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Warring sides in Yemen back calls for coronavirus ceasefire

SANAA, Yemen – All sides in Yemen's long conflict offered support on Thursday, March 26, for the United Nations' call for a ceasefire to protect civilians from the coronavirus pandemic . The move came on the fifth anniversary of regional power Saudi Arabia's intervention in Yemen's civil war, at the ........»»

Category: newsSource: rappler rapplerMar 26th, 2020

Celtics Smart doing well after positive COVID-19 test

By Associated Press Boston Celtics coach Brad Stevens says guard Marcus Smart is doing well and remains in good spirits following his positive test for coronavirus last week. Smart announced his diagnosis on March 19, seven days after Utah Jazz All-Stars Rudy Gobert and Donovan Mitchell tested positive for COVID-19. Boston played the Utah Jazz on March 6. Celtics players and staff were also tested as a precaution and those tests have all come back negative. Stevens said he and team officials have been checking in with Smart and the rest of the team regularly via conference calls. “I’m proud of how he kind of took the initiative to tell people that he had it and that he felt good and that he got online, just continued to ask people to practice social distancing and self-isolation right now,” Stevens said. “It’s just, you know, it’s a really unique, unsettling time for everyone.” — Kyle Hightower reporting from Boston  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News22 hr. 0 min. ago

U.N. chief calls for immediate global ceasefire amid pandemic

UNITED NATIONS – UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres appealed Monday, March 23, for an "immediate global ceasefire" to protect vulnerable civilians in conflict zones from the ravages of the coronavirus pandemic . "The fury of the virus illustrates the folly of war," he said in a brief speech at UN headquarters ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMar 24th, 2020

Tokyo 2020 postponement calls pressure defiant organizers

PARIS, France – Pressure mounted on Olympic organizers to postpone the 2020 Tokyo Games on Saturday, March 21, after the powerful US track and field federation urged for this summer's event to be pushed back due to the coronavirus pandemic. USA Track and Field became the latest influential sporting body to ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMar 22nd, 2020

No fans, no work: Arena workers caught in sports shutdown

By TIM REYNOLDS AP Basketball Writer MIAMI (AP) — David Edelman can usually be found at a Denver Nuggets basketball game or a Colorado Rapids soccer game. As an usher, he interacts with fans in a role he calls a staple of his life. But there are no Nuggets games for at least a month. No Rapids games, either. And Edelman has no idea what he’ll do now. “This is what I do for a living,” Edelman said earlier this week, as the realization hit that sports were going on hiatus because of the coronavirus. “This is my income.” Thousands of workers would have staffed the 450 NBA and NHL games that will not be played over the next month in response to the pandemic. And then there are the more than 300 spring training and regular-season baseball games, 130 NCAA Division I men’s and women’s tournament games, 50 or so Major League Soccer matches, all international golf and tennis tournaments, and who-knows-how-many high school, small college and other entertainment events canceled or postponed because of the global health crisis. The total economic impact of the loss of sports and other events because of the pandemic — assuming only a month shutdown — is impossible to calculate but will reach the billions, easily. Tickets aren’t being sold, so teams and leagues and organizing bodies lose money. Fans aren’t going to events that aren’t happening, so taxi drivers and ride-share operators have no one to ferry to and from those places. Hotel rooms will be empty. Beers and hot dogs aren’t being sold, so concessionaires and vendors lose money. Wait staff and bartenders aren’t getting tips. Without those tips, their babysitters aren’t getting paid. The trickle-down effect sprawls in countless directions. Some teams are trying to help. Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban, within minutes of the NBA shutdown announcement, said he wanted to find a way to help workers who will lose money because games won’t be played. By Friday, he had his plan: “We will pay them as if the games happened,” he told The Associated Press in an email. Other teams, including the Cleveland Cavaliers, have made similar commitments to workers at not just NBA events but also the building’s minor-league hockey games. The Miami Heat, Toronto Raptors, Washington Wizards, Golden State Warriors and Atlanta Hawks were among the earliest NBA franchises to reveal they’re working on how they’ll take care of arena staffs. So have the NHL’s Washington Capitals, among others, and the ownership group for Detroit's Pistons, Red Wings and Tigers on Friday said they were setting up a $1 million fund “to cover one month's wages for our part-time staff for games, concerts and events that they would have otherwise worked." “Our teams, our cities and the leagues in which we operate are a family, and we are committed to looking out for one another,” New Jersey Devils owner Josh Harris said. There were many more significant gifts revealed later Friday. Zion Williamson of the New Orleans Pelicans said he would “cover the salaries” for workers at the team’s arena for the next 30 days. Blake Griffin of the Detroit Pistons pledged $100,000 for workers there, the San Jose Sharks said part-time arena workers would get paid for all games not played and Florida Panthers goalie Sergei Bobrovsky said he was giving $100,000 to workers in that club’s arena -- a donation matched by his teammates and followed by another pledge from the team’s ownership group. “This is a small way for me to express my support and appreciation for these wonderful people who have been so great to me and my teammates and hopefully we can all join together to relieve some of the stress and hardship caused by this national health crisis,” Williamson wrote on Instagram. At Chicago Blackhawks hockey games alone, about 1,500 workers are in or outside the building on event nights: guest services, concessions, parking, security, box office and so on. “The per game payroll is more than $250,000,” said Courtney Greve Hack, a spokeswoman for the United Center. If that’s the NHL norm — no official numbers are available — then workers around the league would stand to lose more than $60 million if hockey does not return this season. “I get it,” said Chris Lee, who owns a coffee and smoothies franchise in Arizona that draws 70% of its annual revenue sales at spring training and Arizona Coyotes hockey games. “But this is going to be really tough.” Lee was packing up cups that won’t be used when baseball announced Thursday that spring training was ending about two weeks early. He and his staff — one full-timer, 14 part-time employees — aren’t sure what comes next. The enormity of the numbers stacks up quickly. The group that owns the Raptors and other pro sports clubs in Toronto, Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment, says it's trying to help 4,000 workers in that city. Extrapolate that across other Canadian and U.S. pro sports cities, and those teams could be looking at 100,000 workers feeling some sort of pinch — not counting the impact at college and other levels. Cavaliers star Kevin Love pledged $100,000 to help the workers in Cleveland address what he described as their “sudden life shift.” On Friday, reigning NBA MVP Giannis Antetokounmpo of the Milwaukee Bucks made a $100,000 pledge on behalf of his family “It’s bigger than basketball! And during this tough time I want to help the people that make my life, my family’s lives and my teammates lives easier," Antetokounmpo wrote on Twitter. The NCAA men’s Division I tournament generates about $900 million annually through television and marketing rights alone. In Albany, New York, which was scheduled to host men’s tournament games for the first time in 17 years, organizers estimated the economic loss from the three-day event to be about $3 million. Bars and restaurants bought tons of additional stock and perishables to prep for crowds that won't arrive. It’ll probably take a few years before the NCAA can bring the tournament back to many of the cities slated to host games next week. “It’s incredibly disheartening. There’s no question about that,” said Mark Bardack, president of public relations and management firm Ed Lewi and Associates, which had worked for more than a year on the planning of the tournament in Albany. “To have it all disappear, though obviously no one’s fault.” Some arena workers, many not wanting to be identified because of workplace policies about speaking to reporters, said they are living paycheck-to-paycheck. They’re not alone, of course: A study last fall by the American Payroll Association said 74% of workers in the U.S. would “experience financial difficulty” if their usual payday was delayed by as little as one week. In Philadelphia, Rodney Thompson works on commission selling popcorn and beer at 76ers basketball games, Flyers hockey games and Phillies baseball games. They’re all on hold. "The more I sell, the more I make,” the 56-year-old said. “The less I sell, the less I make. It would hurt me, financially. I would have no income coming in. ... I make pretty good money. But if there's no fans, there's no work.” ___ AP Hockey Writer Stephen Whyno in Washington, AP Sports Writers Tom Withers in Cleveland, David Brandt in Scottsdale, Arizona, Josh Dubow in San Francisco, Stephen Hawkins in Dallas and Dan Gelston in Philadelphia, and Associated Press Writers Matthew Carlson and Tim Cronin in Chicago contributed to this report. ___ The Associated Press receives support for health and science coverage from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 14th, 2020

Libyans propose ceasefire, slam international inaction

GENEVA, Switzerland – Libya's warring sides have hashed out a draft ceasefire agreement , the UN said Monday, February 24, even as Libyan leaders decried international inaction to rein in hostilities still raging in the war-ravaged country. The United Nations Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL) announced that two rounds of indirect ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsFeb 24th, 2020

Quick ceasefire urged in Libya

United Nations―The UN Security Council called Tuesday on Libya’s warring sides to quickly reach a ceasefire that would pave the way for a political process aimed at ending conflict in the oil-rich state......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 22nd, 2020

Computer plate umps allowed in new labor deal

By Ben Walker and Ronald Blum, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — Computer plate umpires could be called up to the major leagues at some point during the next five seasons. Umpires agreed to cooperate with Major League Baseball in the development and testing of an automated ball-strike system as part of a five-year labor contract announced Saturday, two people familiar with the deal told The Associated Press. The Major League Baseball Umpires Association also agreed to cooperate and assist if Commissioner Rob Manfred decides to utilize the system at the major league level. The people spoke on condition of anonymity because those details of the deal, which is subject to ratification by both sides, had not been announced. The independent Atlantic League became the first American professional league to let a computer call balls and strikes at its All-Star Game on July 10. Plate umpire Brian deBrauwere wore an earpiece connected to an iPhone in his pocket and relayed the call upon receiving it from a TrackMan computer system that uses Doppler radar. The Atlantic League experimented with the computer system during the second half of its season, and the Arizona Fall League of top prospects used it for a few dozen games this year at Salt River Fields. MLB has discussed installing the system at the Class A Florida State League for 2020. If that test goes well, the computer umps could be used at Triple-A in 2021 as bugs are dealt with prior to a big league callup. "It would change the game for the good. It would continue the effort to eliminate human deficiency," Hall of Famer Mike Schmidt wrote in a story for The Associated Press in October. "We have replay everywhere else in the game. Like it or not, replay gets the call right." Several AFL prospects praised the TrackMan system for calls on the inside and outside corners but said it struggled with breaking balls low or high in the strike zone. "This idea has been around for a long time and it's the first time it's been brought to life in a comprehensive way," Morgan Sword, MLB's senior vice president of economics and operations, said on the night the Atlantic League experiment started. Humans still will be needed to determine checked swings and to make sure TrackMan doesn't call a strike on a pitch that bounces and goes through the strike zone. "I think it's a little naive to think that simply letting computers generate strike or ball," Houston manager AJ Hinch said during the World Series. "It's incredibly naive to think that there's not going to be pitfalls in that scenario, as well." Humans will make safe/out calls — subject to video review back in the New York control room, a system that started on home run calls in 2008 and extended in 2014 to many umpire decisions. There were 1,356 video reviews during the 2019 regular season, taking an average of 1 minute, 16 seconds. MLB said 597 calls or 44% were overturned, 277 or 20% confirmed and 463 or 34% allowed to stand because there was not enough evidence to confirm or overturned. The remaining 19 calls were for rules checks or record keeping. As part of the labor contract, the sides agreed to raises in compensation and retirement benefits along with provisions to allow earlier retirement......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 22nd, 2019

MLB attendance drops in boom-bust era of big winners, losers

By Ronald Blum, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — Major League Baseball has entered the Boom/Bust Era. An unprecedented four teams are set to win 100 games in the same season, perhaps even five. Four clubs lost in triple figures for only the second time. Amid widespread claims the baseballs have changed, hitters shattered the home run record for the second time in three seasons. And sparked by batters going for the fences to beat suffocating shifts, strikeouts set a record for the 12th year in a row and outnumbered hits for the second straight season. With some teams out of contention even before their first pitch, average attendance has dropped four years in a row for the first time since the commissioner's office started tracking it in 1980. "We're going to draw 68-plus million people at the big league level," baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred said this week, "another 41 million in minor league baseball — they're actually going to be up. I'll take 110 million people going to see the sport live. That's a really, really awesome number in an environment where people have more and more and more alternatives to consume." More and more teams have adopted an all-in or all-out philosophy. If they don't think they can win it, why bother to be in it? Better to shed expensive veterans and rebuild with cheaper rookies — and incur the box-office hit. Management calls that prudent rebuilding. The players' association labels it tanking. "We have some of the most remarkably talented players our game has seen as a whole in a long time," union head Tony Clark said. "But the willful failure of too many franchises to field competitive teams and put their best players on the field is unquestionably hurting our industry." San Francisco has dropped from 3.2 million fans at home to about 2.7 million, Seattle and Toronto both from 2.3 million to about 1.8 million. Baltimore drew 1.3 million, its lowest total at home in a non-strike shortened season since 1978. Kansas City's 1.5 million is its lowest since 2006. While Philadelphia rose by about 500,000 following the signing of Bryce Harper and Minnesota by 300,000 during the Twins' winningest regular season in a half-century and San Diego by over 200,000 after adding Manny Machado, about half the teams are headed to declines. This year's drop was just around 2% with three days left in the regular season, from 28,830 to 28,252, but the final average should rise slightly after weekend games. The average fell below 30,000 last year for the first time since 2003. Manfred points to increases in television viewers. Fox is up 9% this year and at a seven-year high, and local broadcasts are first in prime time in 24 of 25 markets. Use of MLB's At-Bat app is up 18%. Still, wins and attendance are correlated in many markets. "We've lost a lot of games this year, a few more than we wanted to, but ultimately it's about getting on the right side of things and sometimes you do have to take a step back," said Mariners manager Scott Servais, whose team entered the weekend 66-93. "The disparity in the game between the top and the bottom, it's real. There's no question about it. Is it good for the game? I don't know. I do know that there are a lot of really smart people that work in front offices and ownership groups and they do realize that sometimes you do need to pull back, and that's what we're doing, and I'm all in because I think it's going to work." Houston (104 wins), the Los Angeles Dodgers (103) and New York Yankees (102) all broke the century mark with time to spare, and Minnesota (99) and Atlanta had a chance to join them. It's the third consecutive year three teams have reached 100 — before this run it occurred only in 1942, 1977, 1998, 2002 and 2003. Detroit (112), Baltimore (107), Miami (103) and Kansas City (101) gave baseball four 100-loss teams for the first time since 2002. One-sided season series included Houston going 18-1 against Seattle and the Yankees 17-1 vs. Baltimore. "Whether a team loses 95 or loses 100, I just don't see that as a relevant issue," Manfred said. "I think the more important point is that we have different clubs from all sorts of market sizes that are successful." Players are upset that many teams failed to pursue free agents the last two offseasons, executives concentrating two-to-five years into the future rather than trying to win now. "Each free agent market is a little bit different, but what we have seen that seems to be consistent over these last two markets is this all-in and all-out mentality," Clark said. Still, spending and success are not completely linked. Tampa Bay, last in payroll at $66 million, has a chance to make the playoffs along with Oakland, 25th at $95 million. Three of the six highest payrolls failed to reach the postseason: No. 1 Boston ($228 million), the No. 3 Chicago Cubs ($217 million) and No. 6 San Francisco ($181 million). Throughout the game, the increase in home runs and strikeouts has been a constant. The 6,647 home runs through Thursday were up 19% from last year and well above the previous record of 6,105 in 2017. About half the clubs are on track to establish team records, led by Minnesota (301) and the Yankees (299), who set the previous big league mark of 267 last year. Already 128 players have hit 20 or more homers, 11 more than the old high set in 2017, according to the Elias Sports Bureau. Among that group, 55 have reached 30 to better the record of 47 that had stood since 2000. And 23 pitchers have 200 or more strikeouts, topping the post-1900 record of 18 in both 2015 and last year, Elias said. Baseball's efforts to quicken the pace of games have not resulted in swifter play: the average time of a nine-inning game is 3:05:35, up from 3:00:44 last year and 3:05:11 in 2017. MLB and players have agreed to cut the active roster size from Sept. 1 on from 40 to 28 and increase the maximum from 25 to 26 from opening day through Aug. 31, which should cut down on late-season pitching changes. Management has not decided whether to exercise its right to install pitch clocks and a three-batter minimum for next year. "We'll have a final answer once I have a chance to review the issue with ownership in November," Manfred said. On-field rules are part of collective bargaining. The sides agreed last winter to an early start to negotiations for a labor deal to replace the agreement that expires in December 2021. But there have been just three negotiating meetings, one of them a preliminary session, and the labor rules will remain unchanged this offseason. "We made a deal in 2016. We're good," Manfred said. "The union's got to decide what it is they want us to consider. When they're ready to do that, I'm sure they will make a proposal." Said Clark: "We have had conversations. We anticipate those conversations continuing and at the point in time that they lend themselves to proposals from both sides, then we'll do so." ___ AP Sports Writer Tim Booth contributed to this report......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 28th, 2019

Pimentel calls on Pinoys to back unilateral ceasefire

MANILA, Philippines – Senate President Aquilino Pimentel III called on Filipinos yesterday to support President Duterte’s unilateral declaration of a ceasefi.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsDec 24th, 2016

Coronavirus worsens Yemen’s long tale of woe

By Abdul Mohammed SANA’A, Yemen: In every room in Yemen’s Al-Saba’een hospital, patients in critical condition waited on chairs, and still others laid on the bare ground. I saw women and girls sharing beds in pairs, and children laying close together being treated. This is Sana’a, Yemen’s best-supplied and capital city, on what has become an […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated News1 hr. 34 min. ago

Sa gitna ng COVID-19 ceasefire.. NPA, Army nagbakbakan: 2 patay

ISANG kasapi ng New People’s Army at sundalo ang nasawi sa sagupaan sa Rodriguez, Rizal, Sabado ng hapon, sa gitna ng tigi-putukang pinaiiral sana ng gobyerno at mga rebeldeng komunista bilang pagtugon sa 2019-Coronavirus disease. Ayon kay AFP chief Gen. Filemon Santos Jr., inatake ng mga rebelde ang mga kawal na nagsasagawa ng “community work” […] The post Sa gitna ng COVID-19 ceasefire.. NPA, Army nagbakbakan: 2 patay appeared first on Bandera......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated News3 hr. 0 min. ago

No games, big losses: Money crisis faces US Olympic sports

By EDDIE PELLS AP National Writer DENVER (AP) — The postponement of the Tokyo Games has catapulted the sports organizations that make up the backbone of the U.S. Olympic team into crisis. At least one has already started layoffs and others are desperate to stay solvent. Some are expecting a major downturn in membership dues, while others are reeling from event cancellations totaling more than 8,000 across all sports. A database analyzed by The Associated Press shows combined projected losses of more than $121 million in revenue between February and June for 43 of the 50 national governing bodies that responded to a survey from the NGB Council in the wake of the coronavirus crisis. As much or more as the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee, which serves as an umbrella regulator of the country's Olympic sports, it's the NGBs that provide funding and other support for athletes to pursue their dreams at the Olympic and other elite levels. About 80% of the typical NGB's budget goes toward supporting athletes. Not including the U.S. Tennis Association — an outlier because of the massive revenue it generates from the U.S. Open — the NGBs have a combined annual revenue of about $685 million. By comparison, the NFL and NBA each reportedly brought in about $8 billion during the latest completed season. Half the NGBs are little more than ma-and-pop operations, working with small staffs and on revenue not more than $5 million a year. The USOPC, which sent cash grants to the individual NGBs to the tune of around $65 million in 2018, is also in uncharted territory. The postponement of the Olympics forces the federation to make up for a shortfall nearing $200 million without the NBC payout that comes during Olympic years. The USOPC broke with recent practice by not taking out insurance against that possible loss, instead deciding to self-insure. Some of the shortfall is expected to come from an endowment fund created out of a surplus from the 1984 LA Olympics. The USOPC says the losses across American sports could range from $600 million to $800 million. A good portion of these losses can be recouped if the games go forward, as expected, in 2021. But staying financially healthy until that time is not a given for some of the more vulnerable NGBs. “I haven't heard anyone say their NGB itself was going to go out of business,” said Max Cobb, the president of U.S. Biathlon, who doubles as leader of the USOPC's NGB Council. “But there's very little buffer to absorb any revenue loss for an NGB. They all run on a very tight revenue and expense model, and very few have much in the way of savings.” Already, USA Cycling, a mid-sized NGB with an approximate annual revenue of $15 million, laid off eight of its 70-person staff. And USA Rugby, which existed on about $14 million in revenue through 2017, was already teetering and could be nearing closer to bankruptcy with the added uncertainty the Olympic postponement has brought. Many NGBs, such as cycling, are event driven — reliant on cash brought when people sign up for local and national competitions that they sanction. Others, such as USA Swimming, get their lion's share of funding from membership dues, which are taking a hit as facilities around the nation close on the order of state and local governments. “We, as an NGB, will feel it next fall when memberships start rolling in. That shortfall could have a profound effect,” said USA Swimming's Tim Hinchey. “We can overcome a lot of these things, I think, if all comes back to normal. But we have to wait and see like everyone else.” The only event that makes money for swimming is its Olympic trials, which are also a significant revenue source for track, gymnastics and other sports that send large teams. All have been postponed, to be rescheduled when the IOC sets a new date for the Olympics in 2021. The USOPC recently sent a letter to Congress asking for $200 million to be included in the $2 trillion coronavirus relief package that passed through the House of Representatives on Friday. The money, it said, was to be used to support about 2,500 athletes and to help NGBs, which have a total of about 4,500 full-time employees. “On short notice, we surveyed NGBs and then made additional assumptions about the current and future impact of the pandemic on athlete financial support,” CEO Sarah Hirshland said. “Reflective of that work, funds were requested on behalf of athletes and NGBs only.” That request wasn't granted — the federal government has a long history of not providing financial support to the Olympics — though Cobb said he was encouraged that not-for-profit businesses such as the NGBs are allowed to apply for loans as part of the stimulus package's $349 billion “Paycheck Protection Program.” Hinchey said he'll direct some struggling swim clubs to also seek relief from the loan program. What's clear to Cobb is that without some help, more layoffs could be imminent at some NGBs, while others will suffer in ways that the broad public might not recognize right away. Without as much revenue to support a wider swath of coaching and training programs, to say nothing of equipment and state-of-the-art training facilities, some sports' pipelines might suffer. “The athletes receiving the support right now have earned that by being the best in the country,” Cobb said. “But it's that next generation of athletes, and all the NGBs rely on that next generation, that's the group that's the most impacted.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated News22 hr. 0 min. ago

To do list in entering your home after running an errand during this COVID-19 pandemic

While many of us are staying indoors and practicing social distancing, there are many people who simply don’t have that luxury. So if you just run an errand or have to work outside during the coronavirus pandemic, it’s important to consider what to do once you come back to your home. Here are a few […] The post To do list in entering your home after running an errand during this COVID-19 pandemic appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 28th, 2020

1-year-old COVID-19 patient in Oriental Mindoro awaits test result

CITY OF CALAPAN –– The one-year-old girl, who is the first confirmed coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patient in Oriental Mindoro, has been subjected to a confirmatory test. “The child was admitted due to dengue, but she was tested for COVID-19 [by the Research Institute for Tropical Medicine] which came back positive, but we made her take […] The post 1-year-old COVID-19 patient in Oriental Mindoro awaits test result appeared first on Cebu Daily News......»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 28th, 2020

Pass the COVID-19 crown

The coronavirus looks like a nest that has morphed into a crown, with pink spikes and red globes jutting out from all sides. T.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 27th, 2020

Euro banks told to freeze dividend payments

The European Central Bank on Friday asked eurozone banks to freeze dividend payments “until at least October 2020” to preserve liquidity that can be used to help households and companies through the coronavirus crisis. The Frankfurt institution also asked banks to not to buy back shares, another tool to reward shareholders, at a time when […] The post Euro banks told to freeze dividend payments appeared first on Daily Tribune......»»

Category: newsSource:  tribuneRelated NewsMar 27th, 2020

DOH asks for volunteer health workers vs coronavirus, to be paid P500 a day

MANILA, Philippines – As the Department of Health (DOH) ramped up calls for volunteer health workers to join the fight versus the coronavirus, Filipinos online called for better treatment of these frontliners facing the hazardous job. In a Facebook post on Friday, March 27, DOH said that they ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMar 27th, 2020

Nadal, Gasol launch fundraiser to pay back debt to COVID-hit Spain

  MADRID, Spain – Spanish sports stars Rafael Nadal and Pau Gasol launched a fundraising drive on Thursday, March 26, explaining they wanted to give something back to the coronavirus hit nation that nurtured them to greatness. Tennis ace Nadal and NBA hero Gasol have targeted raising 11 million euros ($12.3million) in ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMar 27th, 2020

Olympics-bound boxer Irish Magno promises to make the most of added time to prepare for Tokyo

Filipina flyweight boxer Irish Magno was the fourth and latest member of the Philippine contingent to secure a spot in the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, before the whole world seemingly went into quarantine due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Magno made the most of her second chance in the 2020 Asia and Oceania Olympic Boxing Qualifiers in Amman, Jordan back in the first week of March, edging out Tajikistan’s Sumaiya Qosimova, 5-0, in the Women’s Flyweight Olympic Box-off to earn her first-ever Olympics berth. She joined top-seeded Men’s Middleweight Eumir Felix Marcial, who also clinched a berth to Tokyo while also taking home gold in the Qualifying Tournament. Just a couple of weeks later, Magno, and the rest of the world, found out that Tokyo 2020 had been postponed to 2021 because of the world’s current health crisis. While it was indeed a saddening development, Magno fully understands the need. “Sobrang nakakalungkot po talaga, kasi yun po yung pinag-hahandaan ng buong team, especially yung mga nag-qualify na,” Magno told ABS-CBN Sports. “But at the same time, okay lang po kasi mas mahabang preparation po kung sakaling ma-postpone yung Tokyo Olympics, at priority po talaga sa ngayon, at mas importante yung safety and health ng every athlete.” “So, if ever po, naiintindihan ko naman po,” Magno added. (READ ALSO: Hidilyn Diaz reacts to Tokyo 2020 Olympics postponement) The 2019 SEA Games Silver Medalist admits that the postponement doused her excitement for her maiden Olympics appearance quite a bit. “Medyo nabawasan din [yung pagka-excited], pero sa panahon ngayon, mahirap rin po sa amin na matuloy kasi hindi po kami makakapag-training ng maayos dahil sa Coronavirus,” Magno explained. “Mas better na ma-postpone, at least makakapag-prepare pa kami ng mas matagal pa.” With the added time to prepare, Magno assured that training won’t let up as they try to bring home some Olympic boxing hardware. “As of now, wala pa po akong balita regarding [sa mga upcoming tournaments], wala pa po kasi kaming naka-schedule, pero I’m sure naman po na tuloy-tuloy ang training.” “Pag-hahandaan po talaga namin to ng buong team, sisiguraduhin po namin na susulitn namin yung binigay na time for the Olympics,” she continued. While the 28-year old will have to wait a bit longer until she can wear the country’s colors in Tokyo, the honor of being an Olympian isn’t lost on her. “Sobrang laki po talaga [na karangalan], is a po ito sa pangarap ng bawat atleta, kaya pagbubutihin ko pa po talaga ang pag-hahanda sa Olympics, dahil para po ito sa ating lahat at sa bansa.” Magno is currently under self-quarantine until March 27th in Baguio City. With the current Enhanced Community Quarantine in Luzon, she isn’t sure if she can go home to Iloilo before April 14th. “Wait ko na lang po sasabihin ng coaches po,” she concluded. (RELATED: Right decision – POC president Tolentino on Tokyo Olympics reset)  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 27th, 2020

Israel s Gantz calls for emergency unity government

JERUSALEM – Israel's ex-military chief Benny Gantz called for an emergency unity government after being elected parliament speaker Thursday, March 26, likely leading to an alliance with his rival Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to tackle coronavirus. "These are unusual times and they call for unusual decisions," Gantz told the Knesset, ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMar 26th, 2020