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WATCH: Anne Curtis sings heart out to ‘Grease’ in adorable childhood video

She isn't really known as a singer, but Anne Curtis sure loves to sing. The actress-host has headlined concerts in the past despite her limited singing abilities, rocking Araneta Coliseum back in 2012 for AnneBisyosa and in 2014 for her AnneKapal concert. This year, Curtis is set to headline her last solo concert, which will be held once again at the Araneta Coliseum on Aug. 18. But for Curtis, it seems having a concert at the Big Dome one day is something that even her young self would never have thought. Curtis took to her Instagram last Aug. 8 to share a throwback video from her childhood, rocking out to Grease's "You're the One that I Want," the iconic song in the musical f...Keep on reading: WATCH: Anne Curtis sings heart out to ‘Grease’ in adorable childhood video.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerAug 10th, 2018

WATCH: Baby Zia sings ‘Happy Birthday’ to Kuya Kim

MANILA, Philippines – At just two years old, Zia Dantes – the daughter of Marian Rivera and Dingdong Dantes – already knows how to banish the blues. She started by being impossibly adorable as she travelled with her parents all over the world , and now she’s at it again with a new video of her singing “Happy Birthday” ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 29th, 2018

WATCH: Erwan Heussaff pranks Anne Curtis with spicy noodle challenge

MANILA, Philippines – Anne Curtis and Erwan Heussaff seem like the perfect couple. But sometimes, like many other couples, they fight, and when they do, it calls for a little harmless pranking. In a video that Erwan posted on January 24, he made his wife eat a bowl of spicy noodles ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 26th, 2018

WATCH: Marawi soldier takes battle footage with GoPro from Anne Curtis

MANILA, Philippines – First Lieutenant Bala Tamayo of the Special Forces has released a video that includes actual footage from the Battle of Marawi. The soldier wrote, edited, and directed the video himself, and shot scenes using a GoPro camera given to him by Anne Curtis. Anne shared a link ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJan 17th, 2018

WATCH: Tear-jerking video of Anne-Erwan wedding

MANILA, Philippines — More than a month after tying the knot, wedding videographer Jason Magbanua released the full video of Anne Curtis and Erwan Heussaff’s.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 18th, 2017

WATCH: Peek inside Anne Curtis and Erwan Heussaff s New Zealand wedding video

MANILA, Philippines – Days after their wedding in New Zealand, Anne Curtis and Erwan Heussaff gave their fans a peek into their star-studded wedding. Videographer Jason Magbanua released a 4-minute clip of the couple's wedding, which showed the wedding guests, the preparations, and also the ceremony. On Saturday, November 18, the ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 20th, 2017

WATCH: Erwan Heussaff and Anne Curtis s Real Engagement Video

MANILA, Philippines – Erwan Heussaff is all set to marry longtime girlfriend Anne Curtis in New Zealand, but right before their big day, with all eyes on them, the vlogger and restaurateur posted a video that will make you swoon, cry, and wish upon a star for such a love. Let’s ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 11th, 2017

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

WATCH: Jackie Forster shares video of sweet moment between Kobe and Andre Paras as kids

The video shows an adorable Kobe--perhaps in his toddler years--staring into a camera. The view switches to mom and son making faces at the camera. Andre appears into the frame and both Jackie and.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsSep 5th, 2018

Watch Hello Kitty make fun of herself on her YouTube channel

Social media has become a platform wherein everyone and anyone can make content and be famous in their own right. So much so that the cartoon characters and toys from our childhood now have their own voice on the Internet. If you've only heard of Barbie's online presence, here's another character you should click "Subscribe" to: Hello Kitty. Yup, the adorable kitty-looking girl (she's human!) now has her own YouTube channel under Japanese brand Sanrio. It started in late August and only has three videos, but they're enough to see how Hello Kitty is going to steer this channel with self-aware humor and even giving out encouraging words for other creators. In her introductory...Keep on reading: Watch Hello Kitty make fun of herself on her YouTube channel.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 5th, 2018

WATCH: Anne Curtis takes on the horror genre in Aurora teaser trailer

MANILA, Philippines – Anne Curtis adds chilling horror to the list of genres she's explored this year as she stars in Yam Laranas' upcoming film, Aurora. In the film, Anne plays a girl named Leanna who lives on a small island where a ship named Aurora has crashed. Leanna and her sister ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 22nd, 2018

Anne to other nonsingers: Embrace your voice and sing your heart out

  After getting married in 2016, Anne Curtis thought that her career was bound to slow down. It was the opposite. Things, somehow, got even "crazier." In the first half of this year alone, she shot three films---"Sid & Aya: Not a Love Story," "BuyBust" and her Metro Manila Film Festival entry, "Aurora"---on top of her daily hosting job in the noontime variety program, "It's Showtime." Now, she's preparing for her coming concert, "ANNEKulit: Promise, Last Na 'To," on Aug. 18 at Araneta Coliseum. "Just when I expected that things would start to get quieter, these things happened---it's amazing! It just goes to show that you don't have to change something about your...Keep on reading: Anne to other nonsingers: Embrace your voice and sing your heart out.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 15th, 2018

Back-to-back triumph for Anne Curtis

Anne Curtis is on a roll. After her bittersweet turn in Irene Villamor's unconventional rom-com "Sid & Aya: Not a Love Story," the actress delivers another career-boosting feat by way of Erik Matti's high-octane actioner "BuyBust," with Filipino-American mixed martial arts star Brandon Vera in tow. The high-wire act sees Anne bravely getting off the beaten track by embodying the heart and soul of Nina Manigan, a hard-hitting drug enforcement operative who can roll with the punches. But, her luck may have run out when she finds herself trapped in a botched buy-bust operation in the slums and shanties of Manila. When the high-stakes mission deployed by an antidrug enforcement...Keep on reading: Back-to-back triumph for Anne Curtis.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 4th, 2018

WATCH: Lea Salonga sings Reflection from Mulan

MANILA, Philippines – It's been two decades since Lea Salonga provided the singing voice of Mulan in the Disney movie, but her rendition of the songs continues to get everyone's attention. On Monday, July 30, actress Keala Settle posted a short video of the Once on This Island and Annie actress singing ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 31st, 2018

HOF preview: Moss went deep to ignite Vikes, transform NFL

By Dave Campbell, Associated Press MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The ball was flying down the field often for Minnesota during that drizzly night in Green Bay, and Randy Moss kept going over and past the defense to get it. Five games into his NFL career, Moss was a star. He was a revolutionary, too. There was no moment that better defined his arrival as the league's premier deep threat than that breakout prime-time performance against the two-time reigning NFC champion and bitter rival Packers. "Seeing Randall Cunningham smile, seeing him energetic," Moss said, reflecting on his five-catch, 190-yard, two-touchdown connection with Cunningham that carried the Vikings to a 37-24 victory. "It was just a great feeling." When the Vikings landed in Minnesota, his half-brother, Eric Moss, who was briefly his teammate, wondered about celebrating the big win. "I said, 'Going out? No, I want to go home,'" Moss said. Then defensive tackle John Randle tapped him on the shoulder. "Man, we're going to party tonight!" Moss said, recalling Randle's pronouncement to the rookie. "That's when I finally understood what it really meant to the guys for us to go into Lambeau and win." Twenty years later, with Moss set to enter the Pro Football Hall of Fame this weekend after being elected in his first year of eligibility, the swift, sleek and sometimes-sassy wide receiver has finally understood the depth of his impact on the game and the privilege of opportunity to serve as a celebrant of the sport. "I came into the league with, I guess, my head not really screwed on my shoulders properly," Moss said recently on a conference call with reporters. Over time, the "homebody-type guy" from tiny Rand, West Virginia, who ranks second in NFL history in touchdown receptions (156) and fourth in receiving yards (15,292), learned how to soften some of the edges he's carried since he was a kid. "I've been able to open myself up and meet more people, be able to travel the world," said Moss, who's in his third season as an ESPN analyst. "Football here in America is a very powerful sport, and just being in that gold jacket, hopefully I can just be able to continue to reach people and continue to do great things." Moss will become the 14th inductee from the Vikings, joining former teammates Cris Carter, Chris Doleman, Randall McDaniel and Randle. He'll be the 27th wide receiver enshrined at the museum in Canton, Ohio. That's a three-hour drive from his hometown, but it's sure a long way from poverty-ridden Rand where Moss and his sports-loving friends played football as frequently as they could in the heart of coal country next to the Allegheny Mountains just south of the capital city, Charleston. "It was something that just felt good. I loved to compete. I just loved going out there just doing what kids do, just getting dirty," Moss said. He landed at Marshall University after some off-the-field trouble kept him out of Florida State and Notre Dame, and he took the Thundering Herd to what was then the NCAA Division I-AA national championship in 1996. Several NFL teams remained wary of his past, but Vikings head coach Dennis Green didn't flinch when Moss was still on the board in the 1998 draft with the 21st overall pick. Moss never forgot the teams that passed on him, with especially punishing performances against Dallas, Detroit and Green Bay. "I just carried a certain chip on my shoulder because the way I grew up playing was just basically having a tough mentality," Moss said. "Crying, hurting, in pain? So what? Get up, and let's go." The Vikings finished 15-1 in 1998, infamously missing the Super Bowl by a field goal. The next draft, the Packers took cornerbacks with their first three picks. Moss never escaped his reputation as a moody player whose behavior and effort were often questioned. That led to his first departure from Minnesota, via trade to Oakland in 2005. The Raiders dealt him to New England in 2007, when the Patriots became the first 16-0 team before losing in the Super Bowl, to the New York Giants. After a rocky 2010 for Moss, including being traded by the Patriots and released by the Vikings, he took a year off. He returned in 2012 to reach one more Super Bowl with the San Francisco 49ers. Moss was not a particularly physical player, but for his lanky frame he had plenty of strength. His combination of height and speed was exceptional, and his instincts for the game were too. Carter taught him how to watch the video board at the Metrodome to find the ball in the air, and he had a knack for keeping his hands close enough to his body that if the defensive back in coverage had his back to the quarterback he couldn't tell when the ball was about to arrive. In an NFL Films clip that captured a sideline conversation between him and Cunningham during one game, Moss yelled, "Throw it up above his head! They can't jump with me! Golly!" For Vikings wide receiver Adam Thielen, who has lived his entire life in Minnesota, was a sports-loving 8-year-old in 1998 when Moss helped lead the Vikings to what was then the NFL season scoring record with 556 points. The first team to break it was New England in 2007 with, again, Moss as the premier pass-catcher who set the all-time record that year with 23 touchdown catches. "It's fun to look back at his career and watch his old film. I love when that stuff pops up on Instagram, to be able to watch some of those old Randy plays that made me want to play this game," Thielen said. "I try to emulate him as much as I can.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJul 31st, 2018

WATCH: Celine Dion sings most iconic hits at first Manila show

MANILA, Philippines – Celine Dion brightened up a rain-drenched Manila as she performed in the first of her two shows on Thursday, July 19. The show ended with one of Celine’s most iconic songs, “My Heart Will Go On.” Wearing a fluttering pink and white dress, Celine sang a perfect rendition of ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 20th, 2018

WATCH: Anne Curtis being hunted in drug-ridden slums of Manila in new BuyBust trailer

Anne Curtis is now being the hunted. Curtis fights her way out of the drug-ridden slums of Manila, as shown in a new trailer for 'BuyBust,' out Friday on Curtis' Facebook page.........»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsJun 30th, 2018

Anne Curtis susubukang pataubin si Vice Ganda sa Metro Manila Film Festival 2018? – Manila Video

Anne Curtis susubukang pataubin si Vice Ganda sa Metro Manila Film Festival 2018? source link: Anne Curtis susubukang pataubin si Vice Ganda sa Metro Manila Film Festival 2018? – Manila Video.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJun 29th, 2018

Vice Ganda at Anne Curtis, nag-road trip sa Metro Manila – Manila Video

Vice Ganda at Anne Curtis, nag-road trip sa Metro Manila – Manila Video.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsJun 4th, 2018

Fitting follow-up for Dingdong’s game-changing thespic triumph

  With the release of Irene Emma Villamor's "Sid & Aya: Not a Love Story," Dingdong Dantes finally finds a fitting follow-up to his game-changing thespic triumph in "Seven Sundays"---with affable Anne Curtis in tow. Yes, it is the movie to watch this week. Dingdong's noirish romantic starrer reverberates with the millennial vibe that has made films like "Never Not Love You" and "Meet Me in St. Galen" crackle with relatable pertinence as it follows the lives of reckless protagonists who don't mind betting on everything but their hearts. Go-getting stockbroker Sid (Dingdong) and odd-jobs worker Aya (Anne) are no strangers to gambling---he with his money, she with her ...Keep on reading: Fitting follow-up for Dingdong’s game-changing thespic triumph.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 2nd, 2018

How Dingdong handles the paparazzi

Since Anne Curtis and Dingdong Dantes are from rival networks, it's not possible for them to be part of the same TV show. So, it'll be quite refreshing and interesting to watch the two st.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsMay 19th, 2018