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Towards an educated and healthy nation

“Helping schoolchildren achieve normal nutrition means empowering them to achieve their potential as students, maximizing their capacity to learn..” I was recently invited as guest of honor to commemorate the centenary of the monument of our national hero, Jose Rizal, in the city of Biñan in Laguna. Biñan, of course, is where Rizal’s mother, Teodora […].....»»

Source: Tribune TribuneCategory: News4 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

SCHOOL THROWBACK 5: Best Section Ever!

. It came from the root word 'connect' and according to Merriam-Webster, 'connect' means 'to become joined' and 'to have or establish a rapport.' But for me,.....»»

Source: Manilanews ManilanewsCategory: News11 hr. 33 min. ago Related News

Modern bigs to dominate 2018 Draft

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com NEW YORK – There was a ballroom full of NBA centers in midtown Manhattan Wednesday – not one of them eager to follow in the sizeable footsteps of Wilt Chamberlain, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Moses Malone, Shaquille O’Neal or Dwight Howard. In fact, on the very day that the top prospects for the 2018 Draft were made available to the media – a talent pool particularly long on length this year – Howard was on the move again, in a reported deal from Charlotte to Brooklyn that will land the eight-time All-Star with his fourth team in four seasons and sixth overall. That bit of news – of an old-school NBA big man being shuffled off again,  primarily for salary-cap purposes, into what looks to be basketball irrelevancy – served as a counterpoint to the young giants just starting out. There will be plenty of guards and forwards selected in the first round Thursday at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, including Michael Porter Jr., Trae Young, Collin Sexton, Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, Mikal Bridges, Kevin Knox and Lonnie Walker. But the lottery will be top-heavy with big men, with Deandre Ayton, Marvin Bagley III, Mo Bamba, Jaren Jackson Jr., Wendell Carter Jr., and Robert Williams all hearing their names called. All six are listed at 6'10" or taller, though they’ll bear little resemblance in style or production to the Hall of Famers cited above or even to Howard. The last time last time six players that size were drafted in the top 10 was 2007, when Greg Oden, Al Horford, Yi Jianlian, Brandan Wright, Joakim Noah and Spencer Hawes all went early. Much has changed in 11 years. These young guys represent basketball’s new-age pivot men, er, which means we’d better drop the “pivot men” nomenclature. Rather, the word that got tossed around most often Wednesday during conversations about these guys’ fit – with specific teams and in the league generally – was modern. Modern centers for a modern NBA. “Modern-day 5,” is how Mamba put it. “Defend multiple positions, can shoot it, handle it a little. Can do a little bit of everything,” the 20-year-old from Harlem, by way of Pennsylvania and Texas. Said Jaren Jackson, Jr., fresh from one season at Michigan State: “At times, I’ve heard that I’m right on time for the way the game is going. A lot of bigs can handle the ball and be versatile and they’re able to make plays.” If you want to feel old, consider the NBA’s prevailing definition of “modern.” With major league baseball, for example, what’s known as the “modern era” historically is thought to have begun in the year 1900. By contrast, the NBA’s modern era dates back to about a week ago last Tuesday. That’s how quickly the contributions from the center position have changed. After ruling the NBA landscape for most of the league’s first 50 years, traditional big men looked at now as dinosaurs, both in form and function. Plodding isn’t allowed. Posting up, back to the basket, and backing into the paint seems as dated in this league as helmetless players in the NHL. There have been noticeable markers along the way. In the ‘90s, players who naturally would have been trained and used as centers – Tim Duncan, Kevin Garnett, Rasheed Wallace, Amare Stoudemire, Antonio McDyess – demanded to face the basket and be referred to as power forwards. Then in 2012, the league joined them, eradicating “center” from its All-Star ballot and opting for “frontcourt” as a catch-all category for everyone from 6'5" wings to seven-foot shot swatters. This latest era dates back just a few years, if you go by a few key analytics. A recent ESPN.com story tracked the minutes played by seven-footers in the playoffs, compared to the regular season, and identified the tipping point as the 2016 postseason. Even if you back it up by a year to include Golden State’s heavy use of small ball in winning its championship in 2015, that’s still barely more than a heartbeat. But the full embrace of the three-point shot and the type of pace favored by a majority of current NBA coaches has put a premium on centers – we’re taking liberties in even calling them that anymore – who are mobile, who can switch defensively, challenge perimeter shooters, do some of that shooting of their own and still crash the boards and protect the rim. The next Shaq or Kareem? Now the model is Houston’s efficient Clint Capela, Boston’s savvy Al Horford or Minnesota’s ridiculously skilled Karl-Anthony Towns. Big guys such as DeMarcus Cousins and Anthony Davis have added range to their shots. Some – Andre Drummond, Jonas Valanciunas, a few more – have status or contracts assure them minutes. Yet other old-style bigs are out of the league (Roy Hibbert, Andrew Bogut) or logging long stretches on the bench (Greg Monroe, Al Jefferson, Hassan Whiteside). Just two years ago, Jahlil Okafor was the No. 3 pick in the 2016 Draft. These days, he’s an afterthought with little market value. Teams don’t want to play the way Okafor and others like him need to play. So the challenge for a fellow such as Ayton, projected to be the near-consensus No. 1 pick this year, is to make sure no one confuses him or his game with DeAndre Jordan. Asked about the trend Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time), Ayton at one point sounded a little defiant. “I’m not changing my way of play in the NBA,” he told reporters. “I’m still an inside-out type of player. I’m going to start inside and establish myself down low until I have to stretch the floor.” It helps, of course, to have that option. Ayton already is built like an NBA veteran, but he has sufficient quickness to cover ground defensively and to keep up with a faster offensive pace. And for those who haven’t been paying attention to him since the NCAA tournament ended – or in Arizona’s case, barely got started with that opening loss to Buffalo – Ayton has a surprise: a more reliable three-point shot he’s willing to unleash. “The NBA three-ball is way farther than the college three-ball,” he said. “I’ve really put on some range and put on some muscle. When I’m fatigued in games, I really can [still] get my shot off in a perfect arc.” Bagley, depending where he lands, might end up playing more out on the floor than the other bigs in this draft. That’s his experience, having had Carter next to him at Duke to handle the basics. Williams will likely benefit from shifting in the opposite direction. He played a lot at power forward for Texas A&M but is rated highly for how his game translates to, you guessed it, modern center play. Bamba has drawn comparisons to Philadelphia’s Joel Embiid, as much for his charisma as for any play similarities. He allegedly has overhauled his shot this spring, and also was eager to tout his three-point range Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time). Then there is Jackson, who has been rated as the best two-way player of the bunch. That includes not just his defense against fellow bigs but his ability to keep up with and guard nearly any position. Jackson seemed to speak for all the big men among the future pros in New York Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time). Unlike a previous generation of centers, many of whom got caught in the NBA’s transition to a smaller, faster, position-less style, the young centers of 2018 grew up watching it. And preparing for it. Nothing frustrating about it, Jackson said, though it’s a far cry from the league in which his father, Jaren Sr., (1989-2002) played. “No. Whatever helps each team do their best is what lineup they’re going to put out,” Jackson said. “They’re going to put the best players on the floor every time. You look at a team like the Warriors, they switch everything. They can play all different positions. That’s what they’re good at.” That’s what these guys, given their size, are remarkably good at too. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: Sports20 hr. 33 min. ago Related News

ONE: Interim champ Geje Eustaquio hopes son follows in his footsteps

While becoming a world champion is indeed motivation for Team Lakay flyweight star and reigning ONE Championship Interim Flyweight Champion Geje Eustaquio, the Baguio City native is being fueled by something...or someone else.  Meet Castiel Achilles Gerard Eustaquio, or Cage for short, Geje's four year old son.  "He’s my fuel, as I said, he’s my drive, motivation, and I’m happy and proud that he’s my son." said Eustaquio during a press conference in Macau, two days before his scheduled title unification bout against reigning ONE Flyweight World Champion Adriano Moraes at ONE: Pinnacle of Power on Satuday, July 23rd.  And while most other fighters would wish that their kids rather not follow in their footsteps, Geje believes otherwise.  It would give the 29-year old nothing but joy to see his little boy one day become a martial artist as well.  "Yeah, if he loves martial arts, I will be the happiest father in the world," "Because as I said, martial arts is not about fighting, it’s not about kicking, it’s a way of life." If Cage decided to take a different path however, daddy assures that his support will still be there, 100%  "Kung ibang sports, it depends on the sport. If he chooses basketball, if he chooses soccer, well my  support is a hundred percent."   Geje Eustaquio and Adriano Moraes battle of the undisputed ONE Championship Flyweight World Title at ONE: Pinnacle of Power, Saturday, June 23rd at the Studio City Events Center in Macau, China.  Catch it LIVE starting at 11:00 PM on ABS-CBN S+A channel 23! .....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: Sports20 hr. 33 min. ago Related News

ONE: With title responsibilities, Geje Eustaquio’s pursuit for further learning has been put on hold

For Team Lakay flyweight star and reigning interim ONE Flyweight champion Geje Eustaquio, life is a continuous learning process. Already the holder of a Master’s Degree in Physical Education, the Baguio native admitted that he’s looking to even further expand his range of learning by either taking law or going for a Doctor’s Degree. The former teacher however admitted, that being an interim champion in Asia’s biggest mixed martial arts promotion is pretty time consuming, thus likely putting his schooling on hold. “It’s gonna be between a doctor’s degree or a law degree. We will see, I cannot say for now, most especially when you’re holding an interim belt, the responsibility is a bit harder.” Eustaquio said. “Kung before I train two, three rounds, now I train four, five, six rounds. It’s kinda tough. It’s on hold for now.” Saturday night at the Studio City Events Center in Macau, China, Eustaquio has the chance to elevate his world title status from interim to undisputed when he challenges reigning ONE Flyweight World Champion Adriano Moraes in a title unification bout. If Eustaquio pulls it off, he will carry the responsibility of being a world champion, and will have a target on his back. This could very well push his academic aspirations back even further. “Actually mas mahirap mag-isip na naman if I become the undisputed champion, because once again, sabi nga ni Spiderman, with great power comes great responsibility, so I have to maintain that belt and train more to maintain that belt.” But for someone who already has a Master’s Degree and is an accomplished mixed martial artist, what’s the motivation behind wanting to go back to school? For Geje, it’s pretty simple. “Life is learning.” “It doesn’t mean that when you have a degree, it’s so you can work, or you can have a better job. It’s about learning. When I have my doctor’s degree, it’s a long run of learning. When I have my law degree, it’s also a learning. For me, I treat as, everyday I learn, that’s why I go into this.” Eustaquio added.   Geje Eustaquio and Adriano Moraes battle of the undisputed ONE Championship Flyweight World Title at ONE: Pinnacle of Power, Saturday, June 23rd at the Studio City Events Center in Macau, China.  Catch it LIVE starting at 11:00 PM on ABS-CBN S+A channel 23! .....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: Sports20 hr. 33 min. ago Related News

Ejercito urges PNP to clarify guidelines on ‘anti-tambay’ drive

https://youtu.be/OdP8EYrjWmM Amid continued fears of possible human rights violations, Senator JV Ejercito called on the Philippine National Police (PNP) on Thursday to come up with guidelines before enforcing its "anti-tambay" campaign.   Ejercito noted the arrests of loiterers immediately after President Rodrigo Duterte's warning against them.   "Siguro dapat i-clarify ng PNP 'yung guidelines. Dapat meron silang guidelines in the first place. Kasi parang noong nagbigay ng order ang Pangulo, agad-agad nilang inimplement without informing the public about the guidelines; so ano ba ang bawal, ano ba ang hindi? Kung ikaw man ay isang ordinaryong mamayan, ordinaryon...Keep on reading: Ejercito urges PNP to clarify guidelines on ‘anti-tambay’ drive.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Jun 21st, 2018Related News

New Gin King Jeff Chan gets a warm welcome from the Barangay

Just a days after getting traded to the Ginebra Gin Kings, Jeff Chan already got some minutes in for his new team, as the sharpshooter went for four points, three rebounds, and two assists in over 19 minutes of action. The new ka-Barangay was happy to be on the floor with the words “GINEBRA AKO” emblazoned on his jersey. It was also a big help that the pro-Gin Kings crowd gave him a warm welcome to the Barangay. Ginebra, after all, has arguably the largest fanbase in the PBA. “Actually yung kanina nga, pag-pasok ko medyo namalahibo ako, kasi yung crowd, pag-welcome nila sa akin.”  Chan said after his Ginebra debut. “Siyempre masaya diba kasi welcome ako sa kanila, sa mga Barangay, so yun. excited na ulit ako sa next game. Sana nandun sila ulit.” And while it was indeed a warm welcome for ‘The Negros Sniper”, Chan admits that on the court, there was still some adjustment to be done. “I think kailangan ko pang matutunan and mapag-aralan yung system ni Coach kasi one day palang ako nakapagpractice so nangangapa pa ako doon” “Ok naman [yung experience] pero minsan sumisigaw sila sa [mula sa] bench kung saan pwesto ko dapat, kasi agai, di ko pa talaga kabisado. Medyo forgiving pa si coach Tim Cone, alam niya na first day ko palang.” Chan added. As the Gin Kings continue to try and make a push for the post-season, expect the former FEU Tamaraw to ease into Ginebra’s system and provide even more valuable minutes......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 20th, 2018Related News

Iza, sa HK naghahanap ng wedding gown

Wala pang nakakapag-interview kay Alden Richards para hingan ng reaction sa pagpili sa kanya ni Kris Aquino sa hypothetical question sa mediacon ng I Love You, Hater kung mapu-fall siya kay Joshua Garcia kung nasa edad siya ni Julia Barretto. Nagulat ang press people sa sagot at pagpili ni Kris….....»»

Source: Journal JournalCategory: NewsJun 20th, 2018Related News

Ethel Booba s sound advice to tambays facing arrest: Matutong tumanggi o humindi kung nasa tama

It seems even Ethel Booba's essential 'Charot!' that so often drives the point of her comical antics and hard-hitting criticism on Twitter is no match to the seriousness of the lates.....»»

Source: Philippinetimes PhilippinetimesCategory: NewsJun 20th, 2018Related News

Duterte brings up sex tape anew to lash back at De Lima over OFW kiss

“There’s a lady. Nakakakulong. Sabi niya bastos daw yung ginawa ko,” Duterte said. “Kung may screen lang kayo dito, ipapakita ko ‘yung X-rated niya. Nakalimutan niya siya ang pinakabastos dito. You forget conveniently that you started the most, pinakabastos na magawa ng isang senador.” Source link link: Duterte brings up 'sex tape' anew to lash back at De Lima over OFW kiss.....»»

Source: Manilainformer ManilainformerCategory: Jun 20th, 2018Related News

Ilang kalsada sa Metro Manila kabilang ang Commonwealth Ave., accident-prone – Manila Video

Maulan na naman kaya ibayong pag-iingat para sa mga motorista lalo na sa mga natukoy na pinaka accident prone na kalsada. Kung saan-saan ang mga `yan, sa pagtutok ni Oscar Oida. 24 Oras is GMA Network’s flagship newscast, anchored by Mike Enriquez, Mel Tiangco and Vicky Morales. It airs on GMA-7 Mondays to Fridays at… link: Ilang kalsada sa Metro Manila kabilang ang Commonwealth Ave., accident-prone – Manila Video.....»»

Source: Manilainformer ManilainformerCategory: Jun 20th, 2018Related News

All-Time NBA Draft: The best pick from every slot

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press There’s a definitive answer every year to the question of who is No. 1 in the NBA draft. But who is the No. 1 pick of all No. 1 draft picks ever? Or No. 1 among the list of No. 2 draft picks? Those are questions that have no definitive answer, except perhaps in a handful of rare cases. Here’s a look at The Best of The Best — the top all-time NBA picks in each of the top 30 draft spots. The best No. 1 overall pick, the best No. 2 overall pick ... and so on. One note: This doesn’t include the territorial selections that were used through 1965, which ruled out Wilt Chamberlain. The list of top picks in each of the 30 draft slots: 1. KAREEM ABDUL-JABBAR Arguments for the best-ever overall pick could and should be made for LeBron James, Shaquille O’Neal, Oscar Robertson and Magic Johnson, among others. When in doubt, give it to the man who has more points than anyone who ever played the game and who mastered perhaps the most difficult shot to guard in NBA history. 2. BILL RUSSELL You didn’t know Bill Russell was a No. 2 overall pick? Jerry West was too, and he’s The Logo for goodness sake, but the 11 rings make Russell the call here. Also, it’s time to lay off Portland. Sam Bowie wasn’t the biggest “oops” pick of all time. Si Green was picked before Russell in 1956. 3. MICHAEL JORDAN The easiest pick of them all. Except for Portland in 1984, when the Trail Blazers took Bowie No. 2 ahead of MJ. OK, now it’s really time to lay off Portland. 4. CHRIS PAUL Dikembe Mutombo, Chris Bosh and Russell Westbrook were all No. 4s as well, but Paul’s body of work over 13 seasons and counting can’t be overlooked. 5. DWYANE WADE Charles Barkley will think this pick is terrible. So will fellow No. 5s Kevin Garnett, Ray Allen, Scottie Pippen and Vince Carter. Wade’s scoring wins out. 6. LARRY BIRD Second-easiest pick of this process. Only Adrian Dantley comes close, and he absolutely doesn’t come close. 7. STEPHEN CURRY He will be the leader in 3-pointers, by a ton, when his career is over. Fellow No. 7s John Havlicek and Chris Mullin merit consideration, but why wait? 8. ROBERT PARISH As time goes on, people might forget how vital The Chief was to those Celtics teams of the 1980s. That shouldn’t happen. 9. DIRK NOWITZKI Jordan was the only true candidate at No. 3, Bird was the same at No. 6, and Nowitzki stands alone at No. 9 as well. 10. PAUL PIERCE Pierce and Nowitzki have haunted those who made the decisions at the top of the 1998 draft — where Michael Olowokandi, Mike Bibby and Raef LaFrentz went 1-2-3 — for 20 years and counting. 11. REGGIE MILLER Kiki VanDeWeghe was a No. 11 pick and so was Klay Thompson, but Miller is the deserving call here. His shot was art. 12. JULIUS ERVING Drafted in 1972 and didn’t come to the NBA until 1976, Doctor J ekes out the pick here over Chet Walker — a seven-time All-Star. 13. KOBE BRYANT This could easily have been Karl Malone. But Kobe has five rings and an Oscar. 14. CLYDE DREXLER The Glide was automatic for 20 points a night for basically his entire career. Apologies to Tim Hardaway. 15. STEVE NASH Someday, this spot might go to Giannis Antetokounmpo or Kawhi Leonard. But Steve Nash going this low in 1996 should remind everyone how good that draft was. 16. JOHN STOCKTON This is yet another reminder that Sam Bowie wasn’t the only mistake made in 1984. 17. DON NELSON This was a difficult group, and Shawn Kemp was probably the better player. Nellie gets the call on total body of NBA work. 18. JOE DUMARS There are some really good players at No. 18, including Calvin Murphy and the vastly underrated Ricky Pierce. Dumars’ role on the Bad Boys was invaluable. 19. TINY ARCHIBALD When looking at No. 19 picks, two things stand out: Rod Strickland should have been an All-Star, and that Tiny was better than many remember. 20. LARRY NANCE So consistent for so long, and now with his son in the league that means more people will get educated about Sr.’s game. 21. RAJON RONDO Michael Finley and Ricky Davis also went this far down in the draft. Rondo was an absolute steal in 2006 — except he wasn’t a steal for Phoenix, which drafted him and then traded him to Boston for cash. 22. REGGIE LEWIS Still sad. Still missed. 23. ALEX ENGLISH Tayshaun Prince was so good and World B. Free was as much fun as anyone, but English had about a 10-year run where he hardly ever missed a game and dropped about 25 every time he was out there. 24. ARVYDAS SABONIS Officially, the hardest of all 30 picks. Don’t just look at his NBA numbers. Look at his whole career. He did things no big man was doing 20 years ago. Terry Porter, Andrei Kirilenko, Kyle Lowry, Sam Cassell, Derek Fisher, Latrell Sprewell all went No. 24 as well ... good luck to whoever is No. 24 is this year. There’s a legacy to follow. 25. MARK PRICE Jeff Ruland was known as “McFilthy” and became a good college coach, Tony Allen was a true defensive star, but Price’s game is too solid to miss here. 26. VLADE DIVAC Now running the Sacramento Kings, Divac gets to pick No. 2 in this year’s draft. The guy he takes there would be well-served to learn from Vlade. 27. DENNIS RODMAN Before he became a political operative, Rodman was as good at rebounding and defense as anyone in the game. 28. TONY PARKER If he had grown up in the U.S. and played college basketball, there was no chance he would have gone this low in 2001. 29. DENNIS JOHNSON Hall of Famer, five-time All-Star and someone who was as good as there was in the NBA down the stretch of big games. 30. SPENCER HAYWOOD Another Hall of Famer, and every underclassman who gets drafted this year needs to thank Haywood. His suit vs. the NBA paved the way for them. ___ Tim Reynolds is a national basketball writer for The Associated Press. Write to him at treynolds@ap.org.....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 20th, 2018Related News

Ethel Booba’s sound advice to ‘tambays’ facing arrest: ‘Matutong tumanggi o humindi kung nasa tama’

It seems even Ethel Booba's essential "Charot!" that so often drives the point of her comical antics and hard-hitting criticism on Twitter is no match to the seriousness of the latest crackdown of the Philippine National Police (PNP) on loiterers. Since 5 a.m. of June 13 to 5 a.m. of June 20, it has been reported that the PNP has arrested as much as 7, 291 tambaysin Metro Manila alone, rounding up nighttime idlers and loiterers in the dark streets of the city. Many people have since been alarmed by the said crackdown, with some taking to social media to air out their grievances. An alarming tweet of a netizen JM (@jmflorante) made last June 17 showed that one of his friends was a ...Keep on reading: Ethel Booba’s sound advice to ‘tambays’ facing arrest: ‘Matutong tumanggi o humindi kung nasa tama’.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Jun 20th, 2018Related News

Sereno: Midas Marquez led the rallies against me

Nothing can stop Maria Lourdes Sereno from speaking her mind now, even if it means burning bridges with former colleagues at the Supreme Court (SC). Immediately after the SC finalized her quo warranto ouster , Sereno accused Court Administrator Midas Marquez of orchestrating the rallies of court ........»»

Source: Rappler RapplerCategory: NewsJun 20th, 2018Related News

‘Us and Them’: Love makes the ultimate sacrifice in riveting romantic drama

Love means never having to say you're sorry. But, sometimes, letting petty misunderstandings pile up unaddressed could have disastrous repercussions. In the three-hanky romantic drama "Us and Them," which makes its Netflix debut on Friday, the strong romantic bond that unexpectedly blooms between bosom buddies Jianqing Lin (played by heartthrob Jing Boran) and Xiaoxiao Fan (Zhou Dongyu of Zhang Yimou's "Under the Hawthorn Tree") cracks under the strain of stubbornness, immaturity and ambition. Jianqing and Xiaoxiao's shared tale is framed by a decadelong journey that begins when their paths cross on a train to Beijing during the hectic chunyun period, the Spring Festival's 40-d...Keep on reading: ‘Us and Them’: Love makes the ultimate sacrifice in riveting romantic drama.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Jun 19th, 2018Related News

Q& A: Chicago Bulls head coach Fred Hoiberg

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com A year ago, on the night of the 2017 NBA Draft, the Chicago Bulls switched gears. Jimmy Butler was traded to Minnesota, taking with him any pretense that the Bulls were a legitimate playoff team. In that moment, Chicago committed to a rebuild, which is to say, a dive into the draft lottery where coach Fred Hoiberg and his team presumably would be rewarded not for how many games they won but how many they lost. By whatever means necessary. Soon after Butler was moved to the Timberwolves, veteran point guard Rajon Rondo was waived. A few months later, Dwyane Wade was cut loose (via a handsome buyout) to bounce through Cleveland to Miami. The Bulls moved forward with three young pieces courtesy of the Wolves -- wing Zach LaVine, guard Kris Dunn and the No. 7 pick in 2017, rookie forward Lauri Markkanen -- and a general acceptance that getting from there to here was going to bring a lot of pain. Some of that was literal: Bobby Portis slugged teammate Nikola Mirotic in a preseason practice, breaking two facial bones and putting Mirotic on the shelf for 23 games. Some of it was figurative: the frustration of a season that began as a 3-20 mess and ended in a 10-28 slog. In between, though, the Bulls somehow put together a 14-7 stretch that offered a glimpse of what 2018-19 might be. It also cost them precious lottery balls, eventually leaving them with the No. 7 pick (and No. 22, after dealing Mirotic in February to New Orleans) in Thursday’s (Friday, PHL time) Draft. Hoiberg, who went from an alleged coaching “hot seat” during two .500 seasons, wound up with more job security as a coach headed toward 50 defeats and beyond. He spoke with NBA.com about his and the Bulls’, er, challenging season. This is edited from a pair of longer conversations, one at the end of the regular season, the other within the past week. NBA.com: So you go through everything that was 2017-18, dutifully lose 55 games and wind up at No. 7 instead of in the top three for the Draft. The inevitable question is, was it worth it? Fred Hoiberg: Obviously you’re disappointed. You were hoping to move up. But we’re confident we’re going to get a good player with the No. 7 pick and we’re confident we’ll get a good player with the 22nd pick. NBA.com: C’mon, this isn’t our first rodeo. I get that people don’t like to use the word “tanking,” but the Bulls’ marching orders last season were pretty clear. FH: I don’t think you can look at it that way in the midst of your season. The players are competitive, your staff is competitive. You want to play as well as you can and put yourself in a position to win. When you look at the successful stretch that we had in December and January, you think about carrying those things forward and then adding, based on who we get, to the roster. There was some real frustration that we didn’t get a lot of wins at the end. But we developed some younger players and saw what we had with some of our guys. NBA.com: When you guys had that run before the season’s midpoint, winning seven in a row (first team in NBA history with such a long winning streak immediately after a losing streak of 10 in a row) and 10 of 12, did you and the front office ever consider a Plan B? As in, maybe, show potential free agents how good your supporting cast could be, in hopes of luring big-name help this summer? FH: I think we did. What we showed was a really good foundation and a young core that we can build around. When I look back at it, I just wish we could have had more opportunity to work with it and see what it would have looked like. When Zach LaVine came back [Jan. 13 from ACL knee surgery], the plan was for him to play about 20 minutes a night. Then his third game, Kris Dunn fell against Golden State and had that concussion [that cost him 11 games, before missing the final 14 with a toe injury]. It’s too bad we didn’t get the full look. But players like Cam Payne, Denzel [Valentine], Bobby, Robin [Lopez], Justin Holiday all had career years.   NBA.com: You had a lot of injuries down the stretch. Not to suggest that they weren’t all legit, but were you instructed at any point by VP John Paxson or GM Gar Forman to dial it back after that 14-7 success? FH: No, we weren’t. And the big thing from the very beginning of last season, the two things we wanted to see, was competing at a high level every night and the development of our players. I think we accomplished that. NBA.com: What -- in your background as a player, coach, competitor, you name it -- prepared you for this past season? FH: Part of what prepared me for this was, I had been through this as a player. I went from four really competitive teams in Indiana, playing with someone as driven and helpful as Reggie Miller, taking me under his wing. There were other great veteran players who helped me just to survive and taught me a lot. Larry Brown was the coach, then Larry Bird my last two years.   Then when I came to Chicago, I knew it would be an opportunity to play. But it was a rebuild. Eventually I got thrust into the role of captain, as the oldest player on team at 28. It really helped me with what we’re going through now. I learned how important it is to keep guys’ morale up and be positive through the ups and downs. I give our guys all the credit in the world for remaining so positive, keeping up a great work ethic and still being sponges in wanting to learn. NBA.com: What were the takeaways from the best and healthiest part of last season? FH: We got a pretty good feel for what Kris Dunn can be. He really evolved into being a closer for our team. Lauri was closing games for us, taking big shots as a 20-year-old kid. Zach had the game against Minnesota. What people fail to remember about Zach, he averaged over 22 points a game in February and really got into a pretty good rhythm. Then he had some knee soreness and wound up sitting for the rest of the year. But we had some flashes of what this can turn into. NBA.com: Niko paid for his role in sparking that hot streak. FH: Niko was great. He missed those first 23, and I thought our team handled that adverse situation about as well as anybody could, not letting it affect us in a negative way. We were able to move past it. You even saw the chemistry that Niko and Bobby played with when they were out there together. NBA.com: How hard was it personally downshifting from a team that had gone to the playoffs to one that didn’t put a priority on winning? FH: When the move was made on draft night, when those three kids came in, right away there was an excitement. Everyone had seen what Zach had done. He was a highlight reel and had those slam dunk championships. He plays the game with ease on the offensive end. His athletic tools and ability to get up and down the floor. Kris, everybody absolutely loved coming out of the draft [in 2016]. Then he had an up-and-down rookie season. Helping him to get that swagger back that he had coming out of Providence took some work, but he was aching to put that work in. Markkanen, I know the guys upstairs knew how good he was but I had no idea. I didn’t study him because we had the 15th pick. He comes over after a grueling summer -- summer league, Eurobasket with all that pressure in front of his home fans -- and he was exhausted. But then you saw every day, “Man, this kid is really good.” You’re thinking, we could probably put the ball in this kid’s hands. Then he goes up and dunks over a whole team and you say, “My God, this kid’s more athletic than we thought. He uses his feet, he’s got anticipation, he’s got toughness.” He showed a little more every day. NBA.com: Was it difficult asking a proud veteran like Robin Lopez to put it in idle over the final 25 games? FH: I think he understood. He’s been a part of a lot of different situations. He was great. He continued to lead. He continued to practice hard. He talked to the bigs as they came off the floor. NBA.com: Was your own health challenged at all by the stress of this season? Your past issues related to your heart are widely known, and coaching an NBA team even in the best of times is a demanding job. FH: After two open-heart surgeries, I do have to sometimes check myself. There are so many things you can over-concern yourself with in this business. Then you look back a week or two later and say, “My God, why did I put so much effort into that one stupid thing that happened?” You have to let go sometimes. My family is so important for me with that. You get some normalcy in your life. [At night, lying in bed, Hoiberg can hear a valve in his heart every time it beats. He let a visitor listen, too, and sure enough... ] If this ever affected me to the point where I had to throttle back, I would move on to something else. When I had my first surgery and they removed the diseased tissue from the aorta that had an aneurysm in it, they got rid of the problem. The valve deteriorated after they put a new valve in and they had to go in again, but the diseased tissue no longer was there. If it was a risk, I’d be doing something else. But it’s a constant reminder. You think you’re going to get used to it, but you never really do. My wife will be lying next to me and she hears it. NBA.com: When you look back on 2017-18, is it like “Casablanca” for you guys? As in, you’ll always have December? FH: It was fun to see how much the work paid off. Everyone was putting so much into it to get out of that slump. You can say, we had something to build on there. But whenever I talked to our team, before or after, it was all about competing on a nightly basis. Being consistent with their effort. I couldn’t be more proud of how they handled it. They were on time. They kept trying to get better. They worried about what they could control. I didn’t have to have even one of those conversations where I sat a guy down and said, “You’re not playing hard enough.” I did have a few conversations where I said, “You need to move the ball more.” [laughs] NBA.com: Big difference, coaching relative kids after the so-called “three alphas” of Butler, Wade and Rondo? Jimmy seemed eager to stay here to win. FH: Jimmy did so many things for this team. He was great to coach. You knew every night you were going to get an unbelievable effort. A guy who never backed down. Who never shied away from the big shot. And was going to defend at a high level every time he stepped on the floor. So Jimmy was missed in a lot of ways. But when you look at the young guys’ abilities, it’s exciting. NBA.com: What do you make of having better job security now that the losses are mounting, compared to those .500 seasons? FH: I don’t think any one of the 30 guys in our position pay attention to that. You can’t do your job if you do. You go in and try to improve as an individual, as a staff, as a team. Our first year, Derrick Rose suffered an orbital fracture in the first workout. We had 10 rotation players who missed double-digit games. Two starters missed 50 or more [Mike Dunleavy, Joakim Noah]. Niko had that botched appendix surgery. The next year was a completely different team. Nobody predicted we’d be a playoff team but we were and had a good chance to beat Boston before Rondo got hurt. NBA.com: When you’re not coaching veterans, is it a purer form, as far as installing “your” system vs. tailoring things to them? FH: You always look for the best system, the best approach. The basics don’t change, but [in 2016-17] we had a lot more isolation players, so we ran more of those types of actions. This [past] year, more ball movement, player movement fit this group better. We had longer, harder practices as opposed to a veteran group as the year went on. NBA.com: Since the end of the season, how much time have you put in on developmental activities and draft preparation? FH: We’ve had a lot of guys in and gotten a lot of work in, in the early part of the offseason. We’re looking forward to working again after the draft with some new young players as part of the roster. It’s all about moving forward. NBA.com: As you look back over the past year, with the script flipping to the point where the Bulls wanted to win by losing and maybe lost -- some draft position, anyway -- by winning, what goes through your mind? FH: What was Donovan Mitchell [the Rookie of the Year finalist chosen by Utah]? The 13th pick? You just never know with the draft. You play hard, you get the culture established the way you want it and things take care of themselves. What really would have been devastating would have been ending the season with negativity, with your team not playing hard, with your team disinterested. That’s something that would be a real cause for concern going into an offseason. But our guys felt good about themselves. Some were sacrificing in a big way and pulling for younger guys. They were playing hard, they were cheering for each other. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 19th, 2018Related News

Portugal can eliminate Morocco from World Cup

MOSCOW --- Cristiano Ronaldo and Portugal can send Morocco to an early World Cup exit on Wednesday. A second straight defeat would ensure elimination for the North African side which has not let an opposing player score in this World Cup campaign since 2015. An own goal by Morocco forward Aziz Bouhaddouz in stoppage-time was decisive in a 1-0 loss to Iran last Friday in a game it mostly dominated. "Because they lost the first game, Morocco will give everything. They have no other choice," Portugal forward Andre Silva said. Portugal's opening 3-3 draw with Spain in a World Cup classic means Morocco must take at least one point before the Spanish play Iran in Wednesday's late game in...Keep on reading: Portugal can eliminate Morocco from World Cup.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Jun 18th, 2018Related News

PBA: Brownlee will trade 35 points for triple-double

By now, everyone knows that Justin Brownlee can score. Sunday at the Manila Clasico, Brownlee dropped 35 for Ginebra, leading the Gin Kings to a huge win over Magnolia in the 2018 PBA Commissioner's Cup. However, Brownlee shot 11-of-24 from the field and personally, the prolific import would gladly trade his 35 points for a nice triple double. Or anything close to that. "Having a triple double means you did a lot of other things on the court," Brownlee said after scoring 35 points on top of "only" eight rebounds and four assists. "And I don't look at myself as just a scorer. I like to rebound, I'm a passer. So I think having a triple double shows more of my game," he added. Regardless of his stats, the most important thing for Brownlee and the Gin Kings right now is getting wins. Ginebra now has won back-to-back contests in the mid-season joust and has been revived with a 3-5 mark. "Overall, it's our best game. Whenever you can win by 20 plus you know you can feel good about it," Brownlee said. "At the same time you can't be satisfied, we're still fighting for the playoffs," he added.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 17th, 2018Related News

RAW Deal: Depositing Money in the Bank 2018

CHICAGO—After 5 weeks (or something that felt like 5 weeks) it’s finally here. It’s time for this year’s Money in the Bank, and you know what that means. Time to predict the show. What’s the big story for this one? Not much, really, other than we’re ........»»

Source: Rappler RapplerCategory: NewsJun 17th, 2018Related News

Woods on expectations for another major win: Absolutely

By Jimmy Golen, Associated Press SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) — Hoist the anchor, and set sail the great ship Privacy on a course for Carnoustie Bay, Pebble Beach or some other future site of a golf major. Tiger Woods isn't going to win the U.S. Open this year. He still thinks he can win another major before he's done. "Absolutely," Woods said after shooting a 2-over 72 at Shinnecock Hills on Friday for a 36-hole total of 10 over that saw him miss the cut. "They're not easy," he said. "I mean, I've won a few of them over the course of my career, and they're the hardest fields and usually the hardest setups. So they're meant to be testers, and you don't win major championships by kind of slapping all around the place and missing putts. "You have to be on," he said. "You just can't fake it at a major championship." Woods couldn't even fake it for the first 34 holes in Southampton, and despite birdies on the last two holes, he needed a lot of help to avoid the cut for the fifth time in his last eight majors. That means he won't need to bunk for the weekend at the Sag Harbor Yacht Club on the 155-foot boat he jokingly calls "the dinghy." Woods also missed the cut when he brought Privacy to the 2006 U.S. Open at Winged Foot in New York City's northern suburbs. He has not played the weekend at a U.S. Open since 2013, or won one since 2008 — his last major victory. He remains stuck at 14 in his career, four short of Jack Nicklaus' record. "Our whole careers are pretty much measured as if you can win four times a year," Woods said. Woods' chances were effectively eliminated after two holes. He shot a triple bogey on Thursday on No. 1 — a 399-yard par 4 that is the fourth-easiest hole on the course — needing three tries to manage a short rise to the elevated green and then two-putting. He entered the second round nine strokes behind the leaders and thought if he could shoot in the 60s on Friday he would have a chance to get back into it. Now he won't even have a chance to play. "I couldn't chase down the leaders right away. It's going to take me probably 2½ to 3 rounds to do it," he said. "Unfortunately, I went the other way." Starting the second round on No. 10, Woods made the turn at even par and came back around to No. 1. His drive was fine, but he yanked his approach shot to the right of the green into deep rough, and then rolled his third shot over it. After pitching to about 14 feet, he missed a bogey putt. He then bogeyed No. 2 for the second straight day. "I didn't play the first and second hole very well," said Woods, who started on No. 10 for the second round. "I was kind of hanging in there until, unfortunately, first and second hole kind of derailed it." Woods said he would take the week off before playing the National and then heading to Carnoustie, Scotland, for the British Open......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 16th, 2018Related News