and bing! They broke the hug and Phil’s looking like, ‘Job well done, son.’ And Kobe has this amazing look of relief and sense of accomplishment and exhaustion.” Back story: Bernstein said this is the only print of his work that his wife, Mariel, allows him to hang in their house. “We have three teenagers [at the time] who basically were the same age, all within a year of each other, and when all hell was breaking loose at our house, we’d stand the kids in front of this photo. My wife would say, ‘Look at that! If those two guys can get along and be respectful, we can do it in this house.’ ” Forever linked Details: The Celtics’ Larry Bird and the Lakers’ Magic Johnson fight for rebounding position along the foul lane at Boston Garden in the 1987 Finals. Bernstein: “This is probably my most well-known image, other than the one of Jordan hugging the trophy. Remember, these guys played different positions. They never really matched up. You’d never see Magic D-ing up Bird like you would with Michael or Isiah Thomas. And you’d never, ever see Bird D-ing Magic. I had to be unbelievably conscious of when they were on the court together, where they were on the court and somehow, if they would end up in my frame. The only times, honestly, I could ever get them in the same frame was the ‘captains’ meeting’ five minutes before tip at center court, shaking hands, and a free-throw situation. When, by the grace of God, they would line up facing me. That’s what this was. Back story: Just as Bird and Johnson were linked literally, arm in arm, in this photograph, their careers were linked figuratively through the NBA of the 1980s. “It kind of defined the era,” Bernstein said. “These two great guys intertwined, neither of them looking superior to the other. Jostling for position, just like the Celtics and the Lakers did. I love this picture, and I know both of those guys love it. This picture is hanging in the Hall of Fame.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsSep 4th, 2018Related News

Myanmar court sentences Reuters reporters to 7 years in jail

YANGON, Myanmar --- A Myanmar court sentenced two Reuters journalists to seven years in prison Monday for illegal possession of official documents, a ruling met with international condemnation that will add to outrage over the military's human rights abuses against Rohingya Muslims. Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo had been reporting on the brutal crackdown on the Rohingya when they were arrested and charged with to violating the colonial-era Official Secrets Act, punishable by up to 14 years in prison. They had pleaded not guilty, contending that they were framed by police. "Today is a sad day for Myanmar, Reuters journalists Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo, and the press everywhere," Stephen ...Keep on reading: Myanmar court sentences Reuters reporters to 7 years in jail.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Sep 3rd, 2018Related News