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Where to treat mom and the family today

It's not really just because today, May 13, is Mother's Day that you should treat mom and the family out to dinner. The more compelling reason is that 13 Ubay St., a restaurant named after its address in Quezon City, has a homey ambiance for slow meals and relaxed conversation with the clan, or even with close friends. The truth is, owner Zaza Sarmiento herself comes from a big family---both mom's and dad's side---that holds frequent get-togethers. And since she wanted to apply her culinary education on her own after working as a chef abroad, Sarmiento opened 13 Ubay St. right in her father's ancestral house. Hung on the walls around the spacious dining area are vintage bla...Keep on reading: Where to treat mom and the family today.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerMay 13th, 2018

Lolit Solis on detained Bong Revilla’s Senate run: ‘Why not?…Hayaan natin siya mangarap’

Veteran talent manager and columnist Lolit Solis is in full support of former senator Ramon "Bong" Revilla Jr. in his plans to run for Senate in the 2019 polls. In fact, the detained Revilla filed his certificate of candidacy (COC) today, Oct. 17, via his wife Bacoor Mayor Lani Mercado and son Cavite Vice Gov. Jolo in hopes of reclaiming a Senate seat in the upcoming elections. Earlier this month, Solis expressed that Revilla was better off returning to show biz instead of politics. As per Solis, he should take a break from politics and focus on his family. In her latest post about Revilla on Oct. 16, however, Solis appeared to have changed her tone,as she wrote that people must l...Keep on reading: Lolit Solis on detained Bong Revilla’s Senate run: ‘Why not?…Hayaan natin siya mangarap’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 17th, 2018

Cheap Eats Manila: Mr. Choi Kitchen Chinese Restaurant Walter Mart Makati – Manila Video

Cheap Eats Manila: Mr. Choi Kitchen Chinese Restaurant Walter Mart Makati. Mr. Choi Kitchen is a casual dining Chinese restaurant by Sharlyn Kaw and family. It was first opened in 2004 at Robinsons Galleris but has since expanded to 5 branches around Metro Manila. Today we visit their Waltermart Makati branch and share with you… link: Cheap Eats Manila: Mr. Choi Kitchen Chinese Restaurant Walter Mart Makati – Manila Video.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsSep 28th, 2018

Chef Hiromi Yokenawa has created some new authentic flavors from different regio…

Chef Hiromi Yokenawa has created some new authentic flavors from different regions in Japan. Ready to treat your taste buds with healthy servings of the new dishes? Book a table at Senju today. #EdsaShangriLa #MyUrbanOasis.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsSep 27th, 2018

Hall of Fame RB Barry Sanders enjoying new role with Lions

By LARRY LAGE,  AP Sports Writer DETROIT (AP) — Barry Sanders shook hands with fans, posed for pictures and engaged in small talk outside a suite at Ford Field before the Detroit Lions opened the season against the New York Jets. At halftime, the Hall of Fame running back was on the field to turn a huge key, and the stadium's speakers blared with the sounds of an engine revving. Sanders is in his second season as an ambassador for the team, a paid role that is sending him on the road for Detroit's game against the Dallas Cowboys on Sunday. "It's definitely nice to be back after the first few years of being retired and there not being much communication," Sanders said in an interview with The Associated Press. "So, certainly just being able to be involved with certain things that the team is doing from a community outreach standpoint and that sort of thing, for me, it's great. "And, just being able to be around the game a little more and certainly around the Lions family a little more for me is meaningful so I do appreciate that." The Lions like the arrangement, too. Sanders visits suite holders during games and attends meet-and-greet sessions along with going to other team functions such as its draft party. "It's great having him around and back in the fold, interacting with fans and corporate sponsors," Lions president Rod Wood told The AP. "He's probably if not the best player in Lions history, he's in the handful of the best. "And, he's definitely the most remembered by our fans." While it may seem like a logical connection between the former star player and the only NFL team he played for, their relationship was not smooth in the years following his sudden and surprising retirement just before training camp began 1999. Sanders is always showered with cheers in the Motor City these days. But he was booed in public at times back in the day by fans who were still unhappy he walked away from the game after 10 spectacular seasons when he was on the verge of becoming the NFL's all-time leading rusher. "I hated that it came to the point where he was getting booed," said Lomas Brown, one of Sanders' former teammates. "He's one of the greatest ever and he did it all here in Detroit. There are still some people holding a grudge today, but that's been gone for a while." Brown hopes the Lions take another step in their relationship with Sanders by honoring him with a statue at Ford Field. "It's hard to believe there's not one," Brown said. Wood declined to say if there are plans to erect a Sanders statue. "We've talked about things we haven't announced," Wood said. When Calvin Johnson announced his retirement two years ago, it reminded people of Sanders' decision to walk away from the game. Like Sanders, the former star receiver chose to leave the Lions and the league with years left on his contract and seemingly some solid seasons left in his career. Johnson retired two years ago and the team has tried and failed, so far, to rekindle its relationship with him. As Sanders was the honored guest in Wood's suite for a game earlier this month, Johnson was in a nearby luxury box on the same floor. "I know Lions fans appreciate Barry's role with the team because he's the greatest Lion and one of the greatest running backs — if not the greatest — to play the game," said Johnson, who declined to talk about his relationship with the team. Brown believes time will take care of whatever issues are keeping Johnson from being a part of the organization in some way. "If the Lions continue to reaching out to him and being warm to him, I think it'll happen," Brown said. Wood is working on it. "It's still goal of the organization, and me in particular, to get Calvin back in the fold," Wood said. "It was good to see him at the (Jets) game.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 26th, 2018

Millennials shoulder many family expenses, reveals study

In the age of Instagram, blogs and vlogs, there is criticism on the seeming superficiality and self-centeredness of today's youth. However, a study conducted by Philam Life, and recently revealed to media, begs to differ. The findings heralded the introduction of Philam Life's newest product, the Active Joint Critical Protect, a health and life insurance in one. It's like a buy one-take one insurance---tailor-made for millennials. "I was surprised by our findings myself," said Ten Paras, head of product of Philam Life. "Millennials are the most misunderstood segment of our market. When we did our research to develop new products, we discovered that a majority of millennials tak...Keep on reading: Millennials shoulder many family expenses, reveals study.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 26th, 2018

India launches ‘Modicare,’ world’s biggest health scheme

NEW DELHI, India --- India on Sunday launched the world's biggest health insurance scheme which Prime Minister Narendra Modi said would cover some 500 million poor people. The program, dubbed "Modicare," promises health cover worth 500,000 rupees ($6,900) to every poor family to treat serious ailments. The scheme is expected to cost the central and 29 state governments $1.6 billion per year in total. Funding will be increased gradually according to demand. Modi handed medical cards out at the launch in Ranchi, capital of the eastern state of Jharkhand, calling it a historic day for India. He called the scheme "a big step towards providing good quality and accessible healthcar...Keep on reading: India launches ‘Modicare,’ world’s biggest health scheme.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 23rd, 2018

Itogon landslide, Nene Pimentel on Mocha Uson, Grab fares | Evening wRap

Today on Rappler: Rescuers ordered to leave as fresh landslides threaten Itogon. 'Distortion of truth': Diokno family slams Bongbong Marcos, Enrile. Nene Pimentel says Mocha Uson should stick to entertainment. P2/min travel charge back but Grab lowers surge pricing cap. {module 3998}.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 21st, 2018

71-year-old Chinese man spent past decade traveling the world on his bike

One man has spent the past decade on his bike just so he can see the world. The 71-year-old Xu Yukun of Nanyang, Henan province in China, took his lofty undertaking of traveling around the world back in 2007 when he turned 61. Today, he has been to 24 countries. The idea struck Xu when, after his 61st birthday, his children told him he should take a rest from work. According to South China Morning Post last Sept. 18, Xu decided to see the world by bike instead of the conventional retirement and occasional travel every year. Afraid that his family and children would disagree with his plan, Xu kept his bicycle and equipment at a friend's house before finally taking the plunge. He...Keep on reading: 71-year-old Chinese man spent past decade traveling the world on his bike.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 20th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Membership superstore offers health and wellness under one roof, too

After successfully opening in key cities in Metro Manila and Cebu, and establishing itself as a one-stop family destination for food, fuel and grooming, Landers Superstore has added another treat to complete the shopping experience of its growing members: health and wellness. Landers recently opened Capital Care Pharmacy, an in-house drugstore where members can avail themselves of medicines, generic or branded, at discounted prices. Capital Care is now open at selected Landers branches, such as ArcoVia City in Pasig, Alabang West and Cebu. "It actually completes one's shopping requirements," says Lowell Yu, chair of Southeast Asia Retail Inc., the company behind Landers Sup...Keep on reading: Membership superstore offers health and wellness under one roof, too.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 27th, 2018

Spurs ace Ginobili retires from NBA

LOS ANGELES, United States -- San Antonio Spurs star Manu Ginobili confirmed his retirement from basketball on Monday, bringing down the curtain on a 23-year career that included four NBA Finals victories. The 41-year-old Argentine star, widely seen as the most successful foreign player in the history of the NBA, confirmed his retirement in a brief posting on social media. "Today, with a wide range of feelings, I'm announcing my retirement from basketball," Ginobili wrote. "IMMENSE GRATITUDE to everyone (family, friends, teammates, coaches, staff, fans) involved in my life in the last 23 years. It's been a fabulous journey. Way beyond my wildest dreams." The veteran shoot...Keep on reading: Spurs ace Ginobili retires from NBA.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 27th, 2018

So, who are HOTS in Bohol  TechVoc Week’s Jobs Fair?

TAGBILARAN CITY, Bohol, August 24 (PIA)— She never expected fate to finally be kind to her. Twenty-one years old Mariel Tocmo of Datag Sur, Balilihan has too many frustrations as a job seeker, she could not stop from thinking today was no different. A graduate of Corella National High School, Mariel admits her family has […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  boholnewsdailyRelated NewsAug 26th, 2018

Red Lobster opens in November

It started as a single, family-owned seafood shack in Lakeland, Florida, in 1968. Today, 50 years later, Red Lobster has over 700 locations worldwide, from Puerto Rico and Qatar to Ecuador and Japan. It opens soon in the Philippines under The Bistro Group. Its coming to Metro Manila was five years in the making, says Jean Paul Manuud, president and COO of The Bistro Group. At one point he thought it wouldn't push through. "The first time we talked, Red Lobster was still under Darden, a resto group which owned the LongHorn steakhouse and Olive Garden. Kim Lopdrup, the vice president, went to Manila. We talked and started finding out whether there was a fit in the market, the ...Keep on reading: Red Lobster opens in November.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2018

Awareness is crucial

Defining the Filipino family must be viewed from a scientific perspective, particularly from psychological and sociological perspectives, so that Filipinos can have a more nuanced understanding of who they are and why they are the way they are today......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 18th, 2018

Letran kidnapping, Mocha federalism video, July inflation | Midday wRap

Today on Rappler: Colegio de San Juan de Letran vows to help the victim’s family and authorities in resolving the case of a 19 year-old student kidnapped by his own schoolmates. Akbayan Representative Tom Villarin says the Presidential Communications Operations Office budget should be removed . Inflation jumps to 5.7% in July , higher ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 7th, 2018

'GrabThatFlight: Grab and GetGo partner to bring Filipinos closer to their dream destinations

Grab and GetGo Rewards by Cebu Pacific today announced a new tie-up that will bring more travel opportunities to Grab users. Starting today, Grab consumers can start converting their GrabRewards points to GetGo points. For just 1000 and 4,500 GrabRewards points, members will be able to get 100 and 500 GetGo points respectively, which they can use to redeem for free flights to any Cebu Pacific destination. To mark the partnership between Southeast Asia's largest loyalty program and the leading lifestyle rewards program in the Philippines, Grab and GetGo will roll-out a special rewards promotion. Jetsetter consumers are in for a treat as Grab and GetGo will double the number of GetG...Keep on reading: #GrabThatFlight: Grab and GetGo partner to bring Filipinos closer to their dream destinations.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 6th, 2018

Absent Browns WR Gordon in contact with teammate

By Brian Dulik, Associated Press BEREA, Ohio (AP) — Josh Gordon hasn't reported to Cleveland Browns training camp, but his presence is being felt on the field. Fellow wide receiver Rashard Higgins is wearing Gordon's gear under his uniform at each practice. "That's my locker buddy, and I'm wearing his shirts every day," Higgins said Saturday. "That's why I feel like I've got superpowers when I come out here." Gordon remains away from the team as part of his treatment for drug and alcohol addictions. An NFL spokesman said the former Pro Bowl wideout has not been suspended. Browns general manager John Dorsey and coach Hue Jackson remain confident that Gordon will return at some point, but no timetable has been set. Cleveland opens its preseason Thursday at the New York Giants. "It will be like Josh never was gone when he comes back," said Higgins, a third-year pro. "That's how we're going to treat things. I feel like the team is a good supporting cast for him, just him knowing that we're here for him and we've got his back, no matter what." The 27-year-old Gordon has played in only 10 games since leading the NFL with a franchise-record 1,646 yards receiving in 2013. He is in Stage 3 of the league's substance-abuse program and faces another indefinite ban for any violation. Higgins exchanged texts with his friend one day earlier, saying he is "in good spirits." They have not discussed football in a conversation since Gordon was placed on the reserve/did not report list on July 23. "We know Josh is handling his business off the field, and when he comes back, he'll be ready to go," Higgins said. "We don't talk about anything on the field. We just talk about: 'Hey, what's up bro? How ya' doin'?' Just family, little things like that." Gordon resumed posting workout videos on social media Thursday from the University of Florida, but he has not made any statements since camp began. He has missed 43 of the Browns' last 48 games because of suspensions. Last season, Gordon was reinstated by Commissioner Roger Goodell following a three-month stay in a rehabilitation facility. He played in the final five games — catching 18 passes for 335 yards and a touchdown — after revealing that he had not previously appeared in an NFL game while sober......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 5th, 2018

Carandang dismissal, Ivanka Trump, CJ Ramos arrest | Evening wRap

Today on Rappler: Malacañang urges Martires: 'Immediately' enforce Carandang dismissal. Arroyo: No 'zero budget' for opposition lawmakers. Ivanka Trump: Family separations a 'low point,' media not the enemy. UN moves to unblock humanitarian aid to North Korea. Actor CJ Ramos arrested in drug buy-bust operation {module 3998}.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 3rd, 2018

Pantaleon Alvarez, ASEAN statement on China, Bong Go movie role | Evening wRap

Today on Rappler: After ouster, Alvarez says he is now 'at peace' with himself. ASEAN to hit China reclamation , hail Trump-Kim talks. Will next UN rights chief treat Duterte, world leaders more gently? Nicki Minaj hunting for Tracy Chapman as album waits. Bong Go to play 'basketball coach' in Stephen Baldwin movie ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 2nd, 2018

Carandang dismissed, Binay on federalism, Janet Napoles | Evening wRap

Today on Rappler: Malacañang dismisses Overall Deputy Ombudsman Melchor Arthur Carandang. Senator Nancy Binay says Communications Assistant Secretary Mocha Uson should present her federalism lectures to the Senate. The United States’ Justice Department says a federal grand jury indicted Janet Lim Napoles and members of her family for ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 1st, 2018