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Sears files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy amid plunging sales, massive debt

NEW YORK --- Sears filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Monday, buckling under its massive debt load and staggering losses. The question now is whether a smaller version of the company that once dominated the American retail landscape can remain viable or whether the iconic brand will be forced out of business. Sears, which started as a mail order catalog in the 1880s, has been on a slow march toward extinction as it lagged far behind its peers and incurred massive losses over the years. "This is a company that in the 1950s stood like a colossus over the American retail landscape," said Craig Johnson, president of Customer Growth Partners, a retail consultancy. "Hopefu...Keep on reading: Sears files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy amid plunging sales, massive debt.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Oct 15th, 2018Related News

BOHOL: New Philippine LGU Integrity Destination

Bohol is new Local Government Integrity Circle (LoGIC) destination after Gov. Edgar Chatto and Local Government Integrity Circles (LoGIC) Project country representative Stefan Maria Jost led signing of memorandum of understanding for the LoGIC project in Bohol on Wednesday. The project enlists multi sectoral participation to ensure government efficiency and good governance and to facilitate […].....»»

Source: Boholnewsdaily BoholnewsdailyCategory: NewsOct 15th, 2018Related News

Mattis pushes closer ties to Vietnam amid tension with China

WASHINGTON --- By making a rare second trip this year to Vietnam, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis is signaling how intensively the Trump administration is trying to counter China's military assertiveness by cozying up to smaller nations in the region that share American wariness about Chinese intentions. The visit beginning Tuesday also shows how far U.S.-Vietnamese relations have advanced since the tumultuous years of the Vietnam War. Mattis, a retired general who entered the Marine Corps during Vietnam but did not serve there, visited Hanoi in January. By coincidence, that stop came just days before the 50th anniversary of the Tet Offensive in 1968. Tet was a turning point wh...Keep on reading: Mattis pushes closer ties to Vietnam amid tension with China.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Oct 14th, 2018Related News

Protest in Hong Kong over China suppression

HONG KONG, China --- Protesters marched in Hong Kong Monday against suppression by Beijing as fears grow that freedoms in the semi-autonomous city are seriously under threat. Official numbers were way down on last year's event with organisers estimating 1,500 had turned out, compared with tens of thousands in 2017. But an AFP journalist at the scene estimated slightly higher, although crowds Monday were visibly smaller than the previous year. The pro-democracy protest comes a week after Hong Kong banned a pro-independence party on the grounds it was a threat to national security, the first time a political party has been prohibited since the city was handed back to China by ...Keep on reading: Protest in Hong Kong over China suppression.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Oct 1st, 2018Related News

USS Manila Bay (CVE-61) – kamikazi attack – Manila Picture

A Zeke (as the kamikazi’s were referred to) circles around to stage an attack on the Manilla bay. Image published by George Moore Photography on 2012-07-02 13:53:41 and used under Creative Commons license. Tagged: link: USS Manila Bay (CVE-61) – kamikazi attack – Manila Picture.....»»

Source: Manilainformer ManilainformerCategory: Oct 1st, 2018Related News

Jerwin Ancajas retains IBF title after Split Draw

Filipino IBF Super Flyweight World Champion Jerwin "Pretty Boy" Ancajas holds on to his title after figuring in a Split Draw against Mexican Alejandro Santiago Barrios at the Oracle Arena in Oakland, Friday evening (Saturday morning, Manila time).  A back-forth-battle throughout the course of twelve rounds, the usually-methodic Ancajas found it difficult to impose his will against the shifty Barrios.  The smaller challenger brought the fight to the defending champion, challenging Ancajas more than anyone has during the Pinoy's title reign.  At the end of the action-packed affair, one judge saw it in 116-112 in favor of the champion, while another saw it 118-110 in favor of the challenger.  The third judge scored it a 114-114 draw.  This is the second Filipino fighter to battle to a draw in the last month, with Donnie Nietes and Aston Palicte battling to a Split Draw in their WBO Super Flyweight title contest back in early September.  Earlier in the card, former world title challenge Genesis Servania made quick work of Mexican opponent Carlos Carlson via third round KO. .....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsSep 29th, 2018Related News

Destroy the selfie competition with upcoming 100-megapixel shooter

Fujifilm outshone the launch of its own 51.4 megapixel GFX-50R mirrorless camera at Cologne, Germany photography salon Photokina 2018 (running September 26-29) by unveiling a concept expected to become reality in 2019. Fujifilm has skipped the full-frame mirrorless-style camera (a trending style that Panasonic launched at Photokina this year) in order to go bigger and then even bigger. The 775g medium-format GFX-50R is a smaller, cheaper descendant of the GTX-50S --- a camera that was released two years ago and has been a fan favorite with a price tag of around $6,500 at its debut (around P352,000). The GFX-50R, however, is going to be a bit more wallet-friendly at $4,500 (abou...Keep on reading: Destroy the selfie competition with upcoming 100-megapixel shooter.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Sep 27th, 2018Related News

When Chele Gonzalez goes ‘crazy’–tuna tartare with cashew milk, ‘ulang’ with Béarnaise sauce

  When Vask Gallery reopened as Gallery by Chele early this year, it was announced that chef Chele Gonzalez would also be opening a smaller, more experimental, venue, aptly named Studio Lab, or, as it is sometimes stylized, Stvdio Lab.   The driving idea behind it---it's a more private, intimate setting with greater interaction with the chef---is L'Atelier de Jol Robuchon as opposed to La Table de Jol Robuchon. I don't think that anyone as much of a perfectionist as Gonzalez, the chef behind both restaurants, would let people see anything so raw as a work in progre ss.   But with the scribbles on the walls, the books from which Gonzalez draws inspiration...Keep on reading: When Chele Gonzalez goes ‘crazy’–tuna tartare with cashew milk, ‘ulang’ with Béarnaise sauce.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Sep 27th, 2018Related News

Gov t to borrow P270B locally in 4th quarter

The government will borrow P270 billion locally through the issuance of treasury bills and bonds in the fourth quarter, a smaller program than a quarter ago, as loans from two multilateral lenders.....»»

Source: Philippinetimes PhilippinetimesCategory: NewsSep 26th, 2018Related News

Bayern toasting Bundesliga dominance ahead of Oktoberfest

By CIARAN FAHEY,  Associated Press BERLIN (AP) — Bayern Munich's rivals appear to have thrown in the towel already. "Bayern's superiority is striking," Schalke general manager Christian Heidel said after his team lost to the defending Bundesliga champions on Saturday. "The way they played, I can't imagine them losing another game." Bayern was supposed to have had a tough start against Hoffenheim, Stuttgart, Bayer Leverkusen and then Schalke, last season's runner-up. But the team's confidence is booming after winning every game comfortably since its loss to Eintracht Frankfurt in the German Cup final in May. "It can go on like that," Bayern sporting director Hasan Salihamidzic said. Ominously for Bayern's rivals, the Bavarian powerhouse has not lost during Oktoberfest for the last eight years. The 185th edition of the beer-festival in Munich started Saturday and runs until Oct. 7. While they may indulge themselves by wearing the traditional leather pants of the region, the players will have to resist the temptations of the jugs of wheat beer at the festival - at least until the last Sunday. "Until then they can maybe drink a radler," Salihamidzic joked, referring to beer watered down by non-alcoholic soda. Bayern coach Niko Kovac said the players know what is expected of them during Oktoberfest. "If they go there, they will certainly be recognized and that won't go down well. We'll have time to go there, but now we still have to get points," Kovac said. Bayern, which is going for a record-extending seventh straight title, next hosts Bavarian rival Augsburg on Tuesday, before traveling to second-place Hertha Berlin on Friday. A win against its closest rival could see Bayern open up a five-point lead after six matches. 'DEATH THREAT' Hoffenheim said it was shocked by the animosity displayed by Borussia Dortmund fans toward its billionaire backer, Dietmar Hopp, in the 1-1 draw on Saturday, when fans displayed what the club called a "death threat" against him. Dortmund fans rolled out a huge banner showing Hopp's head in crosshairs over the words "Hasta la vista, Hopp" across a large section of the guest block at the stadium in Hoffenheim. A similar banner, only much smaller, caused a stir 10 years ago. Dortmund chief executive Hans-Joachim Watzke apologized for the banner. Hopp is a target for Dortmund fans after initiating legal proceedings against more than 30 of them for alleged obscenities during a game last season. HERTHA HERO It took some time, but Ondrej Duda finally seems to have arrived at Hertha in his third season at the club. The Slovakia midfielder sealed the 4-2 win over Borussia Moenchengladbach on Saturday, taking his goal tally to a league-leading four in four games. Duda only made three league appearances - 67 minutes altogether - in his first season at Hertha after joining from Legia Warsaw in 2016, while he scored one goal in 17 appearances last season. GOETZE'S FALL Mario Goetze, who scored Germany's World Cup-winning goal in 2014, has yet to play for Dortmund in the Bundesliga this season. The 26-year-old Goetze was left out of the squad altogether for the game at Hoffenheim, a decision that coach Lucien Favre said was purely sporting......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsSep 25th, 2018Related News

Out-of-the-box acting gig for Josh Groban in ‘Good Cop’

  Last year, we saw Josh Groban acquit himself well as an actor on Broadway in the stage musical "Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812," David Malloy's rousing adaptation of Leo Tolstoy's "War and Peace."   But, Josh's latest foray into acting "The Good Cop," the 10-episode comedy series that premieres on Netflix on Friday, provides neither music nor choreography to help put the multiplatinum-selling singer through his thespic paces in an out-of-the-box acting gig.   Singing circles around colleagues with less-than-exceptional musicality is one thing, but Josh has got his work cut out for him when he's tasked to trade gags and wisecracks with 67-y...Keep on reading: Out-of-the-box acting gig for Josh Groban in ‘Good Cop’.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Sep 18th, 2018Related News

5 things about the third inter-Korean summit 2018 in Pyongyang

SEOUL, South Korea – Summits between North and South Korea are closely watched for both spectacular symbolism – on grand display at the Panmunjeom summit in April – and smaller hints of meaning. The meeting on Tuesday, September 18, between the South's President Moon Jae-in and the North's leader Kim ........»»

Source: Rappler RapplerCategory: NewsSep 18th, 2018Related News

NegOcc guv commits to ethical practices, good governance

BACOLOD City – Negros Occidental Governor Alfredo Marañon Jr. has signed an integrity pledge, committing to ethical practices and good governance, as part of the province’s partnership with the Local Government Integrity Circles (LoGIC) Network. The governor was joined by Dr. Stefan Maria Jost, country representative of Konrad Adenauer Stiftung (KAS), in signing the document during […] The post NegOcc guv commits to ethical practices, good governance appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Source: Thedailyguardian ThedailyguardianCategory: NewsSep 13th, 2018Related News

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsSep 11th, 2018Related News

No pressure for Donnie Nietes as he makes his super flyweight debut

With 46 professional bouts and three world championship runs across as many weight divisions, ALA Promotions star Donnie Nietes is certainly no stranger to the bright lights.  On Saturday evening (Sunday morning, Manila time), Nietes steps back on the big stage as he looks to add a fourth world championship when he makes his highly-anticipated super flyweight debut against compatriot Aston Palicte on the SuperFly 3 card at The Forum in Los Angeles, California.  Nietes and Palicte will fight for the vacant WBO Super Flyweight World Championship.  While he's the smaller man in terms of height and reach, Nietes comes in as the bigger star among the two Negrense protagonists.  As mentioned earlier, Nietes has been here before, challenging for a world championship. For his opponent on the other hand, this is the closest that Palicte has been to a world championship.  "For me, wala naman nang pressure." Nietes shared with ABS-CBN's Steve Angeles. "Iniisip ko lang na parang normal na laban para hindi tayo ma-out of focus sa gameplan natin." After years of dominating in the light flyweight division, where he eclipsed Filipino boxing great Gabriel "Flash" Elorde as the longest-reigning Filipino boxing world champion, Nietes made the jump to the flyweight division. While his run at the 112-pound division lasted for all of just three bouts, it saw him capture and defend the IBF world title.  Now set to embark on his super flyweight journey, Nietes says he's comfortable and confident in his new weight division.  "Yes, for now masasabi ko na nadagdagan ko yung power ko kasi umakyat ako ng timbang. yung katawan ko kumportable talaga sa 115-pounds." Not to overlook the task that's in front of him, but Nietes knows that Palicte is just the beginning for him.  The 36-year old Murcia, Negros native is finally in a spot where he can go after all those 'big names' that he's wanted to face for so long.  Names like Roman 'Chocolatito' Gonzales, like Juan Francisco Estrada, like Srisaket Sor Rungvisai, and even fellow Pinoy Jerwin Ancajas.  Simply put, Nietes wants all of them.  "Lahat ng nasa super flyweight, gusto ko kalabanin. Hindi naman ako medyo maliit kumpara sa kanila, talagang makakatapat ako sa kanila sa timbang." "Talagang pinag-hahandaan namin ang super flyweight." he added. .....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsSep 8th, 2018Related News

Toyota Rush 1.5 G A/T: When is an SUV also an MPV?

THE Toyota Innova having turned better appointed and correspondingly pricey meant Toyota Motor Philippines’ lineup could use a less expensive, smaller, seven-seat model. And this is exactly the slot now filled by the Toyota Rush which, unlike the Toyota Avanza (actually, the Rush is the new version of the Avanza), is ideally suited to be used by families rather than by businesses. Going by looks, too, it’s obvious the Rush aspires for SUV status while the Avanza is decidedly more taxicab-appropriate. The post Toyota Rush 1.5 G A/T: When is an SUV also an MPV? appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Source: Bworldonline BworldonlineCategory: NewsSep 4th, 2018Related News

Juan Luna’s boceto of the Spoliarium surfaces. But is it real?

By Alecs Ongcal/rappler.com – A smaller version of the country’s largest painting and national treasure, the Spoliarium by Juan Luna, surfaced during a private presentation in Makati City on Thursday, August 30. The boceto (a sketch or study that guides an artist in producing a final work), dated a year Read more ».....»»

Source: Thepinoy ThepinoyCategory: NewsSep 4th, 2018Related News

NFA should not be abolished — DA Secretary

Even if he admitted that the National Food Authority (NFA) needs to be reformed, Department of Agriculture (DA) Secretary Manny Piol said on Monday that he would not support calls to abolish it. "No, because the NFA is the only WTO (World Trade Organization) accredited, recognized, trading agency of the Philippines. The problem with NFA is that it has focused on rice alone for so long," Piol said in an interview with reporters. Several lawmakers have proposed the removal of Piol and NFA Administrator Jason Aquino from their posts, and the dissolution of the NFA itself. This plan has garnered support from economic circles, claiming the agency has aggravated rice inflation. READ: ...Keep on reading: NFA should not be abolished — DA Secretary.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Sep 3rd, 2018Related News

Juan Luna s boceto of the Spoliarium surfaces. But is it real?

  MANILA, Philippines – A smaller version of the country’s largest painting and national treasure, the Spoliarium by Juan Luna, surfaced during a private presentation in Makati City on Thursday, August 30. The boceto (a sketch or study that guides an artist in producing a final work), dated a year before ........»»

Source: Rappler RapplerCategory: NewsSep 2nd, 2018Related News

Money supply growth slows in July

GROWTH of money supply eased to its slowest pace in nearly three years in July amid smaller reserves held by the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP), even as bank lending accelerated in the same month. The post Money supply growth slows in July appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Source: Bworldonline BworldonlineCategory: NewsAug 31st, 2018Related News