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Yemen s Shiite rebels welcome UN call for Saudi strike probe

Yemen’s Shiite rebels on Friday backed a U.N. call for a probe into a Saudi-led coalition airstrike in the country’s north that killed dozens of people the previous day, including many children, in an attack that drew wide international criticism. Source link link: Yemen's Shiite rebels welcome UN call for Saudi strike probe.....»»

Category: newsSource: manilainformer manilainformerAug 10th, 2018

Yemen s Shiite rebels welcome UN call for Saudi strike probe

Yemen’s Shiite rebels on Friday backed a U.N. call for a probe into a Saudi-led coalition airstrike in the country’s north that killed dozens of people the previous day, including many children, in an attack that drew wide international criticism. Source link link: Yemen's Shiite rebels welcome UN call for Saudi strike probe.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsAug 10th, 2018

Elders call on Saudi Arabia, allies to lift blockade

CAIRO — An independent group of world leaders are calling on Saudi Arabia and its partners in a coalition fighting Shiite rebels in Yemen to lift their block.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 12th, 2017

Yemen family fears drone strikes under Trump – The Guardian

Every day, as they hear the whine of the drones overhead, the Tuaiman family waits for Donald Trump to finish killing them. The drones used to hover about once a week over al-Rawdah, the Yemeni village where the family lives, sending children running for cover. Now, according to Meqdad Tuaiman, the drones come every day – sometimes three or four times. Usually they arrive in the afternoon. Other times they come after sundown and linger until sunrise. The drones have not fired their weapons in four months, but their patrols have intensified since late January, when Trump took office. Meqdad, a 24-year-old used-car salesman and occasional pipeline guard, considers it no coincidence. In October 2011, Meqdad’s father, Saleh, and his 17-year-old brother Jalal were killed in a drone strike after they drove into the desert to find some missing camels. Another brother who was with them – Ezzaldeen, 14 – escaped the blast and hid until morning, when he found the two shattered bodies. In 2014, the Guardian gave Meqdad’s 13-year-old brother a camera to record his daily life. In January 2015, he too was killed in a drone strike. US drone strikes in Yemen are a key part of the campaign against al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), but the Tuaiman family denies any links to terrorism and say the family has never received any explanation from either US authorities or their Yemeni government allies. According to Meqdad, his brother Ezzaldeen has started to say: “They’re going to kill me next.” Under the Trump administration, airstrikes have escalated dramatically in Iraq and Syria, sending claims of civilian casualties skyrocketing. Airstrikes have also increased in Yemen, where the US campaign against Islamists has played out alongside a tangled civil war, which has already drawn in regional rivals Saudi Arabia and Iran. The Trump administration is considering plans to deepen US involvement in the civil war, which pits Iranian-backed Houthi rebels against the Persian Gulf states who support the exiled president Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi. The Tuaiman family feels pinioned between the two campaigns: its support for Hadi aligns them with the US – even as they fear being marked for death by US drone strikes. In Washington, Obama was criticized from the right for being too risk-averse even as human rights monitors said his administration’s guidance on avoiding civilian casualties was to lax. And under Trump, the guidance is a dead letter, an administration official recently told the Guardian. “Under Obama, Republicans constantly expressed concerns that White House micromanagement of how and where drones were deployed – and unrealistic rules of engagement for drone strikes – hampered US counterterrorism strategy. Even without formal guidance, Trump can reverse this by devolving strike authority to lower-level officials, and signal an acceptance for more strikes and thus more civilian casualties,” said Micah Zenko, who studies counterterrorism at the Council on Foreign Relations. Meqdad fears that Trump intends to make good on a promise he made in 2015: “When you get these terrorists, you have to take out their families.” US officials deny plans to implement such a policy, which legal experts say would constitute a war crime. But with three dead relatives, Meqdad is disinclined to rule it out. “Basically, we felt that [Trump has] no respect for human life. We felt very afraid”, Meqdad said, in a telephone interview arranged by the human rights group Reprieve. Meqdad said that if the US possesses any evidence against his family, “please bring it to court. We’re ready to explain in any US court.” From the Tuaiman’s Yemeni home to Iraq and Syria, the pace of US airstrikes has increased in recent weeks. Central Command has denied relaxing any relevant rules of engagement. Yet it has acknowledged, a December devolution of decision-making that made it quicker for US military “advisers” fighting alongside Iraqi forces in Mosul to call in airstrikes. “I think philosophically the president has made it very clear that he wants to give the commanders on the ground much more flexibility to execute their mission, especially when it comes to defeating Isis,” White House press secretary Sean Spicer said on Monday. US air force statistics show that since December, the US dropped vastly more bombs on Iraq and Syria than ever before in the two-and-a-half-year old war. In January, US warplanes loosed 3,600 munitions, followed in February by another 3,440. (March statistics are not yet available.) That blew away the previous high-water mark for monthly weapons releases: 3,242 in November 2015. The UK-based monitor group Airwars has said claims of civilian casualties caused by the US and its allies have risen so sharply that it lacks the resources to continue monitoring those alleged to have been caused by Russia, which the US had once criticized for indiscriminate bombing. In March 2017 alone, Airwars has tracked allegations of nearly 1,000 civilians killed in Iraq and Syria attributed to the US-led coalition. The Pentagon says it investigates credible claims of civilian deaths. But in Mosul, mass deaths apparently resulting from a 17 March US airstrike have caused international outcry and prompted the Iraqi government to pause its offensive. A similar trend is at work in Yemen. As of Wednesday, Trump’s 69th day in office, the US had conducted 37 drone strikes or raids beyond declared battlefields, at a rate of one strike every 1.8 days, said Zenko. Those strikes and raids have overwhelmingly focused on Yemen. [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 30th, 2017

Saudi Arabia, allies slam biased U.N. resolution on Yemen

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia – Saudi Arabia and key allies have denounced as "biased" a resolution that renewed a UN-backed investigation of alleged war crimes in Yemen, where Riyadh leads a coalition battling Shiite rebels. The condemnation was issued in a joint statement released late Friday, September 28, by the Riyadh-backed Yemen ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 29th, 2018

Saudi-led coalition admits mistakes in deadly Yemen bus strike

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia – The Saudi-led coalition fighting rebels in Yemen admitted on Saturday, September 1, that "mistakes" had been made in an August air strike that killed 51 people including 40 children . The bombing on a crowded market in part of northern Yemen held by Huthi rebels killed a total ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 1st, 2018

39 people killed, 51 others injured, mostly children, in Yemen bus attack

An attack on a bus carrying children in rebel-held northern Yemen on Thursday left dozens of people dead or wounded, the International Committee of the Red Cross said. "Following an attack this morning on a bus driving children in Dahyan Market, northern Saada, (an ICRC-supported) hospital has received dozens of dead and wounded," the organization said on Twitter without giving more details. "Under the international humanitarian law, civilians must be protected during conflict," it added. The Huthi rebels' Al-Masirah TV reported that 39 people had been killed and 51 wounded, "mostly children". It accused the Saudi-led coalition fighting the Shiite rebels on the side of the go...Keep on reading: 39 people killed, 51 others injured, mostly children, in Yemen bus attack.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 9th, 2018

Officials: 30 civilians dead in recent clashes in Yemen city

Heavy fighting over the last two weeks along Yemen's western coast between pro-government forces, backed by a Saudi-led coalition, and Shiite rebels has killed at least 30 civilians, including women and children, officials and witnesses said Tuesday......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsJul 18th, 2018

As Saudis wilt on field, kingdom pursues soccer power grab

By Rob Harris, Associated Press MOSCOW (AP) — The Saudis have ambitions to seize control over parts of international soccer. Losing 5-0 by Russia in the World Cup opener shows they might have bigger problems at home. Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman had to endure the humiliation in the stadium on Thursday, with Saudi Arabia's mauling in Moscow coming at the hands of a side just below the Saudis in the FIFA rankings. Coach Juan Antonio Pizzi studiously sidestepped a question about whether his federation had been distracted lately. But it has. Just when the Saudis had a first World Cup appearance in 12 years to prepare for, the federation has been mounting a power grab of soccer far beyond the kingdom. What appears the creation of just another bureaucratic institution within the sport could actually have wider ramifications. On its face, the establishment of the South West Asian Football Federation by the Saudis, including the United Arab Emirates and Pakistan, to help to develop the game appears a benevolent undertaking, especially when the existing regional governing body is so vast. "Football is about growth and if you don't grow economically, socially, technically, you will not be moving," Saudi federation president Adel Ezzat told The Associated Press. "It's not enough for us to be in the World Cup. "We have a vision that an Asian country will win the World Cup one day, but there must be a start for that. Football is underdeveloped in many areas in Asia." Is the Asian Football Confederation to blame? "Ambitions have to be higher than winning the Asian Cup," Ezzat said. Confederation president Sheikh Salman, a Bahraini, said he "had no objection to the creation of SWAFF as long as it remains as a football body outside of the AFC's zonal structure." Scratch deeper below the surface and the true objectives of the new body seem a little cloudy. It is unclear why SWAFF is required when there are already regional offshoots of the AFC, including the West Asian Football Federation, which is led by Jordan's Prince Ali bin Al-Hussein who resisted an attempt by the Saudis to seize power of his organization before the new regional force emerged. "It will help Asia and it will help FIFA," Ezzat told The Associated Press. "We don't see anything wrong creating that connection between the south and the west. Football needs to grow." Ezzat maintained that SWAFF had followed the right legal steps to avoid breaching the rules of world football's governing body. Ezzat said FIFA governance committee head Mukul Mudgal had been dispatched by FIFA President Gianni Infantino to the SWAFF meeting on May 31 in Jeddah. The Indian judge denied he was in attendance. SWAFF said the founding members also include Pakistan, Sri Lanka, India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Bahrain, Maldives, Yemen, Oman and Kuwait. Oman Football Association General Secretary Said Othman Al Bulushi told the AP his nation was waiting to assess the statutes and legality of the body within FIFA before confirming its membership. The entire Gulf is not in SWAFF. Take a look at the map and three countries in particular are missing: Iran, Qatar and Yemen. "It's not about the geographic map," Saudi federation president Adel Ezzat said. "It's about zones." Could it also be about politics? For three years, a Saudi-led coalition has been trying to drive out Iranian-aligned Shiite rebels known as Houthis from Yemen to break the civil war in the Arab world's poorest nation and restore the exiled government. Across the Gulf, the Saudis are part of a quartet, including the UAE, Egypt and Bahrain, which has spent the last year putting the squeeze on Qatar. Diplomatic ties with the energy-rich country have been severed amid allegations that Qatar supports extremist groups in the region, which Doha denies. The Qataris, though, have plowed ahead with preparations to host an event that will put them at the center of the world's attention: the next World Cup in 2022. Ezzat won't discuss Qatar, or the 2022 World Cup. Turki Al-Sheikh, head of Saudi Arabia's General Sports Authority, has been less circumspect, demanding earlier this year that Qatar be stripped of the hosting rights if corruption around its bid was proven. For now, in Saudi sights is Qatar's flagship sports network, which owns exclusive Middle East and North African rights to the World Cup. The BeIN Sports coverage of the Russia World Cup opener was watched across Saudi Arabia — but on a pirate channel. The beoutQ signal is transmitted by a Riyadh-based satellite provider, whose largest shareholder is the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Still, the BeIN coverage was seized on by Al-Sheikh to threaten legal action against the network for "wrongdoings against KSA, its sports and officials, and for exploiting sports to achieve political goals." In a tweet, Al-Sheikh added Friday that this "proves Saudi authorities' true stance when banning this network from airing on its soil." Soccer's world body, though, is finally intervening. FIFA said it is "exploring all options to stop the infringement of its rights, including in relation to action against legitimate organizations that are seen to support such illegal activities." What FIFA would not say is whether Infantino raised Qatar's concerns when he watched the opener in the Luzhniki Stadium alongside the Saudi crown prince. Infantino has been a keen visitor to Saudi Arabia over the last year, including meeting King Salman, as intrigue has swirled about the country's role in a consortium's plans to underwrite $25 billion to launch a vastly expanded Club World Cup and an international Nations League. "He knows for a fact the importance of Saudi Arabia in the region," Ezzat said. "That's why I believe he is paying a lot of attention to Saudi Arabia. ... That's a very important sign. (FIFA) know this country can play a very important role in the development of football." Infantino, though, said he believed the backing for the new competitions was "not part of a wider Saudi sports grab." The proposals have stalled because of opposition within the council to Infantino's secrecy over the financial backers. Growing football is part of a sweeping "Vision 2030" plan to wean Saudi Arabia off its near-total dependence on oil money. Prince Mohammed is trying to push Saudi Arabia to become a more cosmopolitan nation that appeals to international investors. Ezzat wants to create new soccer competitions under the auspices of SWAFF and invite countries to participate from beyond the region — particularly Europe. "The country is going through an important change," Ezzat said. "Football can be a catalyst for change. The FIFA president I'm sure knows this very well. ... My country can play an important role in football." Just not the Saudi national team at the moment......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 16th, 2018

Fierce fighting intensifies outside Yemen’s Hodeida airport

  SANAA, Yemen --- A Saudi-led coalition and Yemeni fighters backing the country's government were on the verge of seizing control of the airport of a vital rebel-held port as fighting intensified Friday, with pro-government forces within meters (yards) of the airport gates. The death toll climbed to at least 280 on the third day of the campaign aimed at driving out the Iranian-backed Shiite rebels, known as Houthis, from the Red Sea port of Hodeida that is the main entry point for food and aid supplies in a country teetering on the brink of famine. The Saudi-Emirati coalition bombed Houthi positions while rebels said in a statement that they fired a ballistic missile a...Keep on reading: Fierce fighting intensifies outside Yemen’s Hodeida airport.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 16th, 2018

New bout of heavy fighting in Yemen kills dozens

SANAA, Yemen --- Yemeni officials and witnesses say heavy fighting between pro-government forces and Shiite rebels in recent days has killed more than 150 people. Government forces have been trying to seize rebel-held areas along the western coast, while an allied Saudi-led coalition has been targeting the rebels with airstrikes in the northwestern Saada province. Security officials say a Saudi-led airstrike in the capital, Sanaa, killed four civilians on Saturday and wounded 10. The officials spoke Sunday on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to brief the media, while the witnesses did so for fear of reprisals. The coalition has been battling the Ira...Keep on reading: New bout of heavy fighting in Yemen kills dozens.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMay 27th, 2018

DFA alarmed over missile attacks vs Saudi Arabia

The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) is alarmed over the reports that a ballistic missile fired by Yemeni rebelswas intercepted as it was heading towards Riyadh, capital of Saudi Arabia. In light of the missile attack, DFA Secretary Alan Peter Cayetano said they are "strongly concerned" for the safetyof close to one million Filipinos in Saudi Arabia. "This (missile attack) puts innocent civilians, including many of our kababayans (countrymen) there, at seriousrisk," Cayetano said in a statementon Saturday. According to Saudi Arabia's state-run news agency, Houthi Shiite rebels in Yemen launched a missile against aresidential area of the Saudi capital. No damage was report...Keep on reading: DFA alarmed over missile attacks vs Saudi Arabia.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 23rd, 2017

Saudi-led strike on Yemen TV station kills 4 – rebels

SANAA, Yemen – A Saudi-led coalition air strike hit Yemen's rebel-controlled state television station in Sanaa overnight, killing 4 guards, rebel media and the head guard said on Saturday, December 9. "Air bombardment by the Saudi-American enemy targeted the building of the Yemen TV satellite channel, killing four citizens," the rebel ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 9th, 2017

US Air Force official: Missile targeting Saudis was Iranian

DUBAI — Iran manufactured the ballistic missile fired by Yemen's Shiite rebels toward the Saudi capital and remnants of it bore "Iranian markings," the top U.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 10th, 2017

Yemeni rebels say they targeted Saudi capital with a missile

SANAA — Yemen's Shiite rebels said on yesterday they have "successfully" fired a ballistic missile at Riyadh for the first time, vowing more attacks on the S.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 6th, 2017

Yemen government says rebels not serious at U.N. talks

RIMBO, Sweden – A Yemeni government official said Saturday, December 8, that Huthi rebels were "not serious" on finding common ground to end the devastating war , 3 days into UN-brokered talks in Sweden. Nearly 4 years into a war that has pushed 14 million Yemenis to the brink of starvation, the Saudi-backed government of Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 9th, 2018

Yemen goverment says rebels not serious at U.N. talks

RIMBO, Sweden – A Yemeni government official said Saturday, December 8, that Huthi rebels were "not serious" on finding common ground to end the devastating war , 3 days into UN-brokered talks in Sweden. Nearly 4 years into a war that has pushed 14 million Yemenis to the brink of starvation, the Saudi-backed government of Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 8th, 2018

Yemen government team heads to crunch peace talks with rebels

STOCKHOLM, Sweden – Yemeni government representatives were expected to join a rebel delegation in Sweden on Wednesday, December 5 , for high-stakes peace talks aimed at ending 4 years of devastating war. A 12-member team from the Saudi-backed government headed by Foreign Minister Khaled al-Yamani left Riyadh early Wednesday, sources ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 5th, 2018

Aid group: 85,000 kids may have died of hunger in Yemen

SANAA, Yemen --- An estimated 85,000 children under age 5 may have died of hunger and disease since the outbreak of Yemen's civil war in 2015, an international aid group said Wednesday. Save the Children based its figures on mortality rates for untreated cases of Severe Acute Malnutrition in young children. The U.N. says more than 1.3 million children have suffered from SAM since a Saudi-led coalition went to war with Yemen's Houthi rebels in March 2015. The group said its "conservative estimate" was that 84,701 children may have died, based on historical studies that find that 20 to 30 percent of untreated cases lead to death. It says it calculated the figure based on the n...Keep on reading: Aid group: 85,000 kids may have died of hunger in Yemen.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 21st, 2018

Yemen’s Houthis say they are ready for a ceasefire – Al Jazeera

Yemen’s Houthi rebels say they will halt drone and missile attacks on Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and their […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsNov 19th, 2018

15 civilians dead in strikes on minibuses in Yemen s Hodeida – U.N.

SANAA, Yemen – At least 15 civilians were killed in attacks on minibuses in Yemen's embattled Hodeida province, a United Nations agency said Sunday, October 14, as Huthi rebels blamed air strikes by the Saudi-led coalition. The Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs did not specify the type of ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsOct 14th, 2018