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Workers with good behavioral skills get better pay – study

MANILA, Philippines – More employers in the Philippines are finding it hard to search for workers with good behavioral skills, a recent study found. According to a World Bank report titled "Developing Socioemotional Skills for the Philippines' Labor Market," there is a rising number of firms that have ........»»

Category: newsSource: rappler rapplerNov 23rd, 2017

Review: ‘See Her Run’ has sophisticated plotting

"See Her Run" (Thomas & Mercer) by Peggy Townsend Journalist Peggy Townsend's superb debut delivers an intense character study of a woman whose public humiliation after losing her job has left her unemployable and nearly broke, and has triggered personal demons that she thought she had conquered. "See Her Run" introduces former investigative reporter Aloa Snow, who lost her job at the Los Angeles Times because she invented a source for a story on Vietnamese nail salon workers. The story was good --- and illustrated the poor working conditions and abuse that workers encounter. But the fictional source tainted the article and left Aloa a pariah in journalism. Now she's living...Keep on reading: Review: ‘See Her Run’ has sophisticated plotting.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 2nd, 2018

Human error, the leading cause of cybersecurity breaches — study

LACK of skills among employees is a critical barrier holding enterprises back from implementing threat management more effectively, a new study on cybersecurity showed. Based on the 2018 Cyberthreat Defense Report, a joint study by the CyberEdge Group and cybersecurity services firm Imperva Incapsula, the lack of skilled personnel and low security awareness among workers […] The post Human error, the leading cause of cybersecurity breaches — study appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsMay 2nd, 2018

Government mulls job fairs abroad to bring home workers for infrastructure development program

THE GOVERNMENT is thinking of holding job fairs abroad to bring home skills needed for its P8-trillion infrastructure development program till 2022, the Finance chief told reporters recently. “I am told that getting skilled workers is getting a little bit tough. I am talking about technicians, finishing, welders. Probably its a good idea for our […] The post Government mulls job fairs abroad to bring home workers for infrastructure development program appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsFeb 7th, 2018

The Mindanao Trust Fund: Supporting Reconstruction and Development in Conflict-affected areas in Mindanao

MAGUINDANAO – Conflict-affected communities in Mindanao are among the poorest in the Philippines suffering from poor infrastructure and lack of basic services, including education and health, weak local governance, and minimal private sector investment, according to a report by the World Bank. It said insecurity has been a major challenge. Frequent armed clashes driven by multiple and inter-related forms of conflict—insurgent groups, clan disputes, and quasi-ideological criminal banditry—have created severe economic dislocation and displacement of people. Armed conflict and poverty are inextricably linked. The Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM), one of the most heavily conflict-affected regions, has poverty incidence of 52.9 percent, almost double the national average. Based on the peace deal with the Philippine government in 2012, the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) is expected to transition into a social and political movement. One of the key challenges for a successful transition is to help the MILF build development planning, budgeting, and public administration skills within its ranks. The Mindanao Trust Fund or MTF works to enhance access to services and economic opportunities and build social cohesion while enhancing the capacity of local institutions in conflict-affected areas. It supports the Bangsamoro Development Agency (BDA), the development arm of the MILF. Based on a 2001 agreement between the Government of the Philippines and the MILF, the BDA is tasked to determine, lead, and manage relief, rehabilitation, and development projects in the conflict-affected areas. It’s a unique project that enables various stakeholders—government, the World Bank, and other development partners—to work with a revolutionary movement in delivering development results even before the signing of a final peace agreement. With an enhanced role of women, the program helps the BDA to deliver community development and income-generating subprojects in communities. This enhances access to basic services such as clean water, roads and day care centers. BDA also works to strengthen community enterprises for employment and income generation. The community-based approach brings people from different groups—Muslims, Christians, and Indigenous Peoples—together for the common good, building social cohesion and trust. Over time the program has expanded beyond community development to assist the BDA to develop skills in macro-development planning. A broad package of engagement complements the MTF promoting inclusive growth across Mindanao. For example, US$121 million for farm-to-market roads in Mindanao is included in the nation-wide PRDP while the National Community Driven Development Project is financing US$190 million for CDD activities in Mindanao. Over a decade, 650,000 people (52% of whom are women) in 284 villages have benefitted from 641 subprojects financed by the MTF. The subprojects have included water systems, community centers, sanitation facilities, access roads, post-harvest facilities, and farming and fishing equipment. Eighty-six percent of the beneficiaries say that the project reflected their needs. The subprojects have reduced travel time to market, increased agricultural productivity, reduced post-harvest costs, and increased access to basic services such as clean water. Beneficiaries of income-generating subprojects reported a 10 to 20 percent increase in incomes. About 330,383 women beneficiaries learned skills in community planning and implementation. And 42 community enterprises in 11 villages have been trained in business development to generate sustainable employment and income. The Bangsamoro Development Agency has evolved from a small group of volunteers with no development experience to a leading development agency in Mindanao with 300 staff across seven regional management offices. BDA cooperates with multiple national and international partners, including JICA, WFP, and UNICEF. Bangsamoro Development Plan: the MTF provided technical assistance to help the BDA formulate the first comprehensive economic development blueprint prepared by a non-state armed group. Under the Alternative Learning System project, about 1,832 former combatants, housewives and out-of-school youth reported increased confidence because of improved reading, writing and numeracy abilities. These contributed to their more active participation in community meetings, stronger support for their children’s schoolwork, and better fair farm pricing transactions in city markets. The MTF has remained an important mechanism for consolidating peace and development in Mindanao. Beyond the impact of subprojects at the community level, the program’s ability to converge government and international support to empower Bangsamoro people and institutions to lead in community development seeks to lay the foundation for future sustainable and inclusive development in the Bangsamoro. The program fostered social cohesion by creating spaces for dialogue between Muslims, Christians, and Indigenous Peoples, as well as a diverse mix of local, regional, and national institutional actors. In many remote locations, the project provided the only opportunity for different groups to interact. The increased familiarity built mutual understanding—the basis of trust. Project policies also ensured active and meaningful participation of indigenous peoples and women, who are often otherwise marginalized from decision-making processes at the village level. The participative approach fostered social unity and built trust among stakeholders. In tri-people communities, minority groups shared better understanding and more harmonious relations with Muslims due to the consensus-building nature of CDD/CDR. While residents of remote communities—who had had little to no government access—disclosed growing trust towards government institutions at the end of the project due to the assistance provided by officials. The Bank’s technical and analytical support through the MTF and other engagements supporting peace and development in Mindanao have produced a significant body of literature that helps inform policy dialogues among various stakeholders. For instance, the Land Conflict study prepared for the Transitional Justice and Reconciliation Commission provides short- and medium-term recommendations that can help address land conflict in Mindanao. Also, the Public Expenditure Review in […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJan 26th, 2018

Economy: Construction worker deployment could be curbed to aid infra push

THE SHORTAGE of skilled construction workers that is expected to hinder projects associated with the government's infrastructure drive is being addressed to ensure that any delays will only be minimal, with limits on the overseas deployment of workers with the required skills under study......»»

Category: financeSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsMay 7th, 2017

Alcohol & Heart Health: New study untangles the effects – Fox News

When it comes to alcohol and heart health, the back and forth between findings can leave you feeling dizzy: One study concludes that drinking is good for your heart, but then another says it's best to say no. At least part of this back and forth comes from a central problem in many studies: The group of &'8220;nondrinkers&'8221; in any study is likely to include both people who have never consumed alcohol at all and people who used to drink but don't anymore. And since at least some of those &'8220;former drinkers&'8221; likely gave up drinking because it caused health problems for them, a broad look at &'8220;nondrinkers&'8221; conflates many variables that should really be considered separately. So, in an effort to clear up the confusion , researchers in the United Kingdom decided to take a more nuanced look at the effects of alcohol on heart health. Their new study, published Wednesday (March 22) in The BMJ found that moderate drinking was linked to a lower risk of some, but notably not all heart conditions, compared with abstaining from alcohol. The research was led by Steven Bell, an epidemiologist at the University of Cambridge in England. [ Heart of the Matter: 7 Things to Know About Your Ticker ] In addition to including an array of heart conditions, the researchers made a point to distinguish between people who had never been drinkers and those who used to drink, but no longer do so. In the study, the researchers analyzed electronic medical records of nearly 2 million people in the United Kingdom. When the study began, all of the participants were 30 years old or older, and none had previously experienced any heart problems. During the follow-up period, which lasted six years on average, the researchers looked at the records to see whether the participants had been diagnosed with any of 12 heart problems , including heart attack, heart failure and chest pain linked to heart disease. The researchers focused on the first heart problem that each person developed. The medical records also included information about how much alcohol the patients reported drinking, according to the study. Based on their drinking habits, the people in the study were each placed in one of five groups: nondrinkers, former drinkers, occasional drinkers, moderate drinkers and heavy drinkers. The researchers defined moderate drinking using the National Health Services (NHS) guidelines , which means drinking no more than 14 &'8220;units&'8221; of alcohol a week. One unit of alcohol is defined as 8 grams of pure alcohol, according to the NHS. In more palatable terms, a pint of beer that's around 5 percent alcohol is equal to 3 units of alcohol, and a standard glass of wine is equal to about 2 units. [ Here's How Much Alcohol Is OK to Drink in 19 Countries ] The researchers found that there were no heart conditions for which the never-drinkers had the lowest risk. This suggests that drinking is not necessarily bad for heart health. They also found that, compared with people who never drank, moderate drinkers were less likely to be diagnosed with several conditions, including chest pain, heart failure, stroke and peripheral artery disease. So, score a few points for the idea that drinking does lower the risk of some heart problems. For other conditions, there was no statistically significant differences between the groups, the study said. However, heavy drinkers were more likely to be diagnosed with conditions such as heart failure, cardiac arrest, peripheral artery disease and stroke compared with moderate drinkers , the study found. So, this supports the idea that heavy drinking is probably not good for your heart health. Interestingly, the researchers found that heavy drinkers were less likely to be diagnosed with a heart attack than moderate drinkers were. But the researchers noted that this finding does not mean that heavy drinkers are not at risk for having a heart attack; rather, it's just less likely for this to be the first heart problem these individuals have. So, really, this finding doesn't detract from the idea heavy drinking is probably not good for your heart health. On the other side of the coin, the former drinkers were more likely that current moderate drinkers to be diagnosed with certain heart conditions, the researchers found. These conditions included chest pain, heart attack, cardiac arrest and aortic aneurysm , according to the study. But this doesn't mean that quitting drinking is necessarily a bad thing. Rather, the finding that former drinkers had a higher risk for certain conditions than moderate drinkers fits into the &'8220;sick quitters&'8221; hypothesis, which suggests that some people stop drinking partly because it is harming their health, the researchers wrote. Altogether, the findings suggest that moderate drinking is associated with a lower risk of several heart conditions, the researchers wrote. However, the researchers said they do not recommend that nondrinkers start drinking in an attempt to lower their risk of heart conditions. There are other, arguably safer ways to improve heart health , such as exercising and quitting smoking, that don't come with the risks of alcohol, they wrote. The researchers noted that the study had limitations. For example, the information on drinking habits was not only self-reported by the people in study to health care workers, meaning it could be unreliable, but also sorted into the different categories based on the judgment of the researchers, meaning the grouping [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 28th, 2017

UAAP Beach Volleyball: NU rookies dazzle in debut

National University rookies Antonette Landicho and Kly Orillaneda were not supposed to be the ones representing the Lady Bulldogs for the UAAP Season 80 Beach Volleyball Tournament. But due to conflicts with the indoor volleyball team, the 18-year-olds were called up late in August to play on the sand court. "Hindi din po kami dapat ‘yung maglalaro. Sila Ate Roma [Doromal] po [dapat] kaso nagkaconflict po sa indoor," said Landicho who hails from Balayan, Batangas. Despite the late call-up, the duo has been giving an impressive account of themselves after defeating all of their three opponents so far. First, it was the Ateneo Lady Eagles, 21-11, 21-14. Second, was the UP Lady Maroons, 21-19, 21-10. And their latest victim, the University of the East, 21-16, 21-15. "Masaya kasi unexpected po na kami maglalaro tapos naka 3-0 pa din," shared Landicho. Interestingly, this is also Landicho's and Orillaneda's first time to play beach volleyball on a competitive level. "Si [Antonette] first time, ako po paminsan-minsan sa Cebu," shared Orillaneda. However, first time jitters were not obvious among these girls. With their apparent chemistry and smart ball placing on the sands, both girls played as if they have been playing together for a long time already. When asked about it, they said it was all about good communication. "Usap lang po kasi lagi kaming naguusap kung san namin lalagay yung bola like sa dulo dulo, dito, dito," said Landicho. So far, the only unbeaten teams in the league after three games are NU and defending champions University of Santo Tomas. By Tuesday, October 2, the rookie Lady Bulldogs will face the Tigresses. "Okay lang po laban lang naman. Tao din naman si Ate Sisi. May skills din naman po siya na wala [siya pero mayroon] sa amin tapos yun na lang yung papakita namin," said the bubbly Orillaneda. In addition to UST, they will also have to face De La Salle University and Far Eastern University. Regardless of how tough their itinerary is, Orillaneda has this to say. "Nothing to lose, everything to gain ganun lang iniisip namin," shared the rookie......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 25th, 2018

Why the ‘gig’ economy may not be the workforce of the future

WASHINGTON --- The "gig" economy might not be the new frontier for America's workforce after all. From Uber to TaskRabbit to YourMechanic, so-called gig work has been widely seen as ideal for people who want the flexibility and independence that traditional jobs don't offer. Yet the evidence is growing that over time, they don't deliver the financial returns many expect. And they don't appear to be reshaping the workforce. Over the past two years, for example, pay for gig workers has dropped, and they are earning a growing share of their income elsewhere, a new study finds. Most Americans who earn income through online platforms do so for only a few months each year, accordi...Keep on reading: Why the ‘gig’ economy may not be the workforce of the future.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 24th, 2018

POEA advisory on one more fraudster

As a result, the SEC issued an alert to prevent the public from putting good money as a scheme that may be fraudulent The Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA) issued an advisory addressed to overseas Filipino workers to exercise caution in dealing with individuals allegedly offering “high-yield” investments without the necessary permit from the Securities […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsSep 20th, 2018

BanKo Perlas Set to Keep the Ball Rolling in Vietnam, PVL Open Conference

Following their successful stint in the Premier Volleyball League (PVL) Reinforced Conference, the BanKo Perlas Spikers ride on the momentum as they prepare for the back-to-back competitions in PVL Season 2 Open Conference on September 22 and the upcoming Vin Lonh tournament in Vietnam on September 28 to October 3, 2018. The BanKo Perlas Spikers will face three Vietnamese teams and a squad from Thailand in the prestigious Vietnam tournament. The team’s participation in the conference is a strategic move to train them for the different leagues, particularly the PVL Open Conference. “Banko Perlas Spikers is a fairly new team, as the girls have been playing together for just two years. Their exposure to Vin Lonh Volleyball tournament is a great opportunity for the ladies to further hone their skills, individually and as a squad,” shared Charo Soriano, Team Manager of BanKo Perlas. “While this is an overseas competition and the teams that we will be up against are considered giants, at the end of the day, we will focus on the learning and experiences. More than winning, the team is concentrated on giving a good fight every game,” Soriano added. The ladies of BanKo Perlas Spikers gave a breakthrough performance in the PVL Reinforced Conference earlier this year; with an unbeaten streak in the quarterfinals round that earned them a spot in the Final Four. This incredible feat has fortified the trust and support of their fans. Before flying off to Vietnam, the team will face Iriga-Navy and PetroGazz at the Flying V Centre, San Juan City on Saturday and Sunday, respectively. The team will return on October 6 to continue playing against the PVL teams. When asked how their supporters come into play in the team’s performance, Soriano highlighted that without their fans rallying behind the team, it will not be possible to get where they are. She also shared that their supporters are the source of their strength and in return, the squad is committed to continuously inspire and reach out to them. The team’s mindset to put their supporters first was emphasized further through their partnership with BPI Direct BanKo (BanKo), the microfinance subsidiary of Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI). Sponsoring a sports team is almost unheard of from the banking industry. BanKo, however, found the perfect marriage with the PVL third placer, who constantly get in touch with the grassroots to promote the sport. “We are a happy partner of the Banko Perlas Spikers. Their skills are undeniable, but what sets them apart is their heart to reach out to fans nationwide, even to those who barely have access to their matches. This is well aligned with BanKo’s vision to make financial services more accessible to everyone,” stated BanKo president Jerome Minglana. “As they compete on Vietnamese courts representing our country, regardless of the outcome, it will only ignite and empower the team's loyal supporters and boost the local Volleyball further.  BanKo is equally excited to witness this exciting journey unfold,” Minglana concluded.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 19th, 2018

FIBA WORLD CUP: Coach Yeng on his Iran dunk: 'I didn t know na kinukunan pala ako ng video'

Gilas Pilipinas sure had a rough trip to Iran last week. But one of the lighter moments that happened for the national team in the Middle East was head coach Yeng Guiao showing off his incredible dunking skills during one practice prior to Gilas challenging Team Melli in Tehran. [Related: WATCH: Coach Yeng Guiao throws down vicious dunk... on a lowered rim] Coach Yeng was seen throwing down a vicious two-handed reverse slam in Iran. The incredible highlight was captured by guard Paul Lee and was posted on Instagram. Guiao, who's taking over the national team for the moment, was dunking on a lowered rim of course... just in case you didn't pick that one up already. Back in Manila as Gilas prepares for a closed-door game against Qatar in the 2019 FIBA World Cup Asian Qualifiers, coach Yeng addressed his dunk. "Ine-entertain ko lang yung sarili ko while they [Gilas boys] were warming up. I didn't know na kinukunan pala ako ng video," he said. "I was just trying to enjoy that time na... gusto ko maramdaman kung paano umi-slam dunk eh. Nakita ko yung ring, sabi ko samantalahin ko yung pagkakataon," Guiao added. Despite handling the national team in the 2018 Asian Games where they ended up at 5th place, it was coach Yeng's first time coaching in the Asian Qualifiers. While that's a tall order in itself, his first game was against Iran on the road. Him dunking on enemey territory was just his way to calm himself down and ease his nerves a little bit. "It's a good sidelight, because there's humor to that, and siguro it's also something that's going to lighten the atmosphere, to take away some of the pressure," Guiao said. "So ine-enjoy lang namin lahat, enjoy lang namin ang episode na yun," he added.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 16th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

From the Bay to the PH: Stephen Curry s Manila Tour

Golden State Warriors star Stephen Curry made good on a promise he made to Filipinos three years ago -- to return to Manila.  Stephen’s game-breaking approach to basketball has scored him legions of adoring Filipino fans and followers from all around the globe who revel in every deep 3, every slippery drive to the rim, every sneaky steal.  His popularity has transcended borders, languages and cultures, and nowhere was that more evident than in Manila. Stephen’s first day began with a more than two hour on court workout with his trainer Brandon Payne. From shooting to speed and agility drills, Curry put in off season work as he continues to prepare for the upcoming NBA season. Steph Curry early practice in Manila ! pic.twitter.com/gCYsttNQIa — DYAN CASTILLEJO (@DYANCASTILLEJO) September 7, 2018 Curry wasted no time in tasting the local cuisine, and he couldn't have started with anything better, as he tried out some halo-halo.  Curry tries halo halo pic.twitter.com/Nn6Nm6zdGE — DYAN CASTILLEJO (@DYANCASTILLEJO) September 7, 2018   A cold dessert that includes shaved ice, and various fruits such as shredded coconut, mangoes, jackfruit mixed with gelatin and milk. After touring a Jeepney, he traveled to Mall of Asia for the Under Armour Southeast Asia 3x3 Finals which saw he and his father, Dell Curry, on court for a shooting contest with other local fathers, sons and daughters. The competition was fierce but Dell and Stephen secured the win. From a press conference with journalists who came from all around Southeast Asia to cover the UA Brand House ribbon cutting to a skills competition shootout with his dad Dell, everywhere Stephen went in public, his Filipino fans followed in lockstep, fascinated by the presence of the two-time MVP and three-time World Champion. The fans weren’t the only ones awestruck - Stephen himself was blown away by the incredible landscape and cultural significance of the dense and bustling Manila.  Taking a quick tour of some city sights, Stephen then toured a Jeepney, the flamboyant WWII era truck that still can be found transporting residents throughout Manila. Curry capped off the day with a relaxing Filipino scalp massage at Titan and a visit to his shoe brand's main store. Before leaving the country, Curry dropped by the opening ceremony of UAAP season 81, where he led the legions of student-athletes in reciting the oath of sportsmanship. .@StephenCurry30 officially opens #UAAPSeason81! 🔥 pic.twitter.com/GhSKYky44j — ABS-CBN Sports (@abscbnsports) September 8, 2018 After a busy three-day visit to Manila, much is left for the MVP's Asian Tour. Curry still has scheduled visits to Japan and China, among other Asian nations. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 8th, 2018

Duterte discusses plight of undocumented OFWs with good guy King Abdullah II

MANILA, Philippines – Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte and King Abdullah II discussed what can be done to help undocumented Filipino workers in Jordan. "There are many undocumented Filipinos... I hope to work on it right away," he said on Friday, September 7 during a gathering of Filipinos based in ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 8th, 2018

DFA looking into reported exploitation of Filipino workers in New Zealand

The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) on Tuesday said that the Philippine Embassy in Wellington is currently looking into the reported exploitation of Filipino workers in New Zealand. In a statement, the DFA said the embassy is coordinating with Migrante Aotearoa and New Zealand trade unions to address the various concerns of Filipino workers in New Zealand. A study, commissioned by New Zealand trade union E T Union and funded by the Industrial Relations Fund, was recently reported by RadioNZ. It recorded the experiences of mostly migrant workers from the Philippines in Christchurch and Auckland, the difficulties they encounter, and what steps could be taken to improve their work...Keep on reading: DFA looking into reported exploitation of Filipino workers in New Zealand.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 28th, 2018

Laziness may be a good survival strategy-study

INQUIRER.net Stock Photo Being always active and chasing after goals may not be the only way to survive, as suggested by a study made by a team of scientists. Researchers from the University of Kan.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2018

Using Filipino values, food key to better heart health — study

HONOLULU -- Heart disease is the leading cause of death among Filipino American males and second among Filipino American females. Filipinos also have a high prevalence of hypertension resulting from obesity, alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity. The good news: A University of Hawaii at Manoa study has found that food and family are key factors in improving Filipino heart health. The study, published in "Preventing Chronic Disease,"found that the Filipino American community responds better to interventions based on Filipino cultural values and the incorporation of traditional foods. Values such as strong family ties, empathy, a tradition of obligation and reciprocity as ...Keep on reading: Using Filipino values, food key to better heart health — study.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2018

DA s 2018 NBA Offseason Rankings: The Middle 10

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst Wonder what the rental market is like in San Luis Obispo, Calif. San Luis Obispo is, give or take a few miles, one of the closest cities that is near the midway point between Los Angeles and San Francisco. Given the events of the NBA’s offseason, it’s not hare to imagine national reporters are going to be spending a lot of time in California next season, bouncing back and forth between the Bay and L.A. Catch LeBron James and the Lakers on Wednesday and then, Stephen Curry, Kevin Durant and the Warriors on Thursday. The Western Conference only got stronger and deeper with James leaving Cleveland for a second time, this time to go to the Lakers. Add four of the top five Draft picks -- including No. 1 overall selection Deandre Ayton (Phoenix Suns), No. 2 pick Marvin Bagley III (Sacramento Kings) and international phenom Luka Doncic (No. 3 pick, acquired by Dallas Mavericks) -- going to Western Conference teams, and the talent disparity between conferences only seems greater. But did Eastern Conference teams take advantage of Cleveland deflating to make their teams better? And how effective were West teams in making their teams better prepared to at least compete with the Warriors? That’s where this year’s Offseason Rankings come in -- big, bold, definitive. You love them, if the amount of hate tweets and e-mails I get after they’re published are any indication. Every year, we rank how all 30 teams have done since the end of their respective seasons. We look at everything -- how they drafted, what trades they made, what players they signed in free agency, and for how much -- or if they didn’t participate in free agency much at all. We look at if they’ve changed coaches, executives, owners, or if they’re moving into a new building that can generate big revenues. And you have to decide which ones you liked the most. Here's what these rankings ARE NOT: A predicted order of finish for next season. It's an opinion that seeks to answer a question: is the team better now than at the end of last season? The ranking reflects the belief on whether, and how much, that is so. (I liked certain guys who were in the Draft more than others, so if your team took them, I probably weighed it more positively. Doesn't mean I'm right.) I do not expect the Suns, for example, to have a better record than the Celtics, just because they had a better summer. It is not a ranking of the teams in order from 1 through 30 right now; I do not believe the Mavericks are now a better team than Rockets. This is just one person’s opinion about offseason moves -- offseason moves only. Is your team better now than it was before? - If your team is ranked in the top 10, it doesn't mean I love your team.       - If your team is ranked in the bottom 10, it doesn't mean I hate your team. It's an opinion that seeks to answer a question: is the team better now than at the end of last season? The ranking reflects the belief on whether, and how much, that is so. (I liked certain guys who were in the Draft more than others, so if your team took them, I probably weighed it more positively. Doesn't mean I'm right.) What plays into the rankings: - This isn’t science. It’s an educated guess, weighing the impact both of the Draft and free agency, but also assessing whether teams got value in their free-agent signings. Overpaying the right player is as much a sin as signing the wrong player. A good new coach can coax some more wins out of a roster. But if a team’s players don’t believe in the system their team uses, the best Xs and Os on earth don’t matter.       - Teams that are rebuilding obviously have different priorities than teams making a championship push. That's factored in. So Chicago, for example, gets credit for adding young, affordable players as it stockpiles its talent -- but that talent has to fit together, as Wendell Carter Jr. does with Lauri Markannen. And a team like the Warriors that shows it’s willing to go deep into the luxury tax -- which most teams try to avoid -- in order to keep winning has to be commended, and its rankings reflect that commendation.       - Continuity matters here as well. The most successful teams usually not only identify a core group of players, they keep them together for a while, finding that sweet spot: everyone doesn’t get a max contract, but most get paid well enough to keep the train moving down the tracks. That reflects both good roster construction and good financial management -- and, again, is rewarded. The explosion in the cap means everyone has to spend; keeping your powder dry for another day doesn’t have as much cache as it used to. But you still have to manage your money wisely. Salary numbers, with a couple of exceptions, come from Basketball Insiders, whose Eric Pincus does the best job of anyone in the game of keeping track of all the moving financial parts, quickly and accurately -- which is why we use him at NBA TV during the Draft and free agency to tell us what the hell this all means. The Middle 10 * * * 11. TORONTO RAPTORS 2017-18 RECORD: 59-23; lost in Eastern Conference semifinals ADDED: Coach Nick Nurse; G Danny Green (acquired from Spurs); F Kawhi Leonard (acquired from Spurs) LOST: Former coach Dwane Casey; G DeMar DeRozan (traded to Spurs); F Alfonzo McKinnie (waived); C Jakob Poeltl (traded to Spurs) RETAINED: G Fred VanVleet (two years, $18.1 million) THE KEY MAN: Nurse. The former Raps assistant has extensive G League head coaching experience. But the NBA isn’t just about a coach’s Xs and Os acumen. We know Nurse can do that. But an NBA coach has to have command presence in a locker room not only full of millionaires, but full of Alpha males who have their own very strong opinions on how they should be used and how their teammates should help them. Nurse will have to show he can put his own stamp on a team that will have some new faces while still having extremely high expectations. THE SKINNY: You may well think Toronto should be higher, based on Leonard’s standing as a top-five player in the league when fully healthy. No matter what you think of DeRozan, a four-time All-Star, no one can realistically say he’s better than “The Klaw” when both are 100 percent. But, of course, we don’t know if Leonard’s 100 percent. And, trading DeRozan, who’d been the franchise’s biggest advocate during his nine seasons there -- and who had led the team to its greatest extended run of success ever -- is not a transaction without consequence for the Raptors. He helped get the best out of Kyle Lowry. He could help recruit free agents. And, the circumstances of his departure have not helped the franchise’s reputation. Still, this is a talent-based league, and Leonard has it. His and Green’s presence on the perimeter gives Toronto the chance to be a switching defensive monster -- and will help the Raptors be able to match up better with the likes of the Boston Celtics and Philadelphia 76ers in a late-May playoff matchup, as long as the Raptors’ young core in which it believes so strongly continues to play as well in reserve as it did last season. 12. MILWAUKEE BUCKS 2017-18 RECORD: 44-38; lost in first round ADDED: Coach Mike Budenholzer; G Donte DiVincenzo (No. 17 pick, 2018 Draft); G Trevon Duval; F Ersan Ilyasova (three years, $21 million); C Brook Lopez (one year, $3.32 million); F Pat Connaughton (two years, $3.2 million); LOST: Former interim coach Joe Prunty; G Brandon Jennings (waived); F Jabari Parker (signed with Bulls) RETAINED: None THE KEY MAN: G Eric Bledsoe. His departure from Phoenix early last season was messy. But once he got to Brewtown, Bledsoe solidified the Bucks at the point, averaging 17.8 points and 5.1 assists per game in 71 starts. At 28, Bledsoe faces the last year of his contract and will have to show a new coach he’s capable of running things long-term and playing alongside Giannis Antetokounmpo through the meat of his prime. THE SKINNY: Budenholzer’s arrival should coincide with an improvement in the Bucks’ defense, something that former coach Jason Kidd could never quite accomplish. Ilaysova’s return for a second tour in Milwaukee should help, with his celebrated charge-taking skill and Lopez’s still-substantial size a double-boon to Milwaukee’s interior D as the Bucks were bottom 10 last season in points allowed in the paint (47.4 per game). If the paint becomes a little tougher to traverse, the Bucks should finally able to use their substantial length on the wing to get back to create deflections and turnovers, and get out in transition, where Antetokounmpo and Friends do their best work and their most damage to the opposition. They’ll do so 41 nights a year for the next couple of decades in the 17,500-seat Fiserv Forum, the Bucks’ new arena that will open in early September with a concert and should pump new revenues into the Bucks’ bloodstream, giving them more financial wherewithal to keep “The Greek Freak” surrounded with high-quality talent. 13. UTAH JAZZ 2017-18 RECORD: 48-34; lost in Western Conference semifinals ADDED: G Grayson Allen (No. 21 pick, 2018 Draft); G Jarius Lyles; G Naz Mitrou-Long LOST: F Jonas Jerebko (waived) RETAINED: G Dante Exum (three years, $33 million); F/C Derrick Favors (two years, $37.6 million), G Raul Neto (two years, $4.4 million); F Georges Niang (three years, $4.9 million) THE KEY MAN: C Rudy Gobert. He’s a monster presence, the hub of the Jazz’s defensive wheel and the reigning Kia Defensive Player of the Year. And he has to take a step back in Utah next season for the Jazz to take the next step forward. He has to understand what Utah has in Donovan Mitchell and let that kid eat. Nobody in the league can do what Gobert does defensively. So embrace that and concentrate on that -- take the Draymond Green attitude about being the “defensive guy” on a great team (not that Jazz fans want you to do anything that Green does). Gobert’s handsomely paid and the DPOY award found him in Salt Lake City; there’s no small-market bias at work here. So let Mitchell and Joe Ingles carry the shooting/scoring load, let Ricky Rubio orchestrate, and snuff out opponent dreams at the other end, night after night. It’s what you were born to do. THE SKINNY: My God, Mitchell had a great rookie season. And Utah brought most of the band back from last season to provide advice and consent for him again, re-signing Favors, Exum and Neto each on very reasonable contracts. Doing so leaves Utah over the cap, still comfortably under the tax, and with nothing on the books that should raise an eyebrow financially. (Utah’s front office should handle my checking account for a while.) Anyway, no reason to expect any backsliding next season with the crew returning, though coach Quin Snyder will surely miss the counsel of his longtime friend Igor Kokoskov, off to run the Suns. 14. ATLANTA HAWKS 2017-18 RECORD: 24-58; missed playoffs ADDED: Coach Lloyd Pierce; F Justin Anderson (acquired from 76ers); G Kevin Huerter (No. 19 pick, 2018 Draft); C Alex Len (two years, $8.5 million); G Jeremy Lin (acquired from Nets); F Omari Spellman (No. 30 pick, 2018 Draft); G Trae Young (No. 5 pick, 2018 Draft) LOST: Former coach Mike Budenholzer; G Antonius Cleveland (waived); G Damion Lee (signed with Warriors); F/C Mike Muscala (traded to 76ers); G Dennis Schröder (traded to Thunder); G Isaiah Taylor (waived) RETAINED: C Dewayne Dedmon (picked up player option) THE KEY MAN: GM Travis Schlenk. The second-year executive will be judged on how well Atlanta uses its trove of Draft picks -- three firsts this year, three firsts next year, two firsts in 2022 -- the next few years. And, ultimately, the Hawks will live or die by whether Young or Luka Doncic becomes the bigger NBA producer. Schlenk’s chances of completing the rebuild may well ride on that. THE SKINNY: The Hawks’ roster teardown is nearing completion, but the renovated Philips Arena will come online faster than the team, which now needs Young to live up to all the hype after his one season at Oklahoma. He has incredible range and great potential, but he’ll be challenged every night to stay in front of the legion of great points in this league. Pierce, the former Sixers’ assistant, is going to have a very tough time melding all the newcomers with the small core of players who survived, including John Collins, Kent Bazemore, DeAndre' Bembry and Taurean Prince. 15. LA CLIPPERS 2017-18 RECORD: 42-40; missed playoffs ADDED: C Marcin Gortat (acquired from Wizards); G Shai Gilgeous-Alexander (No. 11 pick, 2018 Draft); F Johnathan Motley (acquired from Mavericks); F Mike Scott (one year, $4.3 million); F Luc Mbah a Moute (one year, $4.3 million), G Jerome Robinson (No. 13 pick, 2018 Draft) LOST: G Austin Rivers (traded to Wizards); C DeAndre Jordan (signed with Mavs); G C.J. Williams (waived) RETAINED: G Avery Bradley (two years, $24.9  million); C Montrezl Harrell (two years, $12 million); G Wesley Johnson (picked up player option); G Milos Teodosic (picked up player option) THE KEY MAN: F Tobias Harris. He was the key tangible piece of the Blake Griffin trade last season (the intangible being the unprotected first from Detroit in the deal that eventually became Gilgeous-Alexander after a Draft night trade with Charlotte). And Harris played quite well in his 32 games with the Clips, averaging 19.3 points and six rebounds per game. Those numbers could each well go up in a contract year and with few others outside of Lou Williams on the roster that can go get their own buckets. THE SKINNY: Amazing, but true: the Clipper player with the longest current tenure is … Wesley Johnson, who came aboard in 2015. “Lob City” is in the history books and change will be the norm here for a while, including next summer, when the Clippers expect to be a free-agent destination. The Clips did what they could with that not-insignificant restriction, but the best stuff was in the Draft, winding up with a potential long-term point in Gilgeous-Alexander and a two in Robinson that rocketed up the pre-Draft charts. Bradley’s on a very team-friendly and controllable contract, as is Patrick Beverley, whose modest 2018-19 salary isn’t guaranteed until January. Those two and Mbah a Moute can give coach Doc Rivers hope that he can get some stops on the perimeter, because while Gortat is still willing defensively and still takes a bunch of charges, he is not Jordan when it comes to rim protection. 16. BROOKLYN NETS 2017-18 RECORD: 28-54; missed playoffs ADDED: F/C Ed Davis (one year, $4.4 million); F Jared Dudley (acquired from Suns); F Kenneth Faried (acquired from Nuggets); G/F Treveon Graham (two years); F Rodions Kurucs (No. 40, 2018 Draft); F Dzanan Musa (No. 29 pick, 2018 Draft); G Shabazz Napier (two years, $3.7 million) LOST: F Darrell Arthur (traded to Suns); F Dante Cunningham (signed with Spurs); C Dwight Howard (waived); G Jeremy Lin (traded to Hawks); C Timofey Mozgov (traded to Hornets); G Nik Stauskas (signed with Blazers); G Isaiah Whitehead (traded to Nuggets) RETAINED: G Joe Harris (two years, $16 million) THE KEY MAN: Co-owner Joseph Tsai. The Alibaba executive and billionaire has 49 percent of the team, and can buy majority control from Mikhail Prokhorov by 2021. Until then, they’ll run the team jointly, so no matter Prokhorov’s ups and downs, Brooklyn’s financial spigot should never run dry. Tsai reportedly has designs on expanding the Nets’ brand further in China, just as Prokhorov believed the Nets had global reach. They didn’t, at least not the post-KG and Pierce squads. THE SKINNY: If you love Ed Davis like smart people who know basketball do, Brooklyn makes the top half by bringing the ex-Blazer in on a short deal. If he plays great, he’ll cost the Nets a pretty penny in 2019, but Brooklyn has to take chances on guys who can outperform their contracts. The only thing the Nets couldn’t do was take on more ’19 salary when they’ll be in line to potentially add two max players. Won’t be easy to lure the elites, but Brooklyn also has accumulated enough assets to be able to make uneven trades for salaries if need be. In the interim comes next season, with coach Kenny Atkinson needing to continue to develop diamonds in the rough like Graham, who Cleveland wanted and who will help the Nets at multiple positions. 17. CHICAGO BULLS 2017-18 RECORD: 27-55; missed playoffs ADDED: G Antonius Cleveland; C Wendell Carter Jr. (No. 7 pick, 2018 Draft); F Chandler Hutchison (No. 22 pick, 2018 Draft); F Jabari Parker (two years, $40 million) LOST: F Jerian Grant (traded to Magic); G Sean Kilpatrick (waived); G Julyan Stone (waived); F Noah Vonleh (signed with Knicks); G Paul Zipser (waived) RETAINED: G Antonio Blakeney; G Zach LaVine (matched four year, $78 million offers sheet from Kings) THE KEY MAN: G Kris Dunn. As the 24-year-old will be every season he’s in Chicago. The Jimmy Butler trade in 2017 yielded the pick that became Lauri Markannen, and he’s also a key piece to the Bulls’ future. But Chicago won’t ever get elevation again if Dunn doesn’t become an elite point guard in a league full of them. He showed signs last season that he could be just that, most notably a December in which Dunn averaged 14.9 points and eight assists, and the Bulls went 10-6. But a concussion in January derailed Dunn’s progress and his production fell sharply the rest of the season. THE SKINNY: Can Parker play the three, as the Bulls insist he can? There isn’t a ton of evidence suggesting so, and Parker’s hypothesis that he isn’t getting paid to play defense does not provide much comfort. But the Bulls will try him there alongside Markannen and rookie Carter Jr. in what would be a huge frontcourt. Almost $20 million annually for LaVine going forward is also a stretch, but less of one if LaVine comes all the way back from his 2017 ACL tear with a full training camp and season. Carter may be more important to the Bulls’ hoped-for resurgence than Parker and LaVine; the Duke big man has that much potential. 18. WASHINGTON WIZARDS 2017-18 RECORD: 43-39; lost in first round ADDED: C Thomas Bryant; G Troy Brown (No. 15 pick, 2018 Draft); F Jeff Green (one year, $2.5 million); C Dwight Howard (two years, $11 million); G Austin Rivers (acquired from Clippers); G Issuf Sanon (No. 44 pick, 2018 Draft) LOST: C Marcin Gortat (traded to Clippers); F Mike Scott (signed with Clippers) RETAINED: G Jodie Meeks (picked up player option); C Jason Smith (picked up player option) THE KEY MAN: Coach Scott Brooks. Entering his third season in Washington, Brooks keeps saying he wants the Wizards to defend and play fast. But he has to follow that up with action, especially when and if John Wall doesn’t provide the on-ball defense Washington needs to have any chance to unleash a still-potent fast break. Wall is 27 and, if healthy, in his prime. The team takes almost all of its cues from him; when he’s locked in, the Wizards can compete with anyone. But when he’s indifferent, so are they -- as evidenced by their horrible record against bad teams. Brooks has to demand Wall’s best, or be ready to limit his minutes. THE SKINNY: NBA protocol almost demands you hate the pickup of Howard, such is his current perceived valued among many after multiple stops the last few seasons. The guess here is that Howard won’t hijack the Wizards’ locker room, as he had been accused of while in with the Houston Rockets and Charlotte Hornets, especially. Howard’s skill set can help Washington, which fell off defensively last season. But there’s also not much sense he’ll be a significant pick-me-up in D.C., either. He can’t stretch the floor and he’s not especially potent finishing in pick and roll, either. But the Wizards should at least be deeper off the bench with Green, who played well for the Cavs last season, and Rivers, who gives Washington legit guard depth along with Tomas Satoransky. 19. SACRAMENTO KINGS 2017-18 RECORD: 27-55; missed playoffs ADDED: F Nemanja Bjelica (three years, $20.4 million); C Marvin Bagley III (No. 2 pick, 2018 Draft); G Yogi Ferrell (two years, $4.1 million); G Ben McLemore (acquired from Kings); F Deyonta Davis (acquired from Grizzlies) LOST: G Garrett Temple (traded to Grizzlies) RETAINED: G Iman Shumpert (picked up player option); C Kosta Koufos (picked up player option) THE KEY MAN: F Harry Giles. The Kings traded for the one-and-done forward on Draft night 2017 and redshirted him, feeling he needed a year to fully recover from the multiple knee surgeries he’d undergone the last three years. Those surgeries stopped his top-five Draft potential in its tracks, before and after a year at Duke. But Giles is back on the floor, having flashed his skills during NBA Summer League, as Sacramento gushed about his progress. If the 20-year-old is ready to roll come October, he could be an enormous boost. He’ll have to at least become a contributor, lest folks remind the Kings they passed on the likes of Kyle Kuzma and O.G Anunoby to trade for his rights. THE SKINNY: Bagley III has superstar potential, and he better become one, or the Doncic Stans among the Kings’ fan base will have aneurysms. The Kings were all over everyone, seemingly, this summer, dropping sheets on Zach LaVine, almost doing the same with Marcus Smart and Jabari Parker, and going after unrestricted free agent Mario Hezonja. All well and good, and getting Bjelica out from under Philly and prying Ferrell from Dallas were decent late July pickups. But it will be Bagley III who’ll be under the microscope. His skill sets are prodigious and he’s been working out feverishly all summer. And he wants to make a mark in restoring the Kings to where they were on the floor during the Webber Years. He worked out for them. He’s enthusiastic about them. That counts for something. 20. HOUSTON ROCKETS 2017-18 RECORD: 65-17; lost in Western Conference finals ADDED: G Michael Carter-Williams (one year, $1.5 million); G De'Anthony Melton (No. 46 pick, 2018 Draft); F Vincent Edwards (No. 52 pick, 2018 Draft) LOST: F Trevor Ariza (signed with Suns); Luc Mbah a Moute (signed with LA Clippers); C Chinanu Onuaku (traded to Mavs) RETAINED: C Clint Capela (five years, $90 million); G/F Gerald Green (one year, $2.3 million); G Aaron Jackson (picked up team option); G Chris Paul (four years, $159 million) THE KEY MAN: Jason Biles, Joe Rogowski, Keith Jones and Javair Gillett -- the Rockets’ athletic trainers, sports performance and rehab staff. Their only mission next season, should they decide to accept it, is to get Paul through an 82-game regular season and a two-month playoff slog without breaking or pulling anything of importance that keeps him out of key games. Of course, should any of the staff be unsuccessful, the Morey will disavow any knowledge of their employment. Good luck, men. THE SKINNY: We have not yet included Carmelo Anthony, who will be signing in Houston any minute now. When he’s officially on the roster, he’ll certainly help, and we all saw that even Houston can go through extended scoring droughts in the playoffs. Having Anthony around should alleviate that. The Rockets may have had the best signing of the summer, keeping the 24-year-old Capela locked up long-term for $18 million per -- incredible value these days, given the way salaries are skyrocketing. But that was mitigated by the losses of Ariza and Mbah a Moute, who were crucial to the switching defense Houston employed and perfected by the playoffs, which threw sand in the gears of the Warriors’ impenetrable offense and would likely have propelled the Rockets to The Finals if Paul hadn’t gotten hurt in Game 5. Ennis and Carter-Williams will help some in that regard, but they don’t have the resume of Mbah a Moute and Ariza -- which means they sometimes won’t get the benefit of the doubt from refs that the old heads do. Houston’s still the clear number two to Golden State in the West, but the gap between the Rockets and the best of the rest has closed. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 8th, 2018

Ligue 1 2018-19: 5 new signings to watch out for

By Samuel Petrequin, Associated Press PARIS (AP) — Although the transfer window in the French league doesn't close until the end of August, here is the pick of the signings so far ahead of the season starting this weekend: ALEKSANDR GOLOVIN (Monaco) One of the best players at the World Cup was signed by Monaco from CSKA Moscow despite strong interest from Chelsea. With his excellent technique and dribbling skills, 22-year-old Aleksandr Golovin set the tone for a strong showing at the World Cup by setting up two goals and curling in a free kick in Russia's 5-0 opening victory over Saudi Arabia. The midfielder also held his nerve to convert a penalty in the shootout against Spain that sent Russia to the quarterfinals. LUCAS EVANGELISTA (Nantes) Nantes reportedly paid 4 million euros ($4.6 million) to sign Brazilian midfielder Lucas Evangelista from Udinese. It represents good value for the unsung player who was scouted by Manchester United a few years ago when he played for Desportivo Brasil in his home country. Evangelista has struggled to establish himself in Europe but finally came to prominence in Portugal with Estoril, with four goals and four assists last season. After starting his career further up on the field as a forward, the 23-year-old Evangelista is a versatile player who can also play on the wings and has shown some excellent attacking qualities on set pieces. JOSE FONTE (Lille) Portugal defender Jose Fonte will continue his much-traveled career in northern France after signing a two-year deal with Lille. The 34-year-old Fonte started all four games at the World Cup in Russia as Portugal was eliminated by Uruguay in the round of 16. Two years ago, he was a member of the squad which won the European Championship in France. The former Crystal Palace, Southampton and West Ham center back played only a few matches with Chinese club Dalian Yifang this year before terminating his contract. DUJE CALETA-CAR (Marseille) Nine-time champion Marseille bolstered its defense by signing Duje Caleta-Car from Red Bull Salzburg. The 21-year-old Caleta-Car, who played a group game at the World Cup with Croatia, won four Austrian league titles and three national cups with Salzburg. "He is a clever player, who understands football," Marseille sporting director Andoni Zubizarreta said. "His very physical skills make him very good in the air, and he has good passing abilities." THEOSON-JORDAN SIEBATCHEU (Rennes) American-born striker Theoson-Jordan Siebatcheu is back among the elite with Rennes after joining from Reims. The 22-year-old center forward was born in Washington but grew up in France, honing his skills at the Reims academy. He moved to the Brittany club on the back of an excellent season, helping his former team back to the top division with 17 goals......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 7th, 2018

Astros get reliever Ryan Pressly from Twins

HOUSTON (AP) — The Houston Astros added bullpen help Friday night when they traded for Minnesota right-hander Ryan Pressly. Houston sent two prospects — right-hander Jorge Alcala and outfielder Gilberto Celestino — to the Twins. The 29-year-old Pressley is 1-1 with a 3.40 ERA and 69 strikeouts in 51 appearances this season. He adds depth in the bullpen to a team that sent closer Ken Giles to the minors earlier this month after he struggled most of the season. Pressly, who is from Dallas, said the trade was bittersweet. "It's tough. A lot of friends here, a lot of great guys in this clubhouse," he said. "It's tough to say goodbye to everybody, but it's a business, I get it. So I get to go back home, that's the good part. I'm excited to go down there and help that team win, so I'm pretty excited." Houston manager A.J. Hinch said it was too early for him to say how Pressly would be used. But he raved about his skills. "He can bring a lot," Hinch said. "He's a good arm, and he's had success in the 'pen. I don't know him, but I know his track record. He's somebody we looked at pretty hard. He fits how we like to pitch. He fits in a lot of different roles for us." Pressly has spent his entire six-year career with the Twins, going 17-16 with a 3.75 ERA in 281 games. Alcala was 3-7 with a 3.29 ERA in 19 games between Double-A Corpus and Class-A Advanced Buies Creek this season. The 19-year-old Celestino hit .299 with four homers and 21 RBIs combined between Corpus Christi and Class-A Tri-City. ___ AP freelancer Doug Alden in Boston contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 29th, 2018