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2 dead after truck falls into Batangas ravine

SAN PEDRO CITY - Two men were killed while at least 11 others were injured after a truck fell off a cliff in Nasugbu, Batangas on Wednesday morning. A report from the Batangas police office identified the fatalities as Steven Mendoza and Earl Bonan, sound system operators employed by the J.S. Mina Sound System. The police said the truck, an Isuzu closed van carrying sound system equipment, was traversing the national road in Barangay Natipuan when it fell off a cliff as it approached a sharp curve, around 6 a.m. Police said there were 13 people on board including the driver, Rodrigo Gonzales, 58, from General Mariano Alvarez, Cavite. Responders rescued Gonzales and the ot...Keep on reading: 2 dead after truck falls into Batangas ravine.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Dec 19th, 2018Related News

WATCH: Simba is back in The Lion King live-action remake trailer

MANILA, Philippines – Can't wait to see Simba become king again? We can't either! In 2019, the beloved classic The Lion King is coming back after 24 years as a  live-action remake  starring James Earl Jones as Mufasa once again, Donald Glover as Simba, and Beyoncé as Nala.  Hans Zimmer ........»»

Source: Rappler RapplerCategory: NewsNov 23rd, 2018Related News

Disney releases Lion King remake teaser

Walt Disney has released the trailer for the live-action remake of the classic animation ”The Lion King.” Spanning 90 seconds, it hints of a faithful retelling of the original 1994 version. The casts include Donald Glover as Simba, Beyoncé as Nala, Billy Eichner as Timon, Seth Rogen as Pumbaa, and James Earl Jones, who will […].....»»

Source: Tribune TribuneCategory: NewsNov 23rd, 2018Related News

The much-awaited trailer of Disney’s ‘Lion King’ live-action remake

Disney finally released a trailer of the “Lion King” live-action remake and fans all over the world found it stunning. The teaser featured the iconic opening scene in the 1994 animated film with the “Circle of Life” hymn. The voice of American actor James Earl Jones, who will be reprising his role as Mufasa, was […] The post The much-awaited trailer of Disney’s ‘Lion King’ live-action remake appeared first on Interaksyon......»»

Source: Interaksyon InteraksyonCategory: TopNov 23rd, 2018Related News

Bamboo house for Manila slums wins top prize in future cities contest

BANGKOK — The creator of a low-cost house made of bamboo to tackle the chronic shortage of affordable housing in the Philippine capital has won a top international prize to design future cities in a rapidly urbanizing world. Earl Forlales, 23, won the first prize from the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) in its Cities […] The post Bamboo house for Manila slums wins top prize in future cities contest appeared first on Interaksyon......»»

Source: Interaksyon InteraksyonCategory: TopNov 22nd, 2018Related News

Crowds brave London chill for PH fast-food giant s UK debut

CHICKEN JOY TO THE WORLD UK-based Filipinos eagerly awaiting the opening of Jollibee's first store in London's Earl's Court district share the frame with JFC CEO Ernesto Tanmantiong.....»»

Source: Philippinetimes PhilippinetimesCategory: NewsOct 21st, 2018Related News

Filipinos lead queue to UK’s first Jollibee branch

via ABS-CBN News – Filipinos trooped to Jollibee when it opened its first United Kingdom branch in London’s Earl’s Court on Saturday morning. The London branch is Jollibee Food Corporation’s second in Europe after it opened in Milan, Italy earlier this year. It adds to over 1,300 Jollibee stores worldwide. Read more ».....»»

Source: Thepinoy ThepinoyCategory: NewsOct 21st, 2018Related News

Mark Cuban donates $10M after Mavericks workplace probe

NBA press release The NBA today issued the following statement about the report by independent investigators regarding workplace conditions at the Dallas Mavericks, following allegations made in a Feb. 20, 2018 Sports Illustrated article: Upon learning of the allegations, Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban notified the NBA and an independent investigation was launched with oversight from the league office. Anne Milgram, former Attorney General of New Jersey, a Professor of Practice and Distinguished Scholar at New York University School of Law, and currently Special Counsel at Lowenstein Sandler LLP, and Evan Krutoy, who spent more than 20 years as a prosecutor in the Manhattan District Attorney’s office and currently heads Krutoy Law, P.C., led the seven-month investigation. The league’s oversight function was led by David Anders, a partner at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz and a former Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York. The report was based on information gathered from 215 interviews with current and former Mavericks employees who worked for the team during the past two decades and from the evaluation of more than 1.6 million documents, including emails and other electronic documents. Following the launch of the independent investigation, the Mavericks, under Mr. Cuban’s direction, hired a new Chief Executive Officer, Cynthia Marshall, a former AT&T senior executive, who has since implemented a massive overhaul to improve the organization’s workplace culture. While the investigation was ongoing, Mr. Cuban and Ms. Marshall took a series of steps to enhance the team’s workplace policies and procedures. Under Ms. Marshall’s direction, the Mavericks have replaced or added several new leadership positions in the organization, including a new head of Human Resources, a Chief Ethics and Compliance Officer, a head of Diversity & Inclusion and a new General Counsel. The Mavericks also instituted mandatory “Respect in the Workplace” training for all employees and ownership; created a confidential hotline for employees to share concerns, issues or allegations of misconduct; and established employee resource teams and an external advisory council to ensure a more diverse and collaborative work environment. Ms. Milgram’s and Mr. Krutoy’s extensive investigation, with full cooperation from Mr. Cuban and the Mavericks organization, resulted in a detailed understanding of the scope and substance of the issues. Among the investigation’s key findings: - The investigation substantiated numerous instances of sexual harassment and other improper workplace conduct within the Mavericks organization over a period spanning more than twenty years. - Among other things, the investigation found:     - Improper workplace conduct toward fifteen female employees by the Mavericks’ former President and CEO Terdema Ussery, including inappropriate comments, touching, and forcible kissing;     - Improper workplace conduct by former Mavericks ticket sales employee Chris Hyde, including inappropriate comments to women of a sexual nature, the viewing and sharing of pornographic images and videos, unsolicited and unwanted sexual advances, and violent and threatening outbursts toward co-workers; and     - Two acts of domestic violence perpetrated by former Mavs.com reporter Earl Sneed, including one against a team employee. - The investigators concluded that Mavericks’ management was ineffective, including a lack of compliance and internal controls, and that these shortcomings permitted the growth of an environment in which acts of misconduct and the individuals who committed them could flourish.  In particular, the investigators found:         - The Mavericks executive leadership team failed to respond adequately and committed a significant error in judgment by retaining Mr. Sneed following his domestic violence incidents; and         - The Mavericks’ executive leadership team was responsible for allowing Mr. Hyde to remain employed with the organization despite his inappropriate and problematic behavior, and failed adequately to address his various acts of misconduct.         - The investigators found no evidence that Mr. Cuban was aware of Mr. Ussery’s misconduct.  None of the 215 witnesses who were interviewed stated that they informed Mr. Cuban of Mr. Ussery’s actions, the investigators found no documentary evidence of such a communication, and Mr. Cuban stated that he did not know about the conduct.   The investigation report also contains a series of recommendations for changes to the Mavericks’ organization, including:     - Increasing the number of women on staff, including in leadership positions;     - Enhancing formal reporting processes for victims of misconduct;     - Implementing regular anonymous employee surveys to evaluate workplace culture; and     - Expanding and improving the Mavericks’ Human Resources department and instituting clear protocols for investigating workplace misconduct. The report confirms that several of these steps have already been taken, including the hiring of Ms. Marshall and other new senior female leaders, and notes that “we heard from employees of a sea change in the professional environment at the Mavericks that began almost immediately following” the publication of the Sports Illustrated article. In recognition of the institutional and other failures set forth in the report, Mr. Cuban has agreed to contribute $10 million to organizations that are committed to supporting the leadership and development of women in the sports industry and combating domestic violence.  These organizations will be selected by an advisory council of leaders from the Mavericks, including Mr. Cuban and Ms. Marshall, and the NBA, including President of Social Responsibility & Player Programs Kathy Behrens, President of Team Marketing & Business Operations and Chief Innovation Officer Amy Brooks, and Chief Diversity & Inclusion Officer Oris Stuart. Additionally, the NBA is requiring the Mavericks to:         - Provide the league office with quarterly reports regarding the recommendations set forth in the report and their implementation;         - Immediately report to the league office any instances or allegations of significant misconduct by any employee;         - Continually enhance and update annual “Respect in the Workplace” training for all staff, including ownership; and         - Implement a program to train all staff, including ownership, on issues related to domestic violence, sexual assault, and sexual harassment. “The findings of the independent investigation are disturbing and heartbreaking and no employee in the NBA, or any workplace for that matter, should be subject to the type of working environment described in the report,” said NBA Commissioner Adam Silver. “We appreciate that Mark Cuban reacted swiftly, thoroughly and transparently to the allegations first set forth in Sports Illustrated – including the immediate hiring of Cynthia Marshall as CEO to effect change, but as Mark has acknowledged, he is ultimately responsible for the culture and conduct of his employees. While nothing will undo the harm caused by a select few former employees of the Mavericks, the workplace reforms and the $10 million that Mark has agreed to contribute are important steps toward rectifying this past behavior and shining a light on a pervasive societal failing -- the inability of too many organizations to provide a safe and welcoming workplace for women.” Following the allegations made in the Sports Illustrated article, the NBA conducted a thorough review of its existing policies and procedures related to respect in the workplace, and required all NBA teams to do the same. In addition, the league established a confidential leaguewide hotline for team and league employees to report workplace misconduct including, but not limited to, sexual harassment, discrimination and retaliation.  While many of the recommendations contained in the investigation report are already part of established practice at the league office, any that are not will shortly be adopted. The report of the independent investigation is available here......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsSep 19th, 2018Related News

WATCH: Coen brothers’ ‘The Ballad of Buster Scruggs’ launches trailer

The American writer-director team of the brothers Joel and Ethan Coen are bringing their newest Western, which won the Best Screenplay award at the 2018 Venice Film Festival, to Netflix in November. Originally announced as a television miniseries, "Buster Scruggs" was turned into a feature film that tells six different stories about the American frontier. The trailer, at once comic and violent, doesn't reveal much in the way of plot details but introduces several oddball characters. Tom Waits is seen briefly as a prospector, while James Franco plays a slow-witted cowboy who nevertheless manages to escape death more than once. Tim Blake Nelson ("O Brother Where Art Thou") sta...Keep on reading: WATCH: Coen brothers’ ‘The Ballad of Buster Scruggs’ launches trailer.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Sep 13th, 2018Related News

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsSep 11th, 2018Related News

Bacolod breaks ground on first-ever drug rehab center

BACOLOD CITY, Philippines – This city will soon have its first-ever drug rehabilitation facility. The groundbreaking of the P35-million Bacolod City Drug Treatment and Rehabilitation Center in Barangay Alijis here was held Friday afternoon, August 17. Leading the ceremony were Dangerous Drugs Board (DDB) Chairman Catalino Cuy , Undersecretary Earl Saavedra, ........»»

Source: Rappler RapplerCategory: NewsAug 18th, 2018Related News

VIRAL: School official burns students bags as punishment

MANILA, Philippines – While discipline is a key trait learned in schools, some tactics may have gone too far. Photos posted on Twitter by Bicol Central Academy (BCA) alumnus Earl Vincent Cañaveral show a pile of burnt school bags in the school's quadrangle. Senior high students at the Naga City, Camarines Sur ........»»

Source: Rappler RapplerCategory: NewsAug 18th, 2018Related News

2018 SOONG CHING LING CUP: Negros booters thrash defending champ China

NEGROS Occidental Football Association (NOFA) made clever passes and powerful kicks to upset defending champion China, 3-0, in the 2018 Soong Ching Ling Cup in Beijing, China last Aug. 14. The squad, which represented the Philippine U13 football team, torched the host club for their first victory. Bago City pride Earl Siconiegue opened the scoring […] The post 2018 SOONG CHING LING CUP: Negros booters thrash defending champ China appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Source: Thedailyguardian ThedailyguardianCategory: NewsAug 16th, 2018Related News

PDEA Condems Killing of Agent in Cebu City

The Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency (PDEA) on Sunday expressed its “strong condemnation” on the killing of one of its agents in an ambush incident by unidentified gunmen in Cebu City. PDEA Director General Aaron N. Aquino identified the slain PDEA agent as Investigation Agent III Earl “Baby” Rallos, 48, a resident of Labangon, Cebu City. […].....»»

Source: Metrocebu MetrocebuCategory: NewsJul 30th, 2018Related News

PDEA condemns murder of Cebu agent

  The Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency (PDEA) has condemned the killing of one of its agents in Cebu City.   PDEA director general Aaron Aquino said that the death of its Investigation Agent III, identified as Earl "Baby" Rallos, would be given justice.   "We strongly condemn this cowardly action against PDEA agents who have been diligently working against the illegal drug operators," Aquino said in a statement on Saturday.   "We will make sure that his death will not pass without worth as we will continue our fight against the illegal drugs industry," he added.   Aquino also said that the drug agency would not back down despite t...Keep on reading: PDEA condemns murder of Cebu agent.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Jul 29th, 2018Related News

Lanyards, not medals: How a high school valedictorian finished college ‘sakto lang’

If there's something Earl Joshua Alcantara should credit his newfound celebrity, it's the relative ordinariness of his college life. Alcantara graduated with a degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Santo Tomas (UST) last June and celebrated his achievement with a tweet that has since gone viral. "Pumasok ng UST na Valedictorian, magtatapos na sakto lang. Hanggang lanyard na lang mga medal ko ngayon HAHAHA. Pero marami akong natutunan sa mga taong nakilala ko. Forever grateful for the 5 years' worth of life lessons. Maraming salamat, UST!" he wrote in his tweet. (I entered UST as class valedictorian, I finished college with grades just enough to pass. I've accumulate...Keep on reading: Lanyards, not medals: How a high school valedictorian finished college ‘sakto lang’.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Jul 29th, 2018Related News

PDEA Central Visayas exec gunned down in Cebu City

Published: 7:54 p.m., July 27, 2018 | Updated: 11:43 p.m., July 28, 2018 CEBU CITY --- The series of killings in the city and Metro Cebu continued on Friday with a former radioman turned antinarcotics agent as the latest victim of what Cebu Archbishop Jose Palma had said was the reign of a culture of impunity. Earl Rallos, 48, of Labangon, this city, was driving his gray Toyota Altis when he was shot repeatedly by still unknown assailants on Friday. He suffered multiple gunshot wounds in the head and body. Rallos was assistant operations officer of the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency (PDEA) in Central Visayas. He worked with Bombo Radyo and radio station dySS for ne...Keep on reading: PDEA Central Visayas exec gunned down in Cebu City.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Jul 28th, 2018Related News

More nonlife insurance firms merge

Two nonlife insurance firms will merge before yearend as a number of small players are hard-pressed to comply with the higher capitalization requirement, Insurance Commissioner Dennis B. Funa said Tuesday. "We are down to 54 nonlife companies, but two will be eventually merging before the end of the year---they are actually part of a conglomerate. But I don't want to preempt their announcement. So we will be down to 53 by the end of the year," Funa told reporters on the sidelines of the launch of the AXA Academy in Makati City. The upcoming merger of the two nonlife firms will make the surviving entity "more efficient," Funa said, without disclosing details. Another company earl...Keep on reading: More nonlife insurance firms merge.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Jul 11th, 2018Related News

‘Heartbroken’ father of designer Kate Spade dies at age 89

The father of fashion designer Kate Spade has died just over two weeks after the suicide of his daughter, the family said on Thursday. Earl F. Brosnahan Jr., 89, had been in failing health and he was also “heartbroken over the recent death of his beloved daughter,” the Brosnahan family said in a statement. Brosnahan, […].....»»

Source: Interaksyon InteraksyonCategory: TopJun 22nd, 2018Related News

Diliman captures YBC crown

DILIMAN College lived up to its high billing by winning the boys 19 years old and under title in the 2018 Youth Basketball Cup: Top Class tournament. Powered by the troika of Robbi Darang, Johndel Bauzon and Earl Salazar, Diliman outclassed Warriors Club, 96-66, to capture the title at the….....»»

Source: Journal JournalCategory: NewsMay 27th, 2018Related News