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Ayton thriving with competition, schedule at NBA Summer League

LAS VEGAS --- Deandre Ayton is having no problem with the competition or the schedule at the NBA level. Ayton outplayed a fellow top rookie big man for the second time, keeping the Phoenix Suns undefeated in preliminary play in Las Vegas. Another full day of basketball Monday, highlighted by Ayton against Orlando's Mo Bamba in a matchup of unbeaten teams, was the third game in four days for the 20 teams in action at the NBA Summer League. The games are shorter than a regular NBA game --- 40 minutes instead of 48 --- and there's no travel, but it's still a lot of action in a short amount of time. Some teams even gave players a rest day during the stretch of games, knowing the...Keep on reading: Ayton thriving with competition, schedule at NBA Summer League.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Jul 10th, 2018Related News

Morning Tip Q& A: Mohamed Bamba

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst They have come seemingly all at once -- new, freakish size in the NBA with the ability to put the ball on the floor, shoot from deep and block everything that moves. Kristaps Porzingis begat Joel Embiid, who begat this year’s group of young big men who have grown up facing the basket rather than with their backs to it. Among the most intriguing of the 2018 Draft class is Mo Bamba, the 20-year-old from Texas via Harlem, where he grew up -- fast, as city kids tend to do, learning the game on the hardtops around New York City, while his parents, natives of Ivory Coast, wondered what the increasing fuss was around their son. He, on the other hand, has tended to handle the attention with aplomb and a smile. In a group full of long, tall people, Bamba still stands out, with an insane wingspan of 7'10" that allows for court coverage the likes of which hasn’t been seen. Bamba has been in the spotlight for a while -- the Westtown (Penn.) High School team on which he played featured teammates like Cam Reddish, a blue-chip guard who’ll play for Duke next season -- and played against the likes of the No. 1 pick in 2018, Deandre Ayton. At Texas, he starred for Coach Shaka Smart, himself among the biggest names in the sport. After one season in Austin, where he shattered the school record for blocked shots in a season, Bamba declared for the Draft, assured he’d be a high Lottery pick. But Bamba has also shown a willingness to work on what he doesn’t -- or, at least, didn’t -- do that well. He went to California for weeks with noted player development coach Drew Hanlen, who deconstructed Bamba’s jumper from the ground up. Hanlen lowered Bamba’s shot pocket, adjusted his fingers on the ball and eliminated a hitch Bamba had before shooting. Bamba displayed much improved form before the Draft, but even if he couldn’t hit the broad side of a barn, he was going high -- and, he did, to the Orlando Magic with the sixth pick overall. Desperate to regain relevance in the East, the Magic hired Steve Clifford after he was fired by Charlotte to try and improve their awful defense. At the least, Clifford inherited ridiculous size on his roster, with Bamba joining 6'10" second-year forward Jonathan Isaac and newly re-signed 6'9" forward Aaron Gordon. Bamba must show he can be a killer on the floor like Embiid, and will work to make that happen. The only significant question about him coming into the Draft was the consistency of his motor at Texas. In Las Vegas this week for Summer League with his new team, Bamba is getting his feet wet while keeping them firmly planted to the ground. David Aldridge: I know you’ve spent a lot of time with Drew on the shot. What feels better now? Mo Bamba: Everything. The mechanics are so much cleaner now than they were in college. I think the difference between college and now is just a matter of just repetition, being able to change my jump shot dramatically because of how much I’ve gone in and worked on it. DA: So with time, you can basically improve anything? MB: Yeah, my jump shot is night and day. DA: He also told me that one thing he wanted to keep working with you on after the Draft was, you have a little jump to your left when you shoot? MB: Yeah, that’s a bad tendency that I have. That’s something Drew didn’t want to change. He changed a lot of things, and that’s one of the best things about working with Drew -- he knows boundaries, and he knows how much is too much. That’s one of the things he didn’t want to change right off the bat. But that’s something I’ve been conscious of and something I’ve been working on since he pointed it out. DA: Given where you played high school, was there more pressure on you playing for Westtown or playing for Texas? MB: I’d say there was more pressure playing -- well, actually, it was both, equal. My sophomore year at Westtown, there was a lot of pressure, because I was at a program that had never won a state championship, and had gotten to the finals three or four years in a row. At Texas, I was coming to a team that hadn’t made the NCAA Tournament the year before. So I’d say it was pretty equal. DA: I would imagine playing on a team like that in high school, with Cam and all the others, maybe prepared you not only for college, but playing in the pros. MB: Yeah, Cam can go. He’s a really good basketball player. And I know for a fact I’ll see him here next year. DA: What was Harlem like to grow up in, day by day? MB: It was, when people ask that, I pretty much tell them that you just grow up fast. You’re making decisions at a very young age that most kids don’t even come close to making. I credit a lot of my success to being from Harlem, growing up there. DA: Harlem’s changed a little the last few years. MB: Yeah, gentrification is real. It’s real. DA: What was it like seeing that demographic shift? MB: Well, I was kind of there before gentrification kind of really hit. Obviously there was a bunch of condos that went up and it was pretty cool to see. It was every time I came back home -- I’d see a new development going up. DA: Best advice your parents ever gave you? MB: I wouldn’t say it was direct advice or a quote. I’d say the best thing my parents passed on to me was to let me make my own mistakes and figure out on my age how to kind of see the world on my own. Growing up as the youngest child, one or two years after your siblings, obviously that’s great. You’re learning without truly making the mistakes on your own. But at some point in your life, you’re gonna have to learn on your own. You’re gonna have to fall to rise. DA: Conversely, then, what’s the biggest mistake you’ve made so far? MB: I’d say that the biggest mistake I’ve made so far was not committing to Texas earlier. I think waiting was awesome. I was very methodical about waiting, very strategic about what I wanted in a university. But at the same time, if I could go back, I probably would have committed my junior year, so I could hit the ground running and build the relationships, get to know people. DA: How much freedom did Shaka give you when you were there to try things on the floor that might not necessarily be good for the team, but could be good for you individually down the road? MB: Coach Smart, he’s given me so much freedom to sort of grow into who I was. That’s been a big thing in my life -- my parents and all of my coaches. Coach Smart did a great job of just letting me come to terms with myself, as a basketball player and a person. DA: I saw in one of your interviews before the Draft that you don’t think people really understand you when you say you’re a unicorn. So define that for me as you see it. MB: Well, I mean, people kind of have a concept of what it means. To me, it’s just someone who makes plays that have never been seen before -- a seven-foot big guard, those are all unicorns to me. DA: You played against Ayton and guys like Jarrett Allen (the Nets’ first-round pick in 2017) in high school, and I know how much you’ve looked at Joel Embiid on tape. Are you guys the new normal when it comes to the next generation of bigs? MB: Yeah, I think this is becoming a theme, and you’ll see it more and more with guys coming out of high school. One of the guys you’ll see coming up is James Wiseman (the 6'11" rising senior center currently playing at East High School in Memphis, and who is considered by many to be the top college prospect in the Class of 2019). He’s younger, but he does a lot of the things that I do, that Deandre does, that Jarrett does. It’s refreshing to see so many people that can do what I do. DA: If you were six-feet tall instead of seven, what would you be doing? MB: I’d have to be around the game, like a scout or a GM, something around the game. DA: How did the basketball bug bite you so hard growing up? MB: Honestly, it’s just my competitive nature. It bleeds over into other aspects of my life. But basketball is just something that I really excelled at, and whenever I hit kind of adversity, or whenever I do something that makes me vulnerable enough to get better and to ask for help, I just took this and ran with it. DA: Since you’re a kid, I have to ask you how good you are at Fortnight? MB: I play recreationally. One of my best friends is really good at it, and whenever I play him I get Ws. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJul 9th, 2018Related News

For summer vet Goodwin, NBA hope springs eternal

By Tim Reynolds, Associated Press LAS VEGAS (AP) — Archie Goodwin is about to set a record. It won’t be cause for celebration. Goodwin is a veteran of 165 NBA games, has scored 20 points on 10 different occasions, had a monthlong stretch with Phoenix two years ago where he started and averaged 16 points per game while playing against a slew of All-Stars in that span. He thinks he’s proven. The rest of the league doesn’t see it the same way. So he’s back in the NBA Summer League — where, after scoring six points for Portland on Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) in the Trail Blazers’ 93-78 win over the Utah Jazz, he moved within 13 points of matching Coby Karl’s all-time record for the Las Vegas event. Karl scored 337 points, Goodwin is up to 324, according to data compiled by RealGM. “It comes with the job,” Goodwin said. “My world is just different. I’m just trying to stay positive and continue to fight, looking for a chance to show how I can help a team.” Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) was Day 2 of the Summer League in Las Vegas, with another 10 games on the schedule. More 10-game slates await on Sunday and Monday (Monday and Tuesday, PHL time), and the tournament runs through July 17 (July 18, PHL time). Most guys in Vegas are playing for the first or second time. Goodwin is playing in the event for the fifth time. Drafted No. 29 overall by Oklahoma City in 2013, Goodwin has gotten NBA time with Phoenix, Brooklyn and New Orleans. He appeared in five preseason games with Portland last season as well, but doesn’t even have as much as a training camp deal for this fall. “I’m a resilient person,” Goodwin said. “That speaks to how I was raised that way, to never give up on my dreams. Hopefully the right situation pops up.” Goodwin was one of the best guards in the G League last season, averaging 19 points on 53 percent shooting. “I feel like I’m not getting a fair shake,” Goodwin said. “But that’s how it is. That’s my motivation. I’m going to keep knocking at the door and hopefully someone realizes that this kid — I’m only 23-years-old — can help a team and bring a lot of value to a team.” Saturday’s (Sunday, PHL time) summaries: TRAIL BLAZERS 93, JAZZ 78 Wade Baldwin IV scored 20 points for Portland (1-0), which got 16 points from Gary Trent Jr. and 13 rebounds from Caleb Swanigan. Grayson Allen, Georges Niang and Tony Bradley all scored 16 for Utah (0-1). Allen struggled again from the field just as he did in two summer games at Salt Lake City earlier in the week, shooting 6-for-17, but added six rebounds and five assists. PACERS 86, SPURS 76 TJ Leaf scored 17 for Indiana, which took control by outscoring San Antonio 22-8 in the third quarter. CJ Wilcox added 13 for the Pacers (1-1). Derrick White scored 19 for the Spurs (0-1), who got 15 points from Lonnie Walker IV. SUNS 71, KINGS 63 Top pick Deandre Ayton scored 21 points on 8-of-11 shooting and grabbed 12 rebounds for Phoenix (2-0). Davon Reed added 12 points and Josh Jackson scored 10. Dragan Bender, the fourth overall selection in the 2016 draft, was scoreless on 0-for-5 shooting. Harry Giles had 17 points, six rebounds and five steals for Sacramento (0-1). Marvin Bagley III, the No. 2 pick, had 15 points and seven rebounds. PELICANS 110, HEAT 84 Trevon Bluiett was 10-of-16 shooting, including 6-of-10 from three-point range, and had 26 points to lead New Orleans (2-0). The guard out of Xavier, who went undrafted last month, has scored 50 points, including 12 three's, in two Las Vegas Summer League games. Walter Lemon Jr. had 19 points, eight rebounds and nine assists, Cliff Alexander added 15 points and Cheick Diallo scored 14 for the Pelicans. Duncan Robinson scored 18 points, hitting 4-of-6 3-pointers, and Jarrod Jones had 15 points and 12 rebounds for Miami (0-1). KNICKS 91, HAWKS 89 Kevin Knox, the ninth overall selection in last month’s draft, led New York (1-0) with 22 points and eight rebounds. Troy Williams added 17 points and Allonzo Trier, who went undrafted out of Arizona, had 15 points, six rebounds, four assists and three steals. John Collins scored 30 points, hitting 4 of 7 from 3-point range, and Tyler Dorsey added 15 points and 14 rebounds for Atlanta (0-1). No. 5 pick Trae Young had 21 points and 11 assists. THUNDER 90, NETS 76 Deonte Burton scored 13 points on 6-of-8 shooting and Daniel Hamilton had 12 points, nine rebounds and seven assists for Oklahoma City (1-1), which won for the first time in Las Vegas after 11 consecutive losses. Theo Pinson, who went undrafted last month out of North Carolina, led Brooklyn (0-2) with 16 points, Yuta Watanabe scored 13 and James Webb III added 12. GRIZZLIES 73, PISTONS 70 Wayne Selden scored 20 points and first-round pick Jaren Jackson Jr. had 12 points, eight rebounds and four blocks for Memphis (1-0). Kobi Simmons added 12 points and Deyonta Davis scored 10 and grabbed nine boards as the Grizzlies held on. Henry Ellenson had 15 points and seven rebounds for Detroit (0-2) but was 5-of-21 shooting, including 1-of-10 from three-point range, and committed seven of the Pistons’ 14 turnovers. Second-round picks Khyri Thomas and Bruce Brown Jr. had 13 and 12 points, respectively. BULLS 86, CAVALIERS 81 Antonio Blakeney scored 25 points and Wendell Carter Jr., the seventh overall pick in last month’s draft, had 16 points, nine rebounds and five blocks for Chicago (1-0). First-round pick Chandler Hutchison added 13 points. Ante Zizic led Cleveland (1-1) with 25 points on 11-of-14 shooting, and grabbed 11 rebounds. First-round selection Collin Sexton added 14 points but was just 6-of-15 from the field......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJul 8th, 2018Related News

Suns Booker signs 5-year, $158 million deal

By Bob Baum, Associated Press PHOENIX (AP) — Devin Booker, the high-scoring guard at the heart of Phoenix’s rebuilding plans, has signed a five-year, $158 million maximum contract with the Suns. Booker, 21, tweeted a photo of himself smiling as he signed the contract Saturday night (Sunday, PHL time), moments before the Suns announced the deal, which makes him the highest-paid player in the franchise’s history. I am humbled & honored to commit to the Suns organization long term. I loved calling Phoenix home the last 3 seasons as this team & community are special to me. Thank you to the Suns for drafting me and believing in me. I look forward to the future & pursuing a title as a Sun. pic.twitter.com/AHRaraPww6 — Devin Booker (@DevinBook) July 8, 2018 The 13th overall pick in the 2015 draft out of Kentucky, Booker has averaged 19.8 points per game in his three NBA seasons. He averaged 24.9 points last season, shooting 38 percent from three-point range. He won the NBA three-point contest at All-Star weekend in February. Booker set a franchise record by scoring 70 points in a game at Boston on March 24, 2017, just the sixth player in NBA history to score that many. “I am humbled & honored to commit to the Suns organization long term,” he wrote. “I loved calling Phoenix home the last 3 seasons as this team & community are special to me. Thank you to the Suns for drafting me and believing in me. I look forward to the future & pursuing a title as a Sun.” The announced signing came five days after Booker and his agent met with Suns owner Robert Sarver, general manager Ryan McDonough and vice president of basketball operations James Jones in Los Angeles to discuss the contract. The contract takes effect in the 2019-20 season. Signed, sealed... BOOKED. 🤝#Max pic.twitter.com/Qrr8eeseZM — Phoenix Suns (@Suns) July 8, 2018 “‘Book’ has been a pillar for the Suns franchise ever since he arrived in Phoenix in 2015,” McDonough said in a news release announcing the signing. “Devin and the team both wanted to extend this agreement with the club as long as we possibly could. This agreement reflects a commitment from both parties to the Phoenix community, the state of Arizona and Suns fans worldwide.” Booker topped 4,000 career points last March 2 (Mar. 3, PHL time), becoming the third-youngest player to reach that milestone. Only LeBron James and Kevin Durant were younger. But while Booker has amassed big individual statistics, there has been little team success. The Suns have missed the playoffs the last eight seasons and had the worst record in the NBA last season at 21-61. After the season, Booker said his days of missing the playoffs were over. That may be a bit optimistic, but the team added to its talented core of young players big-time when it selected center Deandre Ayton with the No. 1 overall pick in the draft. Ayton and fellow first-rounder Mikal Bridges join Booker and Josh Jackson as the talented young core of the team under new coach Igor Kokoskov. Booker will be 26, and presumably approaching his prime, when the new contract expires......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJul 8th, 2018Related News

Chris Paul inks deal with Rockets, DeAndre Jordan verbally commits to Mavericks

MANILA, Philippines – Lob City has officially crumbled. DeAndre Jordan, the last remaining piece of the original "Lob City" squad that launched the Los Angeles Clippers to relevancy, has "verbally agreed" to a one-year, $24.1-million deal with the Dallas Mavericks, according to the New York Times' Marc Stein. {source}.....»»

Source: Rappler RapplerCategory: NewsJul 1st, 2018Related News

DeAndre Jordan agrees to deal with Mavericks

FILE - LA Clippers' DeAndre Jordan dunks during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Milwaukee Bucks Wednesday, March 21, 2018, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Morry Gash) Two people w.....»»

Source: Philippinetimes PhilippinetimesCategory: NewsJul 1st, 2018Related News

Guide to 2018 contract options, qualifying offers

By John Schuhmann, NBA.com Before free agency officially tips off at midnight ET on Sunday morning (Sunday afternoon, PHL time), players and teams had to make decisions on contract options, qualifying offers, and contracts that were either partially or non-guaranteed. Here's the low down on who's staying and who could be going. Player options These players had an option in the final year of their contract. If they exercised it, they were in for one more year. If they declined it, they become free agents Saturday.. Exercised (under contract for one more year) Darrell Arthur (DEN) Ron Baker (NYK) Wilson Chandler (DEN) Dewayne Dedmon (ATL) Danny Green (SAS) Wesley Johnson (LAC) Cory Joseph (IND) Enes Kanter (NYK) Kosta Koufos (SAC) Wesley Matthews (DAL) Jodie Meeks (WAS) Mike Muscala (ATL) Austin Rivers (WAS) - Exercised option prior to trade to Washington Iman Shumpert (SAC) Jason Smith (WAS) Milos Teodosic (LAC) Garrett Temple (SAC) Thaddeus Young (IND) Declined (free agents) Jamal Crawford (MIN) Kevin Durant (GSW) Rudy Gay (SAS) Paul George (OKC) LeBron James (CLE) DeAndre Jordan (LAC) Joffrey Lauvergne (SAS) Kyle O'Quinn (NYK) Early termination options Early termination options are the opposite of a player option, where you have to exercise the option to become a free agent. Declined (under contract for one more year) Carmelo Anthony (OKC) Team options Here, the decision lies with the team. If they exercised the team option, they keep the player for another year. If they declined it, they allowed him to become a free agent. Exercised (under contract for one more year) Richaun Holmes (PHI) Aaron Jackson (HOU) T.J. McConnell (PHI) Nikola Mirotic (NOP) Note: Mirotic's option was picked up as part of the trade that sent him from Chicago to New Orleans. Declined (free agents) Nikola Jokic (DEN) - Restricted Jordan Mickey (MIA) Dirk Nowitzki (DAL) Lance Stephenson (IND) Joe Young (IND) Note: The Nuggets declined their team option on Jokic, but because he has played just three seasons, they had the ability to issue him a qualifying offer and make him a restricted free agent (see below). That's what they did. The Heat and Pacers could have done the same with Mickey and Young, but did not, so they're each unrestricted free agents. Qualifying offers Some players were eligible for restricted free agency. This group includes 2014 first round draft picks who had their third and fourth-year options picked up and just completed their rookie contract, as well as other players who have played three or fewer seasons in the league. Restricted free agency allows the team to match any offer the player receives from another team. But in order to have that right, the team must have issued the player a qualifying offer by Saturday night (Saturday afternoon, PHL time). If a qualifying offer wasn't issued, that player is an unrestricted free agent instead. The qualifying offer is binding as a one-year contract. If the player signs it, he's under contract for next season. He could also sign an offer sheet from another team (which his team would have the ability to match), and he and his team could agree on a new, multi-year contract. The team also has the ability to rescind the qualifying offer going forward (the list below is as of July 1, PHL time) Issued (restricted free agents) Kyle Anderson (SAS) Davis Bertans (SAS) Nemanja Bjelica (MIN) Clint Capela (HOU) Dante Exum (UTA) Yogi Ferrell (DAL) Bryn Forbes (SAS) Aaron Gordon (ORL) Montrezl Harrell (LAC) Rodney Hood (CLE) Zach LaVine (CHI) Patrick McCaw (GSW) Raul Neto (UTA) Jusuf Nurkic (POR) David Nwaba (CHI) Jabari Parker (MIL) Julius Randle (LAL) Marcus Smart (BOS) Fred VanVleet (TOR) Not issued (unrestricted free agents) Bruno Caboclo (SAC) Pat Connaughton (POR) Malcolm Delaney (ATL) Marcus Georges-Hunt (MIN) Jonathan Gibson (BOS) Traveon Graham (CHA) Aaron Harrison (DAL) Andre Ingram (LAL) Amile Jefferson (MIN) Damion Lee (ATL) Doug McDermott (DAL) Salah Mejri (DAL) Shabazz Napier (POR) Lucas Nogueira (TOR) Elfrid Payton (PHX) Nik Stauskas (BKN) Noah Vonleh (CHI) Travis Wear (LAL) Waived The following players have been waived so that their contracts didn't become guaranteed (or fully guaranteed) and have been added to the free agent list (or will be added once they've cleared waivers)... Cole Aldrich (MIN) Thomas Bryant (LAL) Tyler Ennis (LAL) Omari Johnson (MEM) Shelvin Mack (ORL) Tyler Ulis (PHX) Two-way free agents This past season was the first with two-way players that can go between the NBA roster and the G League. Some two-way players are still under contract for next season. Those that aren't can be restricted free agents if they were on the NBA team's active or inactive list for 15 or more days of the NBA regular season and if their team issued a qualifying offer. Here's a rundown of two-way free agents... Restricted Ryan Arcidiacono (CHI) Jabari Bird (BOS) Markel Brown (HOU) Torrey Craig (DEN) Milton Doyle (BKN) Isaiah Hicks (NYK) Darrun Hilliard (SAS) Derrick Jones Jr. (MIA) Luke Kornet (NYK) Malcolm Miller (TOR) Xavier Munford (MIL) Georges Niang (UTA) Marshall Plumlee (MIL) JaKarr Sampson (SAC) Tyrone Wallace (LAC) Derrick Walton Jr. (MIA) Unrestricted Jamel Artis (ORL) Anthony Brown (MIN) Charles Cooke (NOP) Jack Cooley (SAC) Matt Costello (SAS) P.J. Dozier (OKC) Kay Felder (DET) Daniel Hamilton (OKC) Danuel House (PHX) Demetrius Jackson (PHI) Josh Magette (ATL) Erik McCree (UTA) Ben Moore (IND) Marcus Paige (CHA) Gary Payton II (LAL) Alec Peters (PHX) James Webb III (BKN) Andrew White III (ATL) C.J. Wilcox (POR) John Schuhmann is a staff writer for NBA.com. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJul 1st, 2018Related News

DeAndre Jordan leaves Clippers, sets sights on Mavericks

DeAndre Jordan leaves Clippers, sets sights on Mavericks.....»»

Source: Rappler RapplerCategory: NewsJun 30th, 2018Related News

Mavericks chasing DeAndre Jordan again, 3 years later

FILE - In this March 10, 2018, file photo, Los Angeles Clippers center DeAndre Jordan, left, reaches for a rebound along with Orlando Magic center Nikola Vucevic during the first half of an NBA bas.....»»

Source: Philippinetimes PhilippinetimesCategory: NewsJun 30th, 2018Related News

Let s go shopping: A look at some of the top NBA free agents

By David Brandt, Associated Press An NBA free-agent class with a little something for everyone hits the market on July 1. The group includes an array of superstars, big men, glue guys and sharp-shooters. Here’s a look at some of the players to follow when the action begins: THE SUPERSTARS — Kevin Durant (player option): Has expressed his desire to remain with the Warriors. He’s in the middle of his prime as one of the game’s premier players. — Paul George (player option): He has one of the best all-around games in the league and is still fairly young at 28. — LeBron James (player option): Still the free-agent grand prize at age 33, James has shown few signs of wear and tear despite 15 stellar seasons in the league. — Chris Paul (unrestricted): Among the league’s best point guards even at 33, but he’s struggled some with injuries over the years, including a hamstring issue in last year’s playoffs. BIG MEN — Clint Capela (restricted): He’s emerged as one of the league’s top young big men after averaging 13.9 points, 10.8 rebounds and nearly two blocks per game with the Rockets. Houston surely would like to keep him, but the price tag could be steep. — DeMarcus Cousins (unrestricted): He was playing very well for the Pelicans before an Achilles injury ended his season. Questions about his long-term health are real, but he’s also a guy who can score 25 points a game if he regains form. — Derrick Favors (unrestricted): He’s not flashy and doesn’t stretch the floor, but the 6-foot-10 forward has had several productive seasons with the Jazz and will likely garner some interest. — DeAndre Jordan (player option): He’ll be 30 years old next season, but was still one of the league’s dominant rebounds last season, averaging more than 15 per game. — Brook Lopez (unrestricted): He averaged just 13 points per game for the Lakers last season, which was his lowest since his rookie year, but he remains a 7-footer who could help several teams. — Julius Randle (restricted): He’s quietly turned into a promising young player with the Lakers, averaging 16.1 points and eight rebounds last season while shooting nearly 56 percent from the field. GLUE GUYS — Trevor Ariza (unrestricted): A valuable forward who can stretch the floor, he’s provided solid shooting and good defense for the Rockets over the past four seasons. — Avery Bradley (unrestricted): Struggled with injuries last season, playing just 46 games, but is still considered a solid two-way player that can help a team in many ways. — Aaron Gordon (restricted): Still just 22 years old, the 6-foot-9 Gordon turned into a productive all-around player for the Magic last season, averaging 17.6 points and 7.9 rebounds. His ability to make 3-pointers last season is a big plus. — Marcus Smart (restricted): The Celtics guard is not a great shooter, but can impact the game in many different ways. He averaged 10.2 points, 4.8 assists and 3.5 rebounds last season while playing great defense. SHOOTERS — Wayne Ellington (unrestricted): He’s emerged as a reliable shooter off the bench for the Heat the past few seasons. He averaged a career-high 11.2 points last years while shooting nearly 40 percent from 3-point range. — Doug McDermott (restricted): Mr. McBuckets has turned into a very good role player, staying excellent from 3-point range while improving the other parts of his game. — J.J. Redick (unrestricted): Had a solid season for the 76ers, averaging a career-high 17.1 points per game and shooting 42 percent from 3-point range. He just turned 34......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 28th, 2018Related News

Ayton arrives as symbol that Suns are on the rise

By Bob Baum, Associated Press PHOENIX (AP) — Since the heady days of Steve Nash came to an end, there have been few signs of joy from a dwindling fan base that watched the Phoenix Suns tumble to the bottom of the NBA standings and miss the playoffs for the eighth year in a row. Then came the announcement that Deandre Ayton would go to the Suns with the first overall pick. A huge cheer went up from the several thousand fans at Talking Stick Resort Arena on Thursday night (Friday, PHL time) for the draft party. General manager Ryan McDonough, owner Robert Sarver and coach Igor Kokoskov came out of their meeting room to watch and bask in that rare moment of sheer joy from the fans. “It was a pretty special moment for our franchise,” McDonough said. Not only that, but McDonough engineered a last-minute trade for swingman Mikal Bridges of Villanova, the 10th pick. It was a spendy move because Philadelphia demanded and got Miami’s unprotected 2021 first-round pick. But the Suns are weary of stockpiling assets. It’s time to cash in, they figured, and did it with that trade. “We weighed the pros and cons of trading it heavily and carefully,” McDonough said. “We were only going to put it in play if we had a chance to get a special player and that’s how we feel about McKell.” All four of the Suns’ picks showed up on a crowded dais in Phoenix on Friday (Saturday, PHL time) — Ayton, Bridges, French point guard Elie Okobo (chosen 31st) and forward George King of Colorado (the 59th selection). The 7'1" Ayton towered over the others, in a white unbuttoned collared shirt and a sharp blue suit, but he looked and sounded a bit weary from the whirlwind of being the No. 1 draft pick. His only sleep lately, he said, was a couple of hours on the plane ride from New York on Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time). “I’m just excited to finally get a jersey on and be able to play five-on-five again,” Ayton said. Ayton had been the frontrunner for the No. 1 pick ever since the draft lottery and any doubts were erased when he went through an individual workout with the Suns, the only team which he did so. McDonough said that Ayton’s workout “in and of itself was as impressive as I’ve ever seen in my 16 drafts in the NBA.” Ayton is seen as strictly a center, so how does he fit in the modern style of the NBA, when center plays is diminished and players are essentially interchangeable, is a question. Ayton replied that he’s no ordinary center. “I don’t like it when people think I’m just a guy down low,” he said. “They haven’t watched me shoot the basketball.” Ayton and Bridges say they got to know each other well at the college awards ceremony in Los Angeles but never figured they’d be on the same team. “It’s like I’ve known him my whole life,” Bridges said. Now comes the hard work, molding a team with Ayton, Devin Booker and Josh Jackson. A billboard of those three already has been erected downtown. The Suns, so bad for so long, seem on the brink of being relevant. “We’re very hungry,” Ayton said. “I think the great team chemistry and the work ethic that we have, especially us guys coming in, we’re going to bring it to the next level. We’ve got young lets. We can run all day. ... We can really start a winning legacy.” And Ayton is the reason for the sudden leap in optimism, even though he won’t turn 20 until next month. “I embrace it a lot,” he said of the expectations placed upon him. “Through my career I’ve always had that on my shoulder, the expectations. I represent a whole nation [Bahamas] I just do that the best that I can and just help this community start over and be the best player I can possibly be. I just want to be the best great player.” Kokoskov says Ayton possesses “a unique talent for the decades.” Ayton said he wants “to be the best person on and off the court.” Now the Suns move on to the next phase. Free agency starts July 1 (July 2, PHL time) and McDonough wants some veteran players to add to this very young core. He said the team should have $15 million to $20 million to spend. “We were aggressive last night with the picks and the trade up to get Mikal,” McDonough said. “We’re going to continue to be aggressive for the next couple of weeks in free agency. We’ve got some money to spend and we’re looking to spend it on the best players we can get.”.....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 23rd, 2018Related News

No. 1 overall pick gets dream come true as he joins ‘hungry’ Suns

Top pick DeAndre Ayton was in cloud nine after his name was called in the 2018 NBA Draft. The former Arizona Wildcats freshman was ecstatic after being selected by the Phoenix Suns in this year's draft. "As I shook his hand, that's when all the emotions came on me. My hard work is starting to pay off. Seeing the reaction of my parents' faces, even my agent's face is just really insane," Ayton said in a video conference sponsored by Cisco. Yet the 19-year-old forward/center knows being the top pick does translate to a successful NBA career. "Coming as a rookie, I let my work ethic speak first. Once you're on the floor, you have to show some respect to the guys who were the...Keep on reading: No. 1 overall pick gets dream come true as he joins ‘hungry’ Suns.....»»

Source: Inquirer InquirerCategory: Jun 22nd, 2018Related News

Seeking new heights, Suns draft Ayton No. 1 overall

The NBA‘s lightweights got the message Thursday: If you’re going to compete with the heavyweights, you’ve got to get bigger. The Phoenix Suns chose 7-foot Deandre Ayton of Arizona first overall and the Sacramento Kings selected 6-11 Marvin Bagley III of Duke second, starting a run on big men at the top of the 2018 NBA Draft. Ayton […].....»»

Source: Interaksyon InteraksyonCategory: TopJun 22nd, 2018Related News

NBA Draft 2018: Top 10 picks

NEW YORK, United States – The Phoenix Suns used their first-overall pick in franchise history to select Bahamian teenager Deandre Ayton No. 1 at the 2018 NBA draft on Thursday.  The 19-year-old Ayton was expected to go first to the Suns, who like the 7-foot center's size and skill that he ........»»

Source: Rappler RapplerCategory: NewsJun 22nd, 2018Related News

2018 NBA Draft Board

These are some of the possible 2018 NBA Draft picks. 2018 NBA Draft Board These are some of the possible 2018 NBA Draft picks. Top row from left are: DeAndre Ayton, Arizona; Marvin Bagley III, Duke; Trae Young, Oklahoma; Mohamed Bamba, Texas; Jaren Jackson Jr., Michigan State and Miles Bridges, Mich Source link: 2018 NBA Draft Board.....»»

Source: Manilainformer ManilainformerCategory: Jun 22nd, 2018Related News

Modern bigs to dominate 2018 Draft

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com NEW YORK – There was a ballroom full of NBA centers in midtown Manhattan Wednesday – not one of them eager to follow in the sizeable footsteps of Wilt Chamberlain, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Moses Malone, Shaquille O’Neal or Dwight Howard. In fact, on the very day that the top prospects for the 2018 Draft were made available to the media – a talent pool particularly long on length this year – Howard was on the move again, in a reported deal from Charlotte to Brooklyn that will land the eight-time All-Star with his fourth team in four seasons and sixth overall. That bit of news – of an old-school NBA big man being shuffled off again,  primarily for salary-cap purposes, into what looks to be basketball irrelevancy – served as a counterpoint to the young giants just starting out. There will be plenty of guards and forwards selected in the first round Thursday at Barclays Center in Brooklyn, including Michael Porter Jr., Trae Young, Collin Sexton, Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, Mikal Bridges, Kevin Knox and Lonnie Walker. But the lottery will be top-heavy with big men, with Deandre Ayton, Marvin Bagley III, Mo Bamba, Jaren Jackson Jr., Wendell Carter Jr., and Robert Williams all hearing their names called. All six are listed at 6'10" or taller, though they’ll bear little resemblance in style or production to the Hall of Famers cited above or even to Howard. The last time last time six players that size were drafted in the top 10 was 2007, when Greg Oden, Al Horford, Yi Jianlian, Brandan Wright, Joakim Noah and Spencer Hawes all went early. Much has changed in 11 years. These young guys represent basketball’s new-age pivot men, er, which means we’d better drop the “pivot men” nomenclature. Rather, the word that got tossed around most often Wednesday during conversations about these guys’ fit – with specific teams and in the league generally – was modern. Modern centers for a modern NBA. “Modern-day 5,” is how Mamba put it. “Defend multiple positions, can shoot it, handle it a little. Can do a little bit of everything,” the 20-year-old from Harlem, by way of Pennsylvania and Texas. Said Jaren Jackson, Jr., fresh from one season at Michigan State: “At times, I’ve heard that I’m right on time for the way the game is going. A lot of bigs can handle the ball and be versatile and they’re able to make plays.” If you want to feel old, consider the NBA’s prevailing definition of “modern.” With major league baseball, for example, what’s known as the “modern era” historically is thought to have begun in the year 1900. By contrast, the NBA’s modern era dates back to about a week ago last Tuesday. That’s how quickly the contributions from the center position have changed. After ruling the NBA landscape for most of the league’s first 50 years, traditional big men looked at now as dinosaurs, both in form and function. Plodding isn’t allowed. Posting up, back to the basket, and backing into the paint seems as dated in this league as helmetless players in the NHL. There have been noticeable markers along the way. In the ‘90s, players who naturally would have been trained and used as centers – Tim Duncan, Kevin Garnett, Rasheed Wallace, Amare Stoudemire, Antonio McDyess – demanded to face the basket and be referred to as power forwards. Then in 2012, the league joined them, eradicating “center” from its All-Star ballot and opting for “frontcourt” as a catch-all category for everyone from 6'5" wings to seven-foot shot swatters. This latest era dates back just a few years, if you go by a few key analytics. A recent ESPN.com story tracked the minutes played by seven-footers in the playoffs, compared to the regular season, and identified the tipping point as the 2016 postseason. Even if you back it up by a year to include Golden State’s heavy use of small ball in winning its championship in 2015, that’s still barely more than a heartbeat. But the full embrace of the three-point shot and the type of pace favored by a majority of current NBA coaches has put a premium on centers – we’re taking liberties in even calling them that anymore – who are mobile, who can switch defensively, challenge perimeter shooters, do some of that shooting of their own and still crash the boards and protect the rim. The next Shaq or Kareem? Now the model is Houston’s efficient Clint Capela, Boston’s savvy Al Horford or Minnesota’s ridiculously skilled Karl-Anthony Towns. Big guys such as DeMarcus Cousins and Anthony Davis have added range to their shots. Some – Andre Drummond, Jonas Valanciunas, a few more – have status or contracts assure them minutes. Yet other old-style bigs are out of the league (Roy Hibbert, Andrew Bogut) or logging long stretches on the bench (Greg Monroe, Al Jefferson, Hassan Whiteside). Just two years ago, Jahlil Okafor was the No. 3 pick in the 2016 Draft. These days, he’s an afterthought with little market value. Teams don’t want to play the way Okafor and others like him need to play. So the challenge for a fellow such as Ayton, projected to be the near-consensus No. 1 pick this year, is to make sure no one confuses him or his game with DeAndre Jordan. Asked about the trend Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time), Ayton at one point sounded a little defiant. “I’m not changing my way of play in the NBA,” he told reporters. “I’m still an inside-out type of player. I’m going to start inside and establish myself down low until I have to stretch the floor.” It helps, of course, to have that option. Ayton already is built like an NBA veteran, but he has sufficient quickness to cover ground defensively and to keep up with a faster offensive pace. And for those who haven’t been paying attention to him since the NCAA tournament ended – or in Arizona’s case, barely got started with that opening loss to Buffalo – Ayton has a surprise: a more reliable three-point shot he’s willing to unleash. “The NBA three-ball is way farther than the college three-ball,” he said. “I’ve really put on some range and put on some muscle. When I’m fatigued in games, I really can [still] get my shot off in a perfect arc.” Bagley, depending where he lands, might end up playing more out on the floor than the other bigs in this draft. That’s his experience, having had Carter next to him at Duke to handle the basics. Williams will likely benefit from shifting in the opposite direction. He played a lot at power forward for Texas A&M but is rated highly for how his game translates to, you guessed it, modern center play. Bamba has drawn comparisons to Philadelphia’s Joel Embiid, as much for his charisma as for any play similarities. He allegedly has overhauled his shot this spring, and also was eager to tout his three-point range Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time). Then there is Jackson, who has been rated as the best two-way player of the bunch. That includes not just his defense against fellow bigs but his ability to keep up with and guard nearly any position. Jackson seemed to speak for all the big men among the future pros in New York Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time). Unlike a previous generation of centers, many of whom got caught in the NBA’s transition to a smaller, faster, position-less style, the young centers of 2018 grew up watching it. And preparing for it. Nothing frustrating about it, Jackson said, though it’s a far cry from the league in which his father, Jaren Sr., (1989-2002) played. “No. Whatever helps each team do their best is what lineup they’re going to put out,” Jackson said. “They’re going to put the best players on the floor every time. You look at a team like the Warriors, they switch everything. They can play all different positions. That’s what they’re good at.” That’s what these guys, given their size, are remarkably good at too. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 21st, 2018Related News

Bahamas’ teen giant DeAndre Ayton eyes top pick in NBA Draft

NEW YORK -- Towering Bahamian teenager DeAndre Ayton is poised to be chosen with the top pick in the NBA Draft on Thursday, with the Phoenix Suns set to snap up the 7ft. center who compares himself to Shaquille O’Neal. The post Bahamas’ teen giant DeAndre Ayton eyes top pick in NBA Draft appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Source: Bworldonline BworldonlineCategory: NewsJun 20th, 2018Related News

Arizona’s Deandre Ayton top choice among bigs in NBA draft

There’s been little question that Arizona’s Deandre Ayton is the best of a potential-filled group of bigs at the top of the NBA draft......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: NewsJun 20th, 2018Related News

Hawks could turn deep supply of picks into draft-day trade

By Charles Odum, Associated Press ATLANTA (AP) — As the only general manager holding three first-round picks in Thursday night’s (Friday, PHL time) NBA draft, including No. 3 overall, Atlanta’s Travis Schlenk has been a popular target for trade talk. Overall, the Hawks have four picks in the top 34. That’s more than enough depth to attract interest, but the rebuilding Hawks are even more attractive trade targets because they also have about $20 million in salary cap space. That creates more attractive options for a team needing to unload a contract in a trade. Schlenk says he is answering every call and considering all options — including the possibility of trading up or down from the No. 3 spot. It’s an exciting time for Schlenk, who never held such a high draft pick in his previous job as assistant GM with the Golden State Warriors. “This is the highest pick that I’ve been a part of,” Schlenk said last week. “At Golden State, the highest pick we had was six. So it’s exciting. Having the four picks, along with the third pick, we get a lot of phone calls, which is exciting as well, and we’re going to go through all the options that are presented to us and make the best decision, hopefully.” He says he’s comfortable with the idea of opening the 2018-19 season with four rookies. Schlenk is planning the Hawks’ future with a new coach. Former Philadelphia assistant Lloyd Pierce was hired on May 11 to replace Mike Budenholzer, now the Bucks coach. Schlenk might use his first pick to select a forward-center to pair with 2017-18 rookie John Collins. Among players who could be available are Duke’s Marvin Bagley III, Michigan State’s Jaren Jackson and Mo Bamba of Texas. Guards Luka Doncic of Slovenia, Trae Young of Oklahoma and forward Michael Porter of Missouri could be alternatives for Schlenk. Pierce stressed defense in his first news conference in Atlanta. Schlenk said it’s important to land players with balanced offensive and defensive skills. “Obviously when you look at the best teams in the league, the majority of the time they’re good defensive teams,” Schlenk said. “But at the end of the day, if you’re not scoring 100 points you’re probably not winning, so we’re going to look for guys that are two-way players, who can play defensively, but also we’ve got to be able to score the ball on the other end.” Bagley qualifies as that two-way talent, but he could be drafted at the No. 2 spot by Sacramento. “I put a lot of work into this and I think I’m the best player in the draft,” Bagley said after his draft workout in Atlanta last week. “I mean that in the most humble way possible, not to be cocky.” Phoenix is projected to select Arizona center Deandre Ayton with the top pick. Jackson is an accomplished shot blocker with less polish on the offensive end. He is regarded by many to have the potential shooting skills to develop into a well-rounded NBA big man. With point guard Dennis Schroder’s future in Atlanta uncertain, the Hawks can look for talent at any position. Their wealth of picks could make it easier to take a chance on Doncic, who has the skills to play multiple positions even though his ability to create space in the NBA has been questioned by some critics. “I’ve maintained all along, and I honestly believe this, we’re going to take the best player,” Schlenk said. “We’re in a situation where we’re looking to add the most talent we can, and we’re going to get a good player at the third pick.” The No. 3 spot is the Hawks’ highest since 2007, when they selected Al Horford at No. 3. Atlanta also has the No. 19 and No. 30 picks in the first round and No. 34 early in the second round. Those selections give Schlenk a wealth of options, including a deal for a higher pick next year. Schlenk said he has considered if the possibility to “trade back to collect more assets would be advantageous.”.....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 19th, 2018Related News

Arizona s Deandre Ayton top choice among bigs in NBA draft

By Aaron Beard, Associated Press There’s been little question that Arizona’s Deandre Ayton is the best of a potential-filled group of bigs at the top of Thursday’s NBA draft. Ayton was a force in his lone college season and looks like the favorite to land with Phoenix as the No. 1 overall pick. Behind him are several talented big men including Michigan State’s Jaren Jackson, Texas’ Mo Bamba and Duke’s Wendell Carter Jr., who like Ayton all played just one year in college and could all hear their name called in the first 10 selections. Here’s a look at the top prospects: DEANDRE AYTON The seven-foot, 250-pound big man can single-handedly dominate defenses, monopolize the boards and alter or swat shots. STRENGTHS: Ayton offers an impressive mix of power and touch . He averaged 20.1 points and was a force around the rim with 75 dunks while shooting 61 percent from the field, yet he had enough range to hit 12 three-pointers to pull defenders away from the paint, too. At the other end, 8.2 of his 11.6 rebounds per game came on the defensive glass to secure a stop. CONCERNS: He wasn’t particularly effective (14 points on 6-for-13 shooting) in the first-round NCAA Tournament loss to underdog and undersized Buffalo. His lofty draft stock assumes he continues to develop physically and build on his game, including on the defensive end (averaged just 1.9 blocks despite his physical tools). JAREN JACKSON JR. The Michigan State one-and-done big man is a possible top-five pick with size, length and a reliable jumpshot. STRENGTHS: The 6'11" Jackson, who averaged 10.9 points and 5.8 rebounds, offers two intriguing skillsets. First, he shot nearly 40 percent from three-point range even as he attempted nearly three per game. He also averaged 3.0 blocks per game, aided by a wingspan measured at more than 7-5 at the combine. CONCERNS: The 18-year-old (he turns 19 in September) had issues with foul trouble during the year, which helped limit him to 21.8 minutes per game on the season. MO BAMBA The seven-foot freshman from Texas has the potential to be an elite defender and rebounder — and that’s just a start. STRENGTHS: Bamba averaged 12.9 points and 10.5 rebounds while shooting 54 percent from the floor. But it’s the defensive potential that stands out here; he ranked second nationally with 3.7 blocks per game, aided by a wingspan measured at an incredible 7'10" at the combine — three inches more than any other player. CONCERNS: While he’s a good athlete, he’ll need to add some strength to a 225-pound frame to hold up physically in the paint against stronger opponents. WENDELL CARTER JR. Duke’s “other” one-and-done frontcourt presence had his own big season, even if overshadowed by teammate and possible top overall pick Marvin Bagley III. STRENGTHS: The 6'10", 259-pound Carter is a bit of a throwback with his post play. He has back-to-the-basket skills yet can step behind the 3-point arc, too. Carter averaged 13.5 points and 9.1 rebounds, posting 16 double-doubles. And he’s got enough bulk to battle up front at the NBA level. CONCERNS: He doesn’t have a lot of foot speed, which can affect him in transition or at the defensive end. He also had bouts with foul trouble, ending when he fouled out in 22 minutes during an overtime loss to Kansas in the NCAA Elite Eight. OTHERS TO WATCH — MITCHELL ROBINSON: The five-star recruit curiously opted to play for Western Kentucky, then never suited up at the college level. The 6'11" center is a first-round prospect with upside to develop thanks to his length and athleticism. — OMARI SPELLMAN: Spellman was the inside-out big man who shot 43 percent from three-point range for national champion Villanova. He could be the defacto post presence capable of stretching the floor in a small lineup in the NBA, though he’s a likely second-round pick. — ROBERT WILLIAMS: Texas A&M’s 6'10" sophomore is a gifted athlete (check out the windmill dunk he threw down in the Aggies’ NCAA Tournament win against Providence for proof). That and his defensive potential is a big reason why he’s a possible lottery pick......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsJun 19th, 2018Related News