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Young photographer mounts exhibit for benefit of Payatas kids

MANILA, Philippines — When basketball superstar Stephen "Steph" Curry first visited the Philippines in 2015, among those lucky to meet him was high school st.....»»

Category: newsSource: philstar philstarJan 4th, 2018

Champions On and Off the Pitch: Milo, FC Barcelona train young footballers in Road to Barcelona Camp

div> MANILA, Philippines, 20 September 2017 – Inspired by MILO and FC Barcelona’s (FCB) shared values of humility, effort, ambition, respect, and teamwork, over 140 kids participated in the MILO FCB Road to Barcelona Camp last September 2 to 3 at the Mckinley Hill Stadium in Taguig. The weekend training saw young footballers from Metro Manila, Cavite, Laguna, IloIlo, and Cebu gather to showcase their skills and embrace life values in sports, with the hopes of being nominated to the team representing the country in the FCB Escola Camp in Barcelona happening in October.  The four-year values-driven partnership between MILO and FC Barcelona was formally launched globally earlier this year, aiming to help more young Filipinos aspire to be the best they can be and realize their dreams through sports and the programs of MILO and FCB. The MILO FCB Road to Barcelona Camp provided free world-class training to deserving young Filipino football players under the tutelage of esteemed FCB Escola Camp Coaches from Barcelona, Spain. These athletes were exposed to playing the Barca way while also getting the opportunity to make new friends among their peers from different clubs, all in the spirit of fun and friendly competition. Aside from this one-of-a-kind training session, the MILO FCB Road to Barcelona Team will also be on the lookout for two of the most deserving players who will stand a chance to get an all-expense paid trip to Barcelona, Spain. They, along with other identified players from the other MILO markets worldwide, will get to go on a once-in-a-lifetime experience to train in Camp Nou, the home stadium of FC Barcelona, in October. A selection panel led by the MILO FCB Road to Barcelona Team will help identify the players who will be included in the event. Just as important as skill, the principal values that define the spirit of FCB and the essence of MILO, will be included in the criterion for selection of the said players. Joining MILO and the Philippine Football Federation in the selection camp were FC Barcelona coaches Arnau Blanco and Marti Vila, who’ve previously held international FCB Escola camps in Europe, Asia, South America, and Australia. Arnau and Marti conducted football drills for the kids which included theoretical concepts that underlined the football club’s system and culture. Bannered by the message of 'TEAMMAKESME, the young athletes were also taught the value and role of their team around them—teammates, coaches, family, and friends who play an important role in their holistic growth to be come champions on and off the field. “You see the kids smiling, improving, enjoying, trying to understand our philosophy, and it really is fulfilling for us coaches. Having them play together as a team and learn the values and skills in football is amazing to witness. For us, it is important that we help Filipinos experience the Barca way through our program,” said FCB Escola Camp coach Arnau Blanco. “We are grateful and honored to have had the opportunity to do this for the local football community. With the our partners, FC Barcelona and the Philippine Football Federation, MILO is eager to search for the most deserving players to send to a once-in-a-lifetime experience in Camp Nou. It is truly encouraging to see these  athletes from all walks of life come together, and we send a big thank you to their supportive parents and coaches who joined them in this journey.The selection process will be a challenging one, but we’re looking forward to providing Filipino athletes a platform to share their talents on a world stage and benefit from the life-changing opportunity this partnership offers,” said de Robbie De Vera, Sports Marketing Executive of MILO Philippines. /div>.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 27th, 2017

Young Filipino artist: The personal is political

Her exhibit, 'By Blood,' to be held on Feb. 20 at the Naked Hub Gallery in Hong Kong, is a celebration of her identity. The 22-year-old multimedia arts student said, 'I wanted to sho.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsFeb 19th, 2018

Visual arts

Ding-Xian at Globe Taiwanese artist Yang Ding-Xian will exhibit his work in "Oriental Power," Feb. 12-23, at Globe Art Gallery in Bonifacio Global City. Hiraya Gallery has brought to the country a selection of works by Ding- Xian, whose show "serves as a refresher course in contemporary Oriental art," art critic Cid Reyes said in the exhibition notes. Globe Art Gallery is at Globe Tower, Bonifacio Global City, Taguig. TWA artists at Art Cube Art Cube Gallery is holding the group exhibit "Points of Origin" until March. It mounts paintings by The Working Animals collective, composed of Aiya Balingit, Lawrence Canto, Keb Cerda, Ronson Culibrina, Dale Erispe, Johanna He...Keep on reading: Visual arts.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 18th, 2018

Master abstractionist Carating mounts ‘Lunar Cycle’

  Foremost abstractionist Norberto Carating will mount his new solo exhibit, "Lunar Cycle," which opens Feb. 17, at the Galerie Joaquin, Podium, Mandaluyong City. Fourteen exquisite pieces comprise the show which ushers in the Year of the Dog. Carating captures the various shades and moods of celestial bodies like the moon, sun and planet as they grace and light up the darkness of the cosmos. The circle functions as the predominant visual motif. It exhibits its universalism as symbol of eternity and infinity, and omnipotence. The square, in contrast to the circle, is the emblem of the earth, such that when used as support in his paintings, represents the n...Keep on reading: Master abstractionist Carating mounts ‘Lunar Cycle’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsFeb 18th, 2018

Raptors center Poeltl gets his bounce from volleyball roots

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Jakob Poeltl went for the volleyball but stayed for the basketball. The place: the gymnasium in Vienna, Austria, where Rainer and Martina Poeltl practiced and honed the skills that earned them roster spots on Austria’s national volleyball men’s and women’s teams. Martina Poeltl (red uniform, second from left) was a standout on Austria's national volleyball team. The child: Jakob Poeltl, dragged along, running loose, playing around and messing with sports equipment from whomever, wherever. Legend has it the energized six-year-old one day picked up a bigger, heavier, pebble-grained orange ball he’d found and, in that instant, began straying from his parents’ sport. The result: Poeltl is a promising, second-year big man for the Toronto Raptors, the first Austrian to reach the NBA and a fellow for whom dunks have replaced spikes entirely. “I was more in basketball,” Poeltl said before a recent game in Chicago. The 22-year-old, now seven feet and 248 pounds, pronounces his name “YA-kub PURR-tuhl.” “I did play volleyball with my parents when we went on holidays. But it was never anything serious, it was always just fun. They taught me a lot -- I think I’m half-decent at volleyball. Obviously I couldn’t play it at a very high level like they did, but I still know some stuff from back in the day that they showed me.” Ranier Poeltl (back row, second from left) was a standout on Austria's national volleyball. Still knows some stuff? That’s intriguing as Poeltl continues to develop as an active, mobile center who backs up Jonas Valanciunas. Is it possible that any aspects of the family business transfer to NBA play, offensively or defensively? Besides the high fives, that is. “A big chunk,” Poeltl said. “I got my height from them. I got my athletic ability probably, to a certain extent, from them too. Always, growing up, I was around sports. It was a very active family, I guess. I was always moving. They say I couldn’t stop running around.” That’s a good start for a big man in today’s NBA. There’s more. Future Raptors center Jakob Poeltl (left, sunglasses) plays some beach volleyball in this 2010 family photo. “His footwork is unbelievable,” Raptors coach Dwane Casey said. “The athletic genes are there. Quick feet, great hands, good hand-eye coordination. And he picks up stuff so fast. I think it comes from being around that athletic background.” Said teammate C.J. Miles, new to Toronto this season with an inside glimpse at Poeltl’s development: “He’s extremely mobile for his size. Great hands. His athleticism shows up on both ends, defensively and offensively. He’s got a tremendous feel for the NBA. “His agility. His feet. He’s got good bounce off the floor.” Volleyball and the NBA have a pretty long history. Wilt Chamberlain, after wrapping his legendary hoops career, picked up the sport and played it well into his 40s. He played both beach and indoor versions and was quoted in his 1991 book, “A View From Above,” saying, “For a long time, volleyball became as big a part of my life as basketball once was.” He even got involved in the mid-1970s with, and lent legitimacy to, the short-lived pro International Volleyball Association. Bill Walton, not surprising given his southern California roots and nature-loving way, played beach volleyball. So does his son, current Lakers coach Luke Walton. On a recent trip to Chicago, the younger Walton talked about how forgiving the sand is for an NBA player whose legs and bodies don’t need any extra pounding. The Waltons honed their games with the help of Greg Lee, a UCLA teammate of Bill who became a renowned beach volleyball star. Vince Carter played both sports at Dayton Beach's Mainland High School, earning Conference Player of the Year status in 1994. Former NBA forward Chase Budinger was more of a standout at volleyball than basketball while at La Costa Canyon High in Carlsbad, Calif. During the 2011 lockout, Budinger joined his brother Duncan briefly on the pro beach tour. The offspring of numerous NBA figures, from Jermaine O’Neal’s daughter (Asjia, committed to Texas) to Houston coach Mike D’Antoni’s niece (Bailey D'Antoni, freshman at Marshall), have snagged college volleyball scholarships. Another former NBA player, Jud Buechler, a member of Walton’s staff, played volleyball in high school, then coached up his daughter, Reily, to a spot at UCLA. Philadelphia’s Joel Embiid was a seven-foot Cameroonian volleyball player before he got introduced to hoops shortly before an NBA Basketball Without Borders camp. And Portland coach Terry Stotts played high school volleyball in Guam when he attended high school there, his parents taking the family overseas in their jobs as teachers. “Volleyball was a varsity sport, so I played volleyball for a couple years,” Stotts said. “The things I would say transfer to basketball are the explosive jumping. Hand-eye coordination. Quick reflexes. Timing. Going to spike the ball is like going to get a rebound -- you’ve got to time your jump. Lateral quickness to the ball. So yeah, I would say there’s some valid skills.” So Stotts is OK if his rebounders occasionally tap out the ball rather than grabbing it. “Robin Lopez used to do that for us on the offensive glass,” the Blazers coach said, “and we’d get a lot of three-pointers because of it.” Said Poeltl: “I actually do that a lot. I also find myself doing a lot of tip-ins. Maybe that has something to do with it.” The 22-year-old’s overall game has stepped up thanks largely to opportunity. Already, he has logged more minutes in 2017-18 than he did all of last season, his nightly shifts increasing by about 50 percent from 11.6 minutes to 17.8. His production has jumped accordingly -- Poeltl is averaging 13.8 points and 9.5 rebounds per 36 minutes while shooting 63.7 percent. “The most important improvement I’ve made was getting more comfortable on the court,” said Poeltl, who is not afraid to challenge dunkers at the rim, regardless of the poster potential. “Just gaining experience. I don’t think it’s anything I specifically worked on in my game. “The chemistry with my teammates, finishing around the rim, all of that, small things have helped me. Knowing opponents, for sure. Knowing my own game more and more. How my teammates play and how I have to play around them.” Said Toronto forward Pascal Siakam, Poeltl’s best friend on the team after arriving as rookies together last season: “I know he looks awkward, but he’s doing a great job of moving his feet.” Poeltl is still carrying that flag as the first Austrian drafted into the NBA, realizing a dream few others in his country had when the Raptors used the No. 9 pick on him in 2016. Austria had a spirited basketball faction through the 1950s, with qualifying for EuroBasket competition six times. But it dropped off after that, with little or nothing to show in international competition over the past five decades. Poeltl’s journey, however, has begun to revive basketball interest in his homeland, and he’s just getting started. “That’s what I’m trying to do -- be something of a role model for young basketball players in Austria,” Poeltl said. “I’m really trying to make basketball more popular and get more kids to play. If I can have that kind of effect, that would be great.” He is on the Austrian roster for the 2019 FIBA Basketball World Cup qualification (Europe), and participated in August in pre-qualifying games. Poeltl will remain strictly a one-sport participant, though, not crossing over to the one his parents played. “They know better,” he said. “I think [the national team organizers] have some better volleyball players than me.” Volleyball’s loss, the Raptors’ and the NBA’s gain. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 3rd, 2018

California man gets life for buying Filipino kids for sex

  SACRAMENTO, California --- A California man was sentenced to life in federal prison on Tuesday for buying Filipino children for sex and pornography in what prosecutors called one of most "lurid, willful and disturbing" child exploitation cases in the nation.   US District Judge John Mendez said he was sickened by the crimes committed by Michael Carey Clemans, 57, of Sacramento.   Prosecutors said he gave detailed instructions on how young girls should be posed, how their hair should be cut, whether they should wear makeup or have their bodies oiled.   "His true plan was to find young girls, virgins, and then go have sex with them," said Assi...Keep on reading: California man gets life for buying Filipino kids for sex.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 25th, 2018

With no World Cup for US this year, Altidore shifts focus

By Anne M. Peterson, Associated Press For Jozy Altidore, this was supposed to be the time when the United States was preparing for this summer's World Cup. That changed early in October when the Americans got bounced from the tournament. The stunning failure shifted Altidore's focus. He spent the beginning of 2018 in Grand Cayman, where his foundation is bringing soccer to kids in a region hit by hurricanes last fall. Soon, he'll start the new season with defending MLS Cup champion Toronto FC. As for this summer? Altidore will watch a few of the matches in Russia on television. The 28-year-old forward isn't stewing in the loss, he's looking with hope to the future. "Of course I'll obviously be disappointed not to be there, but at the end of the day, man, we're blessed to do what we do," he said. Apart from the national team loss, Altidore is coming off one of the better years of his career. He scored 18 goals with the Reds and another four with the U.S. national team. Toronto FC won the Supporters' Shield for the best regular-season record before sweeping through the playoffs and defeating Seattle 2-0 for the league title. Altidore scored in the final and earned MLS Cup MVP honors. The victory was a bit of revenge for a loss to the Sounders for the MLS Cup the previous season, but Altidore said Toronto's motivation was part of a season-long journey he took with his teammates and coach Greg Vanney. "I think more than anything we understood how close we were and how it hurt that we had come up short that season," he said. "The focus for us was to do what we did that last year and if we got to the last game, obviously make sure we got the W and make the most of our chances." Toronto teammate and fellow national team player, Michael Bradley, echoed the sentiment after the title match. "When push comes to shove, you want to step into the biggest moments with people that you would do anything for, that you love, that you believe in, that you trust, that you know have your back," Bradley said. But it wasn't all smooth. Altidore got into a confrontation with New York Red Bulls captain Sacha Kljestan in a tunnel at BMO Field during the conference semifinals. Altidore and Kljestan were handed red cards in the aftermath. Altidore sat out Toronto's next game, while Kljestan was suspended an additional game and won't be able to play the first two games of the upcoming season. Kljestan, who was also fined, was traded in the offseason from the Red Bulls to Orlando. Altidore and Bradley were also jeered — sometimes with profane and personal attacks — by opposing fans over the U.S. team's qualifying performance. "Look, all that stuff I think would have been magnified had we not achieved our objective," Altidore said. "But we did, and we did it in such a convincing manner." Following the 2-1 U.S. loss in Couva, Trinidad, that cost the national team a spot in the World Cup, coach Bruce Arena stepped down and U.S. Soccer President Sunil Gulati said he would not run for another term. Interim U.S. coach Dave Sarachan called 30 players into January training camp in advance of an exhibition game against Bosnia and Herzegovina on Jan. 28 in Carson, California. Altidore and many of the team's veterans were not invited. The camp roster includes 15 players who have never played in a match for the senior national team. The most experienced was LA Galaxy midfielder Gyasi Zardes, who is 26. Twenty-one of the players are 24 and younger. Altidore, who has 41 goals in 110 appearances with the national team, understands that developing young talent is important heading into the next World Cup quadrennial. "We have to do a better job of identifying new talent, for sure," he said, suggesting that missing out on the past two Olympics — where under-23 teams compete — has hurt development efforts. For now, Altidore is pouring his energy into charitable endeavors. Altidore, whose parents are from Haiti, launched his foundation in 2011 following the devastating earthquake that hit the country the year before. The foundation built a well to provide water to a town of more than 400 in Haiti, along with other rebuilding efforts. In 2016, he paid to bring the Copa America matches to television in the country. The latest effort in the Cayman Islands focuses on getting youth involved in soccer. "I think the whole region, the Caribbean has a lot of talent and has a lot of kids who want to become players. And I think it helps to see and identify with players who have played in different leagues from around the world," he said. "If I'm able to be one of those guys that can start that whole thing, it's a great opportunity and honor for me."      .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 17th, 2018

Jr. NBA goes digital as it enters new decade

Jr. NBA is back in business and for 2018, it's about to be bigger than ever. Kicking off a new decade of the youth basketball program, Jr. NBA Philippines has once again teamed up with Alaska to launch the 2018 edition Saturday at Don Bosco Technical Institute in Makati. The Jr. NBA Philippines 2018 will run through May and is expected to hit more than 250,000 participants all over the country. "This year is our 11th year and we wanna make it bigger and better," NBA Philippines Managing Director Carlo Singson told ABS-CBN Sports. "Last year we had about 30,000 players and coaches participating and obviously we want to grow that number but we also want to create new digital, mobile, and social content so that more people can benefit from Jr. NBA," he added. Speaking of the planned move to digital by Jr. NBA, Singson says that their website has been re-launched to accomodate free content. It should allow basketball enthusiasts, even those who cannot directly participate to Jr. NBA events, to access useful tips and drills. "A lot more content geared towards players, coaches, and just fans of the game," Singson said. "So if you're a young basketball coach that has a team and wants new ideas, that will be on our site they can just watch or stream it, potentially even download it. Basically, it's gonna be on 365 days a year. That's the vision for the website, a lot of content is gonna be up. That is one of our key initiatives, to build our presence on the digital side," he added. Following this weekend's tip off, several coaching clinics will run until March while regional selection camps will go until April. Finally, a national training camp will take place in May with the main event slated for May 20 at the SM Mall of Asia. Online registration for Jr. NBA Philippines is now live at www.jrnba.asia/philippines   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 13th, 2018

Young and sober: Drinking on the wane for Australian teens

Drinking among Australian teenagers has declined sharply in the past two decades, with parents less likely to supply kids with booze and youths increasingly conscious of their health, researchers said Friday. The study by Deakin University, which surveyed more than 41,000 teenagers between 1999 and 2015, found that the number of adolescents who had consumed alcohol has dropped from close to 70 percent to 45 percent. Australia, where the legal drinking age is 18, was among the highest youth consumers of alcohol in the world when the survey began, researchers said. But minors buying alcohol has declined from 12 percent nearly two decades ago to just one percent today, the stud...Keep on reading: Young and sober: Drinking on the wane for Australian teens.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 12th, 2018

For Baldovino, art is genetic

With his family name and an ace photographer for a grandfather, some people thought, when they learned that Andr Baldovino was holding his first exhibition, that it was going to be on photography. He is the son of the eldest child of the late Dick Baldovino, a major influence in the development of photography as an art in the Philippines. But the grandson chose to follow the footsteps of another major artistic influence in his life. His grandmother Josie, Dick's wife, is the sister of National Artist Jose Joya. As a young boy, Baldovino spent a lot of time with his illustrious granduncle, triggering the youngster's interest and eventual decision to pursue painting as a career. ...Keep on reading: For Baldovino, art is genetic.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 9th, 2018

10 standouts from Makati basketball clinic get golden ticket to Jr. NBA PH camp

Jr. NBA PH press release Ten outstanding kids earned a chance of a lifetime after being picked to be part of the Jr. NBA Philippines camp 2018. The young standouts were handpicked among 40 participants ages 5-13 from three barangays in Makati who honed their skills in a training session that was concluded by a friendly game in AXA Philippines’ youth basketball clinic. AXA Philippines, one of the leading insurance companies in the country chose the 10 most outstanding players from the group, and will support them as they participate in the NBA's global youth development program that promotes basketball participation, sportsmanship, teamwork, and an active lifestyle.  AXA Philippines, through its corporate social responsibility arm, continuously spearheads and participates in similar development activities to help empower communities to live better lives through sports and other ventures......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

Popovich s odd alliance with red state fans

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com SAN ANTONIO -- About 400 people gathered at the Oak Hills Country Club in June 2016 and paid $500 to $250,000 to sip iced tea and nibble hors d’oeuvres next to a golf course designed by noted architect AW Tillinghast, who built many. One is owned by the man who was feted at this political fundraiser, Donald J. Trump. The presidential campaign was in full blast and saltier than the crackers on the cheese plate being passed around. Fresh off the plane, Trump thanked the Republicans for the big ‘ole Texas welcome, witnesses say, before launching a blistering attack on the usual targets: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, illegal immigration. Then, near the end of his 30-minute lunchtime appearance, in an effort to connect with the locals, he pivoted and mentioned perhaps the most famous man in town: Gregg Popovich. Witnesses say Trump called Popovich “a great coach” and said “he does a good job” and then there was some fidgeting in the room when the soon-to-be polarizing leader of the free world said this: “I don’t know if the coach is on my side.” Confirmation came emphatically, right after Trump won a divisive election that November. The coach of the Spurs lit into the President over the next several months with a handful of rants that had the stealth of Kawhi Leonard ambushing a timid ball-handler. In no particular order, here were Pop’s Greatest Hits, all issued through the media and without prompting or provocation: “The disgusting tenure and tone and all the comments … have been xenophobic, homophobic, racist, misogynistic. I live in a country where half the people ignored that to elect someone.” And: “He is in charge of our country. That’s disgusting.” And: “The man in the Oval Office is a soulless coward who thinks he can only become large by belittling others.” And: “We have a pathological liar in the White House ... You can’t believe anything that comes out of his mouth.” Popovich didn’t stop there with a President whose sensitivity and intelligence he questioned and accused of being guilty of “gratuitous fear-mongering.” When he took Trump to task for criticizing NFL players who knelt during the National Anthem and defended their rights to do so, Popovich also suspected a measure of the public outrage was racially motivated. “Our country is an embarrassment to the world,” he said. A 68-year-old wealthy white man, therefore, became a sports voice with weight in the political and social justice arena, where the NBA league office has greenlighted players and coaches to speak up. Popovich has done so with clarity and insight to gain national applause in certain corners. He wasn’t the first or the last in sports to verbally spank the president or tackle right-leaning sensitivities, yet he’s certainly the most unique in one respect. As a graduate of the Air Force Academy who works in a military town, and a five-time NBA champion coach who might symbolize the city more than The Alamo, Popovich has long been elevated to icon status, perhaps permanently so, in San Antonio, where folks are mad about the Spurs. Still, this is mostly conservative Texas, one of the most Republican of states based on the state legislature and the congressional delegation, a state that voted Republican in 10 straight presidential elections and saw 52.6 percent of voters punch for Trump. While voters in San Antonio-proper lean liberal, the surrounding areas swing solidly the opposite. Julianna Holt, the Spurs CEO and Popovich’s boss since March after assuming the position held for 20 years by her husband Peter, supported various Republican presidential candidates before eventually donating $5,400 to Trump’s campaign and $250,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, according to Federal Election Commission records. Popovich is therefore a blue blood in a red state and the contrast makes for strange if not uncomfortable alliance between a beloved coach and a group of conflicted Spurs worshippers. His views have in fact shattered the sacrilege by generating hostility from a segment of the basketball flock, something no coach with his credentials would ever feel. The constant winning and acts of charity do not insulate him from those who would prefer Popovich stuff a sweat sock in his bullhorn. Party lines not Popovich's focus “While we all believe Gregg Popovich has the right to his opinions, where was Popovich when Hillary called half of us a 'basket of deplorables?’Many were Spurs fans who are now tired of being insulted ... many of us will never pay to see a Spurs game again.” -- Donna Howington  “The money I will save this year not attending Spurs games should buy me a nice set of golf clubs. Thanks Pop!” -- Jake Ingorgia  “I will never watch them again until Popovich is gone. He is just like all the other leftist celebrities.” -- Lee Harbach, Bulverde They arrive on cue, most from the dusty towns that orbit around San Antonio, some from the city itself. Popovich has unloaded three times this year on Trump, once after the election, once at the start of training camp and most recently by cold-calling Dave Zirin, a friend and liberal writer from The Nation, a progressive magazine. And each time, the letters land in the office of Ricardo Pimentel, the editor who coordinates the comments section of the Express-News, San Antonio’s newspaper of record. “It’s a cycle,” says Pimental, with a sigh. “He speaks out. People who disagree with him send us letters to the editor, then people who object to their disagreement write us letters to the editor defending Pop. Then they respond to one another.” The initial reaction, he said, is always stacked against Popovich and many identify themselves as Spurs fans ripping up their tickets or promising to never attend or watch games again. Even if those who made threats actually carried them out, the change in the Spurs’ home attendance is a blip, from 99.2 percent capacity last season to 98.6 so far this season. Popovich, of course, has been big for business since his first full season as coach in 1997-98. Besides the titles, the Spurs have reached the playoffs every season and won 50 games every season (except for the lockout-shortened 50-game 1998-99 campaign, when they won 37). In short, Popovich's Spurs have a track record beyond reproach in the NBA. If the 2017-18 Spurs stay on pace, it’ll be 20 straight winning seasons for Popovich, one more than Phil Jackson for the all-time NBA record. He hasn’t been this politically vocal until lately, due to Trump, yet was always politically aware, say those who know him. Well-versed through his readings and observations, Popovich welcomes discussion with acquaintences about classism, leadership, government and preferably over a bottle of wine. His two-decades exposure to young black men from humble beginnings raised his awareness and sensitivities about race and bias. Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr once played for the Spurs and lately has echoed many of the same thoughts as Popovich. But Kerr coaches in the Bay Area, where folks nod their heads in agreement. Kerr said he can only imagine the flak Popovich catches in Texas. “Here’s this iconic coach who stands for everything that’s right and for honor and integrity, he served in the military, you see him stand at attention for the American flag — man, Pop loves his country,” Kerr said. “And in the middle of Texas for him to be questioning the Republican President, some of the people down there are probably confused. Like, 'I don’t get it, we love this guy but he’s on the other side from us.' “What I love about Pop is that it’s not about party, not about politics. It’s about integrity and character and that’s what people need to pay attention to. It’s not about some policy, not about how much we pay in taxes. If we can just get back to the point where character matters, then we’ll be in better shape. The problem is, it’s clear character has gone down the tubes in many leadership positions in our country. That’s what Pop is calling out.” True enough, Popovich never publicly attached himself to a political party; to suggest he is against Republicans might be as misleading as believing Colin Kaepernick is against the military. When he played for Popovich, Kerr couldn’t recall a time when the coach was this annoyed by the country’s leadership. “The country was in a better place in terms of a relatively peaceful time back then,” Kerr said. “Yes, 9-11 happened and the whole world changed. But we didn’t have quite the same partisan nature, not only in politics but the national conversation. And so people could just admire Pop for who he was and people might not have been aware of his political leanings because they didn’t ask. When we won and went to the White House, Pop and the team went when Bush was in office. We went in ’99 when President Clinton was there. Republican, Democrat, didn’t matter. The times are so different now.” Kerr laughed quickly when asked about the semi-serious groundswell of social media support for a Kerr-Popovich ticket in 2020. Kerr said he hopes to be on his fifth NBA title as a coach then, but turned semi-serious about Popovich. “Our country needs somebody like Pop who can actually lead and unite from a position of authority and credibility,” Kerr said. “This guy served in the military, grew up in a melting pot, understands leadership. More than anything, he’ll cut through all the [expletive].” Since going nuclear on Trump, Popovich declined invites from the national political shows (and wouldn’t comment for this story). That proves what friends have maintained all along: Popovich doesn’t want to be anyone’s political hero or pundit. He’d rather speak when the moment calls for it, then be left alone. That last part is tricky, though. Empathy often marks Popovich's way “Can you imagine being Republican on the Spurs? Would you feel welcome? He’s like Berkeley -- for free speech unless you disagree with him. Shut up and coach, Gregg.” -- Shannon Deason  “When it comes to coaching basketball or drinking wine, Popovich has experience. When it comes to our country, his opinion is no better than anyone else’s." -- Harold Siemens, Seguin  “Open letter to the NBA referee who ejected Pop from the Warriors-Spurs game: Don’t feel bad about what Gregg Popovich called you. He called the POTUS worse and got away with it.” -- Larry Peabody Once the wheels touched down, the pilot jokingly announced over the loudspeaker: “Welcome to Gregg Popovich International Airport,” and one particular passenger noticed that nobody on the plane thought it was strange. Sean Elliott always knew how deeply rooted Popovich is with San Antonio. Aside from the famous Spanish missions and the River Walk, the city is known for the only professional sports team in town. And while George Gervin, David Robinson and Tim Duncan have come and gone, the one lingering reminder is a sometimes gruff and scruffy coach, maybe the NBA’s best ever. “He’s one of the pillars of the community,” said Elliott, twice an All-Star with the Spurs. “He’s looked at with great admiration. He is as respected as anyone who has ever lived in or been part of the city. It’s not just because he’s a basketball coach. Pop has been a big part of the community, huge contributor to charitable functions, good leader.” Elliott was a Spurs rookie in 1989 when their relationship began and he saw the start of Popovich’s reach in the region. Popovich then was an assistant coach under Larry Brown and just planting his feet in the NBA. That summer, Elliott and Popovich piled into a van with the team's "Coyote" mascot and conducted basketball clinics in San Marcos, Corpus Christi, Laredo and similar places. They were signing autographs in malls and running kids through drills in 100 degree heat, never hearing a complaint from the coach. Elliott said folks in those small conservative towns loved him. “If you sit and hear him talk about something, you tend to agree with him,” Elliott said. “He’ll put it in a logical way and he’s very thoughtful, well read and super intelligent, maybe the most intelligent person I’ve ever known.” The owner of the Spurs then was Red McCombs, a homespun Texan who made his fortune in car dealerships and media companies. McCombs didn’t give Popovich the coaching job after firing Brown, telling Popovich “you’ve got a chance to be a great coach” if he got more experience, which he did, going to the Warriors to work for Don Nelson. Popovich returned to San Antonio two years later as general manager, then became coach and the rest is history. Now 90, McCombs said: “Popovich has become the distinguished part of the franchise. He wears it well. Can’t say enough about what kind of man he is and what he’s meant to San Antonio. God has blessed us with Gregg Popovich.” McCombs loves to tell how Popovich, by chance, learned that a local family needed a car. The coach wrote a check, gave it to the father and walked away. McCombs said it was “typical Popovich” who has empathy for those with less. McCombs, curiously, has traditionally been one of the biggest Republican bankrollers in the state, who gave to the Trump campaign and is fully aware of what Popovich thinks of his choice for President. And so one of the most powerful men in Central Texas, who leans politically to the color of his nickname, had a strong reaction to that. “He’s earned the right to give his comments about citizenship or Trump or anything else,” said McCombs, voice rising. “Yes, he made some statements that others might disagree with. But I’ll tell you this: Popovich would be elected to anything he wants to in San Antonio.” Remaining silent never an option “Our country is not an embarrassment to the world. I will tell you what an embarrassment is. It is an American citizen who got a free education from the great Air Force Academy ... and then has the audacity to say that the greatest nation in the world is an embarrassment because the President rightly demands that Americans stand for the anthem. Popovich should be ashamed of himself.” -- Nick DeLouis, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Nowhere on God’s green Earth do they have the right to disrespect our flag and the men and women who died to keep us free. I’m appalled that you stooped so low to join in that disrespect. Shame on you!” -- Fred Martin, Fair Oaks Ranch  “Coach Pop has squashed my love and enthusiasm for the team. A national treasure, he is not. Coach Pop has a voice, but not my voice." -- Jo Ivan A few years ago Popovich was in New York with his daughter to catch a Broadway play when the coach had a last minute change in strategy. He learned that John Carlos was giving a lecture at New York University that night. So Popovich told his daughter to take one of her friends instead; said he was going to see “Dr. Carlos” speak. “When he came in I was surprised and delighted,” Carlos said recently. “Quite naturally, everyone knew who he was but he just wanted to sit and listen.” A year later, in 2015, Popovich flew Carlos to San Antonio to address the team and Carlos admitted to being star struck around Tim Duncan and others. Yet Carlos was most curious about Popovich and why the coach took a strong interest in an Olympic sprinter who raised a fist on the victory stand in 1968, which is frozen as an iconic civil rights moment. “Being with the Spurs gave me an opportunity to check his character out,” Carlos said. “I knew he was a whiz at putting players together to bring out their best ability. But through my conversations with him it became apparent that he was a social activist himself at one point in his life. He was teaching his players about activism and to be concerned about their fellow man and what was going on around their lives, not just basketball. “I was impressed. He just wanted them to know they had a larger role than just playing basketball in the society in which they live.” Carlos, therefore, was not surprised to see Popovich defend the rights of kneeling black football players who came under attack from Trump. On the first day of training camp in September, Popovich said: “Obviously race is the elephant in the room and we all understand that. Unless it is talked about constantly it is not going to get better.” What followed was another swirl of exchanges between Popovich critics and supporters in San Antonio, and Popovich acknowledged receiving mail from both sides. The anti-Pop mail, though, was jarring to Carlos, given the coach’s work in town. “When people write and lambast him for taking leaders to task for what they’re doing to society, that’s like water rolling off a duck’s back, man,” Carlos said. “When they write negative things about him, it encourages him to keep doing what he’s doing. Those people are the problem. Go ahead and throw stones and it just motivates him to do his job. “Look, I’m a black man who spoke out. Imagine what they think of him as a white man who speaks just as strong, to try and get people to see things in a better light? They throw stones at him even more, like, 'Hey you’re white, you have a great life. Keep your mouth shut.’ Well, God points people in certain directions. We know who we are. We do what we do.” And what Popovich does is enlist the help of giants in the social justice world and bring them into his world. He did that with Cornel West, the Harvard professor and civil rights activist, last fall. Popovich invited West to San Antonio to speak at an East Side community center with a few hundred mostly black and Latino students and their parents. Done without TV cameras or media invitation, the discussion was about the importance of education, the imperfect world, self respect and how to help communities. This was an audience that, presumably and unanimously, connected with a white man who didn’t live among them, but was with them. They were the people Popovich had in mind when he attacked present leadership. This was not the audience that writes to the Spurs and the Express-News asking him to take a vow of silence, though he is aware of them, too. “Some responses make you wonder what country you live in,” Popovich said, “and other responses make you very hopeful … overall, it renews my feeling that something must be done because there is enough people willing to listen.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 5th, 2018

Lusting after married coworker

Dear Emily, I have a pretty officemate who is married with four children. We're both 43 years old. I am also married with three young kids. Her husband is abroad working as a seaman. She is really very attractive and very sweet. Whenever she asks me for a favor, I always grant her request. She is always on my mind---even in my dreams. She shows such sweetness to me in the office. She even calls me sweetheart publicly, which I've tried to ignore. I keep praying that I be spared all thoughts of her since I know it is not morally right. I've heard of some illicit relations between office workers who fall in love or lust after each other. I will definitely not allow this to happen t...Keep on reading: Lusting after married coworker.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 31st, 2017

The legend of Kobe Bryant s career

Five championships with the Los Angeles Lakers. 33,570 points, third all time in NBA history. Eighteen All-Star selections. Fifteen All-NBA selections. Four All-Star MVPs. Two Finals MVPs. The 2007-08 regular season MVP. Together, those stats and accomplishments only begin to tell the legacy Kobe Bryant left both in the NBA and the basketball world at large. As the Los Angeles Lakers get ready to retire Bryant's No. 8 and No. 24 jersey on Dec. 18 (Dec. 19, PHL time), take a look back at some of the stories, videos and highlights from the best moments in Bryant's unique career. The Young Kobe * Quote history: Kobe arrives on the scene in L.A. * Quote history: Bryant's legacy begins in Lakerland * Aldridge: Bryant ends his career his way (Editor's note: Column is from 2015-16 season) VIDEO *  Kobe's debut in 1996 *  Kobe comes up short vs. Jazz in 1997 *  Top 10 plays from Kobe's rookie season *  Top 10 plays from Kobe's second season Three-peat time for Lakers * Quote history: Kobe, Phil, Shaq and the new-look Lakers * Quote history: A three-peat to remember in Los Angeles * Quote history: Unique (yet strained) Shaq-Kobe dynamic * Finals moments: Kobe takes over in Game of 2000 Finals * Aldridge: Bryant remembers his role as top bad guy to many fans (Editor's note: Column is from 2015-16 season) VIDEO *  Kobe's top 10 plays from 1999-2000 *  Kobe's top 10 plays from 2000-01 *  Kobe's top 10 plays from 2001-02 The 81-Point Game! * Quote history: A game like no other for Bryant * Even today, outburst still amazes Kobe himself VIDEO *  Every basket ... in 3 minutes *  Kobe 81: The morning of the game *  Kobe 81: Early signs pointed to a big night *  Kobe 81: In second half, 'things started getting crazy' *  Kobe 81: 'You get in a zone and stay there' *  Kobe 81: History made at Staples Center *  'I didn't know it would be that big' of a night *  Kobe tweets thoughts about game in 2013 *  Photographer recounts shooting 81-point game *  NBA stars of today reflect on Kobe's game *  Kobe drops 62 on Mavs in three quarters *  Kobe's top 10 plays from 2005-06 season Renewed glory & final lap *  Quote history: Championship days return for Lakers, Bryant *  Quote history: Injuries short circuit twilight of career *  Quote history: 'Our Michael Jordan' to a generation *  Lakers.com: Crunching numbers from Bryant's jersey history *  Aldridge: Final game a more than fitting finale for Bryant (Editor's note: Column is from 2015-16 season) *  Powell:  For a generation, Kobe was 'our Michael Jordan' VIDEOS *  Top 10 plays from Kobe's MVP season *  Relive Lakers' run to 2009 title *  Relive Lakers' run to 2010 title *  Kobe's best plays vs. every team *  All-Access: Ultimate look back at Bryant's career *  Kobe's best play from each of his All-Star Game appearances *  Final All-Star Game introduction *  Kareem Abdul-Jabbar reads Kobe's retirement poem || Kareem's ode to Bryant *  Bryant reflects on amazing career *  Taking stock of Kobe's impact on NBA *  The Starters: What was Kobe's best moment? *  The Starters: Kobe's best dunk? *  The Starters: Kobe more memorable as No. 8 or No. 24? *  The Starters: Is Kobe a top-three all time Laker? *  LeBron, Curry, others bid adieu to Bryant *  Fans say farewell to their idol *  All-Access: Kobe's 60-point finale vs. Utah *  A farewell speech to remember *  Top 10 games in Kobe's career MORE KOBE VIDEOS TOP PLAYS *  Kobe's top 10 career-best plays *  Kobe's top 10 plays wearing No. 24 *  Kobe's top 10 plays wearing No. 8 *  Great playoff 3-pointers in Kobe's career *  Milestone baskets in Bryant's career *  More milestones: 25K points || 30K points || Youngest to 33K *  Best moments from Christmas Day games *  Four straight games of 50+ points in 2007 *  Kobe vs. MJ: Similarities and differences *  Through the years: Kobe vs. LeBron James *  Through the years: Kobe vs. the Celtics *  Through the years: Kobe vs. Michael Jordan *  The Starters: Top 10 games in Kobe's career *  The Starters: Kobe's best season? *  Best moments at Staples Center: In season || In NBA playoffs REFLECTING ON KOBE *  Shaquille O'Neal recalls Lakers heyday with Kobe *  Charles Barkley praises Kobe's career *  Reggie Miller reflects on Finals showdown with Kobe *  Inside The NBA: The legacy of Kobe *  Players around NBA reflect on Kobe *  Defending Kobe * Players reflect on facing Kobe * Derek Fisher shares four untold Kobe stories.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 18th, 2017

Fatherhood a priority for Aaron Carter

Now that he's 30, American singer Aaron Carter, who recently came out as a bisexual, said that being a father has become one of his priorities. "My goal is to be a father...I want to be a dad and I want to transcend any of the shortcomings that my parents experienced growing up with us," Aaron, whose parents divorced when he was young, told US Weekly. "I was thinking about adopting. I want kids so bad," he said. And having a life partner wouldn't hurt, too. "My resolution is to have a kid. But not just a kid. A beautiful woman or man, because we can have kids, too," Aaron related. He is the former child singer behind the pop song, "I Want Candy." He opened up about his bis...Keep on reading: Fatherhood a priority for Aaron Carter.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 17th, 2017

Young Abalos earns US Kids golf berth

MANILA, Philippines — Barely a year into international competition, Celine Abalos is now gearing up towards representing the Philippines in two of the bigges.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 17th, 2017

Art exhibit for kids/Christmas at Manila Bay

An artist compatriot, who made good in Austria with his paintings, is in town for a five-day art show, after a series of highly successful exhibits in his ad.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 11th, 2017

Sean Chambers to UST?

With the UST coaching job vacant, several names have been mentioned with regards to taking over from Boy Sablan. La Salle head coach Aldin Ayo has been rumored to transfer for a while now but it seems like he's staying at Taft. Current Globalport mentor Pido Jarencio really, really, wants to come back but it appears UST would rather not go through that road again. A left field choice is Sean Chambers. The legendary PBA import, for some reason, has been linked to the job after he resurfaced a couple of weeks ago. It seems highly unlikely but you never really know. Stranger things have happened in the UAAP and in Philippine basketball in general. The rumor has had some traction though, enough for Ginebra head coach Tim Cone, Chambers' former mentor at Alaska, to talk about it among other things last week. "I don’t know. I had a lunch with Sean the day before he left," Cone said last week during Ginebra's grand fans day after defending the PBA Governors' Cup. "I don’t really know anything about it. But he’s got a family, he’s got kids, he’s got a wife, he has a good job. And it’s hard to bring him over here and make him settle here and get his kids in school. He got young kids I think 9 and 11 years old," he added. Chambers is currently a middle school administrator back in the States in the Sacramento City Unified School District in California. The PBA legend was in town a couple of weeks back and was seen watching the UAAP and several practices of Gilas Pilipinas. Still, if and when Chambers decides on coaching basketball, here or elsewhere, Cone believes his former import will do well. "I don’t know but Sean is a great guy, a great coach and a great motivator. He teaches the game the right way," the 20-time PBA champion said. "And if anybody picks him up, it would be great. It is actually my dream to bring him over and be part of my coaching staff. If anybody picks him up, they would love Sean," Cone added.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 11th, 2017

How will the Spurs meld Aldridge, Leonard?

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com A top-three team in the Western Conference is ready to get its best player back from injury. He's someone who, last season, made first-team All-NBA, had a seat at the MVP roundtable and nearly chopped down the champion Golden State Warriors in a playoff game (before being chopped down himself). And this will be good for the San Antonio Spurs, most would agree. What’s less certain is what Kawhi Leonard’s return from an achy quadricep means for LaMarcus Aldridge, who looks comfortable playing the lead right now without his co-star, yet squirmed to find peace when he had to ride shotgun. The Spurs star could make his season debut on Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time) against the Mavericks. The Spurs’ season rides on a happy balance between the two and a way to once again lurk as the team that gives the Warriors a severe case of the creeps, more than any other in the West. Despite all the fuss made over Chris Paul joining James Harden in Houston, and the star-infused Thunder in Oklahoma City, it’s the same-old Spurs who spooked Golden State in Game 1 before losing the Western Conference finals. They were also the last non-Warriors team to reach the NBA Finals. And look who’s sitting a bounce pass from the top of the West, despite missing Kawhi all season? That opening playoff game last May against Golden State was a flash point for San Antonio. The series of events that followed managed to put Leonard in a bad place physically, saw Aldridge melt epically the rest of that series and generate trade talk in the off-season, forced a major sit-down/showdown between coach Gregg Popovich and Aldridge and then, out of seemingly nowhere and somewhat surprisingly, a peaceful resolution was reached and wins followed. “As you can see, based on the evidence,” said Aldridge the other day, “everything’s good.” Yes, it appears so. With Kawhi out of the lineup, the Spurs are doing what they usually do, using disciplined basketball to stamp themselves as a contender. Some nights, Aldridge has been a force, ripping double-doubles and looming large in close games. The ball is finding him in a greedy groove; Aldridge is taking almost 17 1/2 shots a game and the Spurs’ No. 2 shooter, Rudy Gay, is getting nine. As a result, his scoring average is up from a year ago, from 17.3 points per game to 22.6 ppg, matching his best production during his peak with the Portland Trail Blazers. Now in his third season with the Spurs, Aldridge has never felt this frisky and once again is leaning on his money maker: the floating 18-foot jumper. Most important, the Spurs are winning because of him, and Popovich is gloating over him. “Are you kidding?” Popovich said. “We’d be in the toilet if it wasn’t for L.A. He’s been a complete basketball player at both ends of the floor, great rebounding, defensively, running the floor, scoring. What’s really been great is his leadership. And him bringing it every night.” It’s a short sample size after 25 games, but Popovich and the Spurs are cautiously encouraged by this. The Spurs veered from their usual draft-and-develop ways when they signed Aldridge to a big free-agent contract three summers ago. Because of that, Aldridge was considered an outsider, someone who wasn’t a true Spur, but who was needed by a team that craved proven talent to remain a contender in the post-Tim Duncan era. But it’s been a learning process for Aldridge, Popovich and the Spurs. He came from the Blazers anxious to break free of a team that began to orbit around Damian Lillard, but wouldn’t you know it, Leonard turned into a superstar almost overnight after Aldridge arrived. The timing was good for the Spurs ... and awkward for Aldridge, who was forced to adjust his game with prodding from Popovich. Aldridge bit his tongue last season when he averaged his lowest point total since his rookie season. When Leonard suffered his ankle sprain against the Warriors, Aldridge suddenly had the burden of carrying the load, and he failed spectacularly for the rest of that series. He averaged just 11.3 points in the final three games and became low hanging fruit for critics. Popovich was asked the other day if Aldridge had to atone for that this season and the coach came to his player’s defense. “I don’t know if the word ‘atone’ is accurate,” Popovich said. “If your leading scorer and also your point guard (Tony Parker, who was also out against the Warriors) isn’t there, then it falls on someone else. If you take away the two top players from any playoff team, it’s probably going to be tough to move on. I don’t think he has anything to atone for.” Still, something wasn’t right; anyone could see that. Aldridge requested a summertime meeting with Popovich and came with demands. On the surface, that might seem a risky strategy, given the coach’s credentials vs. someone without a single title, and Aldridge knew he was walking on eggshells. “I didn’t know how it would go because he’s Gregg Popovich. I didn’t know how he’d take me saying things. I didn’t know what to expect, with me coming at a person a different way but I was very honest and I think he could tell this was maybe different from what he was used to. But I was not disrespectful. I was trying to express how I was feeling and he was very receptive to it. We kept talking and things got better. I was pleasantly surprised.” For anyone who thought one of the game’s greatest coaches didn’t have a humble side, guess again. Popovich said: “We broke bread a few times, talked about it, laughed about it, discussed what we thought needed to happen, and frankly 95 percent of it fell on me because I made an error in trying to change him too much. That might sound odd, but he’d been in the league nine years and there’s one way he plays on the offensive end and feels comfortable with. I tried to turn him into Jack Sikma, told him I was going to teach you how to play on the elbow, go on the wing, face up. It was confusing for him. It really didn’t fit his style of play. I was guilty of over coaching in a sense. “We came to an agreement on what had to happen. Well, on defense, I told him ‘I’m going to get on you like I do everyone else. But on offense, I don’t even want to talk to you. When they double you, kick it. Other than that, you be LaMarcus Aldridge.’ You see the result right now. He’s happy, confident and kicking everybody’s butt.” Every star player’s ego needs a degree of pampering, and Popovich did admit that dealing with Aldridge was different than any player he’s ever had, yet says there’s a reason for that. “When guys like Kawhi and Tony Parker and others came to me, they were young kids. When a guy’s been in a league nine years and is used to doing something and I try to take it away, that’s not right. That wasn’t very wise on my part.” Popovich didn’t pull rank in the meeting with Aldridge and if anything, he put his ego in check, something you see from coaches who haven’t accomplished one-fourth of what he’s done. But Pop has never strayed from the first rule in coaching players, especially the good ones: Keep them happy by any means necessary. “You gotta look at things and make it better as a coach,” he said. “It’s your responsibility. This was mostly me.” Here’s Aldridge this season so far: Back-to-back 33- and-41-point games a few weeks ago, sharper court awareness, better rebounding and passing than a year ago. Aldridge: “I was frustrated. I just wanted to help more and I think he understood that. Now I feel as confident as I was in Portland. I’m definitely being myself and playing my game and not overthinking and not worried about what’s going to happen if I don’t play well. I’m not a face-up guy. I like to have my back to the basket more. Pop’s given me the freedom to be myself again and that has shown itself on the court.” The issue, both say, wasn’t necessary the number of shots, though that was certainly one of the issues. It also was about the spot on the floor, when those shots needed to be taken. Aldridge said he has no problem with Leonard as the core -- he called Kawhi “our main guy” -- but wanted the same amount of comforts within the system. “He’s a go-to guy also,” said Aldridge. “The plan is to have him be the guy he is, and I be who I am now.” And there’s the key word: now. Leonard was bothered by the quad all last season and it didn’t respond quickly to offseason treatment. But now he’s nearly 100 percent and hopes a quick return to the level of last season when he jacked his scoring and finished third in the MVP voting, one spot ahead of LeBron James. Count Parker among the teammates who’ve said the obvious about Aldridge and how the power forward, in Leonard’s absence, has looked All-Star quality. “Everything’s going through him right now and he’s doing a better job knowing when to score and when to pass,” Parker said, “along with reading double teams and playing good defense.” But then Parker, the most senior Spur after Manu Ginobili, stressed that everyone, including Aldridge, must sacrifice for Leonard and not vice-versa, for the sake of the system and ultimately, wins. “When you play for the Spurs you don’t get a lot of big stats,” Parker said. “Now that Kawhi is out, he obviously has the ball more and he’s going to shoot more shots.” Then he added the kicker: “When Kawhi comes back we will share” -- Parker said while smiling -- “like we always do here.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 9th, 2017

Celeb moms and kids grace event

  Celebrities Isabel Oli-Prats, Camille Prats-Yambao and Dimples Romana-Ahmee recently attended events with their young kids. Isabel and her daughter Feather, Dimples and son Alonzo, and Camille and her child Nathan, participated in the Rainbow Surprise Meet at Red Ribbon in SM Megamall, Mandaluyong City. Isabel received a Rainbow Dedication Cake, a belated surprise for her birthday. Now a mom of two, Camille says her life is made "colorful" by her son Nathan and her newborn, Nala. Dimples and Alonzo, meanwhile, called themselves "cake lovers."...Keep on reading: Celeb moms and kids grace event.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 8th, 2017