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NBA execs take pay cuts amid season shutdown

Among the executives to take the pay cuts are NBA commissioner Adam Silver and deputy commissioner Mark Tatum......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: SportsMar 27th, 2020Related News

Coronavirus pushes 3.3 million to claim U.S. jobless benefits

WASHINGTON, USA – The economic shutdown caused by the coronavirus pandemic sparked an explosion of Americans filing for unemployment benefits, surging to 3.3 million last week – the highest number ever recorded, the Labor Department reported Thursday, March 26. The normally routine report is at the ........»»

Source: Rappler RapplerCategory: NewsMar 26th, 2020Related News

Two weeks after NBA shutdown, U.S. sports landscape barren

    WASHINGTON, USA – Imagine a  Masters with fall foliage instead of spring flowers, an NBA Finals just weeks before the usual preseason training camps and a neutral-site World Series in a warm vacation getaway. Those are just some of the options being eyed by American sports event organizers planning for a ........»»

Source: Rappler RapplerCategory: NewsMar 26th, 2020Related News

No plant shutdown despite falling power demand, says DoE

No plant shutdown despite falling power demand, says DoE.....»»

Source: Bworldonline BworldonlineCategory: FinanceMar 26th, 2020Related News

EDITORIAL - Fake news in a crisis

In this health crisis, even a hint of further curtailment of people’s mobility or shutdown of retail stores could trigger panic buying and more crowding at outlets of food and other basic necessities......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: NewsMar 24th, 2020Related News

UEFA formally postpones Champions League final amid shutdown

UEFA formally postpones Champions League final amid shutdown.....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsMar 24th, 2020Related News

Rwanda imposes shutdown

KIGALI, Rwanda (AFP) — Rwanda has suspended all “unnecessary movements” outside the home and clamped down on travel across its borders, in one of the toughest measures yet imposed in sub-Saharan Africa to curb the spread of the coronavirus. “Unnecessary movements and visits outside the home are not permitted,” the government announced in a statement […] The post Rwanda imposes shutdown appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Source: Tribune TribuneCategory: NewsMar 22nd, 2020Related News

Ayalas’ IMI on ‘partial’ shutdown

Ayalas’ IMI on ‘partial’ shutdown.....»»

Source: Bworldonline BworldonlineCategory: FinanceMar 20th, 2020Related News

U.S. to close Canada border to non-essential traffic – Trump

WASHINGTON DC, USA – President Donald Trump on Wednesday, March 18, announced the closure of the US-Canada border to non-essential travelers as the coronavirus epidemic intensified in both countries – but said that trade would not be impacted. The shutdown built on Trump's barring of visitors from most of Europe, ........»»

Source: Rappler RapplerCategory: NewsMar 19th, 2020Related News

NBA season, ‘di pa maibabalik sa Hunyo

US – Posibleng sa buwan pa ng Hunyo ang pagbabalik ang NBA season matapos ang suspensyon nito sa kabila ng coronavirus pandemig, ayon sa ulat. Tinatrabaho ngayon ng NBA ang planong dagdagan ang credit line ng $550 milyon hanggang $1.2 bilyon para maasistihan ang mga gastusin sa posibleng mapahabang shutdown. Sa ngayon ay nag-aantay pa […] The post NBA season, ‘di pa maibabalik sa Hunyo appeared first on REMATE ONLINE......»»

Source: Remate RemateCategory: NewsMar 19th, 2020Related News

LIST: Routes for Robredo s free shuttle service for health workers

MANILA, Philippines – The office of Vice President Leni Robredo announced it will provide free shuttle service for health workers that will be operational starting Wednesday, March 18. The announcement comes amid the shutdown of  mass transportation  in Luzon, which was placed under  lockdown  from Tuesday, March 17, until April ........»»

Source: Rappler RapplerCategory: NewsMar 18th, 2020Related News

Hope, defiance at last Moulin Rouge show before virus shutdown

High-kicking dancers with bare chests and giant feathers sprouting from their heads enthralled a full house at the world’s most famous cabaret, the Moulin Rouge in Paris......»»

Source: Thestandard ThestandardCategory: MoviesMar 17th, 2020Related News

Orlando Magic commit $2 million to game-night workers

By The Associated Press The DeVos family that owns the Orlando Magic has unveiled plans for a $2 million fund to pay hourly workers who will miss time because of sports shutdown caused by the coronavirus pandemic. The $2 million will be earmarked to help about 1,800 workers who are employed at Magic games, Lakeland Magic G League games, Orlando Solar Bears minor-league hockey games and other Amway Center events. In addition, Magic players have told the organization that they want to provide even more money for those workers. Magic CEO Alex Martins says: “The DeVos Family has a history of stepping up during challenging times. Today is no different. If someone is losing a paycheck because we are not playing, they will be fairly compensated.” The Magic say the part-time employees will receive paychecks for missed games through what would have been the end of the regular season......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsMar 16th, 2020Related News

US moves nearer to shutdown amid coronavirus fears

Officials across the country curtailed many elements of American life to fight the coronavirus outbreak on Sunday, with health officials recommending that groups of 50 or more don’t get together and a government expert saying a 14-day national shutdown may be needed. Governors were closing restaurants, bars, and schools as the nation sank deeper into […].....»»

Source: Manilatimes_net Manilatimes_netCategory: NewsMar 16th, 2020Related News

Deprived of football, players try to fill the big void

PARIS, France – Mowing the lawn, playing football with your dog, turning on the TV – footballers around Europe are struggling to fill the "big void" created by the coronavirus shutdown.  Many are writing about the unfamiliar experience on social media. Some have already come to the conclusion that "there is ........»»

Source: Rappler RapplerCategory: NewsMar 16th, 2020Related News

How Premier League stars keep busy during the coronavirus shutdown

LONDON, UK – The Premier League has postponed all matches until at least April 3 as the coronavirus wreaks havoc with the sporting schedule across Europe. That has left the league's players and clubs at a loose end, so AFP Sport looked at what some of them have been getting up ........»»

Source: Rappler RapplerCategory: NewsMar 16th, 2020Related News

Gobert pledges $500,000 to help with relief, NBA shutdown

Gobert pledges $500,000 to help with relief, NBA shutdown.....»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsMar 15th, 2020Related News

For these athletes, this is a spring break they don t want

By ERIC OLSON AP Sports Writer OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Creighton right-hander Ben Dotzler was supposed to be in the bullpen at TD Ameritrade Park this weekend, readying himself to pitch against Northern Colorado. Molly Little, who plays lacrosse for Denver, expected to be on the road for a much anticipated match against Michigan, the team the Pioneers beat to reach the Elite Eight of the NCAA Tournament last year. Avrey Steiner thought she would be with her softball teammates for Illinois' first home games of the season against Bowling Green and Green Bay. Everything changed for thousands of college athletes when the NCAA announced Thursday it was canceling all spring sports championships, along with remaining winter championships, because of the coronavirus pandemic. Conferences followed, saying they were temporarily or permanently shutting down their regular seasons. Suddenly, athletes who put in long hours juggling commitments to their sports and academics had lots of free time. And they're miserable. “We didn't work a whole year,” Dotzler said, “to play 15 games.” Little said she woke up at 6:30 every morning to go to the training room to rehab an injury and stretch before lifting weights and running — all before going to a 2 1/2-hour practice and then her classes. “There's nothing that can prepare you for the feeling of your season being done, and it's not because you lost in NCAAs,” Little said. “I spent many hours crying with teammates. You work your whole life to get to this point, to play on this big stage, and to have it taken from you is devastating.” Steiner said she was doing fine emotionally until she started cleaning out her locker Friday. “That really got me,” she said. “A lot of people are going to say, 'Oh, yeah, this is like a week off or getting a couple days off. I guarantee you it's going to hit me and other people in the coming weeks.” Some good news arrived on Friday when the NCAA informed schools that spring athletes would be given another year of eligibility to make up for their lost season. Details must be worked out. States Fort, a senior on the Coastal Carolina men's golf team, hopes to return for another year even though he'll graduate in May. “I would try to make it work with grad courses,” he said. “I would do everything in my power as long as the finances are there. I would love to come back and play with these guys." Not all seniors will be able to take advantage of being granted an extra year. Some already have jobs lined up. Others have been accepted into graduate programs at other schools. There are athletes who currently are on partial scholarships, and they may not be able to afford paying the difference for another year. Though the eligibility extension offers some consolation, it will be impossible for athletes to duplicate the experiences of playing with their 2020 teams. The Richmond women's lacrosse team, for example, was off to a program-best 7-0 start and ranked in the top 20 nationally for the first time since 2008. “We just accelerated into the season and started off so hot,” senior goaltender Megan Gianforte said. "Personally, I thought I was peaking this year. I felt I was in the best condition for this season. That's why I was so excited for it. We brought in so much talent, which helps me defensively. “I'm leaving Richmond now with such unfinished business, knowing all the potential we could have had. I just know how much more we have to give.” Now the spring athletes are left to wonder what they'll do with themselves. “It is just heartbreaking to see these kids face this unfortunate situation,” longtime University of San Francisco baseball coach Nino Giarratano said. “They are too young.” Creighton sophomore Tommy Steier said he and Dotzler, his roommate, have been spending a lot of time hanging out with teammates, rehashing old stories and plotting their immediate futures. Creighton isn't allowing athletes to use the school's training facilities during the shutdown. Baseball players will work out on their own and prepare to join summer teams in a few months — if the summer leagues operate. Fort, the Coastal Carolina golfer, said a temporary sports stoppage would have been more appropriate, followed by a reassessment of the situation. He wishes the NCAA would have waited before canceling championships scheduled for months from now. For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia. The vast majority of people recover from the virus. “Obviously I'm biased because I play a small outdoor sport where spectators aren't much of an issue,” Fort said. “It was kind of quick and a little rash and short-sighted on the NCAA's part, especially to blanket cancel all sports. "I can understand basketball. That's a spectator sport where you have a ton of people constantly rubbing shoulders. I can almost understand baseball. But sports like (men's) volleyball, softball, golf and lacrosse don't have as much of a pronounced fan base.” Creighton's baseball team was busing back to Omaha from Minnesota on Thursday when the players' Twitter feeds started showing conference basketball tournaments being canceled. An hour after the players got home they received a text telling them to return to campus for a meeting. Steier and Dotzler said everyone sensed what was coming. As coach Ed Servais broke the news, seniors, who wouldn't know for another 24 hours they would be allowed to come back next year, broke into tears. “It was hard to see all of them knowing they were losing what they love to do,” Steier said. Gianforte, the Richmond lacrosse goalie, said she and her teammates had a feeling as early as Wednesday afternoon their season might be in jeopardy. That's when the Ivy League announced it was closing down spring sports. “I think the other conferences were feeling some peer pressure,” she said. Then the NBA announced Wednesday night it was suspending its season. “That," Gianforte said, “is when we knew we were goners.” ___ AP Sports Writer Janie McCauley in San Francisco contributed to this report......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsMar 15th, 2020Related News

Curfew, shutdown of malls in Metro Manila during quarantine

(8th update) City mayors called for a nine-hour curfew during the community quarantine of Metro Manila as among the measures seen to prevent further infections of the novel coronavirus disease or COVID-19......»»

Source: Philstar PhilstarCategory: NewsMar 14th, 2020Related News

No fans, no work: Arena workers caught in sports shutdown

By TIM REYNOLDS AP Basketball Writer MIAMI (AP) — David Edelman can usually be found at a Denver Nuggets basketball game or a Colorado Rapids soccer game. As an usher, he interacts with fans in a role he calls a staple of his life. But there are no Nuggets games for at least a month. No Rapids games, either. And Edelman has no idea what he’ll do now. “This is what I do for a living,” Edelman said earlier this week, as the realization hit that sports were going on hiatus because of the coronavirus. “This is my income.” Thousands of workers would have staffed the 450 NBA and NHL games that will not be played over the next month in response to the pandemic. And then there are the more than 300 spring training and regular-season baseball games, 130 NCAA Division I men’s and women’s tournament games, 50 or so Major League Soccer matches, all international golf and tennis tournaments, and who-knows-how-many high school, small college and other entertainment events canceled or postponed because of the global health crisis. The total economic impact of the loss of sports and other events because of the pandemic — assuming only a month shutdown — is impossible to calculate but will reach the billions, easily. Tickets aren’t being sold, so teams and leagues and organizing bodies lose money. Fans aren’t going to events that aren’t happening, so taxi drivers and ride-share operators have no one to ferry to and from those places. Hotel rooms will be empty. Beers and hot dogs aren’t being sold, so concessionaires and vendors lose money. Wait staff and bartenders aren’t getting tips. Without those tips, their babysitters aren’t getting paid. The trickle-down effect sprawls in countless directions. Some teams are trying to help. Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban, within minutes of the NBA shutdown announcement, said he wanted to find a way to help workers who will lose money because games won’t be played. By Friday, he had his plan: “We will pay them as if the games happened,” he told The Associated Press in an email. Other teams, including the Cleveland Cavaliers, have made similar commitments to workers at not just NBA events but also the building’s minor-league hockey games. The Miami Heat, Toronto Raptors, Washington Wizards, Golden State Warriors and Atlanta Hawks were among the earliest NBA franchises to reveal they’re working on how they’ll take care of arena staffs. So have the NHL’s Washington Capitals, among others, and the ownership group for Detroit's Pistons, Red Wings and Tigers on Friday said they were setting up a $1 million fund “to cover one month's wages for our part-time staff for games, concerts and events that they would have otherwise worked." “Our teams, our cities and the leagues in which we operate are a family, and we are committed to looking out for one another,” New Jersey Devils owner Josh Harris said. There were many more significant gifts revealed later Friday. Zion Williamson of the New Orleans Pelicans said he would “cover the salaries” for workers at the team’s arena for the next 30 days. Blake Griffin of the Detroit Pistons pledged $100,000 for workers there, the San Jose Sharks said part-time arena workers would get paid for all games not played and Florida Panthers goalie Sergei Bobrovsky said he was giving $100,000 to workers in that club’s arena -- a donation matched by his teammates and followed by another pledge from the team’s ownership group. “This is a small way for me to express my support and appreciation for these wonderful people who have been so great to me and my teammates and hopefully we can all join together to relieve some of the stress and hardship caused by this national health crisis,” Williamson wrote on Instagram. At Chicago Blackhawks hockey games alone, about 1,500 workers are in or outside the building on event nights: guest services, concessions, parking, security, box office and so on. “The per game payroll is more than $250,000,” said Courtney Greve Hack, a spokeswoman for the United Center. If that’s the NHL norm — no official numbers are available — then workers around the league would stand to lose more than $60 million if hockey does not return this season. “I get it,” said Chris Lee, who owns a coffee and smoothies franchise in Arizona that draws 70% of its annual revenue sales at spring training and Arizona Coyotes hockey games. “But this is going to be really tough.” Lee was packing up cups that won’t be used when baseball announced Thursday that spring training was ending about two weeks early. He and his staff — one full-timer, 14 part-time employees — aren’t sure what comes next. The enormity of the numbers stacks up quickly. The group that owns the Raptors and other pro sports clubs in Toronto, Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment, says it's trying to help 4,000 workers in that city. Extrapolate that across other Canadian and U.S. pro sports cities, and those teams could be looking at 100,000 workers feeling some sort of pinch — not counting the impact at college and other levels. Cavaliers star Kevin Love pledged $100,000 to help the workers in Cleveland address what he described as their “sudden life shift.” On Friday, reigning NBA MVP Giannis Antetokounmpo of the Milwaukee Bucks made a $100,000 pledge on behalf of his family “It’s bigger than basketball! And during this tough time I want to help the people that make my life, my family’s lives and my teammates lives easier," Antetokounmpo wrote on Twitter. The NCAA men’s Division I tournament generates about $900 million annually through television and marketing rights alone. In Albany, New York, which was scheduled to host men’s tournament games for the first time in 17 years, organizers estimated the economic loss from the three-day event to be about $3 million. Bars and restaurants bought tons of additional stock and perishables to prep for crowds that won't arrive. It’ll probably take a few years before the NCAA can bring the tournament back to many of the cities slated to host games next week. “It’s incredibly disheartening. There’s no question about that,” said Mark Bardack, president of public relations and management firm Ed Lewi and Associates, which had worked for more than a year on the planning of the tournament in Albany. “To have it all disappear, though obviously no one’s fault.” Some arena workers, many not wanting to be identified because of workplace policies about speaking to reporters, said they are living paycheck-to-paycheck. They’re not alone, of course: A study last fall by the American Payroll Association said 74% of workers in the U.S. would “experience financial difficulty” if their usual payday was delayed by as little as one week. In Philadelphia, Rodney Thompson works on commission selling popcorn and beer at 76ers basketball games, Flyers hockey games and Phillies baseball games. They’re all on hold. "The more I sell, the more I make,” the 56-year-old said. “The less I sell, the less I make. It would hurt me, financially. I would have no income coming in. ... I make pretty good money. But if there's no fans, there's no work.” ___ AP Hockey Writer Stephen Whyno in Washington, AP Sports Writers Tom Withers in Cleveland, David Brandt in Scottsdale, Arizona, Josh Dubow in San Francisco, Stephen Hawkins in Dallas and Dan Gelston in Philadelphia, and Associated Press Writers Matthew Carlson and Tim Cronin in Chicago contributed to this report. ___ The Associated Press receives support for health and science coverage from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content......»»

Source: Abscbn AbscbnCategory: SportsMar 14th, 2020Related News