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World oil supply risks being ‘stretched to limit’: IEA

Rising global oil supply, driven by crude giants Saudi Arabia and Russia, may come under pressure as key producers face disruptions, the International Energy Agency said Thursday. The IEA welcomed in its July report last month’s agreement between the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and Russia to open the taps in order to […].....»»

Category: financeSource: bworldonline bworldonlineJul 12th, 2018

World oil supply risks rising – IEA

PARIS: Rising global oil supply, driven by crude giants Saudi Arabia and Russia, may come under pressure as key producers face disruptions, the International Energy Agency said Thursday. The IEA welcomed in its July report last month’s agreement between the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and Russia to open the taps in order… link: World oil supply risks rising – IEA.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJul 13th, 2018

World oil supply risks rising – IEA

PARIS: Rising global oil supply, driven by crude giants Saudi Arabia and Russia, may come under pressure as key producers face disruptions, the International Energy Agency said Thursday. The IEA welcomed in its July report last month’s agreement between the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and Russia to open the taps in order [...] The post World oil supply risks rising – IEA appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJul 12th, 2018

LeBron s free agency decision could swing NBA s balance of power

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com CLEVELAND -- These combo coronation-funerals can be tricky. Imagine the crowning of a new monarch where the royal subjects couldn’t stop chattering about the freshly deposed or deceased predecessor. Where the traditional cry of continuity and succession, “The king is dead! Long live the king!” got flipped, with what was overshadowing what is. That’s pretty much how it went Friday night (Saturday, PHL time) at Quicken Loans Arena, with the Golden State Warriors’ latest NBA championship having to share the stage with speculation, instantly revved up, about LeBron James and the choice he’ll soon make about his next employer. The Warriors are the kings, claiming pro basketball’s throne yet again by completing a sweep of James’ Cleveland Cavaliers in the 2018 Finals. But of course, James is the King, and as so many of us learned in sophomore English – thanks, CliffsNotes! – “Uneasy lies the head (of those who fret and obsess about the future whereabouts of the NBA superstar) that wears a crown.” Long live the kings! The King is ... gone? There was so much energy before, during and after Game 4 Friday (Saturday, PHL time) poured into the last game/next game conjecture about James, the Cavaliers and seismic shifts in the league’s 2018-19 landscape that even the player’s surprise reveal near the end of the night – a bruised and bandaged right hand – couldn’t derail it. Turns out, as James ‘fessed up, the sore shooting paw was an injury he had been playing with ever since Game 1 in Oakland eight days earlier. He had “self-inflicted” it in a fit of pique when he smacked a whiteboard in the visitors’ dressing room at Oracle Arena after Cleveland’s overtime loss in the series-setter, an outcome driven at least in part by some teammates’ mistakes and an arcane wrinkle in the NBA’s replay rules regarding block/charge fouls. Despite the hordes of media people chronicling every waking detail of the Finals, James had kept the injury on the down-low (along with the possibility that J.R. Smith’s nickname amongst his Cavs teammates might be “whiteboard”). The cameras zoomed in and clicked in a paparazzi frenzy of motor drives every time James raised the hand, wrapped in black tape, above the table during his postgame podium remarks. Whether a legit Page-2-the-rest-of-the-story factor in the championship series or a too-late alibi, the contused hand wound up as a sidebar to where James plans to be using it when training camps open in a few months. As of Friday (Saturday, PHL time), it had been 95 months since “The Decision,” the 2010 announcement that James made in a tone-deaf vanity TV production that he was taking his talents from Cleveland to South Beach. Nearly 47 months had passed since he broke the news of his return in a Sports Illustrated ghost-written essay, envisioning much of what actually has unfolded in the four years since. Now savvy insiders and casual observers alike presume James will be on the move again, pushed to leave the franchise he has defined in an urgent search for more and better talent with which he can compete. As in, y’know, some horses, some horses, his kingdom for some horses. James’ free-agency process next month (he can opt out of a $35.6 million deal in the final season of his current contract) is expected to dictate the market of player movement this summer like an oversized domino. It easily could swing the balance of power, if not quite at Golden State’s lofty level then immediately below it. The monster he helped create Dr. Frankenstein eventually was done in by his macabre creation, and it can similarly be argued that James has no one but himself to blame for the predicament in which he again finds himself. He set in motion the machinery of the super team, after all, when he chose to join forces with Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh in Miami eight years ago. Oh sure, the Boston Celtics in 2007-08 got there first by luring Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen to join Paul Pierce, but that was about knitting together three stars, all age 30 or older, for what would be their last best chance to win in an extremely limited run. That group won one title, went to two Finals in three seasons and was done, Allen leaving to join James & Co. with the Heat while Garnett and Pierce morphed into trade chips for Boston POBO Danny Ainge. When James, Wade and Bosh teamed up, they were in their basketball primes and their initial giddy boasts of “not four, not five, not six” championships turned off fans league-wide as much for its portent as its pretension. That crew went 4-for-4 in Finals, winning two rings before James, nudged by staleness and chafing as well as his grand plan for northeast Ohio, went home. From there, a line can be drawn through the ill-conceived 2012-13 L.A. Lakers of Kobe Bryant, Steve Nash, Dwight Howard and Pau Gasol all the way to this season’s Houston Rockets of James Harden and Chris Paul and the talent-gorged Golden State roster. James was the centerpiece as Cleveland replicated the Big Three concept around him with Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love, two younger, playoff-stymied All-Stars. The new-look Cavaliers went to the Finals in their first season together and clambered atop the basketball world to win the franchise’s first NBA title by the end of the second, becoming the first team in league history to do so after digging a 1-3 hole in the best-of-seven series. In that moment, regardless of the two Finals trips that followed, James’ bill was stamped: Paid In Full. Misguided fans might burn his jersey if he leaves again, but James burned the mortgage after that Game 7 in Oakland in 2016 as far as any remaining obligation to fulfill. “I came back because I felt like I had some unfinished business,” he said after elimination Friday (Saturday, PHL time). “To be able to be a part of a championship team two years ago with the team that we had and in the fashion that we had is something I will always remember. Honestly, I think we'll all remember that. It ended a drought for Cleveland of 50-plus years, so I think we'll all remember that in sports history.” James added: “When you have a goal and you're able to accomplish that goal, it actually – for me personally – made me even more hungry to continue to try to win championships. And I still want to be in championship mode. I think I've shown this year why I will still continue to be in championship mode.” In other words, James intends to sustain his high level of performance. He expects to win. And he presumably will do whatever – and go wherever – is necessary to achieve that. There’s no perfect fit So what does that mean for the NBA’s best player (never mind what the annual MVP balloting says in any given season)? It means this: compromise. There is no ideal situation, certainly no easy answer to the guesswork surrounding James’ looming free agency. He could transform any of the 30 teams, but not without some trade-offs for him, for them or for both. Most of them won’t be in play. Teams in markets such as Indianapolis, Milwaukee, Portland, Sacramento, the Twin Cities and so on can’t scratch James’ itches for either championship-worthy depth chart or spotlight. New York and Chicago, among the biggies, are out of synch with his timeline. Toronto? No way James is resettling his brand north of the border, and given his stated desire for teammates who have not just sufficient basketball skills but also mental toughness, well, the Raptors teams he and the Cavs have dominated do not qualify. The Boston club that stretched Cleveland to seven games in the Eastern Conference finals is built for the long haul and would have to surrender much of that to adjust to James’ career calendar. There’s a little Kyrie problem lurking there and, truth be told, the Celtics look to be on their way and are doing just fine without the 33-year-old heading, one of these years, toward decline. At some point in each of the 2018 Finals’ final three days, James spoke admiringly of the Warriors and the San Antonio Spurs title teams that blocked his path whether in Miami or Cleveland. He was at it again even as the Warriors were dousing the opponent’s locker room at The Q with Moet champagne. “I made the move in 2010 to be able to play with talented players, cerebral players that you could see things that happen before they happened on the floor,” James said. “When you feel like you're really good at your craft, I think it's always great to be able to be around other great minds as well and other great ballplayers. “That's never changed. Even when I came here in '14, I wanted to try to surround myself and surround this franchise with great minds and guys that actually think outside the box of the game and not just go out and play it.” Where might James find that now or recruit that swiftly? Hard to say. There are asterisks and “buts” everywhere: * If he were to sign with the Houston Rockets, James would be hitching his star to Chris Paul, a buddy with an injury history that’s about the mirror opposite of his own. He would be teaming up with an elite coach in Mike D’Antoni, something he’s never had (though Miami’s Erik Spoelstra was just young and unproven, on his way to big things). But it also would require another big ask of James Harden, who had to adapt last summer to Paul’s arrival and need for the ball. * If James chooses the Lakers, he has the chance to hit reset with the league’s glitziest franchise, in a market that can meet his every off-court wish and where he and his family already own one or more ultra-comfortable homes. The Lakers have young talent to help James transition into a lower-usage veteran’s role, favored status as a destination team for other top free agents and the salary-cap space to get it done this summer with the likes of Paul George or his pal Paul. But that roster might not be capable of insta-contending, which could burn a season or two when James’ clock most definitely is clicking. * If it’s San Antonio, James could link up with the elite coach in Gregg Popovich, where the winning culture is in the DNA rather than some acquired taste. The Spurs have talent, particularly if Kawhi Leonard finds happiness again there. But they might not have enough to rattle the Warriors’ cage. And for all their professed admiration, James and Popovich might both fare better by keeping their relationship long-distance vs. the 82-game grind. * If it’s Golden State? Perish the thought. The NBA might have to board up itself if competitive balance were capsized to that extent. And as Draymond Green shrewdly noted on Thursday (Friday, PHL time), if James climbed aboard, it likely would require him and several other Golden State teammates to be dispatched to parts unknown. * If James prefers to stay East, where the winning comes easier, he could pick Philadelphia. The Sixers have two foundational young stars at positions that matter most, center Joel Embiid and point guard Ben Simmons. But Simmons is a non-shooter at the moment, the antithesis of what makes a great complementary LeBron teammate. As for Embiid, James never has had to play off of and service a top center. And Philly might feel like a basketball-only move, with the hungriest and most demanding of any new fan base he would embrace. * If it’s Miami – wait, could it be Miami? Could he go second-home again? The Heat always strive to be competitive and offer a talent base deep enough for the East and lots of familiarity. But they also have players such as Hassan Whiteside and Dion Waiters whose mental approaches don’t seem to fit the model James was cooing about in Golden State and with the Tim Duncan-era Spurs. * That brings us to Cleveland, where it’s possible James might choose to remain. Staying with the Cavaliers, after leading them to four Finals and that heady 2016 title, would be the easiest choice as far as pressure to win. He owes these fans nothing anymore – in fact, had the bargain been offered to them in 2010 (“LeBron will leave and win elsewhere for four years, but will come back and deliver a championship and four Finals trips”), most would have grabbed it. Here, James and the fans who have watched him even through the interruption develop from ridiculously touted high schooler to one of the world’s most famous athletes could grow older together. Then he could partner up and buy the team from owner Dan Gilbert for a long-term future. Certainly, staying has a certain place in his and the rest of the James clan’s hearts. “The one thing that I've always done is considered, obviously, my family,” he said at series end Friday (Saturday, PHL time). “Understanding especially where my boys are at this point in their age. They were a lot younger the last time I made a decision like this four years ago. I've got a teenage boy, a pre-teen and a little girl that wasn't around as well. So sitting down and considering everything, my family is a huge part of whatever I'll decide to do in my career, and it will continue to be that.” It’s worth noting that as James contemplates his options as a modern pursuer of championship excellence, the prospect of him moving again qualifies at some level as a failure. Not just by the support system in Cleveland, where he and Gilbert have their friction and James gets snidely mentioned as the team’s unofficial GM and head coach, but by him too. He’s the one who went off to seek his “college education” in south Florida in what it takes to win, whether on the court, in the front office or in and around the seams 365 days a year, straight out of the Pat Riley handbook. The teams about which James talks so glowingly in Oakland now and in San Antonio then have cultures he covets, stability up and down the flowchart he craves. In Cleveland, for a variety of reasons, his team has been incapable of establishing and maintaining that to a lasting degree. He is part of that missed opportunity and he has to own it, no matter if he goes or stays. James is inseparable from the dynamic of the Cavaliers’ ever-changing and often melodramatic roster maneuvers. Spending big, swapping out draft picks to import current stars and supporting players, and overvaluing secondary guys like Smith and Tristan Thompson are risks the Warriors and the Spurs largely avoided thanks to shrew drafting and laudable continuity. The Cavs’ scrap heap, by contrast, is high with traded picks, scuttled plans, panic deals, short-term patches and folks such as former coach David Blatt and former GM David Griffin. And maybe James could have nurtured a little better relationship with All-Star point guard and 2016 title sidekick Kyrie Irving, enough to have kept Irving from bailing on them all with his trade demand last summer. Now he’s on the verge of casting about again, prioritizing what matters most for however long he continues to play. James is more at peace with it than he was before, particularly in 2010, and surely can enjoy the leverage he wields and the riches it delivers. But there is a burden there as well, one that could be seen as completing a circle. So many of the NBA’s greatest stars have been stuck playing and living in the Age of LeBron, right? Their paths to the Finals blocked, on one whole side of the league, by him and his? Well, LeBron James is stuck now in the Era of the Warriors, freshly swept and anxious to close the gap. What goes around comes around, though the key more pressing of the big W’s now is, where? Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 11th, 2018

New era, new challenges emerge for Warriors

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst "It’s the lack of faith that makes people afraid of meeting challenges, and I believe in myself. He who is not courageous enough to take risks will accomplish nothing in life. I figured that if I said it enough, I would convince the world that I really was the greatest." -- Muhammad Ali Ali defended his heavyweight championship 20 times, during two eras: when he was young and unstoppable, after beating Sonny Liston in Miami in 1964, and when he was old and vulnerable, after beating George Foreman in Zaire in 1974. He was the fastest heavyweight ever in the first era; he was smart and could take a punch in the second. A generation later, the Golden State Warriors are defending their NBA title for a second time, in three years. But they, too, are doing so in two eras. In 2014, no one had seen anything like what Golden State did on a basketball court, and how Stephen Curry’s and Klay Thompson’s shooting range changed the geometry of NBA defenses. They stretched to the breaking point trying to get out to Curry and Thompson. They couldn’t figure out how to handle the Warriors’ five-man switching defenses. They couldn’t stand up under Golden State’s withering pace. There is no need to hold a telethon yet for the Warriors, three years later. They are 49-14 today, with four All-Stars among their five starters, including Kia MVP candidate Kevin Durant, in the prime of his career, who wasn’t there when the Warriors first beat the Cleveland Cavaliers in the 2015 Finals. They are still first in the league in Offensive Rating, first in True Shooting Percentage, first in Effective Field Goal Percentage. They still are unsolvable to most opponents. But maybe not all, not anymore. The margin of separation between Golden State and the rest of the league is still there, most of the time. But there are tiny signs of slippage. Tiny. You recall what Warriors assistant coach Bruce Frasier said in the preseason, when no one is injured and everyone thinks they’re going 82-0. “Teams are starting to figure us out a little bit,” he said then. “We’re talented, so that sometimes overrides strategy. But I feel like teams are figuring certain things out to do to counter what they’ve seen. Year one, it was really hard, because it was all new. The pieces have changed a little bit, but I feel like our challenge will be to see if we can layer on some of the offense, our fluid movement, and counters, and change things up, and execute better. Defense is always big, too, so I wouldn’t go into the complacent (problem). I think it’s going to be more execution, and how smart can we really be, and can we keep that energy up through this year?” In each of their previous three seasons, the Warriors led the league in margin of victory -- 10.1 points in 2014-15, 10.8 points in 2015-16 and 11.6 points last season. This year, though, they’ve fallen to third, behind the Houston Rockets and Toronto Raptors -- and their win margin is down to 8.5 points per game. Two years ago, the Warriors were fourth in the league in Defensive Rating (100.9). Last season, Golden State was second (101.1). This season, the Warriors are fifth, at 103.4. In 2014-15, they were 14th in the league in points allowed in the paint; this year, they’re 24th (to be fair, they were 23rd last year, when they won it all anyway). Are they bored? Tired? Aging? Is their bench inconsistency this year the result of vets saving themselves for the playoffs, or guys just getting old? And will it matter against anyone other than Houston? “Once you start getting a little older, it’s harder and harder,” guard Shaun Livingston said last week. “We definitely need the youth, we definitely need the health. We’ve got to be healthy. We’ve got to be healthy. Sometimes you see teams that maybe are over the hill -- they have the experience, but maybe not (the ability). It’s human nature. Obviously, I don’t think we’re there yet. We’ve got guys that are still in their prime. It’s mental now.” In the Jean-Pierre Coopman phase of their latest title defense (oh, how one misses spectacles like Ali fighting Coopman, the “Lion of Flanders” -- with Pat Summerall and Tom Brookshier on the call!), the Warriors came to Washington last week. There was no White House visit on the docket, only time with D.C. area kids and a trip to the African-American History Museum, with owner Joe Lacob and GM Bob Myers on the trip as well. They have been in the public eye for five years now, back to Mark Jackson’s last season as coach, when the Splash Brothers exploded into the national consciousness. That’s a long time for one NBA team to have all that light and heat on it. For a minute, the Warriors tried to convince themselves that there was a backlash building against them nationally, that people had grown tired of their 3-pointers and video game point totals. It was, of course, a ridiculous posit -- Golden State and its players are more popular than ever, the love for Curry such that he felt perfectly comfortable posting a photo of the glass table he accidentally smashed in his hotel room on Instagram, any criticism surely to be muted amid America’s love for the two-time MVP.   when you feel like you’re on the @pgatour so you gotta get some swings going in the hotel room 😂😂😂 #idiot A post shared by Wardell Curry (@stephencurry30) on Mar 1, 2018 at 1:33pm PST “There was a little guy who was probably eight years old, and he came up and introduced himself,” Steve Kerr said. “His name was Ryan, and I’m talking to him, and he goes ’oh, my God, there’s Quinn Cook!’ And he ran over to Quinn Cook. Not Steph, not me -- he loved Quinn Cook. That was cool.” Throughout the Warriors’ run, they’ve faced down different challengers in the Western Conference -- the first iteration of the Rockets with Harden, a hybrid inside-out attack where Houston unhappily and unsuccessfully tried to meld Harden and Dwight Howard in the post. The Durant/Russell Westbrook one-two combo in Oklahoma City. The Spurs, morphing from the Tim Duncan/Tony Parker-led team to the Kawhi Leonard-dominant one. The “Lob City” Clippers, followed by the Chris Paul/Blake Griffin halfcourt version. But this season’s Rockets, with Paul at the point, may be the most unique and dangerous threat to the Warriors. They are much more than a team that just rains 3-pointers on you -- though they most certainly do that, and do it historically well. They’re also an outstanding defensive team, with the additions of P.J. Tucker and Luc Mbah a Moute giving them a grit they haven’t had in past seasons to pair with the shot blocking and rim presence of Clint Capela. The numbers are stark: Houston is 32-1 this season when Paul, Harden and Capela all play, including two wins over the Warriors The Rockets have no obvious weakness. They have no fear of Golden State, either, having won two of the three meetings with the Warriors this season. It’s not just that they’re good, it’s how they’re good that makes them look like the greatest challenge yet to Golden State’s hegemony in the West. “I mean, yes, because they do it a different way, I guess,” Curry said last week. “They adopted the power of the three ball and try to use it as a main weapon, and obviously with James and CP together. Honestly, we know that they’re playing well. We’re chasing that number one seed and keeping tabs on how they’re playing and whatnot. But at the end of the day, we’ve got a lot of time left before we have to face them again. We know they’re serious. But so are we.” The Warriors have had to deal with great adversity during their run, to be sure. The biggest challenge came about this time last year, when a collision between teammates -- Zaza Pachulia and Durant, in D.C., ironically -- culminated in a Grade 2 MCL sprain and bone bruise for Durant, taking him out of the lineup at the worst possible part of the season. Golden State had just ripped off wins in 23 of its previous 27 games since a lamentable Christmas Day loss to the Cavs. Curry had started to figure out how to play with KD, and vice versa. They were in the middle of a brutal stretch of seven road games in eight overall, with the one brief return home to play the Celtics. When Durant went down, the initial fear was that he’d torn his ACL and would be out for the season. The Warriors’ locker room was funeral after the Wizards game. “Obviously, we were trying to figure out if he was like ’done-done’ for the year, or whether or not there was going to be a chance he’d return,” forward David West said. “We were, at the time he got hurt, we were just starting to figure out the sort of roles, everybody was getting comfortable with roles. We basically had to reset., change some of the functions we were doing. We lost a few games  trying to literaly just figure out and recalibrate and re-balance. That was one of those periods where we were just looking at each other, trying to start this thing -- we lost this huge, huge piece.” Yet the Warriors figured it out on the fly. And how they responded then provides a big clue to how they might respond to the challenge the Rockets present to them now. “It took us, I think we needed to get home before we were able to stablize,” Kerr said. “I want to say we lost three of the last four on the trip or something  (they did lose three of four, but one of the three losses was at Oracle in that one home game with the Celtics). We got home and righted the ship and got going. But sometimes (an injury is) a galvanizing force when a guy gets hurt, and you have to do certain things. Like, for us, when Kevin got hurt, we talked about it and we said we have to be the best defensive team in the league. We don’t have that luxury of throwing the ball to Kevin and saying ’get us 30 points tonight.'” During that stretch without Durant (March 2, 2017 to April 5, 2017), who returned just before the start of the playoffs, the Warriors led the league in the league in Defensive Rating (100.0, just head of San Antonio’s 100.2), first in opponent field goal percentage (.429), tied for second in opponent 3-point percentage (.316) and fourth in opponent points allowed per game (100.9). And once Durant returned for good, the Warriors again flexed. They tore through the West, winning all but one game en route to a third straight NBA Finals. And they took the Cavaliers apart in five games for their second title in three years. “You could see Draymond, Klay, Andre, Shaun, those guys, even Loon (Kevin Looney), were like, ’we didn’t have KD last year,’ ” West said. “For someone like myself, I just followed their lead. Klay got a little more aggressive. Draymond sort of settled everybody defensively. And we started winning.” That muscle memory will come in handy this year. Durant and Curry have missed time with injuries, and Golden State hasn’t figured out things at center just yet. (Would it shock me if rookie Jordan Bell played a big role there down the stretch? No, it would not.) But the Warriors still are smoking people in the second halves of games; per teamrankings.com, the Warriors lead the lead in third-quarter scoring margin at 5.3 points per game, more than double the margin of the second-place Denver Nuggets. Whether it’s adjustments or something else (“mainly, fiery halftime speeches, Knute Rockne style,” Kerr opines), they have again put a lot of opponents away with 12 minutes to spare. Since the All-Star break, they’re fourth in the league in opponent field goal percentage (.433) and Defensive Rating (100.3). “This year, obviously, knock on wood, we want to stay healthy,” Curry said. “We want to continue to push in the right direction. Every year’s different. That’s the fun part about this league. No matter how much success you’ve had and what your expectations are, it’s a different journey every year. We’re right in the middle of that right now. We have an amazing record, considering how we’ve played. I think we’d all say we haven’t lived up to our own expectations. That’s okay. We have an opportunity to build the right habits and the right momentum going into the playoffs this year and do it, all 15 guys.” Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 6th, 2018

It's on: Triple G and Canelo ready for big middleweight bout

em>By Tim Dahlberg, Associated Press /em> LAS VEGAS (AP) — It's the kind of fight Gennady Golovkin has been chasing from the moment he walked off an airplane six years ago to make his new home in Los Angeles. It's the fight boxing fans have been waiting for almost as long. Golovkin and Canelo Alvarez meet Saturday night in a middleweight showdown that has been brewing for years. They do it in their prime, and they both bring the kind of power that could make for a night that will be talked about in boxing for years to come. Three weeks after Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Conor McGregor met in an odd spectacle, boxing shows off its best side in a scheduled 12-round fight that will pay both men millions and make one of them the undisputed top 160-pounder in the world. 'It's a true fight,' Golovkin said. 'You can go back home or go to the hospital. It's dangerous. Everyone understands that.' Indeed they do, which is one reason Golovkin has had trouble getting fighters in the ring with him. The fearsome slugger from Kazakhstan has stopped almost everyone put in the ring with him, winning all 37 of his fights, 33 by knockout. But Alvarez packs power, too, and the red-headed Mexican is a savage counterpuncher with a style that should match up perfectly against the onrushing Golovkin. 'I don't back down,' Alvarez said. 'I'm a counter puncher, and I like to fight.' The combination of styles has boxing fans salivating over what will happen in the same ring where Mayweather stopped McGregor three weeks ago. The fight quickly sold out and is expected to do well on HBO pay-per-view, though it will not reach the level of last month's spectacle. Still, it promises to be a can't miss fight that brings back memories of the great middleweights of the 1980's. Both fighters weighed in Friday at the middleweight limit of 160 pounds. 'It all depends on who lands the punch that defines the fight and I think Gennady is going to do that,' said Abel Sanchez, Golovkin's trainer. 'They're going to hit each other and give fans the kind of fight they want and expect.' It won't be the first time the two have met, but it will be under far different circumstances. They sparred together at Golovkin's camp in Big Bear, Calif., in 2011 as both were preparing for fights and, though accounts vary, both had their moments with each other. But this is a real fight, with Golovkin's titles at stake and a lot more. Both will make millions of dollars in a fight that holds risks — and plenty of rewards — for both of their careers. 'These are the fights that define your career,' said Oscar De La Hoya, who promotes Alvarez. 'Both guys are not going to back down.' Alvarez is already an established superstar, arguably the most popular athlete in Mexico. Golovkin, who won a silver medal in the 2004 Olympics, is hoping for the kind of performance that will finally win over fans not overly impressed by a 23-fight knockout streak of 18 middleweight title defenses. Between them they have 86 wins, against only one loss. That was suffered by Alvarez (49-1-1, 34 knockouts) in 2013 against Mayweather in a fight he admitted he was too young to take. Oddsmakers in this gambling city have made Golovkin a slight 7-5 favorite, but the fighters themselves say anything could happen. 'It's not an easy fight for him or me,' Golovkin said. 'I think the first couple of rounds will be very close. I think the second half will be much crazier, like a street fight.' For Golovkin, the fight is the culmination of a long battle to establish himself as the top middleweight in the world. Triple G came to the U.S. in 2011 to pursue bigger fights, and has collected the major middleweight titles while trying to get Alvarez into the ring. It finally happened after Golovkin (37-0, 33 knockouts) was forced to go 12 rounds earlier this year against Danny Jacobs in a fight where he got hit a lot and barely escaped with a decision. Some in boxing thought it showed some vulnerability or suggested that at the age of 35 Triple G is getting a bit old. Nonsense, he says. 'I am the champion and I bring all my belts,' Golovkin said. 'This is my game, my fight. I am the boss, not Canelo.' Golovkin, who speaks limited English, backed his comments up with a tweet warning Alvarez what was yet to come. 'If you go in the ocean the shark knows,' he wrote. 'He's home. It's the same for me in the ring. ... Let's do it.' .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 16th, 2017

Manny Pacquiao beats Lucas Matthysse and Father Time in latest win

The fire is back in the eyes and belly of 39 year old Philippine senator Manny Pacquiao who scored an emphatic knockout victory over Lucas Martin Matthysse to win his 11th world title at 2:43 of the seventh round Sunday afternoon at the Axiata Arena here. Proving his critics wrong, Pacquiao put on a clinic of sorts as he showed facets of his ring brilliance that were missing in his previous fights since 2009 where he last won by knockout. Before a screaming horde of fans led by the heads of state of Malaysia and the Philippines, Pacquiao was brilliant, fast and accurate with his timing and combinations, completely frustrating and flustering the former WBA king. "You have to love what you do in order to do what I still do as a 39-year-old fighter," said Pacquiao, who trained hardest despite his age, pushing himself to the limit. But this time around, his new team of mostly Filipinos led by chief trainer Buboy Fernandez, acknowledged his conditions and custom-fit a new training regimen that brought back the power and the speed, however diminished a bit. "Do I look old,?" asked Pacquiao laughing in front of the members of media at the post-fight press conference. Every masterful stroke dealt by Pacquiao befuddled Matthysse who secretly plotted to retire Pacquiao. "Not today," said Pacquiao, who was cheered on by Philippine president Rodrigo Duterte who watched in the presidential suite with new Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad. "Of course, it was an extra motivational tool for me to fight well and careful." Fernandez warned his ward not to be too confident when he knocked down Matthysse for the second round, the Argentine taking a knee at the end of the fifth round. "It might have been a trick. But we were ready for Matthysse," said a beaming Fernandez, who for the first time, acted as chief trainer aided by strength and conditioning coach Justin Fortune and assistant Raides "Nonoy" Neri. Cutman Edgardo de la Vega was not much needed as Pacquiao was never in trouble. "We will take a rest for now before we decide what to do next," said Pacquiao, who goes back to work this week as the Philippine Senate opens its sessions. - RELEASE.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 16th, 2018

With flags, song, pride, French celebrate unifying victory

By Elaine Ganley, Associated Press PARIS (AP) — It was a victory for all of France and the home crowd did it justice, pouring into Paris' Champs-Elysees Avenue by the tens of thousands to celebrate in an explosion of joy. France's 4-2 win over Croatia in the World Cup final in Moscow on Sunday marked the second time in 20 years that France has won the World Cup, and came at a time when the people feel needy. "It represents enormous things," said Goffrey Hamsik, dressed in a hat resembling a rooster — the French national symbol — and a shirt with the No. 10 for Kylian Mpappe, the 19-year-old breakout star who hails from the Paris suburb of Bondy. "We've had lots of problems in France these past years," he said, recalling deadly terror attacks. "This is good for the morale ... Here, we are all united. We mix. There is no religion, there is nothing, and that's what feels good." Troublemakers marred some of the festivities at the top of the Champs-Elysees, breaking the window of a major store, throwing bottles, temporary barriers and even a bicycle at riot police as the celebrations wound down close to midnight. Police responded with water cannon and tear gas. BFM-TV reported that the store was pillaged. Earlier, people wrapped in flags and dressed in crazy hats, and one man spotted totally nude except for the Tricolor, marched down the avenue where France displayed its military might a day earlier for Bastille Day. Revelers set off smoke bombs in the national colors — blue, white and red — obscuring Napoleon's triumphal arch. People climbed atop every newspaper kiosk and bus stop in the area to wave flags and lead the crowds below in cheers. The national anthem, the Marseillaise, rang out, cars honked horns and cherry bombs cracks. A young man sprayed a fire extinguisher on the crowd on a late hot afternoon. Hundreds of police in riot gear were discretely lined up on side streets to monitor revelers. Typically, celebrations in France end up with some broken shop windows and other destruction, and Sunday was no exception. Tear gas was lobbed at one point on the Champs-Elysees. About 4,000 police watched over the fan zone — packed to its 90,000 capacity — during the match, then moved to the Champs-Elysees and neighboring streets. As night fell, The Eiffel Tower flashed 1998-2018 to mark France's two World Cup titles. The Arc de Triomph was awash in the national colors, lit with the rooster, the faces of the winning team and the words "Proud to be Blue," or French. The celebrations were spread across the nation. For all the crazy antics — and some revelers who got out of control — a sense of patriotism and unity was almost visceral. Antoine Griezmann, the France striker who scored one of the goal's Sunday, told a news conference two days before the final, televised on BFM TV, that pride in country is in short supply. "We say it so little ... We should be proud to be French," Griezmann said. Mahmoud Bourassi was among those taking a longer-term view and he had some sobering thoughts about France's run to the title and the festivities it has sparked. Bourassi runs a youth center in Bondy — Mbappe's home that was among those scarred by riots in 2005 that exposed the fissures of France that have yet to heal — and he knows the teenage star of the tournament. "All this euphoria and effervescence, it's positive but it's emotional and ephemeral," he said ahead of France's win. Bourassi said sports is a "catalyst to bring people and nations together." But, he added, it must be built on. "What we're seeing is magic, exceptional. But what are we going to do with it tomorrow?" That is a question for President Emmanuel Macron, who was in Moscow celebrating with the team on victory night, and will receive the squad more formally on Monday at the presidential Elysee Palace. Revelers celebrated the moment. "We're happy. It took 20 years ... It's the pride of the nation. It unites everyone. It federates," Frederique Pourquet said as she and her friend left the Champs-Elysees. The win "shows that the French people are consolidated and the work of all France," said Omar Bzi. Hajar Maghnaoui, of Asnieres, north of Paris, said "It's a way to bring the French people together, and also the world." ___ John Leicester in Moscow contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 16th, 2018

Billionare Manny: I’m ready, I’m hungry

KUALA LUMPUR --- Boxing legend Manny Pacquiao weighed in at a comfortable 146 pounds, well under the 147-pound (67-kilogram) limit on Saturday, and said he was "ready" to win back the welterweight belt against World Boxing Association (WBA) champion Lucas Matthysse of Argentina.   "I am ready. I am motivated, I am happy and I am hungry," said the 39-year-old Pacquiao, the only man to have won world titles in eight weight divisions in a glittering 23-year career.   Amid the noise inside his packed VIP room, now Senator Pacquiao briefly reflected on his phenomenal career.   "Back then only true boxing fans watched my fights," he said. "Now heads of stat...Keep on reading: Billionare Manny: I’m ready, I’m hungry.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 14th, 2018

Pacquiao-Matthysse: No weight problems

  MANILA, Philippines – Manny Pacquiao's challenge for Argentine Lucas Matthysse's World Boxing Association (WBA) regular welterweight title is officially underway as they both made weight for their bout billed as Fight of Champions.  The Filipino boxing legend tipped the scales at 146 lbs, a pound lighter than the welterweight limit, ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 14th, 2018

Revolution Precrafted bags $460-M contract in Brazil

Revolution Precrafted, which designs and builds prefabricated structures for clients around the world, announced a deal to supply homes and hotel villas in Brazil.   The company, founded by Filipino businessman Robbie Antonio, said the contract in Brazil was worth $460 million and would be located in an 80-hectare eco-resort development near Rio de Janeiro.   Revolution Precrafted said the contract involved the supply of "high end quality eco-sustainable designer homes and eco-friendly villas."   Specifically, it will design and supply one to three-bedroom homes and units measuring 50 to 200 square meters. It will also be supplying medium sized resort...Keep on reading: Revolution Precrafted bags $460-M contract in Brazil.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJul 13th, 2018

Argentina staves off Batang Gilas in thriller

BATANG Gilas dropped its third straight game at the FIBA U17 Basketball World Cup on Wednesday but not after pushing to the limit host Argentina at the Newell’s Old Boys in Rosario. A battle of two winless teams in Group D of the tournament, the Filipinos crowded the hosts for much of the contest but just could not complete the task, slumping to the 74-71 defeat......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsJul 4th, 2018

Artificial sugar shortage raising domestic prices

SUGAR prices have shot up by 50 percent in the past few months -- despite efforts by the Sugar Regulatory Administration to bolster domestic supply by removing allocation for the world market. There is no sugar shortage on the local market but the unreasonable price increases are causing consumers to….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJul 3rd, 2018

Gov. Imee warns of sugar manipulation

SUGAR prices have shot up to 50 percent in the past few months -- despite efforts by the Sugar Regulatory Administration to bolster domestic supply by removing allocation for the world market. There is no sugar shortage in local markets but the unreasonable price increases are causing consumers to suspect….....»»

Category: newsSource:  journalRelated NewsJul 3rd, 2018

FIBA WORLD CUP ASIAN QUALIFIERS: Wright after brawl: 'We just stood up for our guys'

MANILA, Philippines --- Gilas Pilipinas remains unapologetic over the brawl that transpired between the Philippines and Australia Monday in the 2019 FIBA World Cup Asian Qualifiers. [Related: FIBA WORLD CUP ASIAN QUALIFIERS: Unapologetic Romeo will defend Gilas to the very bitter end] Matthew Wright, the only player who talked to the media in the immediate aftermath of the unfortunate incident, says that the national team was just standing up for one another. If a similar thing were to happen again, Gilas Pilipinas would pretty much react the same way he added. "Yeah, I mean, it’s unfortunate that we lost today but if it ever happens again to us," Wright said. "We would probably do the same thing because cause we have each other’s backs. We’re brotherhood. It’s more than basketball," he added. Wright was one of the players that was allegedly targeted by Australia's Daniel Kickert during warm ups. [Related: FIBA WORLD CUP ASIAN QUALIFIERS: Chot stands his ground with Gilas, basically names Kickert as trigger] The shooting guard was also one of the nine Gilas players to be ejected from the game after the brawl ended. While it's important to be gracious hosts, Wright says that the Boomers just pushed them to the very limit and their patience ran out. "We just stood up for our guys. It happened before the game even started. So, you know everyone knows we’re a gracious hosts but if you pushes to a limit, there’s only so much we can do," he said. "I'm just happy everyone stood up for each other and we had each other’s backs," Wright added.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 3rd, 2018

Another early exit for Socceroos at the World Cup

SYDNEY (AP) — Any Australians who didn't stay up to watch the World Cup woke up Wednesday to the inevitable news that their Socceroos failed to make it past the group stage for the third consecutive tournament. Caretaker coach Bert van Marwijk's tenure is over after the Australians lost 2-0 to Peru in their last group game and slumped to last place in a tough Group C which also included France and Denmark. The match began at midnight on Australia's east coast. Veteran striker Tim Cahill finally took the field in the 53rd minute for his first action in Russia but couldn't score a goal in his fourth consecutive World Cup. The worst news to come out of the tournament was that Socceroos attacker Andrew Nabbout requires a shoulder reconstruction and will miss the next six months. Nabbout is flying to Melbourne to have surgery after dislocating his right shoulder in Australia's draw with Denmark last week. "I have been told the rehab is about six months," Nabbout said after missing the loss to Peru. "It's a painful one but hopefully I can make it back in less and be ready for the Asian Cup (next year)." Australia had its preparations for the World Cup affected by the resignation of Ange Postecoglou as coach shortly after the Socceroos qualified for Russia. Van Marwijk was hired to coach for the World Cup only, and Graham Arnold will soon take over as a fulltime coach. "Agony," the Daily Telegraph in Sydney said in the headline. It also showed a picture of Cahill touching a goalpost and wondering if it is was his final goodbye to the sport. Dan Colasimone of the Australian Broadcasting Corp. radio said van Marwijk may have made the Socceroos too one dimensional. "In the end, van Marwijk talked a good game — when he spoke to the media at all — but he could not deliver one win at the World Cup for Australia, let alone qualification for the next round," Colasimone said. "The line Van Marwijk and his players repeated ad nauseam, in lieu of any clear public discussion of plans or formations or tactics, was that this side was built to deal with any situation, any opposition. Yet it was only really built to limit damage against superior sides.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 27th, 2018

Manny Pacquiao 85 percent ready as Matthysse fight draws near

GENERAL SANTOS CITY--With just less than three weeks left before his defining fight with WBA  champion Lucas Matthysse, Manny Pacquiao's handlers were pleased with the work ethic shown by the 39-year-old legend. Just moments after Pacquiao displayed his old and fiery form on Tuesday, staggering sparring partner Gherich Chavez with a single solid straight to the jaw, chief trainer Buboy Fernandez and strength and conditioning coach Justin Fortune gave high marks for their champion. Pacquiao had to pause for ten seconds to give Chavez a respite, as old timers recalled memories of the Filipino's single knockout punch that took the lights out of Emmanuel Lucero in 2003 in Los Angeles. "I would say he is 85 already percent ready and we don't want him to peak too soon," said Fernandez, who is leaving no stone unturned in their preparation for "Fight of Champions," the biggest boxing event in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia slated on July 15 at the Axiata Arena. Fortune concurred with Fernandez. "He is right there where we want him to be right now," said the Australian coach who is seeing a resurgent spirit of the only boxer in history who has won eight world titles in eight different divisions. Pacquiao challenged himself Monday morning, testing himself to the limit by climbing the steepest route in Maasim, Sarangani province. "It's a sign that Manny is trying to ask himself questions whether he still has it or not. That talks a lot about his warrior spirit," said Fortune. Meanwhile, Matthysse is also doing all he can to match whatever firepower Pacquiao will be bringing to battle. Under the tutelage of Joel Diaz in Indio, California, Matthysse promised to keep his belt at all costs. Matthysse's promoter Oscar Dela Hoya also dispelled rumors that the fight might be cancelled due to financial problems as alleged by Pacquiao's long-time and former promoter Bob Arum of rival Top Rank Promotions. "I feel very, very confident the fight is going to happen, let's put it that way," said Dela Hoya in an interview with boxing scribe Steve Kim. Matthysse is planning to arrive in Kuala Lumpur ahead of everyone to acclimatize for 10 days prior to the match. "I might be there for about ten days, I want to go out there and help Manny promote and do my rounds in Malaysia. I have my plane tickets already. So we're set to go, we have a fight," De La Hoya insisted. - RELEASE.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 26th, 2018

ONE: Danny Kingad happy to play gatekeeper if Geje Eustaquio wins ONE title

Macau, China - ONE: PINNACLE OF POWER in Macau, China on June 23 is one of the deepest cards from top to bottom offered by ONE Championship for its 24-event calendar this 2018. From the preliminary portion to the main card of ONE: PINNACLE OF POWER, there are plenty of bouts with championship and ranking implications, including the three-round flyweight encounter between former title contender Danny Kingad and Chinese prospect Ma Hao Bin. The winner of the aforementioned 61.2-kilogram tussle could earn a shot at the ONE Flyweight World Championship, which will be on the line in the main event of ONE: PINNACLE OF POWER as Adriano Moraes is slated to duke it out with Geje Eustaquio in a much-awaited rematch and title unification contest. Kingad is now trying to build some momentum towards a second crack at the ONE Flyweight World Championship, while Ma has aced six of his assignments since joining the promotion in 2016. However, the 22-year-old Baguio City native finds himself in a peculiar position if he and his teammate Eustaquio will walk out of the Studio City Event Center with respective victories. Kingad knows that he has to be relegated to a gatekeeping role if Eustaquio will be successful in unifying both titles against Moraes at ONE: PINNACLE OF POWER. “I will be super happy for coach Geje if he wins the match in Macau. It’s an honor to be competing alongside him on June 23. I’ve learned a lot of things from him. For this training camp, I’ve spent more time with him. I want him to win the title,” he said. Although he could be knocking on the door for a world title shot again with a decisive win over Ma, Kingad stressed that he will gladly play gatekeeper to Eustaquio. “I don’t mind filling that role if ever he wins against Adriano Moraes. He is my senior, and we are teammates. He is like a brother to me,” he stated. “I am still young. I believe that my time will come.” Kingad is not fond of the idea of squaring off with Eustaquio for the flyweight crown, pointing out that he would not trade his treasured friendship with his Team Lakay comrade for a shot at the world title. “That's not going to happen. We always go at it in practice anyway. I'm happy that I get to spar with him all the time because he pushes me to the limit. We push each other, and we push each other to the next level,” he shared. “I will support coach Geje all the way. For now, I'll just keep getting better as a competitor. I'll wait for my time,” Kingad added. Following an unsuccessful challenge for the ONE Flyweight World Championship this past November against Moraes, which ended in his first professional defeat, Kingad rebounded with an impressive triumph over a battle-tested veteran in Sotir Kichukov four months later. Kingad seeks to sustain his winning groove in ONE Championship as he is set to take on Ma, a Chinese national freestyle wrestling champion with a mixed martial arts record of 11-2. Diligently preparing under the tutelage of head coach Mark Sangiao at Team Lakay in Baguio City, Kingad is fully aware of his opponent’s capabilities. “Training is, as usual, very tough. We are drilling very hard each and every day. I am still working on all areas, be it my striking or my grappling,” he mentioned. “Knowing my opponent is a good wrestler, however, I am particularly working on my takedown defense for this match. I want to keep this fight standing, so I have worked very hard on my takedown defense,” Kingad explained further. Despite the threat that Ma poses in the grappling department, Kingad assured that he is comfortable wherever the bout goes on June 23. “I want to test his stand-up game. I believe I am stronger, faster, and more explosive than he is,” he disclosed. “I am definitely going for a knockout in this match. However, if he does take me to the ground, I will be ready for anything.” Kingad believes that his in-ring meeting with Ma at ONE: PINNACLE OF POWER is a must-win clash as he embarks on a hazy road towards the organization’s flyweight championship. “I must win this bout because honestly, I don’t know what the future holds. What if we don’t get the result that we want for coach Geje? I am ready to step up. I cannot wait to get right back in there and make another run at the title. I know things will be very different next time,” he ended......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJun 18th, 2018

New study confirms Dengvaxia poses more risks for kids without prior infection

MANILA, Philippines – A new study confirmed that Sanofi Pasteur's controversial vaccine Dengvaxia poses more risks for children who have not been infected by the dengue virus before immunization. A study recently published  in the New England Journal of Medicine confirmed the  World Health Organization's recommendation in April that Dengvaxia should only be administered to children who ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJun 16th, 2018

World economy at risk from US policies – IMF

WASHINGTON, D.C.: President Donald Trump’s aggressive trade policies, and expansive tax cut at a time when the US economy is growing, are creating risks that could damage the domestic and global economies, the International Monetary Fund warned Thursday. The tax cuts will generate a near-term boost to growth but also “will elevate the risks to [...] The post World economy at risk from US policies – IMF appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsJun 15th, 2018

PH coco oil exports dive 39% as prices continue to slide

The country's coconut oil exports in the first quarter of the year fell by 39.2 percent to $383 million from $630 million last year as world prices continued to decline due to supply glut. The.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJun 12th, 2018